Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Modeling of high energy laser ignition of energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

We present a model for simulating high energy laser heating and ignition of confined energetic materials. The model considers the effect of irradiating a steel plate with long laser pulses and continuous lasers of several kilowatts and the thermal response of well-characterized high explosives for ignition. Since there is enough time for the thermal wave to propagate into the target and to create a region of hot spot in the high explosives, electron thermal diffusion of ultrashort (femto- and picosecond) lasing is ignored; instead, heat diffusion of absorbed laser energy in the solid target is modeled with thermal decomposition kinetic models of high explosives. Numerically simulated pulsed-laser heating of solid target and thermal explosion of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, triaminotrinitrobenzene, and octahydrotetranitrotetrazine are compared to experimental results. The experimental and numerical results are in good agreement.

Lee, Kyung-cheol; Kim, Ki-hong; Yoh, Jack J. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

3

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Ignition methods and apparatus using microwave energy  

SciTech Connect

An ignition apparatus for a combustor includes a microwave energy source that emits microwave energy into the combustor at a frequency within a resonant response of the combustor, the combustor functioning as a resonant cavity for the microwave energy so that a plasma is produced that ignites a combustible mixture therein. The plasma preferably is a non-contact plasma produced in free space within the resonant cavity spaced away from with the cavity wall structure and spaced from the microwave emitter.

DeFreitas, Dennis Michael (Oxford, NY); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

6

Study on Adaptive Ignition Energy System of Two-Stroke Spark Ignition Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kerosene is characteristic of higher flash point, poorer evaporation, higher energy density, higher use safety, higher ignition temperature, and slower combustion velocity than that of gasoline. Therefore, kerosene is widely used in the field of navigation. ... Keywords: CDI, Adaptive Ignition Energy, Spark Ignition Engine, Microcontroller Unit

Binglin Li; Minxiang Wei

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

Moses, E

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

9

On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term ({approx}3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of {approx}60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around {approx}0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R&D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

Perkins, L J; Betti, R; Schurtz, G P; Craxton, R S; Dunne, A M; LaFortune, K N; Schmitt, A J; McKenty, P W; Bailey, D S; Lambert, M A; Ribeyre, X; Theobald, W R; Strozzi, D J; Harding, D R; Casner, A; Atzemi, S; Erbert, G V; Andersen, K S; Murakami, M; Comley, A J; Cook, R C; Stephens, R B

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

10

Exploring the Fast Ignition Approach to Fusion Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Probably the most famous equation in physics is Einstein's E=mc{sup 2}, which was contained within his fifth and final paper that was published in 1905. It is this relationship between energy ( E) and mass ( m) that the fusion process exploits to generate energy. When two isotopes of hydrogen (normally Deuterium and Tritium (DT)) fuse they form helium and a neutron. In this process some of the mass of the hydrogen is converted into energy. In the fast ignition approach to fusion a large driver (such as the NIF laser) is used to compress the DT fuel to extremely high densities and then is ''sparked'' by a high intensity, short-pulse laser. The short-pulse laser energy is converted to an electron beam, which then deposits its energy in the DT fuel. The energy of the electrons in this beam is so large that the electron's mass is increased according to Einstein theory of relativity. Understanding the transport of this relativistic electron beam is critical to the success of fast ignition and is the subject of this poster.

Town, R J; Chung, H; Cottrill, L A; Foord, M; Hatchett, S P; Key, M H; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lund, S; Mackinnon, A J; McCandless, B C; Patel, P K; Sharp, W L; Snavely, R A; Still, C H; Tabak, M

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

11

Ignition Rate Measurement of Laser-Ignited Coals  

SciTech Connect

We established a novel experiment to study the ignition of pulverized coals under conditions relevant to utility boilers. Specifically, we determined the ignition mechanism of pulverized-coal particles under various conditions of particle size, coal type, and freestream oxygen concentration. We also measured the ignition rate constant of a Pittsburgh #8 high-volatile bituminous coal by direct measurement of the particle temperature at ignition, and incorporating this measurement into a mathematical model for the ignition process. The model, called Distributed Activation Energy Model of Ignition, was developed previously by our group to interpret conventional drop-tube ignition experiments, and was modified to accommodate the present study.

John C. Chen; Vinayak Kabadi

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Inertial fusion target development for ignition and energy  

SciTech Connect

The target needs of the next ICF experiments that will lead toward ignition and energy are different from those of today`s experiments. The future experiments on OMEGA Upgrade, GEKKO XII Upgrade, the National Ignition Facility and Megajoule will need large, precise, cryogenic targets. Development is needed on a number of aspects of these targets, including shell fabrication, characterization, cryogenic layering and target handling. However, coordinated R and D programs are in place and work is in process to carry out the needed development. It is vital to the success of inertial fusion that this work be sustained. Coordinated effort, like the National Cryogenic Target Program in the USA, will help make the development activities as efficient and effective as possible, and should be encouraged.

Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Norimatsu, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Research Program for the U.S. Department of Energy. Work under this co-funded program began in August 2005 and finished in July 2010. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a low emission, high thermal efficiency engine system that met 2010 EPA heavy-duty on-highway truck emissions requirements (0.2g/bhp-hr NOx, 0.14g/bhp-hr HC and 0.01g/bhp-hr PM) with a thermal efficiency of 46%. To achieve this goal, development of diesel homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was the chosen approach. This report summarizes the development of diesel HCCI combustion and associated enabling technologies that occurred during the HECC program between August 2005 and July 2010. This program showed that although diesel HCCI with conventional US diesel fuel was not a feasible means to achieve the program objectives, the HCCI load range could be increased with a higher volatility, lower cetane number fuel, such as gasoline, if the combustion rate could be moderated to avoid excessive cylinder pressure rise rates. Given the potential efficiency and emissions benefits, continued research of combustion with low cetane number fuels and the effects of fuel distillation are recommended. The operation of diesel HCCI was only feasible at part-load due to a limited fuel injection window. A 4% fuel consumption benefit versus conventional, low-temperature combustion was realized over the achievable operating range. Several enabling technologies were developed under this program that also benefited non-HCCI combustion. The development of a 300MPa fuel injector enabled the development of extended lifted flame combustion. A design methodology for minimizing the heat transfer to jacket water, known as precision cooling, will benefit conventional combustion engines, as well as HCCI engines. An advanced combustion control system based on cylinder pressure measurements was developed. A Well-to-wheels analysis of the energy flows in a mobile vehicle system and a 2nd Law thermodynamic analysis of the engine system were also completed under this program.

None

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit ... NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog The NNSA's National Ignition Facility (NIF) surpassed a critical

16

Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

Moses, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 21, 2003 #12;2 Statements to FESAC IFE panel 10/28/03 · Ignition is a major goal for NNSA supports OFES's mission and OFES use of NNSA's ICF facilities is accepted · Defense Programs reserves right: Provide mission need report for the proposed OMEGA Extended Performance project. · October 2002: NNSA

18

Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose.

Benson, David A. (Albuquerque, NM); Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose. 2 figs.

Benson, D.A.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Blewer, R.S.

1990-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

20

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

Stolz, C J

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Driving high-gain shock-ignited inertial confinement fusion targets by green laser light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires UV light irradiation in order to achieve ignition at total laser energy of the order of 1 MJ. The shock-ignition approach opens up the possibility of igniting fusion targets using green light by reducing the implosion velocity and laser-driven ablation pressure. An analytical model is derived, allowing to rescale UV-driven targets to green light. Gain in the range 100-200 is obtained for total laser energy in the range 1.5-3 MJ. With respect to the original UV design, the rescaled targets are less sensitive to irradiation asymmetries and hydrodynamic instabilities, while operating in the same laser-plasma interaction regime.

Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo [Dipartimento SBAI, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High-Average-Power Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Average-Power Laser NIF-1005-11471 07BEW/dj P9765 Agenda #12;P9516NIF-0805-11197 01EIM/dj Stockpile Stewardship #12;P9504NIF-0404-08345r2 27EIM/ld Basic Science and Cosmology #12;NIF-0702-05346rIFSA Fusion Energy Campaign and point design NIF-0305-10564 23MLS/cld P8719 The NIF Laser User Optics Physics Operations

23

Preparing for Ignition Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing ignition experiments for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light ({lambda} = 351 nm) making it the world's largest and most powerful laser system. NIF will be the world's preeminent facility for the study of matter at extreme temperatures and densities for producing and developing ICF. The ignition studies will be an essential step in developing inertial fusion energy (IFE). the NIF Project is over 93% complete and scheduled for completion in 2009. Experiments using one beam have demonstrated that NIF can meet all of its performance goals. A detailed plan called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to begin ignition experiments in 2010. The plan includes the target physics and the equipment such as diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator and user optics required for the ignition experiment. Target designs have been developed that calculate to ignite at energy as low as 1 MJ. Plans are under way to make NIF a national user facility for experiments on HED physics and nuclear science, including experiments relevant to the development of IFE.

Moses, E; Meier, W

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: A Path Towards Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Arial 18 pt bold Name here Title or division here Date 00, 2008 LLNL-PRES-407907 #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 2 Two major possibilities for fusion energy #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 3 The NIF is nearing completion and will be conducting

25

ENERGY PARTITIONING, ENERGY COUPLING (EPEC) EXPERIMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy-partitioning, energy-coupling (EPEC) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will simultaneously measure the coupling of energy into both ground shock and air-blast overpressure from a laser-driven target. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of seismic and air-blast phenomena caused by a nuclear weapon. In what follows, we discuss the motivation for our investigation and briefly describe NIF. Then, we introduce the EPEC experiments, including diagnostics, in more detail.

Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Dunlop, W H; Compton, S M; Kane, J O; Mirkarimi, P B; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Key, M.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California94551 (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Edward Teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

Key, M. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Edward Teller medal lecture: high intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

Key, M.H.

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

Auto-ignition during instationary jet evolution of dimethyl ether (DME) in a high-pressure atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The auto-ignition process during transient injection of gaseous dimethyl ether (DME) in a constant high-pressure atmosphere is studied experimentally by laser-optical methods and compared with numerical calculations. With different non-intrusive measurement techniques jet properties and auto-ignition are investigated at high temporal and spatial resolution. The open jet penetrates a constant pressure oxidative atmosphere of up to 4 MPa. During the transient evolution, the fuel jet entrains air at up to 720 K. The subsequent auto-ignition of the ignitable part of the jet occurs simultaneously over a wide spatial extension. The ignition delay times are not affected by variation of the nozzle exit velocity. Thus, the low-temperature oxidation is slow compared with the shorter time scales of mixing, so that chemical kinetics is dominating the process. The typical two-stage ignition is resolved optically with high-speed shadowgraphy at a sampling rate of 10 kHz. The 2D fields of jet velocity and transient mixture fraction are measured phase-coupled with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Tracer Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) during the time-frame of ignition. The instationary Probability Density Functions (PDF) of mixture fraction are described very well by Beta functions within the complete area of the open jet. Additional 1D flamelet simulations of the auto-ignition process are computed with a detailed reaction mechanism for DME [S. Fischer, F. Dryer, H. Curran, Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 32 (12) (2000) 713-740; H. Curran, S. Fischer, F. Dryer, Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 32 (12) (2000) 741-759]. Calculated ignition delay times are in very good agreement with the measured mean ignition delay times of 3 ms. Supplemental flamelet simulations address the influence of DME and air temperature, pressure and strain. Underneath a critical strain rate the air temperature is identified to be the most sensitive factor on ignition delay time. (author)

Fast, G.; Kuhn, D.; Class, A.G. [Institut fuer Kern- und Energietechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Weberstrasse 5, D-76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Maas, U. [Institut fuer Technische Thermodynamik, Universitat Karlsruhe (TH), Kaiserstrasse 12, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Special Feature: Energy - The Spark that Ignited DOE Supercomputing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of civilization. Every time you add firewood to a dying fire, you are converting biomass (wood) into energy (heat) through a process called direct combustion. For thousands of...

31

IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed and has high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments to be conducted by the academic community is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present a brief discussion of the unparalleled opportunities to explore frontier basic science that will be available on the NIF.

Moses, E

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel...

33

Isobutane ignition delay time measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations  

SciTech Connect

Rapid compression machine and shock-tube ignition experiments were performed for real fuel/air isobutane mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2. The wide range of experimental conditions included temperatures from 590 to 1567 K at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, and 30 atm. These data represent the most comprehensive set of experiments currently available for isobutane oxidation and further accentuate the complementary attributes of the two techniques toward high-pressure oxidation experiments over a wide range of temperatures. The experimental results were used to validate a detailed chemical kinetic model composed of 1328 reactions involving 230 species. This mechanism has been successfully used to simulate previously published ignition delay times as well. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to gain further insight to the chemical processes occurring at various conditions. Additionally, useful ignition delay time correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K. Comparisons are also made with available isobutane data from the literature, as well as with 100% n-butane and 50-50% n-butane-isobutane mixtures in air that were presented by the authors in recent studies. In general, the kinetic model shows excellent agreement with the data over the wide range of conditions of the present study. (author)

Healy, D.; Curran, H.J. [Combustion Chemistry Centre, School of Chemistry, NUI Galway (Ireland); Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Zinner, C.M. [Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Bourque, G. [Rolls-Royce Canada Limited, 9500 Cote de Liesse, Lachine, Quebec (Canada)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - National Ignition Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national-ignition-facility National Ignition Facility en Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy http:www.pppl.govnode1361

35

Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Distribution and Ignition System Spark Distribution and Ignition System Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implement- ing United States Patent Number 7,421,166 entitled "Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System." Disclosed in this patent is NETL's laser spark distribution and ignition system, which reduces the high-power optical requirements normally needed for such a system by using optical fibers to deliver low-peak-energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. Laser spark generators then produce a high-peak-power laser spark from a single low power pulse. The system has ap- plications in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

37

Dynamic instabilities in spark-ignited combustion engines with high exhaust gas recirculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We propose a cycle-resolved dynamic model for combustion instabilities in spark-ignition engines operating with high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). High EGR is important for increasing fuel efficiency and implementing advanced low-emission combustion modes such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We account for the complex combustion response to cycle-to-cycle feedback by utilizing a global probability distribution that describes the pre-spark state of in-cylinder fuel mixing. The proposed model does a good job of simulating combustion instabilities observed in both lean-fueling engine experiments and in experiments where nitrogen dilution is used to simulate some of the combustion inhibition of EGR. When used to simulate high internal EGR operation, the model exhibits a range of global bifurcations and chaos that appear to be very robust. We use the model to show that it should be possible to reduce high EGR combustion instabilities by switching from internal to external EGR. We also explain why it might be helpful to deliberately stratify the fuel in the pre-spark gas mixture. It might be possible to extend the simple approach used in this model to other chemical reaction systems with spatial inhomogeneity.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In two embodiments the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion

39

Relativistic electron beam transport for fast ignition relevant scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A crucial issue surrounding the feasibility of fast ignition, an alternative inertial confinement fusion scheme, is the ability to efficiently couple energy from an incident short-pulse laser to a high-density, pre-compressed ...

Cottrill, Larissa A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Extension of the high load limit in the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine offers diesel-like efficiency with very low soot and NOx emissions. In a HCCI engine, a premixed charge of air, fuel and burned gas is compressed to achieve ...

Scaringe, Robert J. (Robert Joseph)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS OF CONVECTION PRECEDING IGNITION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend our previous three-dimensional, full-star simulations of the final hours of convection preceding ignition in Type Ia supernovae to higher resolution using the adaptive mesh refinement capability of our low Mach number code, MAESTRO. We report the statistics of the ignition of the first flame at an effective 4.34 km resolution and general flow field properties at an effective 2.17 km resolution. We find that off-center ignition is likely, with radius of 50 km most favored and a likely range of 4075 km. This is consistent with our previous coarser (8.68 km resolution) simulations, implying that we have achieved sufficient resolution in our determination of likely ignition radii. The dynamics of the last few hot spots preceding ignition suggest that a multiple ignition scenario is not likely. With improved resolution, we can more clearly see the general flow pattern in the convective region, characterized by a strong outward plume with a lower speed recirculation. We show that the convective core is turbulent with a Kolmogorov spectrum and has a lower turbulent intensity and larger integral length scale than previously thought (on the order of 16 km s?1 and 200 km, respectively), and we discuss the potential consequences for the first flames. Key words: convection hydrodynamics methods: numerical nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances supernovae: general white dwarfs Online-only material: color figures 1.

A. Nonaka; A. J. Aspden; M. Zingale; A. S. Almgren; J. B. Bell; S. E. Woosley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A high-resolution integrated model of the National Ignition Campaign cryogenic layered experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed simulation-based model of the June 2011 National Ignition Campaign cryogenic DT experiments is presented. The model is based on integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations that utilize the best available models for the hohlraum wall, ablator, and DT equations of state and opacities. The calculated radiation drive was adjusted by changing the input laser power to match the experimentally measured shock speeds, shock merger times, peak implosion velocity, and bangtime. The crossbeam energy transfer model was tuned to match the measured time-dependent symmetry. Mid-mode mix was included by directly modeling the ablator and ice surface perturbations up to mode 60. Simulated experimental values were extracted from the simulation and compared against the experiment. Although by design the model is able to reproduce the 1D in-flight implosion parameters and low-mode asymmetries, it is not able to accurately predict the measured and inferred stagnation properties and levels of mix. In particular, the measured yields were 15%-40% of the calculated yields, and the inferred stagnation pressure is about 3 times lower than simulated.

Jones, O. S.; Cerjan, C. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Springer, P. T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. M.; Doppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-399, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

n-Butane: Ignition delay measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition delay time measurements were recorded at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 for n-butane at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, 30 and 45 atm at temperatures from 690 to 1430 K in both a rapid compression machine and in a shock tube. A detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of 1328 reactions involving 230 species was constructed and used to validate the delay times. Moreover, this mechanism has been used to simulate previously published ignition delay times at atmospheric and higher pressure. Arrhenius-type ignition delay correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K which relate ignition delay time to temperature and concentration of the mixture. Furthermore, a detailed sensitivity analysis and a reaction pathway analysis were performed to give further insight to the chemistry at various conditions. When compared to existing data from the literature, the model performs quite well, and in several instances the conditions of earlier experiments were duplicated in the laboratory with overall good agreement. To the authors' knowledge, the present paper presents the most comprehensive set of ignition delay time experiments and kinetic model validation for n-butane oxidation in air. (author)

Healy, D.; Curran, H.J. [Combustion Chemistry Centre, School of Chemistry, NUI Galway (Ireland); Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Zinner, C.M. [Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Bourque, G. [Rolls-Royce Canada Limited, 9500 Cote de Liesse, Lachine, Quebec, H8T 1A2 (Canada)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System Opportunity The Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners ...

45

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

Disclosed in this patent is NETLs laser spark distribution and ignition system, which reduces the high-power optical requirements normally needed for such a system by using optical fibers to deliver low-peak-energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier ...

46

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF and plans for the NIF ignition experimental program. A brief summary of the overall NIF experimental program is also presented.

Moses, E

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

Investigation of spark discharge processes and ignition systems for spark-ignited internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spark ignition of the air-fuel mixture at the appropriate time is important for successful flame initiation and complete combustion thereafter without unnecessary emissions. The physical and chemical reactions taking place between the spark plug electrodes during spark delivery determine the intensity of the spark and subsequent flame initiation. The energy of spark and the duration of its delivery are dependent on the ignition system design. The characteristics of the spark plug determine the interaction of the spark with the air-fuel mixture. The compression pressure, combustion chamber temperature and mixture motion at the time of spark generation play a significant role in the flame initiation process. All of these parameters are responsible for the resulting spark discharge and flame initiation process. The objectives of this research include investigation of the different phases of spark discharge and development of a thermodynamic analysis to determine the rate of change of the spark kernel temperature with time during the initial phases of the spark discharge. The effect of spark energy delivery rate, heat transfer losses and mass entrainment on the spark kernel temperature was determined through the thermodynamic analysis. This research also includes an evaluation of the various types of conventional as well as high-energy ignition systems for lean burn engines. An experimental ignition system was constructed to determine the effect of ignition energy, spark plug electrode geometry and gas pressure on the characteristics of the spark discharge. Images of spark discharge were captured through photography using three different types of electrode geometries and also by varying the pressure and by changing the ignition energy using different condensers in the ignition system. Finally, the results of the thermodynamic analysis were compared with the results from the experiment.

Khare, Yogesh Jayant

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Laser-induced spark ignition fundamental and applications  

SciTech Connect

Laser ignition has become an active research topic in recent years because it has the potential to replace the conventional electric spark plugs in engines that are required to operate under much higher compression ratios, faster compression rates, and much leaner fuel-to-air ratios than gas engines today. It is anticipated that the igniter in these engines will face with pressures as high as 50MPa and temperatures as high as 4000 K. Using the conventional ignition system, the required voltage and energy must be greatly increased (voltages in excess of 40 kV) to reliably ignite the air and fuel mixture under these conditions. Increasing the voltage and energy does not always improve ignitability but it does create greater reliability problem. The objective of this paper is to review past work to identify some fundamental issues underlying the physics of the laser spark ignition process and research needs in order to bring the laser ignition concept into the realm of reality.

Tran, P.X.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

NNSA Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF Project #12;2 Outline · National Nuclear Security Administration · ICF Campaign and Stewardship overview · NIF Use Plan ­ Defense Science Board review (Ignition 2010) · Recent progress ­ NIF, OMEGA, Z Confinement Fusion Acting Director Dr. Richard K. Thorpe NA-161 Office of the NIF Project Acting Director

50

Prospectus of ignition enhancement in a two-stroke SI engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional two-stroke spark-ignition (SI) engines have difficulty meeting the ignition requirements of lean fuel-air mixtures and high compression ratios, due to their breaker operated, magneto-coil ignition systems. In the present work, a breakerless, high-energy electronic ignition system was developed and tested with and without a platinum-tipped electrode spark plug. The high-energy ignition system showed an improved lean-burn capability at high compression ratios relative to the conventional ignition system. At a high compression ratio of 9:1 with lean fuel-air mixtures, the maximum percentage improvement in the brake thermal efficiency was about 16.5% at 2.7 kW and 3000 rpm. Cylinder peak pressures-were higher ignition delay was lower, and combustion duration was shorter at both normal and high compression ratios. Combustion stability as measured by the coefficient of variation in peak cylinder pressure was also considerably improved with the high-energy ignition system.

Manivannan, P.V.; Ramesh, A. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India); Poola, R.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dhinadgar, S.J. [Tata Engineering & Locomotive Co., New Delhi (India)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles close-in to the target (built-in as part of each target); (4) beam space charge-neutralization during both drift compression and final focus to target. Except for (1) and (2), these critical issues may be explored on existing heavy-ion storage ring accelerator facilities.

Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger targets and longer pulse lengths produce unique plasma conditions for laser-plasma instabilities that could reduce hohlraum coupling efficiency. Initial experiments have demonstrated efficient coupling of laser energy to x-rays. X-ray drive greater than 300 eV has been measured in gas-filled ignition hohlraum and shows the expected scaling with laser energy and hohlraum scale size. Experiments are now optimizing capsule implosions for ignition. Ignition conditions require assembling the fuel with sufficient density and temperature for thermonuclear burn. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, accelerating and spherically compressing the capsule for assembling the fuel. The implosion stagnates, heating the central core and producing a hot spot that ignites and burns the surrounding fuel. The four main characteristics of the implosion are shell velocity, central hot spot shape, fuel adiabat, and mix. Experiments studying these four characteristics of implosions are used to optimize the implosion. Integrated experiments using cryogenic fuel layer experiments demonstrate the quality of the implosion as the optimization experiments progress. The final compressed fuel conditions are diagnosed by measuring the x-ray emission from the hot core and the neutrons and charged particles produced in the fusion reactions. Metrics of the quality of the implosion are the neutron yield and the shell areal density, as well as the size and shape of the core. The yield depends on the amount of fuel in the hot core and its temperature and is a gauge of the energy coupling to the fuel. The areal density, the density of the fuel times its thickness, diagnoses the fuel assembly, which is measured using the fraction of neutrons that are down scattered passing through the dense shell. The yield and fraction of down scattered neutrons, or shell rho-r, from the cryogenic layered implosions are shown in Figure 3. The different sets of data represent results after a series of implosion optimization experiments. Both yield and areal density show significant increases as a result of the optimiza

Kauffman, R L

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

Calibration of X-ray detectors in the 8 to 115 keV energy range and their application to diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration of X-ray diagnostics is of paramount importance to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) fills this need by providing a wide variety of calibration and diagnostic development services in support of the ongoing research efforts at NIF. The X-ray source in the High Energy X-ray lab utilizes induced fluorescence in a variety of metal foils to produce a beam of characteristic X rays ranging from 8 to 111 keV. Presented are the methods used for calibrating a High Purity Germanium detector, which has been absolutely calibrated using radioactive check sources, compared against a silicon photodiode calibrated at Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Also included is a limited presentation of results from the recent calibration of the upgraded Filter Fluorescer X ray Spectrometer.

J. J. Lee, M. J. Haugh, G. LaCaille, and P. Torres

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Advanced ignition options for laser ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;FSC · With day-one hardware, the NIF can explore high-gain shock ignition - Polar Shock Ignition (uses half the NIF beams to drive the implosion: multi-FM or 2D-SSD (talk by J. Soures at this meeting) The NIF can explore advanced ignition options

55

DIRECT DRIVE FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUB-MJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates, S. P. Obenschain, and S. T. Zalesak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compresses and burns the relatively cold fuel around it, leading to a release of fusion energy. In the pastDIRECT DRIVE FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUB-MJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates 20375 R. Betti Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester

56

DIRECT DRIVE FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUBMJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates, S. P. Obenschain, and S. T. Zalesak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compresses and burns the relatively cold fuel around it, leading to a release of fusion energy. In the pastDIRECT DRIVE FUSION ENERGY SHOCK IGNITION DESIGNS FOR SUB­MJ LASERS Andrew J. Schmitt, J. W. Bates 20375 R. Betti Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester

57

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

E. I. Moses

58

Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Brookhaven High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Energy Physics High-Energy Physics High-energy physicists probe the properties and behavior of the most elementary particles in the universe. At the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), they perform experiments of unique sensitivity using high-intensity, intermediate-energy beams. The AGS currently provides the world's most intense high-energy proton beam. It is also the world's most versatile accelerator, accelerating protons, polarized protons, and heavy ions to near the speed of light. Magnet system at Brookhaven used to measure the magnetic moment of the muon. Important discoveries in high-energy physics were made at the AGS within the last decade. An international collaboration, including key physicists from Brookhaven, performed a very high-precision measurement of a property

60

Precision Shock Tuning on the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility [ J.?D. Lindl et al. Phys. Plasmas 11 339 (2004)] are underway with the goal of compressing deuterium-tritium fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (?R) to sustain ...

Frenje, Johan A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility ,,invited...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2006; published online 5 October 2006 The National Ignition Facility NIF will provide up to 1.8 MJ of laser energy for imploding inertial confinement fusion ICF targets. Ignited NIF targets are expected of nuclear diagnostics in ICF experiments. In 2005, the suite of nuclear-ignition diagnostics for the NIF

62

High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untitled Document Argonne Logo DOE Logo High Energy Physics Division Home Division ES&H Personnel Publications HEP Awards HEP Computing HEP Committees Administration...

63

Laser preheat enhanced ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the worlds largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

Ross, P.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

65

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Plasma jet ignition device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

High Energy Photoproduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Optimization of the process of plasma ignition of coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of experimental and theoretical investigations of plasma ignition of coal as a result of its thermochemical preparation in application to the processes of firing up a boiler and stabilizing the flame combustion. The experimental test bed with a commercial-scale burner is used for determining the conditions of plasma ignition of low-reactivity high-ash anthracite depending on the concentration of coal in the air mixture and velocity of the latter. The calculations produce an equation (important from the standpoint of practical applications) for determining the energy expenditure for plasma ignition of coal depending on the basic process parameters. The tests reveal the difficulties arising in firing up a boiler with direct delivery of pulverized coal from the mill to furnace. A scheme is suggested, which enables one to reduce the energy expenditure for ignition of coal and improve the reliability of the process of firing up such a boiler. Results are given of calculation of plasma thermochemical preparation of coal under conditions of lower concentration of oxygen in the air mixture.

Peregudov, V.S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Project: Reduced Ignition and Flame Spread with Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to ignition, time to extinction, and time to smoke ... of innovative technologies to develop cost-effective fire ... [6] Frster resonance energy transfer (FRET ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

PF Coil System Comparisons for a Compact Ignition Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compact Ignition Tokamak Program / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 1519, 1986)

R.D. Pillsbury; Jr.; J.H. Schultz; R.J. Thome

72

High-energy detector  

SciTech Connect

The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Air Kerma - High Energy Xray  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as high energy megavoltage x rays with peak voltages of at least 5 MV. Currently, air-kerma measurements at these high energies are not ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

74

LANL | Physics | High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring high energy physics Physics Division scientists and engineers investigate the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental...

75

Stockpile Stewardship and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Since the completion of the construction project in March 2009, NIF has completed nearly 150 target experiments for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), High Energy Density Stewardship Science (HEDSS) in the areas of radiation transport, material dynamics at high pressure in the solid state, as well as fundamental science and other national security missions. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with over 50 X-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. NIF is now qualified for use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high yield experiments and classified experiments. DT implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 4.5 x 10{sup 14} neutrons have been achieved. A series of 43 experiments were successfully executed over a 27-day period, demonstrating the ability to perform precise experiments in new regimes of interest to HEDSS. This talk will provide an update of the progress on the NIF capabilities, NIC accomplishments, as well as HEDSS and fundamental science experimental results and an update of the experimental plans for the coming year.

Moses, E

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments  

SciTech Connect

A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys of Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.

Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Moody, J D; Kyrala, G A; Schneider, M B; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Milovich, J L; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Berger, R L; Edwards, M J; Suter, L J; Haan, S W; Lindl, J D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Moses, E I; Scott, H A; Harte, J A; Zimmerman, G B

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

TRIDENT high-energy-density facility experimental capabilities and diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The newly upgraded TRIDENT high-energy-density (HED) facility provides high-energy short-pulse laser-matter interactions with powers in excess of 200 TW and energies greater than 120 J. In addition, TRIDENT retains two long-pulse (nanoseconds to microseconds) beams that are available for simultaneous use in either the same experiment or a separate one. The facility's flexibility is enhanced by the presence of two separate target chambers with a third undergoing commissioning. This capability allows the experimental configuration to be optimized by choosing the chamber with the most advantageous geometry and features. The TRIDENT facility also provides a wide range of standard instruments including optical, x-ray, and particle diagnostics. In addition, one chamber has a 10 in. manipulator allowing OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF) diagnostics to be prototyped and calibrated.

Batha, S. H.; Aragonez, R.; Archuleta, F. L.; Archuleta, T. N.; Benage, J. F.; Cobble, J. A.; Cowan, J. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Gonzales, R. P.; Greenfield, S. R.; Hegelich, B. M.; Hurry, T. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Kline, J. L.; Letzring, S. A.; Loomis, E. N.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] (and others)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

High-energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 22. High-energy collider parameters HIGH-ENERGY COLLIDER PARAMETERS: e + e - Colliders (I) The numbers here were received from representatives of the colliders in late 1999 (contact C.G. Wohl, LBNL). Many of the numbers of course change with time, and only the latest values (or estimates) are given here; those in brackets are for coming upgrades. Quantities are, where appropriate, r.m.s. H and V indicate horizontal and vertical directions. Parameters for the defunct SPEAR, DORIS, PETRA, PEP, and TRISTAN colliders may be found in our 1996 edition (Phys. Rev. D54, 1 July 1996, Part I). VEPP-2M (Novosibirsk) VEPP-2000 ∗ (Novosibirsk) VEPP-4M (Novosibirsk) BEPC (China) DAΦNE (Frascati) Physics start date 1974 2001 1994 1989 1999 Maximum beam energy (GeV) 0.7 1.0 6 2.2 0.510 (0.75 max.) Luminosity (10 30 cm -2 s -1 ) 5 100 50 10 at 2 GeV 5 at 1.55 GeV 50(→500) Time between collisions (µs)

79

Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

LANL | Physics | Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inertial confinement and high density Inertial confinement and high density plasma physics Using the world's most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The experimental research of the Physics Division's Inertial Confinement Fusion program is conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester, and the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos. Within inertial confinement fusion and the high energy density area, Los Alamos specializes in hohlraum energetics, symmetry tuning, warm dense matter physics, and hydrodynamics in ultra-extreme conditions. When complete, this research will enable the exploitation of fusion as an energy resource and will enable advanced research in stockpile stewardship

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Kinetics of ignition of saturated hydrocarbons by nonequilibrium plasma: C{sub 2}H{sub 6} -to C{sub 5}H{sub 12}-containing mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of ignition in C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2}:O{sub 2}:Ar mixtures for n=2 to 5 has been studied experimentally and numerically after a high-voltage nanosecond discharge. The ignition delay time behind a reflected shock wave was measured with and without the discharge. It was shown that the initiation of the discharge with a specific deposited energy of 10-30 mJ/cm{sup 3} leads to an order of magnitude decrease in the ignition delay time. Discharge processes and following chain chemical reactions with energy release were simulated. The generation of atoms, radicals and excited and charged particles was numerically simulated using the measured time-resolved discharge current and electric field in the discharge phase. The calculated densities of the active particles were used as input data to simulate plasma-assisted ignition. The sensitivity of the results to variation in electron cross sections, reaction rates and radical composition was investigated. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated ignition delay times and the experimental data. The analysis of the simulation results showed that the effect of nonequilibrium plasma on the ignition delay is associated with faster development of chain reactions, due to atoms and radicals produced by the electron impact dissociation of molecules in the discharge phase. Finally, we studied the role of various hydrocarbon radicals in the plasma-assisted ignition of the mixtures under consideration. (author)

Kosareva, I.N.; Aleksandrova, N.L.; Kindyshevaa, S.V.; Starikovskaia, S.M.; Starikovskii, A.Yu. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii Lane 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

High energy photon emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this work was to initiate the use of BaF2 arrays for detection of high energy photon emission from nuclear reactions. A beam from the Texas A&M University K-500 Superconducting Cyclotron, and a variety of detectors for hard photons, neutrons, charged particles, and fission fragments were used to study the reaction 160 + 238 U at a projectile energy of 50 MeV/u. Inverse slope values of the photon spectra were extracted for inclusive data and data of higher multiplicities at angles of 90' and 135'. Two 19-element barium fluoride (BaF2) arrays, an array of liquid scintillation fast neutron detectors and plastic scintillation charged-particle veto detectors, together with a silicon-cesium iodide (Si-CsI) telescope and a silicon fission fragment detector allowed the possibility of impact parameter selection through neutron and charged particle multiplicities. The associated multiplicity distributions of photon and fast neutron triggers were compared at 30' and 90' angles. The hardware and electronics layout of the experimental set up are described. Fundamental properties of the various detectors are explained and typical spectra are shown as examples for each detector system. The data acquisition and data compression is described in Chap. III, and followed by the calibration methods used for the BaF2 and Nal(TI) detectors. A description of a dynamic pedestal (zero level) correction mechanism, is followed by a description of several cosmic ray background reduction methods, including the highly effective centrality condition. A summary is given to compare the various methods. After a description of the other types of detectors used in the experiment, an example is given how the final photon spectra were produced. In Chap. IV the measured results are presented and compared to those in the literature. The last chapter provides the conclusions of this work.

Jabs, Harry

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Prompt Beta Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Mix in Ignited NIF Capsules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) technology is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser beam energy captured in a hohlraum. Hydrodynamical instabilities at interfaces in the ICF capsule leading to mix between the DT fue l and the ablator shell material are of fundamental physical interest and can affect the performance characteristics of the capsule. In this Letter we describe new radiochemical diagnostics for mix processes in ICF capsules with plastic or Be (0.9%Cu) ablator shells. Reactions of high-energy tritons with shell material produce high-energy $\\beta$-emitters. We show that mix between the DT fuel and the shell material enhances high-energy prompt beta emission from these reactions by more than an order of magnitude over that expected in the absence of mix.

A. C. Hayes; G. Jungman; J. C. Solem; P. A. Bradley; R. S. Rundberg

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

The National Ignition Facility and the Ignition Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(atm-s) Indirect drive on the NIF is within a factor of 2-3 of the conditions required for ignition Callahan -- AAAS, February 14-18, 2013 82013-047661s2.ppt NIF Ignition #12;2013-047661s2.ppt Callahan -- AAAS and initiated operation of NIF as the world's premier HED science facility Story of NIF and Ignition 102013

88

High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer...

89

Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes 'day one' NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Ignition of a deuterium micro-detonation with a gigavolt super marx generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Centurion-Halite experiment demonstrated the feasibility of igniting a deuterium-tritium micro-explosion with an energy of not more than a few megajoule, and the Mike test, the feasibility of a pure deuterium explosion with an energy of more than 10^6 megajoule. In both cases the ignition energy was supplied by a fission bomb explosive. While an energy of a few megajoule, to be released in the time required of less than 10^-9 sec, can be supplied by lasers and intense particle beams, this is not enough to ignite a pure deuterium explosion. Because the deuterium-tritium reaction depends on the availability of lithium, the non-fusion ignition of a pure deuterium fusion reaction would be highly desirable. It is shown that this goal can conceivably be reached with a "Super Marx Generator", where a large number of "ordinary" Marx generators charge (magnetically insulated) fast high voltage capacitors of a second stage Marx generator, called a "Super Marx Generator", ultimately reaching gigavolt potentials with an energy output of 100 megajoule. An intense 10^7 Ampere-GeV proton beam drawn from a "Super Marx Generator" can ignite a deuterium thermonuclear detonation wave in a compressed deuterium cylinder, where the strong magnetic field of the proton beam entraps the charged fusion reaction products inside the cylinder. In solving the stand-off problem, the stiffness of a GeV proton beam permits to place the deuterium target at a comparatively large distance from the wall of a cavity confining the deuterium micro-explosion.

Friedwardt Winterberg

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Premature ignition of a rocket motor.  

SciTech Connect

During preparation for a rocket sled track (RST) event, there was an unexpected ignition of the zuni rocket motor (10/9/08). Three Sandia staff and a contractor were involved in the accident; the contractor was seriously injured and made full recovery. The data recorder battery energized the low energy initiator in the rocket.

Moore, Darlene Ruth

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed.

Kumpan, S

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

High Energy Physics  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govhepaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

94

High Energy Density Capacitors  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of todays best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Problems in High Energy Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This contribution discusses some of the main problems in high energy astrophysics, and the perspectives to solve them using different types of "messengers": cosmic rays, photons and neutrinos

Lipari, Paolo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Problems in High Energy Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This contribution discusses some of the main problems in high energy astrophysics, and the perspectives to solve them using different types of "messengers": cosmic rays, photons and neutrinos

Paolo Lipari

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

97

The velocity campaign for ignition on NIF  

SciTech Connect

Achieving inertial confinement fusion ignition requires a symmetric, high velocity implosion. Experiments show that we can reach 95 {+-} 5% of the required velocity by using a 420 TW, 1.6 MJ laser pulse. In addition, experiments with a depleted uranium hohlraum show an increase in capsule performance which suggests an additional 18 {+-} 5 {mu}m/ns of velocity with uranium hohlraums over gold hohlraums. Combining these two would give 99 {+-} 5% of the ignition velocity. Experiments show that we have the ability to tune symmetry using crossbeam transfer. We can control the second Legendre mode (P2) by changing the wavelength separation between the inner and outer cones of laser beams. We can control the azimuthal m = 4 asymmetry by changing the wavelength separation between the 23.5 and 30 degree beams on NIF. This paper describes our 'first pass' tuning the implosion velocity and shape on the National Ignition Facility laser [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 041006 (2009)].

Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celeste, J. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Glenn, S.; Haan, S. W.; Haynam, C. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; London, R. A.; MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Auto-ignition of toluene-doped n-heptane and iso-octane/air mixtures: High-pressure shock-tube experiments and kinetics modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toluene is often used as a fluorescent tracer for fuel concentration measurements, but without considering whether it affects the auto-ignition properties of the base fuel. We investigate the auto-ignition of pure toluene and its influence on the auto-ignition of n-heptane and iso-octane/air mixtures under engine-relevant conditions at typical tracer concentrations. Ignition delay times {tau}{sub ign} were measured behind reflected shock waves in mixtures with air at {phi}=1.0 and 0.5 at p=40 bar, over a temperature range of T=700-1200 K and compared to numerical results using two different mechanisms. Based on the models, information is derived about the relative influence of toluene on {tau}{sub ign} on the base fuels as function of temperature. For typical toluene tracer concentrations {<=}10%, the ignition delay time {tau}{sub ign} changes by less than 10% in the relevant pressure and temperature range. (author)

Hartmann, M.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C. [Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics (IVG), University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Gushterova, I.; Schiessl, R.; Maas, U. [Institute for Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Regulated Emissions from a High Efficiency Spark-Ignition with Maximum Engine Power at or Below 19 KW.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous research has developed a set of high efficiency generator engines converted from a stock automobile engine. These all employed different variations of squish and (more)

Mackey, Travis J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

High Performance Buildings - Alternative/Renewable Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Buildings - Alternative/Renewable Energy. High Performance Buildings - Alternative/Renewable Energy Information at NIST. ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Power conditioning development for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high energy glass laser system and target chamber that will be used for research in inertial confinement fusion. The 192 beams of the NIF laser system are pumped by over 8600 Xenon flashlamps. The power conditioning system for NIF must deliver nearly 300 MJ of energy to the flashlamps in a cost effective and reliable manner. The present system design has over 200 capacitive energy storage modules that store approximately 1.7 MJ each and deliver that energy through a single switch assembly to 20 parallel sets of two series flashlamps. Although there are many possible system designs, few will meet the aggressive cost goals necessary to make the system affordable. Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing the system and component technologies that will be required to build the power conditioning system for the National Ignition Facility. This paper will describe the ongoing development activities for the NIF power conditioning system.

Newton, M.A.; Larson, D.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wilson, J.M.; Harjes, H.C.; Savage, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, R.L. [American Controls, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Ignition Engines Spark Ignition Engines Thomas Wallner and omni engine Thomas Wallner and the omnivorous engine Background Today the United States import more than 60% of its crude oil and petroleum products. Transportation accounts for a major portion of these imports. Research in this field is focused on reducing the dependency on foreign oil by increasing the engine efficiency on the one hand and blending gasoline with renewable domestic fuels, such as ethanol, on the other. Argonne's Research The main focus of research is on evaluation of advanced combustion concepts and effects of fuel properties on engine efficiency, performance and emissions. The platforms used are a single-cylinder research engine as well as an automotive-size four-cylinder engine with direct fuel injection.

103

Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics  

SciTech Connect

Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates {approximately}500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed {approximately}15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed.

Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Burner ignition system  

SciTech Connect

An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

Carignan, Forest J. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-energy Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

Two-stage Ignition as an Indicator of Low Temperature Combustion in a Late Injection Pre-mixed Compression Ignition Control Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal combustion engines have dealt with increasingly restricted emissions requirements. After-treatment devices are successful in bringing emissions into compliance, but in-cylinder combustion control can reduce their burden by reducing engine out emissions. For example, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are diesel combustion exhaust species that are notoriously difficult to remove by after-treatment. In-cylinder conditions can be controlled for low levels of NOx, but this produces high levels of soot potentially leading to increased particulate matter (PM). The simultaneous reduction of NOx and PM can be realized through a combustion process known as low temperature combustion (LTC). In this study, the typical definition of LTC as the defeat of the inverse relationship between soot and NOx is not applicable as a return to the soot-NOx tradeoff is observed with increasing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). It is postulated that this effect is the result of an increase in the hot ignition equivalence ratio, moving the combustion event into a slightly higher soot formation region. This is important because a simple emissions based definition of LTC is no longer helpful. In this study, the manifestation of LTC in the calculated heat release profile is investigated. The conditions classified as LTC undergo a two-stage ignition process. Two-stage ignition is characterized by an initial cool-flame reaction followed by typical hot ignition. In traditional combustion conditions, the ignition is fast enough that a cool-flame is not observed. By controlling initial conditions (pressure, temperature, and composition), the creation and duration of the cool-flame event is predictable. Further, the effect that injection timing and the exhaust gas recirculation level have on the controlling factors of the cool-flame reaction is well correlated to the duration of the cool-flame event. These two results allow the postulation that the presence of a sufficiently long cool-flame reaction indicates a combustion event that can be classified as low temperature combustion. A potential method for identifying low temperature combustion events using only the rate of heat release profile is theorized. This study employed high levels of EGR and late injection timing to realize the LTC mode of ordinary petroleum diesel fuel. Under these conditions, and based on a 90 percent reduction in nitric oxide and no increase in smoke output relative to the chosen baseline condition, a two part criteria is developed that identifies the LTC classified conditions. The criteria are as follow: the combustion event of conventional petroleum diesel fuel must show a two-stage ignition process; the first stage (cool-flame reaction) must consume at least 2 percent of the normalized fuel energy before the hot ignition commences.

Bittle, Joshua

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Science on high-energy lasers: From today to the NIF  

SciTech Connect

This document presents both a concise definition of the current capabilities of high energy lasers and a description of capabilities of the NIF (National Ignition Facility). Five scientific areas are discussed (Astrophysics, Hydrodynamics, Material Properties, Plasma Physics, Radiation Sources, and Radiative Properties). In these five areas we project a picture of the future based on investigations that are being carried on today. Even with this very conservative approach we find that the development of new higher energy lasers will make many extremely exciting areas accessible to us.

Lee, R.W.; Petrasso, R.; Falcone, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

National Ignition Facility Target Chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was necessary to achieve the overall schedule. Plans had to be developed for the precise location and alignment of laser beam ports. Upon completion of the fabrication of the aluminum target chamber in a temporary structure the 130 ton sphere was moved from the temporary construction enclosure to its final location in the target building. Prior to the installation of a concrete shield and after completion of the welding of the chamber penetrations vacuum leak checking was performed to insure the vacuum integrity of target chamber. The entire spherical chamber external surface supports a 40 cm thick reinforced concrete shield after installation in the target building. The final task is a total survey of the laser ports and the contour machining of spacer plates so that laser devices attached to these ports meet the alignment criteria.

Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

109

Research in High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

Conway, John S.

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

High Country Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Country Energy High Country Energy Place Kasson, Minnesota Zip MN 55944 Sector Wind energy Product Developing a planned 300MW wind project in Dodge and Olmsted countries, Minnesota. Coordinates 44.02676°, -92.748254° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.02676,"lon":-92.748254,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

111

Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF  

SciTech Connect

The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

Ma, T

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Simulation of hydrogen and hydrogen-assisted propane ignition in Pt catalyzed microchannel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with self-ignition of catalytic microburners from ambient cold-start conditions. First, reaction kinetics for hydrogen combustion is validated with experimental results from the literature, followed by validation of a simplified pseudo-2D microburner model. The model is then used to study the self-ignition behavior of lean hydrogen/air mixtures in a Platinum-catalyzed microburner. Hydrogen combustion on Pt is a very fast reaction. During cold start ignition, hydrogen conversion reaches 100% within the first few seconds and the reactor dynamics are governed by the ''thermal inertia'' of the microburner wall structure. The self-ignition property of hydrogen can be used to provide the energy required for propane ignition. Two different modes of hydrogen-assisted propane ignition are considered: co-feed mode, where the microburner inlet consists of premixed hydrogen/propane/air mixtures; and sequential feed mode, where the inlet feed is switched from hydrogen/air to propane/air mixtures after the microburner reaches propane ignition temperature. We show that hydrogen-assisted ignition is equivalent to selectively preheating the inlet section of the microburner. The time to reach steady state is lower at higher equivalence ratio, lower wall thermal conductivity, and higher inlet velocity for both the ignition modes. The ignition times and propane emissions are compared. Although the sequential feed mode requires slightly higher amount of hydrogen, the propane emissions are at least an order of magnitude lower than the other ignition modes. (author)

Seshadri, Vikram; Kaisare, Niket S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Comparison of the Recently proposed Super Marx Generator Approach to Thermonuclear Ignition with the DT Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid Concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently proposed Super Marx generator pure deuterium micro-detonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser DT fusion-fission hybrid concept (LiFE) [1]. In a Super Marx generator a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultra-high voltage Marx generator, from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-explosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. A typical example of the LiFE concept is a fusion gain of 30, and a fission gain of 10, making up for a total gain of 300, with about 10 times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means a substantial release of fission products, as in fusion-less pure fission reactors. In the Super Marx approach for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-detonation a gain of the same magnitude can in theory be reached [2]. If feasible, the Super Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of ther...

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures. 18 figs.

Early, J.W.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

115

Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Plasma Diagnostic Calibration and Characterizations with High Energy X-rays  

SciTech Connect

National Security Technologies High Energy X-ray (HEX) Facility is unique in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The HEX provides fluorescent X-rays of 5 keV to 100 keV with fluence of 10^510^6 photons/cm^2/second at the desired line energy. Low energy lines can be filtered, and both filters and fluorescers can be changed rapidly. We present results of calibrating image plates (sensitivity and modulation transfer function), a Bremsstrahlung spectrometer (stacked filters and image plates), and the National Ignition Facilitys Filter- Fluorescer Experiment (FFLEX) high energy X-ray spectrometer. We also show results of a scintillator light yield and alignment study for a neutron imaging system.

Zaheer Ali

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Spark ignited turbulent flame kernel growth. Annual report, January--December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study of the effect of spark power on the growth rate of spark-ignited flame kernels was conducted in a turbulent flow system at 1 atm, 300 K conditions. All measurements were made with premixed, propane-air at a fuel/air equivalence ratio of 0.93, with 0%, 8% or 14% dilution. Two flow conditions were studied: a low turbulence intensity case with a mean velocity of 1.25 m/sec and a turbulence intensity of 0.33 m/sec, and a high turbulence intensity case with a mean velocity of 1.04 m/sec and a turbulence intensity of 0.88 m/sec. The growth of the spark-ignited flame kernel was recorded over a time interval from 83 {mu}sec to 20 msec following the start of ignition using high speed laser shadowgraphy. In order to evaluate the effect of ignition spark power, tests were conducted with a long duration (ca 4 msec) inductive discharge ignition system with an average spark power of ca 14 watts and two short duration (ca 100 nsec) breakdown ignition systems with average spark powers of ca 6 {times} 10{sup 4} and ca 6 {times} 10{sup 5} watts. The results showed that increased spark power resulted in an increased growth rate, where the effect of short duration breakdown sparks was found to persist for times of the order of milliseconds. The effectiveness of increased spark power was found to be less at high turbulence and high dilution conditions. Increased spark power had a greater effect on the 0--5 mm burn time than on the 5--13 mm burn time, in part because of the effect of breakdown energy on the initial size of the flame kernel. And finally, when spark power was increased by shortening the spark duration while keeping the effective energy the same there was a significant increase in the misfire rate, however when the spark power was further increased by increasing the breakdown energy the misfire rate dropped to zero.

Santavicca, D.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O' Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

119

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O' Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

High-Energy Petawatt Project at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-energy petawatt laser, OMEGA EP, is currently under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Integrated into the existing OMEGA laser, it will support three major areas of research: (a) backlighting of high-energy-density plasmas, (b) integrated fast ignition experiments, and (c) high-intensity physics. The laser will provide two beams combined collinearly and coaxially with short pulses (~1 to 100 ps) and high energy (2.6 kJ at 10 ps). Cone-in-shell fuel-assembly experiments and simulations of short-pulse heated cryogenic targets are being performed in preparation for cryogenic integrated fast ignitor experiments on OMEGA EP.

Stoeckl, C.; Delettrez, J.A.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Maywar, D.N.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Rigatti, A.L.; Waxer, L.J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Stephens, R.B.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database David A. Brown 1it requires the high-energy nuclear physics com- munitys ?compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications

Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Spark Ignited Turbulent Flame Kernel Growth  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study of the effects of spark power and of incomplete fuel-air mixing on spark-ignited flame kernel growth was conducted in turbulent propane-air mixtures at 1 atm, 300K conditions. The results showed that increased spark power resulted in an increased growth rate, where the effect of short duration breakdown sparks was found to persist for times of the order of milliseconds. The effectiveness of increased spark power was found to be less at high turbulence and high dilution conditions. Increased spark power had a greater effect on the 0-5 mm burn time than on the 5-13 mm burn time, in part because of the effect of breakdown energy on the initial size of the flame kernel. And finally, when spark power was increased by shortening the spark duration while keeping the effective energy the same there was a significant increase in the misfire rate, however when the spark power was further increased by increasing the breakdown energy the misfire rate dropped to zero. The results also showed that fluctuations in local mixture strength due to incomplete fuel-air mixing cause the flame kernel surface to become wrinkled and distorted; and that the amount of wrinkling increases as the degree of incomplete fuel-air mixing increases. Incomplete fuel-air mixing was also found to result in a significant increase in cyclic variations in the flame kernel growth. The average flame kernel growth rates for the premixed and the incompletely mixed cases were found to be within the experimental uncertainty except for the 33%-RMS-fluctuation case where the growth rate was significantly lower. The premixed and 6%-RMS-fluctuation cases had a 0% misfire rate. The misfire rates were 1% and 2% for the 13%-RMS-fluctuation and 24%-RMS-fluctuation cases, respectively; however, it drastically increased to 23% in the 33%-RMS-fluctuation case.

Santavicca, D.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the converter-foil which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of the available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra bonus energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for hot spot ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10%meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in CA within a year. This will usher in the technology development Phase of ICF after years of research aimed at achieving breakeven experiment. Methods to achieve the high energy gain needed for a competitive power plant will then be a key developmental issue, and our D-cluster target for Fast Ignition (FI) is expected to meet that need.

Miley, George H.

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

INVESTIGATION OF THE ENERGY CONTENT OF HIGH ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This effort was sponsored by the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology ... that 120 volts AC (VAC) boosted through a transformer can ignite ...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Ignition Analysis of a Porous Energetic Material - II. Ignition at a Closed Heated End  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuation of an ignition analysis for porous energetic materials subjected to a constant energy flux is presented. In the first part (I), the analysis was developed for the case of an open-end, semi-infinite material such that gas flow, generated by thermal expansion, flowed out of the porous solid, thereby removing energy from the system. In the present study, the case of a closed end is considered, and thus the thermally-induced gas flow is now directed into the solid. In these studies, an asymptotic perturbation analysis, based on the smallness of the gas-to-solid density ratio and the largeness of the activation energy, is utilized to describe the inert and transition stages leading to thermal runaway. In both cases it is found that the effects of porosity provide a leading-order reduction in the time to ignition relative to that for the nonporous problem, arising from the reduced amount of solid material that must be heated and the difference in thermal conductivities of the solid and gaseous phases. A correction to the leading-order ignition-delay time, however, is provided by the convective flow of gas through the solid, and the sign of this correction is shown to depend on the direction of the gas flow. Thus, gas flowing out of an open-end solid was previously shown to give a positive correction to the leading-order time to ignition. Here, however, it is demonstrated that when the flow of gas is directed into the porous solid, the relative transport effects associated with the gas flow serve to preheat the material, resulting in a negative correction and hence a decrease in the ignition-delay time.

S. B. Margolis; A. M. Telengator; F. A. Williams

1999-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ignition analysis of a porous energetic material. 2. Ignition at a closed heated end  

SciTech Connect

A continuation of an ignition analysis for porous energetic materials subjected to a constant energy flux is presented. In the first part, the analysis was developed for the case of an open-end, semi-infinite material such that gas flow, generated by thermal expansion, flowed out of the porous solid, thereby removing energy from the system. In the present study, the case of a closed end is considered, and thus the thermally-induced gas flow is now directed into the solid. In these studies, an asymptotic perturbation analysis, based on the smallness of the gas-to-solid density ratio and the largeness of the activation energy, is utilized to describe the inert and transition stages leading to thermal runaway. In both cases it is found that the effects of porosity provide a leading-order reduction in the time to ignition relative to that for the nonporous problem, arising from the reduced amount of solid material that must be heated and the difference in thermal conductivities of the solid and gaseous phases. A correction to the leading-order ignition-delay time, however, is provided by the convective flow of gas through the solid, and the sign of this correction is shown to depend on the direction of the gas flow. Thus, gas flowing out of an open-end solid was previously shown to give a positive correction to the leading-order time to ignition. Here, however, it is demonstrated that when the flow of gas is directed into the porous solid, the relative transport effects associated with the gas flow serve to preheat the material, resulting in a negative correction and hence a decrease in the ignition-delay time.

Alexander M. Telegentor; Stephen B. Margolis; Forman A. Williams

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

USDA - High Energy Cost Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Energy Cost Grant Program USDA - High Energy Cost Grant Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Municipal Utility Nonprofit Residential...

128

High West Energy, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name High West Energy, Inc Place Colorado Utility Id 27058 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A F Industrial Commercial & Small Power Commercial Farm and Home Residential Irrigation Industrial Large Power Industrial Large Power T-O-D Industrial Large Power T-O-D V2 Industrial Large Power V2 Industrial Security Lighting-150 - 175 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Security Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Security Lighting-400 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Street Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Street Lighting-400 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Time-of-Use Commercial

129

Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests  

SciTech Connect

The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High-energy atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

High-energy atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known hadronic models, SIBYLL 2.1 and QGSJET-II. The atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy range $10-10^7$ GeV was computed within the 1D approach to solve nuclear cascade equations in the atmosphere, which takes into account non-scaling behavior of the inclusive cross-sections for the particle production, the rise of total inelastic hadron-nucleus cross-sections and nonpower-law character of the primary cosmic ray spectrum. This approach was recently tested in the atmospheric muon flux calculations [1]. The results of the neutrino flux calculations are compared with the Frejus, AMANDA-II and IceCube measurement data.

S. I. Sinegovsky; A. A. Kochanov; T. S. Sinegovskaya

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

132

Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to refine the system details, interfaces and the requirements for remote handling. Table 1. FIRE RadialInsulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM objectives and subsystem requirements in an arrangement that allows remote maintenance of in

133

TOWARD A STANDARD IGNITION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ignited with a small propane torch. The top center ofhead is supplied with propane. In these experiments allin the pre-mixed mode with propane alone to simulate trash

Volkingburg, David R. Van

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

High Mesa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mesa Mesa Jump to: navigation, search Name High Mesa Facility High Mesa Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exelon Wind Developer Exelon Wind Energy Purchaser Idaho Power Location Bliss ID Coordinates 42.88797667°, -115.0169849° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.88797667,"lon":-115.0169849,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes Record American Fusion News Category: National Ignition Facility Link: National Ignition Facility (NIF):...

136

Demonstration of the shock-timing technique for ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-performance inertial confinement fusion capsule is compressed by multiple shock waves before it implodes. To minimize the entropy acquired by the fuel, the strength and timing of those shock waves must be accurately controlled. Ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will employ surrogate targets designed to mimic ignition targets while making it possible to measure the shock velocities inside the capsule. A series of experiments on the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] validated those targets and the diagnostic techniques proposed. Quartz was selected for the diagnostic window and shock-velocity measurements were demonstrated in Hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a Hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were used to further validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, allowing these critical parameters to be optimized.

Boehly, T. R.; Hu, S. X.; Morozas, J. A.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Munro, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W.; Robey, H. F.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Partial fuel stratification to control HCCI heat release rates : fuel composition and other factors affecting pre-ignition reactions of two-stage ignition fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion with fully premixed charge is severely limited at high-load operation due to the rapid pressure-rise rates (PRR) which can lead to engine knock and potential engine damage. Recent studies have shown that two-stage ignition fuels possess a significant potential to reduce the combustion heat release rate, thus enabling higher load without knock.

Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.; Cannella, William (Chevron USA Inc.); Yang, Yi; Dronniou, Nicolas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

High Energy Laser Diagnostic Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advancements in high energy laser (HEL) sources have outpaced diagnostic tools capable of accurately quantifying system performance. Diagnostic tools are needed that allow system developers to measure the parameters that define HEL effectiveness. The two critical parameters for quantifying HEL effectiveness are the irradiance on target and resultant rise in target temperature. Off-board sensing has its limitations, including unpredictable changes in the reflectivity of the target, smoke and outgassing, and atmospheric distortion. On-board sensors overcome the limitations of off-board techniques but must survive high irradiance levels and extreme temperatures.We have developed sensors for on-target diagnostics of high energy laser beams and for the measurement of the thermal response of the target. The conformal sensors consist of an array of quantum dot photodetectors and resistive temperature detectors. The sensor arrays are lithographically fabricated on flexible substrates and can be attached to a variety of laser targets. We have developed a nanoparticle adhesive process that provides good thermal contact with the target and that ensures the sensor remains attached to the target for as long as the target survives. We have calibrated the temperature and irradiance sensors and demonstrated them in a HEL environment.

Luke, James R.; Goddard, Douglas N.; Thomas, David [AEgis Technologies Group, 10501 Research Rd SE, Suite D, Albuquerque, NM 87123, 505-938-9221 (United States); Lewis, Jay [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS DISCHARGE DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The high-energy electrical discharge device described comprises an envelope, a pair of main discharge electrodes supported in opposition in the envelope, and a metallic shell symmetrically disposed around and spaced from the discharge path between the electrodes. The metallic shell comprises a first element of spaced helical turns of metallic material and a second element of spaced helical turns of methllic material insulatedly supported in superposition outside the first element and with the turns overlapping the gap between the turns of the first element.

Josephson, V.

1960-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

String Scattering Amplitudes in High Energy Limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A very review of string scattering amplitudes in two important high energy limits: hard scattering and Regge scattering. Recent results of the symmetries in string theory by studying high energy string scattering anplitudes are showed.

Yang, Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Pyrolysis and ignition behavior of coal, cattle biomass, and coal/cattle biomass blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in demand, lower emission standards, and reduced fuel supplies have fueled the recent effort to find new and better fuels to power the necessary equipment for societys needs. Often, the fuels chosen for research are renewable fuels derived from biomass. Current research at Texas A&M University is focused on the effectiveness of using cattle manure biomass as a fuel source in conjunction with coal burning utilities. The scope of this project includes fuel property analysis, pyrolysis and ignition behavior characteristics, combustion modeling, emissions modeling, small scale combustion experiments, pilot scale commercial combustion experiments, and cost analysis of the fuel usage for both feedlot biomass and dairy biomass. This paper focuses on fuel property analysis and pyrolysis and ignition characteristics of feedlot biomass. Deliverables include a proximate and ultimate analysis, pyrolysis kinetics values, and ignition temperatures of four types of feedlot biomass (low ash raw manure [LARM], low ash partially composted manure [LAPC], high ash raw manure [HARM], and high ash partially composted manure [HAPC]) as well as blends of each biomass with Texas lignite coal (TXL). Activation energy results for pure samples of each fuel using the single reaction model rigorous solution were as follows: 45 kJ/mol (LARM), 43 kJ/mol (LAPC), 38 kJ/mol (HARM), 36 kJ/mol (HAPC), and 22 kJ/mol (TXL). Using the distributed activation energy model the activation energies were 169 kJ/mol (LARM), 175 kJ/mol (LAPC), 172 kJ/mol (HARM), 173 kJ/mol (HAPC), and 225 kJ/mol (TXL). Ignition temperature results for pure samples of each of the fuels were as follows: 734 K (LARM), 745 K (LAPC), 727 (HARM), 744 K (HAPC), and 592 K (TXL). There was little difference observed between the ignition temperatures of the 50% blends of coal with biomass and the pure samples of coal as observed by the following results: 606 K (LARM), 571 K (LAPC), 595 K (HARM), and 582 K (HAPC).

Martin, Brandon Ray

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite - Energy ...  

Energy Storage Advanced Materials High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite Processes to add metal hydrideds to nanocarbon structures to yield high capacity ...

144

Bringing Energy Efficiency to High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bringing Energy Efficiency to High Performance Computing Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Jaguar Supercomputer William Tschudi September 2013 The ability of high performance...

145

Scaling to Ultra-High Intensities by High-Energy Petawatt Beam Combining  

SciTech Connect

The output pulse energy from a single-aperture high-energy laser amplifier (e.g. fusion lasers such as NIF and LMJ) are critically limited by a number of factors including optical damage, which places an upper bound on the operating fluence; parasitic gain, which limits together with manufacturing costs the maximum aperture size to {approx} 40-cm; and non-linear phase effects which limits the peak intensity. For 20-ns narrow band pulses down to transform-limited sub-picosecond pulses, these limiters combine to yield 10-kJ to 1-kJ maximum pulse energies with up to petawatt peak power. For example, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) project at NIF is designed to provide kilo-Joule pulses from 0.75-ps to 50-ps, with peak focused intensity above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Using such a high-energy petawatt (HEPW) beamline as a modular unit, they discuss large-scale architectures for coherently combining multiple HEPW pulses from independent apertures, called CAPE (Coherent Addition of Pulses for Energy), to significantly increase the peak achievable focused intensity. Importantly, the maximum intensity achievable with CAPE increases non-linearly. Clearly, the total integrated energy grows linearly with the number of apertures N used. However, as CAPE combines beams in the focal plane by increasing the angular convergence to focus (i.e. the f-number decreases), the foal spot diameter scales inversely with N. Hence the peak intensity scales as N{sup 2}. Using design estimates for the focal spot size and output pulse energy (limited by damage fluence on the final compressor gratings) versus compressed pulse duration in the ARC system, Figure 2 shows the scaled focal spot intensity and total energy for various CAPE configurations from 1,2,4, ..., up to 192 total beams. They see from the fixture that the peak intensity for event modest 8 to 16 beam combinations reaches the 10{sup 21} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} regime. With greater number of apertures, or with improvements to the focusability of the individual beams, the maximum peak intensity can be increased further to {approx} 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. Lastly, an important feature of the CAPE architecture is the ability to coherently combine beams to produce complex spatio-temporal intensity distributions for laser-based accelerators (e.g. all-optical electron injection and acceleration) and high energy density science applications such as fast ignition.

Siders, C W; Jovanovic, I; Crane, J; Rushford, M; Lucianetti, A; Barty, C J

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

146

Oxides having high energy densities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

June 11, 1999: National Ignition Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

June 11, 1999Secretary Richardson dedicates the National Ignition Facility target chamber at DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

148

Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

Bayless, John R. (Malibu, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context 1 Some references The following set of volumes is an outstanding summary of the field of High Energy Astrophysics and its relation to the rest of Astrophysics High Energy Astrophysics, Vols. 1,2 and 3. M.S. Longair, Cam- bridge University

Bicknell, Geoff

150

Compact, high energy gas laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically pumped gas laser amplifier unit having a disc-like configuration in which light propagation is radially outward from the axis rather than along the axis. The input optical energy is distributed over a much smaller area than the output optical energy, i.e., the amplified beam, while still preserving the simplicity of parallel electrodes for pumping the laser medium. The system may thus be driven by a comparatively low optical energy input, while at the same time, owing to the large output area, large energies may be extracted while maintaining the energy per unit area below the threshold of gas breakdown.

Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stapleton, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Stratton, Thomas F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

Analytic criteria for shock ignition of fusion reactions in a central hot spot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock ignition is an inertial confinement fusion scheme where the ignition conditions are achieved in two steps. First, the DT shell is compressed at a low implosion velocity creating a central core at a low temperature and a high density. Then, a strong spherical converging shock is launched before the fuel stagnation time. It increases the central pressure and ignites the core. It is shown in this paper that this latter phase can be described analytically by using a self-similar solution to the equations of ideal hydrodynamics. A high and uniformly distributed pressure in the hot spot can be created thus providing favorable conditions for ignition. Analytic ignition criteria are obtained that relate the areal density of the compressed core with the shock velocity. The conclusions of the analytical model are confirmed in full hydrodynamic simulations.

Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Breil, J.; Lafon, M.; Le Bel, E. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Universite Bordeaux 1-CEA-CNRS, Talence 33405 (France)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Flash Ignition and Initiation of Explosives-Nanotubes Mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent astounding discoveries of ignition in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) after exposure to an ordinary photographic flash, (1) other formulations of carbons containing noble metals, (2) and polyaniline nanofibers (3) prompted us to explore a possible further instigation of explosive materials. Here, we report that an ignition and initiation process, further leading to actual detonation, does occur for explosives in lax contact with carbon nanotubes that are prone to opto-thermal activity via a conventional flashbulb. Optical ignition and initiation of explosives could thus far only be accomplished through lasers, (4) with specific characteristic of high power, pulse length, wavelength, and a small target area that greatly inhibit their applications. Our results have the implication that explosives with opto-thermally active SWNTs formulations are new ideal candidates for remote optical triggering of safety apparatus such as the firing of bolts on space shuttles rockets and aircraft exit doors, and for controlled burning of explosives as actuators.

Manaa, M R; Mitchell, A R; Garza, R G; Pagoria, P F; Watkins, B E

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

Railplug Ignition System for Enhanced Engine Performance and Reduced Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress that was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project. The primary objectives of the project were to (1) develop an improved understanding of the spark ignition process, and (2) develop the railplug as an improved ignitor for large bore stationary natural gas engines. We performed fundamental experiments on the physical processes occurring during spark ignition and used the results from these experiments to aid our development of the most complete model of the spark ignition process ever devised. The elements in this model include (1) the dynamic response of the ignition circuit, (2) a chemical kinetics mechanism that is suitable for the reactions that occur in the plasma, (3) conventional flame propagation kinetics, and (4) a multi-dimensional formulation so that bulk flow through the spark gap can be incorporated. This model (i.e., a Fortran code that can be used as a subroutine within an engine modeling code such as KIVA) can be obtained from Prof. Ron Matthews at rdmatt{at}mail.utexas.edu or Prof. DK Ezekoye at dezekoye{at}mail.utexas.edu. Fundamental experiments, engine experiments, and modeling tasks were used to help develop the railplug as a new ignitor for large bore natural gas engines. As the result of these studies, we developed a railplug that could extend the Lean Stability Limit (LSL) of an engine operating at full load on natural gas from {phi} = 0.59 for operation on spark plugs down to {phi} = 0.53 using railplugs with the same delivered energy (0.7 J). However, this delivered energy would rapidly wear out the spark plug. For a conventional delivered energy (<0.05 J), the LSL is {phi} = 0.63 for a spark plug. Further, using a permanent magnet to aid the plasma movement, the LSL was extended to {phi} = 0.54 for a railplug with a delivered energy of only 0.15 J/shot, a typical discharge energy for commercial capacitive discharge ignition systems. Here, it should be noted that railplugs and the associated ignition circuit should not cost much more than a conventional spark ignition system. Additionally, it is believed that the railplug performance can be further improved via continued research and development.

DK Ezekoye; Matt Hall; Ron Matthews

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The national ignition facility: early operational experience with a large Ada control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt laser being built by the Department of Energy and the National ...

Robert W. Carey; Paul J. Van Arsdall; John P. Woodruff

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A comparison between direct spark ignition and prechamber ignition in an internal combustion engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We simulated the flow field and flame propagation near top dead center in a generic large-bore internal combustion engine using the COYOTE computer program, which is based on the full Navier-Stokes equations for a fluid mixture. The combustion chamber is a right circular cylinder, and the main charge is uniformly premixed. The calculations are axisymmetric. The results illustrate the differences in flow patterns, flame propagation, and thermal NO production between ignition with a spark plug and with a small prechamber. In the spark-ignited case, the flame propagates away from the spark plug approximately as a segment of a spherical surface, just as expected. With the prechamber, a high speed jet of hot combustion products shoots into the main chamber, quickly producing a large flame sheet that spreads along the piston face. The prechamber run consumes all of the fuel in half the time required by the spark-ignited case. The two cases produce comparable amounts of thermal NO at the end of fuel combustion.

Cloutman, L.D.

1993-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

Very high energy explosives systems  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of where to go next in exploring HE systems with energy equal to LX-09, or better.

Scribner, K.

1968-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

Callaghan, R.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fast Camera Imaging of Hall Thruster Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Hall thrusters provide efficient space propulsion by electrostatic acceleration of ions. Rotating electron clouds in the thruster overcome the space charge limitations of other methods. Images of the thruster startup, taken with a fast camera, reveal a bright ionization period which settles into steady state operation over 50 ?s. The cathode introduces azimuthal asymmetry, which persists for about 30 ?s into the ignition. Plasma thrusters are used on satellites for repositioning, orbit correction and drag compensation. The advantage of plasma thrusters over conventional chemical thrusters is that the exhaust energies are not limited by chemical energy to about an electron volt. For xenon Hall thrusters, the ion exhaust velocity can be 15-20 km/s, compared to 5 km/s for a typical chemical thruster

C.L. Ellison, Y. Raitses and N.J. Fisch

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept  

SciTech Connect

Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition and Growth concept, introduced by Lee and Tarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homogeneized burn rate needs to account for three mesoscale physical effects (i) the density of burnt hot spots, which depends on the lead shock strength; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by hot spots, which depends on the local deflagration speed; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent hot spots. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable {lambda}(t) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t)/{ell}{sub hs}, rather than by xpecifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale {ell}{sub hs} is the average distance between hot spots, which is proportional to [N{sub hs}(P{sub s})]{sup -1/3}, where N{sub hs} is the number density of hot spots activated by the lead shock. The reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t) = {line_integral}{sub 0}{sup t} D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single hot spot, where D is the deflagration speed and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. They have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

CO/sub 2/-laser ignition of DAPP targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pulse derived by shuttering a CO/sub 2/ laser operating in the cw mode has been used to ignite a diallyl phthalate pyrotechnic (DAPP) material. Data from this work along with some data taken earlier, while operating the laser in the pulse mode, are presented. When operating in the cw mode, a pulse is mechanically chopped out of the beam and focussed onto the DAPP material. It was found that the shuttered cw mode of operation gives a more reproducible pulse and a more accurate determination of the incident energy than the pulse mode does. The pulse widths for threshold ignition (50% ignitions) at different power levels have been determined for 254 and 127 mm-focal-length lenses which were used to focus the beam on the target. It was also found that targets could be penetrated without ignition of the DAPP material. A 2.54 mm-thick DAPP target is penetrated by the laser beam if the energy per unit area exceeds 29 +1 J/mm/sup 2/. Based on this study, recommendations are given for improving the present test procedures used for DAPP material.

Brannon, P.J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On Operational Power Reactor Regime and Ignited Spherical Tokamaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2003 version of the "cold" magnetic "Fusion without ignition" in the next 35 years, the talk.-Pitersburg, St.-Pitersburg, RF % Insutute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC "Kurchatov Ins.", Moscow, RF & Vyoptics, Inc for magnetic fusion, OPRR requires a low recycling and wall-stabilized high- plasma. Because of the small

Zakharov, Leonid E.

162

High Energy Density Secondary Lithium Batteries  

High Energy Density Secondary Lithium Batteries Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

163

HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ALUMINUM BATTERY - Energy Innovation Portal  

Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery ...

164

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics [for High Energy Physics Computational and Storage for High Energy Physics Computational and Storage

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Service Members Aim High -- for Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Members Aim High -- for Energy Savings Service Members Aim High -- for Energy Savings Service Members Aim High -- for Energy Savings February 22, 2010 - 12:32pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me? Service members are helping reduce our dependency on oil, and saving taxpayers' money, with their energy-saving efforts. Operation Change Out has cut $26.3 million in total energy costs and helped prevent more than 396 lbs. of carbon dioxide. Reducing our dependency on foreign oil means finding ways to harness the power of renewable energy sources, but it also means saving energy whenever and wherever possible. The Americans charged with keeping the country safe are now helping the U.S. reach its energy savings goals by taking small, important steps. "Operation Change Out: The Military Challenge" is a campaign asking

166

Service Members Aim High -- for Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Members Aim High -- for Energy Savings Service Members Aim High -- for Energy Savings Service Members Aim High -- for Energy Savings February 22, 2010 - 12:32pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me? Service members are helping reduce our dependency on oil, and saving taxpayers' money, with their energy-saving efforts. Operation Change Out has cut $26.3 million in total energy costs and helped prevent more than 396 lbs. of carbon dioxide. Reducing our dependency on foreign oil means finding ways to harness the power of renewable energy sources, but it also means saving energy whenever and wherever possible. The Americans charged with keeping the country safe are now helping the U.S. reach its energy savings goals by taking small, important steps. "Operation Change Out: The Military Challenge" is a campaign asking

167

The Ignition Physics Study Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the US magnetic fusion program there have been relatively few standing committees of experts, with the mandate to review a particular sub-area on a continuing basis. Generally, ad hoc committees of experts have been assembled to advise on a particular issue. There has been a lack of broad, systematic and continuing review and analysis, combining the wisdom of experts in the field, in support of decision making. The Ignition Physics Study Group (IPSG) provides one forum for the systematic discussion of fusion science, complementing the other exchanges of information, and providing a most important continuity in this critical area. In a similar manner to the European program, this continuity of discussion and the focus provided by a national effort, Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), and international effort, Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), are helping to lower those barriers which previously were an impediment to rational debate.

Sheffield, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates  

SciTech Connect

The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Spherical shock-ignition experiments with the 40 + 20-beam configuration on OMEGA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spherical shock-ignition experiments on OMEGA used a novel beam configuration that separates low-intensity compression beams and high-intensity spike beams. Significant improvements in the performance of plastic-shell, D{sub 2} implosions were observed with repointed beams. The analysis of the coupling of the high-intensity spike beam energy into the imploding capsule indicates that absorbed hot-electron energy contributes to the coupling. The backscattering of laser energy was measured to reach up to 36% at single-beam intensities of {approx}8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Hard x-ray measurements revealed a relatively low hot-electron temperature of {approx}30 keV independent of intensity and timing. At the highest intensity, stimulated Brillouin scattering occurs near and above the quarter-critical density and the two-plasmon-decay instability is suppressed.

Theobald, W.; Anderson, K. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Gotchev, O. V.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics and Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics and Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Physics at the University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Lafon, M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics and Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); University of Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), F-33400 Talence (France); Casner, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G. [University of Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), F-33400 Talence (France); Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

History and future of spark ignition engines  

SciTech Connect

A report on the history and future of spark ignition engines for automobile propulsion is presented, with particular emphasis on their environmental impact. Topics covered include: factors affecting early decisions in favor of spark ignition engines and influencing continued reliance on spark ignition engines; the early history of automobile engines, including propulsion by steam, electricity, spark ignition, and diesel power; and contemporary alternative power sources such as the stratified charge engine and the Wankel rotary combustion engine. There appear to be no equivalents in knowledge, experience, or data with alternative engine designs to allow for the prediction that a change from spark ignition propulsion to one of the possible alternatives would be beneficial either in terms of emission reduction or performance and fuel economy. The stratified charge engine, however, appears to offer great promise for adequate emission control with good fuel economy and performance characteristics; moreover, it has the significant advantage of being an incremental change from the current spark ignition engine.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

HIGH-ENERGY HEAVY-ION BEAMS AS IGNITERS FOR COMMERCIAL-SCALE INTERTIAL-FUSION POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucl. Proceedings of the Brookhaven Workshop on Heavy IonOctober 17-21, 1977- Brookhaven National Laboratory Report (the physics of Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, and

Judd, D.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

High Energy Emission from Magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered soft gamma-ray emission from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045 has a luminosity L_g ~ 10^{36} ergs/s. This luminosity exceeds the spindown power by three orders of magnitude and must be fed by an alternative source of energy such as an ultrastrong magnetic field. A gradual release of energy in the stellar magnetosphere is expected if it is twisted and a strong electric current is induced on the closed field lines. We examine two mechanisms of gamma-ray emission associated with the gradual dissipation of this current. (1) A thin surface layer of the star is heated by the downward beam of current-carrying charges, which excite Langmuir turbulence in the layer. As a result, it can reach a temperature kT ~ 100 keV and emit bremsstrahlung photons up to this characteristic energy. (2) The magnetosphere is also a source of soft gamma rays at a distance of ~100 km from the star, where the electron cyclotron energy is in the keV range. A large electric field develops in this region in resp...

Thompson, C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

High Energy Emission from Magnetars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently discovered soft gamma-ray emission from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045 has a luminosity L_g ~ 10^{36} ergs/s. This luminosity exceeds the spindown power by three orders of magnitude and must be fed by an alternative source of energy such as an ultrastrong magnetic field. A gradual release of energy in the stellar magnetosphere is expected if it is twisted and a strong electric current is induced on the closed field lines. We examine two mechanisms of gamma-ray emission associated with the gradual dissipation of this current. (1) A thin surface layer of the star is heated by the downward beam of current-carrying charges, which excite Langmuir turbulence in the layer. As a result, it can reach a temperature kT ~ 100 keV and emit bremsstrahlung photons up to this characteristic energy. (2) The magnetosphere is also a source of soft gamma rays at a distance of ~100 km from the star, where the electron cyclotron energy is in the keV range. A large electric field develops in this region in response to the outward drag force felt by the current-carrying electrons from the flux of keV photons leaving the star. A seed positron injected in this region undergoes a runaway acceleration and upscatters keV photons above the threshold for pair creation. The created pairs emit a synchrotron spectrum consistent with the observed 20-100 keV emission. This spectrum is predicted to extend to higher energies and reach a peak at ~1 MeV.

C. Thompson; A. M. Beloborodov

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

High Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: High Temperature Dictionary.png High Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 230°C and 300°C is considered by Sanyal to be "high temperature." "Above a temperature level of 230°C, the reservoir would be expected to become two-phase at some point during exploitation. The next higher

175

Relativistic Laser Plasma Research for Fast Ignition Laser Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviewed are the present status and future prospects of the laser fusion research at the ILE (Institute of Laser Engineering) Osaka. The Gekko XII and Peta Watt laser system have been operated for investigating the fast ignition, the relativistic laser plasma interactions and so on. In particular, the fast ignition experiments with cone shell target have been in progress as the UK and US-Japan collaboration programs. In the experiments, the imploded high density plasmas are heated by irradiating 500 J level peta watt laser pulse. The thermal neutron yield is found to increase by three orders of magnitude by injecting the peta watt laser into the cone shell target. Transport of relativistic high density electron is the critical issue as the basic physics for understanding the dense plasma heating process. By the theory, simulation and experiment, the collective phenomena in the interactions of intense relativistic electron current with dense plasmas has been investigated to find the formation of self organized flow as the result of filamentation (Weibel) instability. Through the present understanding, the new project, FIREX-I has started recently to prove the principle of the fast ignition scheme. Keywords: fast ignition, peta watt laser, relativistic electron, weibel instability

Mima Kunioki; Tanaka Kazuo. A; Kodama Ryosuke; Johzaki Tomohiro; Nagatomo Hideo; Shiraga Hiroyuki; Miyanaga Noriaki; Azechi Hiroshi; Nakai Mitsuo; Norimatsu Takayoshi; Nagai Keiji; Sunahara Atsushi; Nishihara Katsunobu; Taguchi Toshihiro; Sakagami Hitoshi; Sentoku Yasuhiko; Ruhl Hartmut

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Home - combustion, compression ignition,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Combustion Visualization * Combustion Visualization * Compression-Ignition * Emissions Control * Fuel Injection and Sprays * Idling * Multi-Dimensional Modeling * Particulate Matter * Spark Ignition Green Racing GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Engines Omnivorous engine tested by Thomas Wallner Thomas Wallner tests the omnivorous engine, a type of spark-ignition engine. Argonne's engine research is contributing to advances in technology that will impact the use of conventional and alternative fuels and the design of advanced technology vehicles. Compression Ignition

177

Ignitability Measurements with the Cone Calorimeter*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 22. WD Weatherford, Jr and DM Sheppard, Basic studies of the mechanism of ignition of cellulosic materials. Tenth Symp. (IntI) on Combustion, pp. ...

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

Ignition and spread of electrical wire fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pilot source, placed in the center of the wire sample to initiate ignition, which heats the wire through both convection (major) and radiation (

Huang, Xinyan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model piloted ignition times of wood and plastics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is applied on a packed bed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When the air flow is above a critical level, no ignition can take place. - Abstract: To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The incoming radiative heat flux, sample thickness and moisture content are some of the used variables. Not only the ignition time can be calculated with the model, but also the mass flux and surface temperature at ignition. The ignition times for softwoods and PMMA are mainly under-predicted. For hardwoods and PVC the predicted ignition times agree well with experimental results. Due to a significant scatter in the experimental data the mass flux and surface temperature calculated with the model are hard to validate. The model is applied on the startup of a municipal waste incineration plant. For this process a maximum allowable primary air flow is derived. When the primary air flow is above this maximum air flow, no ignition can be obtained.

Blijderveen, Maarten van [TNO, Schoemakerstraat 97, 2628 VK Delft (Netherlands); University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Bramer, Eddy A. [University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Brem, Gerrit, E-mail: g.brem@utwente.nl [University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Devices to improve the performance of a conventional two-stroke spark ignition engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents research efforts made in three different phases with the objective of improving the fuel economy of and reducing exhaust emissions from conventional, carbureted, two-stroke spark ignition (SI) engines, which are widely employed in two-wheel transportation in India. A review concerning the existing two-stroke engine technology for this application is included. In the first phase, a new scavenging system was developed and tested to reduce the loss of fresh charge through the exhaust port. In die second phase, the following measures were carried out to improve the combustion process: (1) using an in-cylinder catalyst, such as copper, chromium, and nickel, in the form of coating; (2) providing moderate thermal insulation in the combustion chamber, either by depositing thin ceramic material or by metal inserts; (3) developing a high-energy ignition system; and (4) employing high-octane fuel, such as methanol, ethanol, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil, as a blending agent with gasoline. Based on the effectiveness of the above measures, an optimized design was developed in the final phase to achieve improved performance. Test results indicate that with an optimized two-stroke SI engine, the maximum percentage improvement in brake thermal efficiency is about 31%, together with a reduction of 3400 ppm in hydrocarbons (HC) and 3% by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions over the normal engine (at 3 kW, 3000 rpm). Higher cylinder peak pressures (3-5 bar), lower ignition delay (2-4{degrees}CA){degrees} and shorter combustion duration (4-10 {degrees}CA) are obtained. The knock-limited power output is also enhanced by 12.7% at a high compression ratio (CR) of 9:1. The proposed modifications in the optimized design are simple, low-cost and easy to adopt for both production and existing engines.

Poola, R.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K.V. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Tank farm deflagration rates due to various ignition sources  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document evaluates potential ignition sources, documents calculated deflagration rates in flammable gas tanks from these ignition sources, and assesses the efficacy of controls to mitigate or prevent ignition.

Powers, T.B., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

High-energy cosmic ray interactions  

SciTech Connect

Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

Engel, Ralph [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Orellana, Mariana [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Reynoso, Matias M. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata, (UNMdP-CONICET) (Argentina); Vila, Gabriela S. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Energy recovery linacs in high-energy and nuclear physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. We describe some of the potential applications which are under development by our laboratories in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The applications that we discuss are electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for some of these applications are high currents of polarized electrons, high-charge and high-current electron beams and the associated issues of High-Order Modes. The advantages of ERLs for these applications are numerous and will be outlined in the text. It is worth noting that some of these advantages are the high-brightness of the ERL beams and their relative immunity to beam-beam disturbances.

I. Ben-Zvi; Ya. Derbenev; V. Litvinenko; L. Merminga

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the D? experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 {mu}m diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 {+-} 3) {mu}m, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 {+-} 0.09) g cm{sup -2} result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm{sup -3}. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 {+-} 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 10{sup 15} that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5{+-}0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 {+-} 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date. This achievement is the result of the first hohlraum and capsule tuning experiments where the stagnation pressures have been systematically increased by more than a factor of 10 by fielding low-entropy implosions through the control of radiation symmetry, small hot electron production, and proper shock timing. The stagnation pressure is above 100 Gbars resulting in high Lawson-type confinement parameters of P{tau} Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 atm s. Comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations indicate that the pressure is within a factor of three required for reaching ignition and high yield. This will be the focus of future higher-velocity implosions that will employ additional optimizations of hohlraum, capsule and laser pulse shape conditions.

Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

High energy mode locked fiber oscillators for high contrast, high energy petawatt laser seed sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a high-energy petawatt laser beam line the ASE pulse contrast is directly related to the total laser gain. Thus a more energetic input pulse will result in increased pulse contrast at the target. We have developed a mode-locked fiber laser with high quality pulses and energies exceeding 25nJ. We believe this 25nJ result is scalable to higher energies. This oscillator has no intra-cavity dispersion compensation, which yields an extremely simple, and elegant laser configuration. We will discuss the design of this laser, our most recent results and characterization of all the key parameters relevant to it use as a seed laser. Our oscillator is a ring cavity mode-locked fiber laser [1]. These lasers operate in a self-similar pulse propagation regime characterized by a spectrum that is almost square. This mode was found theoretically [2] to occur only in the positive dispersion regime. Further increasing positive dispersion should lead to increasing pulse energy [2]. We established that the positive dispersion required for high-energy operation was approximately that of 2m of fiber. To this end, we constructed a laser cavity similar to [1], but with no gratings and only 2m of fiber, which we cladding pumped in order to ensure sufficient pump power was available to achieve mode-locked operation. A schematic of the laser is shown in figure 1 below. This laser produced low noise 25nJ pulses with a broad self similar spectrum (figure 2) and pulses that could be de-chirped to <100fs (figure 3). Pulse contrast is important in peta-watt laser systems. A major contributor to pulse contrast is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which is proportional to the gain in the laser chain. As the oscillator strength is increased, the required gain to reach 1PW pulses is decreased, reducing ASE and improving pulse contrast. We believe these lasers can be scaled in a stable fashion to pulse energies as high as 100nJ and have in fact seen 60nJ briefly in our lab, which is work still in progress. At this level, even if the pulses are not perfect, post-oscillator pulse cleaning can be used to create a clean high energy pulse for injection into a peta-watt laser beam line.

Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; An, J; Kim, D; Barty, C J

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ablation driven by hot electrons generated during the ignitor laser pulse in shock ignition  

SciTech Connect

An analytical model for the ablation driven by hot electrons is presented. The hot electrons are assumed to be generated during the high intensity laser spike used to produce the ignitor shock wave in the shock ignition driven inertial fusion concept, and to carry on the absorbed laser energy in its totality. Efficient energy coupling requires to keep the critical surface sufficiently close to the ablation front and this goal can be achieved for high laser intensities provided that the laser wavelength is short enough. Scaling laws for the ablation pressure and the other relevant magnitudes of the ablation cloud are found in terms of the laser and target parameters. The effect of the preformed plasma assembled by the compression pulse, previous to the ignitor, is also discussed. It is found that a minimum ratio between the compression and the ignitor pulses would be necessary for the adequate matching of the corresponding scale lengths.

Piriz, A. R.; Rodriguez Prieto, G. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Zhang, Y. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 Dalian (China); Liu, S. D.; Zhao, Y. T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 730000 Lanzhou (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

High Sheldon Energy Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheldon Energy Wind Farm Sheldon Energy Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name High Sheldon Energy Wind Farm Facility High Sheldon Energy Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser Market Location WY County NY Coordinates 42.721106°, -78.406972° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.721106,"lon":-78.406972,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

Analysis of ignition of a porous energetic material  

SciTech Connect

A theory of ignition is presented to analyze the effect of porosity on the time to ignition of a semi-infinite porous energetic solid subjected to a constant energy flux. An asymptotic perturbation analysis, based on the smallness of the gas-to-solid density ratio and the largeness of the activation energy, is utilized to describe the inert and transition stages leading to thermal runaway. As in the classical study of a nonporous solid, the transition stage consists of three spatial regions in the limit of large activation energy: a thin reactive-diffusive layer adjacent to the exposed surface of the material where chemical effects are first felt, a somewhat thicker transient-diffusive zone, and finally an inert region where the temperature field is still governed solely by conductive heat transfer. Solutions in each region are constructed at each order with respect to the density-ratio parameter and matched to one another using asymptotic matching principles. It is found that the effects of porosity provide a leading-order reduction in the time to ignition relative to that for the nonporous problem, arising from the reduced amount of solid material that must be heated and the difference in thermal conductivities of the solid and gaseous phases. A positive correction to the leading-order ignition-delay time, however, is provided by the convective flow of gas out of the solid, which stems from the effects of thermal expansion and removes energy from the system. The latter phenomenon is absent from the corresponding calculation for the nonporous problem and produces a number of modifications at the next order in the analysis arising from the relative transport effects associated with the gas flow.

Telengator, A.M.; Williams, F.A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Sciences; Margolis, S.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

High-performance Electrochemical Capacitors - Energy ...  

... metal oxides on the high-surface-area walls of carbon nanofoam papers (0 ... Pairing MnOxcarbon nanofoam with FeOxcarbon nanofoam yields an energy ...

192

The evolution of high energy accelerators  

SciTech Connect

In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

Courant, E.D.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

High Performance Buildings Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database Jump to: navigation, search The High Performance Buildings Database (HPBD), developed by the United States Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, is "a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad."[1] Map of HPBD entries Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":1000,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"-","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

194

Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

Marquet, C; Lappi, T; Venugopalan, R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

C. Marquet; H. Kowalski; T. Lappi; R. Venugopalan

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Managing transient behaviors of a dual mode spark ignition-- controlled auto ignition engine with a variable valve timing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine has the potential of providing better fuel economy and emissions characteristics than current spark ignition engines. One implementation of this technology ...

Santoso, Halim G. (Halim Gustiono), 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy Star Helps Manufacturers To Achieve High Energy Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From personal electronic devices to homes and office buildings, ENERGY STAR is a recognized symbol of high quality energy performance which enables consumers, home buyers, and businesses to make informed energy decisions. Now, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, within the construct of ENERGY STAR, is extending the benefits to manufacturers in new and meaningful ways. Through the development of tools and technical resources specifically targeting manufacturing companies, ENERGY STAR seeks to provide a means for these businesses to understand and achieve excellence in energy performance by reinforcing the link between energy, financial, and environmental performance. Discussed are the enhanced programmatic offerings as well as two new tools under development that will illustrate the impact of energy consumption on financial performance. The first tool will permit an assessment of energy performance, or benchmark it, at a plant level normalizing for such variables as product type, annual plant hours, plant capacity, annual product value, number of employees, and location. Use of this tool and the information it provides as a means to assess, track and provide targets for plant energy performance is examined. The second tool seeks to elevate the consideration of energy use to an executive level within an organization by calculating financial energy indices specific to individual companies and industrial sectors. These indices relate a business' energy use to such factors as net operating income, value of sales, net income, and so forth. Corporate executives, Wall Street analysts, and energy managers are intended to be the primary users of these ratios. Programmatic improvements to ENERGY STAR include greater networking among participants in the partnership and more opportunities for recognition of their achievements. With the new tools, resources, and program enhancements, it is believed that manufacturers will be equipped with valuable and credible information from which more informed and progressive energy performance decisions can be made. Further, these businesses will be doing their part to demonstrate that protection of the environment is good for business.

Dutrow, E.; Hicks, T.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pilot-plant case. For a given molten-salt jet velocity, theof With a Flibe molten salt blanket energy multiplier Ptha potassium-containing molten salt, has just enough mass to

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

High Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds Wind Farm Winds Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name High Winds Wind Farm Facility High Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser PPM Energy Inc Location Solano County CA Coordinates 38.124844°, -121.764915° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.124844,"lon":-121.764915,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

202

High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava; L. Larsen

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by hydride formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by the oxidation of uranium hydride are described. The models were developed to demonstrate that ignition of large uranium ingots could not occur as a result of possible hydride formation during storage. The thermodynamics-based analytical model predicted an overall 17 C temperature rise of the ingot due to hydride oxidation upon opening of the storage can in air. The numerical model predicted locally higher temperature increases at the surface; the transient temperature increase quickly dissipated. The numerical model was further used to determine conditions for which hydride oxidation does lead to ignition of uranium metal. Room temperature ignition only occurs for high hydride fractions in the nominally oxide reaction product and high specific surface areas of the uranium metal.

Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Engineering Div.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effects of natural gas composition on ignition delay under diesel conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of variations in natural gas composition on autoignition of natural gas under direct-injection (DI) diesel engine conditions were studied experimentally in a constant-volume combustion vessel and computationally using a chemical kinetic model. Four fuel blends were investigated: pure methane, a capacity weighted mean natural gas, a high ethane content natural gas, and a natural gas with added propane typical of peak shaving conditions. Experimentally measured ignition delays were longest for pure methane and became progressively shorter as ethane and propane concentrations increased. At conditions characteristic of a DI compression ignition natural gas engine at Top Dead Center (CR=23:1, p = 6.8 MPa, T = 1150K), measured ignition delays for the four fuels varied from 1.8 ms for the peak shaving and high ethane gases to 2.7 ms for pure methane. Numerically predicted variations in ignition delay as a function of natural gas composition agreed with these measurements.

Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Di Julio, S.S. [California State Univ., Northridge, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

High-energy emission from pulsar binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unpulsed, high-energy emission from pulsar binaries can be attributed to the interaction of a pulsar wind with that of a companion star. At the shock between the outflows, particles carried away from the pulsar magnetosphere are accelerated and radiate both in synchrotron and inverse Compton processes. This emission constitutes a significant fraction of the pulsar spin-down luminosity. It is not clear however, how the highly magnetized pulsar wind could convert its mainly electromagnetic energy into the particles with such high efficiency. Here we investigate a scenario in which a pulsar striped wind converts into a strong electromagnetic wave before reaching the shock. This mode can be thought of as a shock precursor that is able to accelerate particles to ultrarelativistic energies at the expense of the electromagnetic energy it carries. Radiation of the particles leads to damping of the wave. The efficiency of this process depends on the physical conditions imposed by the external medium. Two regimes can b...

Mochol, Iwona

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Bellevue High School | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bellevue High School Bellevue High School Jump to: navigation, search Name Bellevue High School Facility Bellevue High School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Bellevue High School Energy Purchaser Bellevue High School Location Bellevue WA Coordinates 41.28241024°, -82.84591019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.28241024,"lon":-82.84591019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

Margaretta High School | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Margaretta High School Margaretta High School Jump to: navigation, search Name Margaretta High School Facility Margaretta High School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Margaretta High School Energy Purchaser Margaretta High School Location Castalia OH Coordinates 41.39923794°, -82.80122995° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.39923794,"lon":-82.80122995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Imaging VISAR diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. A VISAR (Velocity Interferometry System for Any Reflector) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two interferometers. A 60-kW VISAR probe laser operates at 659.5 nm with variable pulse width. Special coatings on the mirrors and cutoff filters are used to reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and to pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, passive shock breakout light, or thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing other experimenters to use that port. A unique resolution pattern has been designed to validate the VISAR diagnostic before each use. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. Seven CCD cameras monitor the diagnostic alignment.

Malone, R M; Bower, J R; Bradley, D K; Capelle, G A; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W; Eckart, M J; Eggert, J H; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Hicks, D G; Kaufman, M I; MacGowan, B J; Montelongo, S; Ng, E W; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W; Zapata, P G

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fuzzy Expert System to Estimate Ignition Timing for Hydrogen Car  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the application of fuzzy expert system technique as a basis to estimate ignition timing for subsequent tuning of a Toyota Corolla 4 cylinder, 1.8l hydrogen powered car. Ignition timing prediction is a typical problem to which decision ... Keywords: Fuzzy expert system, Hydrogen engine tuning, Hydrogen powered car, Ignition advance, Ignition timing

Tien Ho; Vishy Karri

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

FY2001 Progress Report for the Spark Ignition Direct Injection R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPARK IGNITION, SPARK IGNITION, DIRECT INJECTION ENGINE R&D 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and Computer Systems Management, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for the Spark Ignition Direct Injection R&D Program

213

High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. TRIDENT target chamber Sasi Palaniyappan, right, and Rahul Shah left inside a target chamber where the TRIDENT short pulse laser is aimed at a very thin diamond- foil target, a fraction of a micrometer thick. The laser delivers a power on target of 150 Terawatts focused into a 7 micrometer spot, yielding laser brilliance over 100 times more intense than needed to make the target electrons fully relativistic. These experiments test novel methods of producing intense

214

Scientific applications for high-energy lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

Lee, R.W. [comp.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Stochastic Jet Quenching in High Energy Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy losses of fast color particles in random inhomogeneous color medium created in high energy nuclear collisions are estimated.

Kirakosyan, M R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible Solid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Storage III: Materials, Systems and Applications Symposium. Presentation Title, High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible...

217

Glass Capacitor for High-Temperature Applications - Energy ...  

Energy storage; Power factor correction; High-voltage capacitors; Power electronic filters; More Information Inventor: Enis Tuncer Fusion Energy Division

218

Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

219

Frontiers in High-Energy Astroparticle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the discovery of evidence for neutrino mass, a vivid gamma ray sky at multi-TeV energies, and cosmic ray particles with unexpectedly high energies, astroparticle physics currently runs through an era of rapid progress and moving frontiers. The non-vanishing neutrino mass establishes one smooth component of dark matter which does not, however, supply a critical mass to the Universe. Other dark matter particles are likely to be very massive and should produce high-energy gamma rays, neutrinos, and protons in annihilations or decays. The search for exotic relics with new gamma ray telescopes, extensive air shower arrays, and underwater/-ice neutrino telescopes is a fascinating challenge, but requires to understand the astrophysical background radiations at high energies. Among the high-energy sources in the Universe, radio-loud active galactic nuclei seem to be the most powerful accounting for at least a sizable fraction of the extragalactic gamma ray flux. They could also supply the bulk of the observed cosmic rays at ultrahigh energies and produce interesting event rates in neutrino telescopes aiming at the kubic kilometer scale such as AMANDA and ANTARES. It is proposed that the extragalactic neutrino beam can be used to search for tau lepton appearance thus allowing for a proof of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis. Furthermore, a new method for probing the era of star formation at high redshifts using gamma rays is presented which requires new-generation gamma ray telescopes operating in the 10-100 GeV regime such as MAGIC and GLAST.

Karl Mannheim

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

High Plains Tech Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tech Center Tech Center Jump to: navigation, search Name High Plains Tech Center Facility High Plains Tech Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner High Plains Tech Center Energy Purchaser High Plains Tech Center Location Woodward OK Coordinates 36.40645133°, -99.4282195° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.40645133,"lon":-99.4282195,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Target Diagnostics Supports NIF's Path to Ignition  

SciTech Connect

The physics requirements derived from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experimental campaigns are leading to a wide variety of target diagnostics. Software development for the control and analysis of these diagnostics is included in the NIF Integrated Computer Control System, Diagnostic Control System and Data Visualization. These projects implement the configuration, controls, data analysis and visual representation of most of these diagnostics. To date, over 40 target diagnostics have been developed to support NIF experiments. In 2011 diagnostics were developed or enhanced to measure Ignition performance in a high neutron yield environment. Performance is optimized around four key variables: Adiabat (a) which is the strength and timing of four shocks delivered to the target, Velocity (V) of the imploding target, Mix (M) is the uniformity of the burn, and the Shape (S) of the imploding Deuterium Tritium (DT) hot spot. The diagnostics used to measure each of these parameters is shown in figure 1. Adiabat is measured using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) diagnostic consisting of three streak cameras. To provide for more accurate adiabat measurements the VISAR streak cameras were enhanced in FY11 with a ten comb fiducial signal controller to allow for post shot correction of the streak camera sweep non-linearity. Mix is measured by the Neutron Time of Flight (NTOF) and Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostics. To accommodate high neutron yield shots, NTOF diagnostic controls are being modified to use Mach Zehnder interferometer signals to allow the digitizers to be moved from near the target chamber to the neutron shielded diagnostic mezzanine. In December 2011 the first phase of RAGS diagnostic commissioning will be completed. This diagnostic will analyze the tracers that are added to NIF target capsules that undergo nuclear reactions during the shot. These gases are collected and purified for nuclear counting by the RAGS system. Three new instrument controllers were developed and commissioned to support this diagnostic. A residual-gas analyzer (RGA) instrument measures the gas content at various points in the system. The Digital Gamma Spectrometer instrument measures the radiological spectrum of the decaying gas isotopes. A final instrument controller was developed to interface to a PLC based Gas collection system. In order to support the implosion velocity measurements an additional Gated X-ray Detector (GXD) diagnostic was tested and commissioned. This third GXD views the target through a slit contained in its snout and allows the other GXD diagnostics to be used for measuring the shape on the same shot. In order to measure the implosion shape in a high neutron environment, Actide Readout In A Neutron Environment (ARIANE) and Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostics were commissioned. The controls for ARIANE, a fixed port gated x-ray imager, contain a neutron shielded camera and micro channel plate pulser with its neutron sensitive electronics located in the diagnostic mezzanine. The NI diagnostic is composed of two Spectral Instruments SI-1000 cameras located 20M from the target and provides neutron images of the DT hot spot for high yield shots. The development and commissioning of these new or enhanced diagnostics in FY11 have provided meaningful insight that facilitates the optimization of the four key Ignition variables. In FY12 they will be adding three new diagnostics and enhancing four existing diagnostics in support of the continuing optimization series of campaigns.

Shelton, R

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

Chemical kinetic modelling of hydrocarbon ignition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon ignition is discussed with reference to a range of experimental configurations, including shock tubes, detonations, pulse combustors, static reactors, stirred reactors and internal combustion engines. Important conditions of temperature, pressure or other factors are examined to determine the main chemical reaction sequences responsible for chain branching and ignition, and kinetic factors which can alter the rate of ignition are identified. Hydrocarbon ignition usually involves complex interactions between physical and chemical factors, and it therefore is a suitable and often productive subject for computer simulations. In most of the studies to be discussed below, the focus of the attention is placed on the chemical features of the system. The other physical parts of each application are generally included in the form of initial or boundary conditions to the chemical kinetic parts of the problem, as appropriate for each type of application being addressed.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Marinov, N.M.

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

Building Technologies Office: Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project on Facebook...

225

Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and Humid Climates Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and Humid Climates School districts around...

226

Electrolytes and Electrodes for High-energy Secondary Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D Nanostructured Bicontinuous Electrodes: Path to Ultra-High Power and Energy ... High Energy Density Lithium Capacitors Using Carbon-Carbon Electrodes.

227

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Case study...

228

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Home > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas...

229

High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The APS 1-ID beamline is dedicated to high-energy diffraction and the status of the ... High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source 1-ID...

230

Modeling of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operation of piston engines on a compression ignition cycle using a lean, homogeneous charge has many potential attractive features. These include the potential for extremely low NO{sub x} and particulate emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency and not requiring the expensive high pressure injection system of the typical modem diesel engine. Using the HCT chemical kinetics code to simulate autoignition of methane-air mixtures, we have explored the ignition timing, burn duration, NO{sub x} production, indicated efficiency and power output of an engine with a compression ratio of 15:1 at 1200 and 2400 rpm. HCT was modified to include the effects of heat transfer. This study used a single control volume reaction zone that varies as a function of crank angle. The ignition process is controlled by varying the intake equivalence ratio and varying the residual gas trapping (RGT). RGT is internal exhaust gas recirculation which recycles both heat and combustion product species. It is accomplished by varying the timing of the exhaust valve closure. Inlet manifold temperature was held constant at 330 Kelvins. Results show that there is a narrow range of operational conditions that show promise of achieving the control necessary to vary power output while keeping indicated efficiency above 50% and NO{sub x} levels below 100 ppm.

Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.M.; Westbrook, C.; Pitz, W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

Slane, Patrick

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

Patrick Slane

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

Permeability enhancement using high energy gas fracturing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of a preliminary study of using High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) techniques for geothermal well stimulation. Experiments conducted in the G-tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) showed that multiple fractures could be created in water-filled boreholes using HEGF. Therefore, the method is potentially useful for geothermal well stimulation. 4 refs., 11 figs.

Chu, T.Y.; Cuderman, J.F.; Jung, J.; Jacobson, R.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Very high energy heavy-ion accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A review is given of various programs for building heavy ion accelerators. Topics discussed are (1) options of reaching very high energies with heavy ions; (2) present performance of the superHILAC and the Bevalac; (3) heavy ion sources; (4) applications of heavy ion accelerators outside of basic research; and (5) reliability and operating costs of heavy ion sources. (PMA)

Grunder, H.A.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Trends in experimental high-energy physics  

SciTech Connect

Data from a scan of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review are used to demonstrate that American high-energy physicists show a pattern of accelerator and instrumentation usage characteristic of that expected from the logistic-substitution model of Marchetti and of Fischer and Pry.

Sanford, T.W.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The National Ignition Facility: Status of Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bruce Warner Deputy Associate Director, NIF Programs Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory October 11, 2005 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L2 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL P9266 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L28 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL National Ignition FacilityNational Ignition Facility P9292 San

238

Jet fuel ignition delay times: Shock tube experiments over wide conditions and surrogate model predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition delay times were measured for gas-phase jet fuel (Jet-A and JP-8) in air behind reflected shock waves in a heated high-pressure shock tube. Initial reflected shock conditions were as follows: temperatures of 715-1229 K, pressures of 17-51 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentrations of 10 and 21% in synthetic air. Ignition delay times were measured using sidewall pressure and OH* emission at 306 nm. Longer ignition delay times at low temperatures (715-850 K) were accessed by utilizing driver-gas tailoring methods. Also presented is a review of previous ignition delay time measurements of kerosene-based fuels and recent work on surrogate fuel and kinetic mechanism development. To our knowledge, we report the first gas-phase shock tube ignition delay time data for JP-8, and our measurements for Jet-A are for a broader range of conditions than previously available. Our results have very low scatter and are in excellent agreement with the limited previous shock tube data for Jet-A. Although JP-8 and Jet-A have slightly different compositions, their ignition delay times are very similar. A simple 1/P dependence was found for ignition delay times from 874 to 1220 K for the pressure range studied for both fuels. Ignition delay time variations with equivalence ratio and oxygen concentration were also investigated. The new experimental results were compared with predictions of several kinetic mechanisms, using different jet fuel surrogate mixtures. (author)

Vasu, Subith S.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

ENERGY SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI AT HIGH ENERGIES  

SciTech Connect

We present new measurements of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei from the second flight of the balloon-borne experiment Cosmic-Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM). The instrument included different particle detectors to provide redundant charge identification and measure the energy of CRs up to several hundred TeV. The measured individual energy spectra of C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe are presented up to approx10{sup 14} eV. The spectral shape looks nearly the same for these primary elements and it can be fitted to an E {sup -2.66} {sup +}- {sup 0.04} power law in energy. Moreover, a new measurement of the absolute intensity of nitrogen in the 100-800 GeV/n energy range with smaller errors than previous observations, clearly indicates a hardening of the spectrum at high energy. The relative abundance of N/O at the top of the atmosphere is measured to be 0.080 +- 0.025 (stat.)+-0.025 (sys.) at approx800 GeV/n, in good agreement with a recent result from the first CREAM flight.

Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Malinine, A. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S. [Department of Physics, University of Siena and INFN, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Barbier, L. [Astroparticle Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jeon, J. A. [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Minnick, S., E-mail: paolo.maestro@pi.infn.i [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Tuscarawas, New Philadelphia, OH 44663 (United States)

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S.distributions and energy flux in violent nuclear collisions.of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S.

Stocker, H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study describes an outline of energy efficiency opportunities in federal high performance computing data centers.

242

EEEL Researchers Develop Novel Attenuator for High-energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EEEL Researchers Develop Novel Attenuator for High-energy Lasers. For Immediate Release: June 2, 2008. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

The evolution of high energy accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

Courant, E.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

High Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plains Wind Farm Plains Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name High Plains Wind Farm Facility High Plains Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PacifiCorp Developer PacifiCorp Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Southwest of Rock River WY Coordinates 41.665943°, -106.043487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.665943,"lon":-106.043487,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

245

Prospects of High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics  

SciTech Connect

Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have been observed but their sources and production mechanisms are yet to be understood. We envision a laboratory astrophysics program that will contribute to the understanding of cosmic accelerators with efforts to: (1) test and calibrate UHECR observational techniques, and (2) elucidate the underlying physics of cosmic acceleration through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Innovative experiments belonging to the first category have already been done at the SLAC FFTB. Results on air fluorescence yields from the FLASH experiment are reviewed. Proposed future accelerator facilities can provided unprecedented high-energy-densities in a regime relevant to cosmic acceleration studies and accessible in a terrestrial environment for the first time. We review recent simulation studies of nonlinear plasma dynamics that could give rise to cosmic acceleration, and discuss prospects for experimental investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

Ng, J.S.T.; Chen, P.; /SLAC

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

High energy physics at UC Riverside  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Wausau High School | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wausau High School Wausau High School Jump to: navigation, search Name Wausau High School Facility Wausau High School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Location Wausau WI Coordinates 44.97944687°, -89.59666014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.97944687,"lon":-89.59666014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Overview of the Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has a need for measuring gamma radiation as part of a nuclear diagnostic program. A new gamma-detection diagnostic uses 90 off-axis parabolic mirrors to relay Cherenkov light from a volume of pressurized gas. This nonimaging optical system has the high-speed detector placed at a stop position with the Cherenkov light delayed until after the prompt gammas have passed through the detector. Because of the wavelength range (250 to 700 nm), the optical element surface finish was a key design constraint. A cluster of four channels (each set to a different gas pressure) will collect the time histories for different energy ranges of gammas.

Malone, R M; Frogget, B C; Kaufman, M I; Tibbitts, A; Tunnell, T W; Evans, S C; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Mack, J M; Young, C S; McGillivray, K D; Palagi, M J

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Gratings for High-Energy Petawatt Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To enable high-energy petawatt laser operation we have developed the processing methods and tooling that produced both the world's largest multilayer dielectric reflection grating and the world's highest laser damage resistant gratings. We have successfully delivered the first ever 80 cm aperture multilayer dielectric grating to LLNL's Titan Intense Short Pulse Laser Facility. We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings.

Nguyen, H T; Britten, J A; Carlson, T C; Nissen, J D; Summers, L J; Hoaglan, C R; Aasen, M D; Peterson, J E; Jovanovic, I

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

251

Support Vector Machines in High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This lecture will introduce the Support Vector algorithms for classification and regression. They are an application of the so called kernel trick, which allows the extension of a certain class of linear algorithms to the non linear case. The kernel trick will be introduced and in the context of structural risk minimization, large margin algorithms for classification and regression will be presented. Current applications in high energy physics will be discussed.

Anselm Vossen

2008-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

Chan, A.K.

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

253

On fuel selection in controlled auto-ignition engines : the link between intake conditions, chemical kinetics, and stratification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to examine the impact fuel selection can have on the high-load limit in a stratified Compression Auto-Ignition (CAI) engine. This was accomplished by first studying the validity of the ...

Maria, Amir Gamal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Oil Study Guide - High School | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High School Oil Study Guide - High School Oil Study Guide - High School More Documents & Publications Oil Study Guide - Middle School Fossil Energy Today - First Quarter, 2012...

255

Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Kwan, T. J.; Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO BOX 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E. [ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept., La Jolla, CA 92038 (United States); Gall, B.; Kovaleski, S. [University of Missouri, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Columbia MO 65211 (United States); Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Korgan, G.; Malekos, S. [Nanolabz, 661 Sierra Rose Dr., Reno, NV 89511 (United States); Lockard, T. [University of Nevada, Physics, Reno, NV 89557 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

Alp, Ercan E. (Bolingbrook, IL); Mooney, Timothy M. (Westmont, IL); Toellner, Thomas (Green Bay, WI)

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

257

High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut ({alpha}=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5--30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the {micro}eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator. 7 figs.

Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

258

Developing High-Temperature Laser-Driven Half Hohlraums for High-Energy-Density Physics Experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from 20th Target Fabrication Meeting, May 20-24, 2012, Santa Fe, NM, Guest Editor: Robert C. Cook

A. S. Moore; J. Morton; T. Guymer; N. Bazin; C. Bentley; M. Stevenson; J. L. Kline; P. Keiter; M. Taccetti; K. Mussack; B. Peterson; D. W. Schmidt; C. Hamilton; N. Lanier; J. Workman

259

Attainment of Gigavolt Potentials by Fluid Dynamic Suppression of the Stepped Leader its Significance for Thermonuclear Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proposed to levitate a conducting sphere in a high pressure Taylor flow and to charge it up to gigavolt potentials, either mechanically as in a Van de Graaff electrostatic generator, or inductively by a rising magnetic field. If the Taylor flow is sufficiently fast, it should overcome the electric pressure and breakdown by stepped leader formation, leading to the maximum attainable voltage by the Paschen law. Discharging the electrostatically stored energy can be done by controlled breakdown. With gigajoule energies stored and released in about 10^-8 sec, this implies and electric pulse power of the order 10^17 Watt, opening the prospect of large driver energies for thermonuclear ignition.

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

High Energy Density Utracapacitors: Low-Cost, High Energy and Power Density, Nanotube-Enhanced Ultracapacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FastCAP is improving the performance of an ultracapacitora battery-like electronic device that can complement, and possibly even replace, an HEV or EV battery pack. Ultracapacitors have many advantages over conventional batteries, including long lifespans (over 1 million cycles, as compared to 10,000 for conventional batteries) and better durability. Ultracapacitors also charge more quickly than conventional batteries, and they release energy more quickly. However, ultracapacitors have fallen short of batteries in one key metric: energy densityhigh energy density means more energy storage. FastCAP is redesigning the ultracapacitors internal structure to increase its energy density. Ultracapacitors traditionally use electrodes made of irregularly shaped, porous carbon. FastCAPs ultracapacitors are made of tiny, aligned carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide a regular path for ions moving in and out of the ultracapacitors electrode, increasing the overall efficiency and energy density of the device.

None

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

HIGH CURRENT ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC AT BNL.  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and parameters of an energy recovery linac (ERL) facility, which is under construction in the Collider-Accelerator Department at BNL. This R&D facility has the goal of demonstrating CW operation of an ERL with an average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere and with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The possibility of a future upgrade to a two-pass ERL is also being considered. The heart of the facility is a 5-cell 703.75 MHz super-conducting RF linac with strong Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping. The flexible lattice of the ERL provides a test-bed for exploring issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities and diagnostics of intense CW electron beams. This ERL is also perfectly suited for a far-IR FEL. We present the status and plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

LITVINENKO,V.N.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BARTON,D.S.; ET AL.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

The ePLAS Code for Ignition Studies  

SciTech Connect

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) presents unique opportunities for the extraction of clean energy from Fusion. Intense lasers and particle beams can create and interact with such plasmas, potentially yielding sufficient energy to satisfy all our national needs. However, few models are available to help aid the scientific community in the study and optimization of such interactions. This project enhanced and disseminated the computer code ePLAS for the early understanding and control of Ignition in ICF. ePLAS is a unique simulation code that tracks the transport of laser light to a target, the absorption of that light resulting in the generation and transport of hot electrons, and the heating and flow dynamics of the background plasma. It uses an implicit electromagnetic field-solving method to greatly reduce computing demands, so that useful target interaction studies can often be completed in 15 minutes on a portable 2.1 GHz PC. The code permits the rapid scoping of calculations for the optimization of laser target interactions aimed at fusion. Recent efforts have initiated the use of analytic equations of state (EOS), K-alpha image rendering graphics, allocatable memory for source-free usage, and adaption to the latest Mac and Linux Operating Systems. The speed and utility of ePLAS are unequaled in the ICF simulation community. This project evaluated the effects of its new EOSs on target heating, compared fluid and particle models for the ions, initiated the simultaneous use of both ion models in the code, and studied long time scale 500 ps hot electron deposition for shock ignition. ePLAS has been granted EAR99 export control status, permitting export without a license to most foreign countries. Beta-test versions of ePLAS have been granted to several Universities and Commercial users. The net Project was aimed at achieving early success in the laboratory ignition of thermonuclear targets and the mastery of controlled fusion power for the nation.

Mason, Rodney J

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Radiochemistry: A versatile diagnostic for the NIF ignition campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide quick, clear, concise information about radiochemical diagnostics for the NIF program. Radiochemistry is perhaps the most versatile, flexible and dynamic of all nuclear diagnostics because it provides quantitative data on multiple capsule performance parameters such as mix, asymmetry of implosion, shell and fuel {rho}R, yield, neutron spectral information, high energy neutron information, fill tube jets, charged particle stopping, and the fission yield of the hohlraum by employing a variety of nuclear reactions on materials either present naturally in the capsule or specifically doped into the capsule. The choice and location of the doped material, together with the specific nuclear reaction used to produce a measurable product nuclide or ratio of nuclides, provides significant diagnostic information on the performance of the capsule during the experiment. The nature of the experiment, design of the capsule including fuel(s), and desired diagnostic information would dictate the radiochemical dopants used on any given shot--not all reactions would be possible nor monitored on any given experiment. Some of this diagnostic information is obtainable with other diagnostics, for example, the neutron yield is measured using Cu-activation pucks or nTOF. The unique niche of radiochemistry, for which few other measurements are currently planned, is the quantification of ablator/fuel mix. This diagnostic can supply complementary information on ablator {rho}R, asymmetry and unique information on mix--three of the four important concerns of the ignition campaign. This paper will not discuss the additional nuclear chemistry and physics possible by utilizing radiochemistry collection and similar nuclear reactions.

Stoyer, M A; Cerjan, C J; Moody, K J; Hoffman, R D; Bernstein, L A; Shaughnessy, D A

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

High West Energy, Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming) Wyoming) Jump to: navigation, search Name High West Energy, Inc Place Wyoming Utility Id 27058 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A F Industrial Commercial & Small Power Commercial Farm and Home Residential Irrigation Industrial Large Power Industrial Security Lighting-150 - 175 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Security Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Security Lighting-400 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Street Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting

265

High West Energy, Inc (Nebraska) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Nebraska Place Nebraska Utility Id 27058 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A F Industrial Commercial & Small Power Commercial Security Lighting-150 - 175 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Security Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Security Lighting-400 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Street Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Street Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Street Lighting-400 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.1100/kWh Commercial: $0.1040/kWh Industrial: $0.1000/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for High West Energy, Inc (Nebraska).

266

Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

Potter, D

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

APPLICATION OF FAULT TREE ANALYSIS TO IGNITION OF FIRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ignition, but which, due to human error causing a sufficientfuel is primarily due to human error. For example, a cooke.g. planned ignition f human error comes in e.g. failure of

Teresa Ling, W.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fuel effects in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogenous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion is a new method of burning fuel in internal combustion (IC) engines. In an HCCI engine, the fuel and air are premixed prior to combustion, like in a spark-ignition ...

Angelos, John P. (John Phillip)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

High Resolution Solar Energy Resource Assessment within the UNEP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Resolution Solar Energy Resource Assessment within the UNEP Project SWERA

(Abstract):To expand the world wide use of renewable energy a consistent,...

270

Complex Oxides for Highly Efficient Solid-State Energy ...  

Complex Oxides for Highly Efficient Solid-State Energy ... Using complex oxides to directly convert thermal to electrical energy is both ... Thermal P ...

271

Net-Zero Energy, High-Performance Buildings Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net-Zero Energy, High-Performance Buildings Program. ... NIST completed design and construction of Net-Zero Energy Residential Test Facility; ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

272

Amplifying Magnetic Fields in High Energy Density Plasmas | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Amplifying Magnetic Fields in High Energy Density Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities...

273

[Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Emerging Computing Technologies in High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While in the early 90s High Energy Physics (HEP) lead the computing industry by establishing the HTTP protocol and the first web-servers, the long time-scale for planning and building modern HEP experiments has resulted in a generally slow adoption of emerging computing technologies which rapidly become commonplace in business and other scientific fields. I will overview some of the fundamental computing problems in HEP computing and then present the current state and future potential of employing new computing technologies in addressing these problems.

Amir Farbin

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

275

High Energy Instrumentation Efforts in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work summarizes the efforts in Turkey to build a laboratory capable of building and testing high energy astrophysics detectors that work in space. The EC FP6 ASTRONS project contributed strongly to these efforts, and as a result a fully operational laboratory at Sabanci University have been developed. In this laboratory we test and develop Si and CdZnTe based room temperature semiconductor strip detectors and develop detector and electronics system to be used as a payload on potential small Turkish satellites.

Kalemci, Emrah [Sabanci University, Tuzla, Istanbul (Turkey)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

276

GEM applications outside high energy physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From its invention in 1997, the Gas Electron Multiplier has been applied in nuclear and high energy physics experiments. Over time however, other applications have also exploited the favorable properties of GEMs. The use of GEMs in these applications will be explained in principle and practice. This paper reviews applications in research, beam instrumentation and homeland security. The detectors described measure neutral radiations such as photons, x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons, as well as all kinds of charged radiation. This paper provides an overview of the still expanding range of possibilities of this versatile detector concept.

Pinto, Serge Duarte

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Channeling and dechanneling at high energy  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using channeling as a tool for high energy particle physics has now been extensively investigated. Bent crystals have been used as an accelerator extraction element and for particle deflection. Applications as accelerating devices have been discussed but appear remote. The major advantage in using a bent crystal rather than a magnet is the large deflection that can be achieved in a short length. The major disadvantage is the low transmission. A good understanding of dechanneling is important for applications. 43 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

1987-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for High Energy Physics for High Energy Physics Accelerator Physics P. Spentzouris, Fermilab Motivation Accelerators enable many important applications, both in basic research and applied sciences Different machine attributes are emphasized for different applications * Different particle beams and operation principles * Different energies and intensities Accelerator science and technology objectives for all applications * Achieve higher energy and intensity, faster and cheaper machine design, more reliable operation a wide spectrum of requirements for very complex instruments. Assisting their design and operation requires an equally complex set of computational tools. High Energy Physics Priorities High energy frontier * Use high-energy colliders to discover new particles and

279

On the ignition of fuel beds by firebrands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The firebrand ignition apparatus consists of four butane burners and a firebrand mounting probe. The butane flowrate is ...

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

High Plains Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Plains Power Inc High Plains Power Inc Place Wyoming Utility Id 8566 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png IRRIGATION Industrial LARGE POWER 500kW OR GREATER TIME OF USE Industrial LARGE POWER DISTRIBUTION SUBSTATION GREATER THAN 500kW LEVEL SERVICE Industrial LARGE POWER DISTRIBUTION SUBSTATION LESS THAN 500kW LEVEL SERVICE Industrial LARGE POWER THREE PHASE DISTRIBUTION PRIMARY LEVEL SERVICE Industrial LARGE POWER THREE PHASE DISTRIBUTION PRIMARY LEVEL SERVICE V2 Industrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

High Lonesome Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lonesome Wind Farm Lonesome Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name High Lonesome Wind Farm Facility High Lonesome Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group Developer Edison Mission Group Location South of Willard NM Coordinates 34.498433°, -105.927606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.498433,"lon":-105.927606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Laboratory high-energy astrophysics on lasers  

SciTech Connect

The tremendous range of temperatures and densities spanned by astrophysical plasmas has significant overlap with conditions attainable using high-power laser facilities. These facilities provide an opportunity to create, control, and characterize plasmas in the laboratory that mirror conditions in some of the most important cosmological systems. Moreover, laboratory experiments can enhance astrophysical understanding by focusing on and isolating important physical processes, without necessarily reproducing the exact conditions of the integral system. Basic study of radiative properties, transport phenomena, thermodynamic response and hydrodynamic evolution in plasmas under properly scaled conditions leads both directly and indirectly to improved models of complex astrophysical systems. In this paper, we will discuss opportunities for current and planned highpower lasers to contribute to the study of high-energy astrophysics.

Goldstein, W.H.; Liedahl, D.A.; Walling, R.S.; Foord, M.E.; Osterheld, A.L.; Wilson, B.G.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF Maxwell Prize Address APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting November 15, 2007 John Lindl NIF and Photon Science.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 #12;The NIF

284

Critical database technologies for high energy physics  

SciTech Connect

A number of large-scale high energy physics experiments loom on the horizon, several of which will generate many petabytes of scientific data annually. A variety of exploratory projects are underway within the physics computing community to investigate approaches to managing the data. There are conflicting views of this massive data problem: (1) there is far too much data to manage effectively within a genuine database; (2) there is far too much data to manage effectively without a genuine database; and many people hold both views. The purpose of this paper is to begin a dialog between the computational physics and very large database community on such problems, and to simulate research in directions that will be of benefit to both groups. This paper will attempt to outline the nature and scope of these massive data problems, survey several of the approaches being explored by the physics community, and suggest areas in which high energy physicists hope to look to the database community for assistance.

Malon, D.M.; May, E.N.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Diffractive phenomena in high energy processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the evolution of the studies of diffractive processes in the strong interaction over the last 60 years. First, we briefly outline the early developments of the theory based on analyticity and unitarity of the S-matrix, including the derivation and exploration of the Regge trajectories and related moving cuts. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Pomeron trajectory introduced for description of total, elastic and diffractive cross sections at high energies and to the emergence of the dynamics of multi-Pomeron interactions.The role of large longitudinal distances and color coherent phenomena for the understanding of inelastic diffraction in hadron-hadron scattering and deep inelastic scattering is emphasized. The connection of these phenomena to the cancellation of the contribution of the Glauber approximation in hadron-nucleus collisions and to the understanding of the Gribov-Glauber approximation is explained. The presence of different scales in perturbative QCD due to masses of heavy quarks has led to the emergence of numerous new phenomena including non-universality of the slopes of Regge trajectories made of light and heavy quarks and non-universal energy dependence of elastic cross sections. The application of the perturbative QCD techniques allowed us to calculate from the first principles the interaction of small transverse size color singlets with hadrons leading to the development of the quantitative theory of hard exclusive reactions and to the successful prediction of many regularities in hard large mass diffraction. It also led to the prediction of the phenomenon of complete transparency of nuclear matter in QCD in special processes. The conflict of perturbative QCD with probability conservation for high energy processes of virtual photon-nucleon scattering is explained. Some properties of the new QCD regime are outlined.

Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode () ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Role of Viscosity in TATB Hot Spot Ignition  

SciTech Connect

The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

Fried, L E; Zepeda-Ruis, L; Howard, W M; Najjar, F; Reaugh, J E

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indicator for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed.

Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 13240 of 31,917 results. 31 - 13240 of 31,917 results. Download CX-007034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hoosier Heavy Hybrid - Department of Energy Graduate Automotive Technology Education Center of Excellence CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): West Lafayette, Indiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007034-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007466: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Application of High Energy Ignition and Boosting/Mixing Technology in Spark Ignition Engines CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/15/2011 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007466-categorical-exclusion-determination

290

Measurement of critical energy for direct initiation of spherical detonations in stoichiometric high-pressure H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} mixtures  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the critical energy for direct initiation of spherical detonations in stoichiometric high-pressure hydrogen-oxygen mixtures are measured and investigated to look at the effect of explosion limits on the detonation sensitivity. Results up to an initial pressure of 20 atm are obtained. Experiments are carried out in a spherical bomb and direct initiation is achieved via spark ignition from a high-voltage capacitor discharge. A detailed description of different methods to obtain a good estimate of the correct amount of energy deposited into the mixture used to initiate the detonation, including the calorimeter method and current method, is provided. It is demonstrated that at elevated initial pressure, the second explosion limit effect plays a significant role leading to slow-branching reactions and the detonation sensitivity of hydrogen mixtures is comparable to other common hydrocarbon mixtures at such condition. (author)

Kamenskihs, Vsevolods; Lee, John H.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ng, Hoi Dick [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting Secretary Bodman and Pakistan Officials Hold High-Level Energy Meeting March 13, 2006 - 11:48am Addthis...

292

UCRL-PRES-225531 National ignition facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title Page UCRL-PRES-225531 #12;National ignition facility #12;NIF is 705,000 #12;NIF laser system #12;NIF us 885 #12;NIF-0506-11956 Laser bay 2 #12;Switchyard 2 #12;Target chamber in the air #12 experiments on NIF have demonstrated #12;21 1 MJ shaping results: Comparison of requested vs measured 3 pulse

293

Orchestrating shots for the national ignition racility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultra-violet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter ... Keywords: Ada95, CORBA, XML, architecture, concurrency, data driven, framework, java, model-based, multi-threaded, state machine, workflow

David G. Mathisen; Robert W. Carey

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advanced aircraft ignition CRADA final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional commercial and military turbo-jet aircraft engines use capacitive discharge ignition systems to initiate fuel combustion. The fuel-rich conditions required to ensure engine re-ignition during flight yield less than optimal engine performance, which in turn reduces fuel economy and generates considerable pollution in the exhaust. Los Alamos investigated two approaches to advanced ignition: laser based and microwave based. The laser based approach is fuel ignition via laser-spark breakdown and via photo-dissociation of fuel hydrocarbons and oxygen. The microwave approach involves modeling, and if necessary redesigning, a combustor shape to form a low-Q microwave cavity, which will ensure microwave breakdown of the air/fuel mixture just ahead of the nozzle with or without a catalyst coating. This approach will also conduct radio-frequency (RF) heating of ceramic elements that have large loss tangents. Replacing conventional systems with either of these two new systems should yield combustion in leaner jet fuel/air mixtures. As a result, the aircraft would operate with (1) considerable less exhaust pollution, (2) lower engine maintenance, and (3) significantly higher fuel economy.

Early, J.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Calculation of the proportion of reactive waste for hydrogen ignition scenario  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was conducted as outlined in NHC Letter of Instruction 9751330 dated February 247 1997 and entitled {open_quotes}Analysis by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to Support a Safety Assessment for Rotary Mode Core Sampling in Flammable Gas Watchlist Tanks{close_quotes}. As prescribed in this letter, the results of this study were provided to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to revise the safety assessment document. Sampling Hanford tanks with a rotary drill could result in a drill-bit overheating accident which could ignite flammable gases present in the tanks. According to calculations, an over-heated drill bit could not get hot enough to ignite the hydrogen directly. However, an overheated drill bit could ignite saltcake waste containing high concentrations of organics, and a local organics burn would achieve sufficient temperature to ignite flammable gas present in the waste. This report estimates one quantity required to evaluate this particular accident scenario; the fraction of reactive waste in the tank waste. Reactive waste is waste that contains sufficient organic carbon and a low enough moisture content to ignite when in contact with an over-heated drill bit. This report presents a methodology to calculate the proportion of reactive waste for the 100 series tanks, using sampling data from tank characterization studies. The tanks are ranked according to their reactive waste proportions, and confidence limits are assigned to the estimates.

Gao, Feng; Heasler, P.G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

High energy processes using effective field theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

free theory, so the low-energy matrix element contributionout. 5. The low-energy matrix element, which gives unity,energy parton scattering, and can be included by treating all the equations below as matrix

Kelley, Randall Scott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

047 Glass-Ceramic Composites for High Energy Density Capacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

047 Glass-Ceramic Composites for High Energy Density Capacitors .... 150 Analysis of Hf-Ta Alloys for Oxidation Protection in Ultra High Temperature...

298

High Energy Density Lithium Capacitors Using Carbon-Carbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate a lithium capacitor which is capable of achieving high energy ... 3D Nanostructured Bicontinuous Electrodes: Path to Ultra-High Power and...

299

Fundamental Studies of Ignition Process in Large Natural Gas Engines Using Laser Spark Ignition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past research has shown that laser ignition provides a potential means to reduce emissions and improve engine efficiency of gas-fired engines to meet longer-term DOE ARES (Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems) targets. Despite the potential advantages of laser ignition, the technology is not seeing practical or commercial use. A major impediment in this regard has been the 'open-path' beam delivery used in much of the past research. This mode of delivery is not considered industrially practical owing to safety factors, as well as susceptibility to vibrations, thermal effects etc. The overall goal of our project has been to develop technologies and approaches for practical laser ignition systems. To this end, we are pursuing fiber optically coupled laser ignition system and multiplexing methods for multiple cylinder engine operation. This report summarizes our progress in this regard. A partial summary of our progress includes: development of a figure of merit to guide fiber selection, identification of hollow-core fibers as a potential means of fiber delivery, demonstration of bench-top sparking through hollow-core fibers, single-cylinder engine operation with fiber delivered laser ignition, demonstration of bench-top multiplexing, dual-cylinder engine operation via multiplexed fiber delivered laser ignition, and sparking with fiber lasers. To the best of our knowledge, each of these accomplishments was a first.

Azer Yalin; Bryan Willson

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility May 29, 1997 Livermore, CA Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Stochastic cooling of a high energy collider  

SciTech Connect

Gold beams in RHIC revolve more than a billion times over the course of a data acquisition session or store. During operations with these heavy ions the event rates in the detectors decay as the beams diffuse. A primary cause for this beam diffusion is small angle Coloumb scattering of the particles within the bunches. This intra-beam scattering (IBS) is particularly problematic at high energy because the negative mass effect removes the possibility of even approximate thermal equilibrium. Stochastic cooling can combat IBS. A theory of bunched beam cooling was developed in the early eighties and stochastic cooling systems for the SPS and the Tevatron were explored. Cooling for heavy ions in RHIC was also considered.

Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Lee, R.C.; Mernick, K.

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

High energy emission from galactic jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter we review some aspects of X-ray binaries, particularly those presenting steady jets, i.e. microquasars. Because of their proximity and similarities with active galactic nuclei (AGN), galactic jet sources are unique laboratories to test astrophysical theories of a universal scope. Due to recent observational progress made with the new generation of gamma-ray imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and in view of the upcoming km3-size neutrino detectors, we focus especially on the possible high-energy gamma radiation and neutrino emission. In connection with this, we also comment about astrophysical jets present in young stellar objects, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences with extragalactic AGN and gamma-ray bursters.

H. R. Christiansen

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first-stage (when observed) and second-stage ignition delay times and of heat release rate. The experimental and computational results are used to gain insight into low and intermediate temperature processes during gasoline ignition.

Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)  

SciTech Connect

A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% {+-} 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel {rho}R on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness were also examined, both of which indicated that instabilities seeded at the ablation front are a significant source of hydrodynamic mix into the central hot spot. Additionally, a direct test of the surrogacy of cryogenic fuel layered versus gas-filled targets was performed. Together all these measurements have established the fundamental ablative-rocket relationship describing the dependence of implosion velocity on fractional ablator mass remaining. This curve shows a lower-than-expected ablator mass at a given velocity, making the capsule more susceptible to feedthrough of instabilities from the ablation front into the fuel and hot spot. This combination of low velocity and low ablator mass indicates that reaching ignition on the NIF will require >20 {mu}m ({approx}10%) thicker targets and laser powers at or beyond facility limits.

Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Doeppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Direct Injection Compressed Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The underlying goal of this project was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome technological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the US. market. Further, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive technologies. Eight objectives were defined to accomplish this goal: (1) Develop an interdisciplinary internal combustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. (2) Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. (3) Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary curriculum. (4) Promote strong interaction with industry, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. (5) Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. (6) Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. (7) Establish ''off-campus'' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various industrial sites. (8) Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

Carl L. Anderson

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

High Temperature Superconductivity Partners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Temperature Superconductivity Partners High Temperature Superconductivity Partners Map showing DOE's partnersstakeholders in the High Temperature Superconductivity Program...

308

Overview and Status of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that provides over 34 kilojoules of energy to each of the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. Up to 400 megajoules of energy can be stored in the NIF PCS system, discharged through spark gaps and delivered to the flashlamps through a coaxial transmission line system requiring nearly 100 miles of high-voltage cable. The NIF PCS has been under development for nearly 4 years. During this time, the system was developed and designed by Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM (SNLA) in conjunction with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Extensive reliability testing was performed at SNLA on the First Article NIF Test Module (FANTM) test facility and design improvements were implemented based on FANTM test results, leading to the final design presently undergoing system reliability testing at LLNL. Low-cost energy-storage capacitors, charging power supplies, and reliable, fault-tolerant components were developed through partnerships with numerous contractors. Extensive reliability and fault testing of components has also been performed. This paper will provide an overview of the many efforts that have culminated in the final design of the NIF PCS. The PCS system design will be described and the cost tradeoffs discussed. Plans for fabrication and installation of the NIF PCS system over the next 6 years will be presented.

Newton, M A; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Kamm, R E; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Smith, C R; Ullery, G T; McKay, P F; Moore, W B; Muirhead, D A

2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Innovative High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential for Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential for Clean Energy Applications Innovative High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential for Clean Energy Applications June 10, 2011 - 4:46pm Addthis Similar system to the clustering tool that will manufacture TroyCap’s High Energy Density Nanolaminate Capacitor | Credit: TroyC Similar system to the clustering tool that will manufacture TroyCap's High Energy Density Nanolaminate Capacitor | Credit: TroyC Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Can you imagine a photovoltaic module that's able to generate and store electricity on its own? Or an electric vehicle (EV) powered by a technology more durable than the advanced batteries in today's EVs? Malvern, Pennsylvania's TroyCap, LLC is using nanolaminate technology patented by

310

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-High Economic Growth Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) 7 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table B1. World Total Primary energy consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table B2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

311

Innovative High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential for Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential Innovative High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential for Clean Energy Applications Innovative High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential for Clean Energy Applications June 10, 2011 - 4:46pm Addthis Similar system to the clustering tool that will manufacture TroyCap’s High Energy Density Nanolaminate Capacitor | Credit: TroyC Similar system to the clustering tool that will manufacture TroyCap's High Energy Density Nanolaminate Capacitor | Credit: TroyC Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Can you imagine a photovoltaic module that's able to generate and store electricity on its own? Or an electric vehicle (EV) powered by a technology more durable than the advanced batteries in today's EVs? Malvern,

312

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - High World Oil Price Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table D1. World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table D2. World total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

313

The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a 3-year research program conducted by the Engines & Energy Conversion Laboratory (EECL) at Colorado State University (CSU) to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. Research activities for the overall program were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. An extensive state-of-art review was conducted to leverage the existing body of knowledge of micropilot ignition with respect to retrofit applications. Additionally, commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of micropilot ignition for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios under laboratory conditions at the EECL. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase I were to develop a single-cylinder test chamber to study the injection of pilot fuel into a combustion cylinder and to develop, install and test a multi-cylinder micropilot ignition system for a 4-cylinder, natural gas test engine. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support these two (2) primarily elements in a stepwise fashion. Task-specific approaches and results are documented in this report. The four-cylinder prototype data was encouraging for the micro-pilot ignition technology when compared to spark ignition. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system at the EECL for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase II were to evaluate the results for the 4-cylinder system prototype developed for Phase I, then optimize this system and prepare the technology for the field demonstration phase in Year 3. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support objectives in a stepwise fashion. The optimized four-cylinder system data demonstrated significant progress compared to Phase I results, as well as traditional spark ignition systems. These laboratory results were enhanced, then verified via a field demonstration project during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program. An Implementation Team of qualified engine retrofit service providers was assembled to install the retrofit micropilot ignition system on an engine operated by El Paso Pipeline Group at a compressor station near Window Rock, Arizona. Testing of this demonstration unit showed that the same benefits identified by laboratory testing at CSU, i.e., reduced fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (NOx, THC, CO, and CH2O). Commercialization of the retrofit micropilot ignition technology is awaiting a ''market pull'', which is expected to materialize as the results of the field demonstration become known and accepted. The Implementation Team, comprised of Woodward Governor Company, Enginuity LLC, Hoerbiger Corporation of America, and DigiCon Inc., has direct experience with the technology development and implementation, and stands ready to promote and commercialize the retrofit micropilot ignition system.

Scott Chase; Daniel Olsen; Ted Bestor

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science - Bringing Star Power to Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF Go NIF Go LLNL Logo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL Home NIF Home LIFE Home Jobs Site Map Contact News Press Releases In the News Status Update Media Assistance About Us National Ignition Facility About NIF How NIF Works The Seven Wonders of NIF Building NIF An Engineering Marvel NIFFY Early Light Collaborators Status Visiting NIF Missions National Security Energy for the Future Understanding the Universe People The People of NIF Awards NIF Professor Sabbatical Opportunities NIF Online Store Programs National Ignition Campaign How to Make a Star (ICF) Target Physics Target Fabrication Cryogenic Target System Diagnostics Participants Photon Science & Applications Advanced Optics Advanced Radiography Directed Energy Fusion Energy Inertial Fusion Energy How IFE Works Science at the Extremes

316

Detailed Analysis and Control Issues of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a new combustion technology that may develop as an alternative to diesel engines with high efficiency and low NOx and particulate matter emissions. This paper describes the HCCI research activities being currently pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at the University of California Berkeley. Current activities include analysis as well as experimental work.

Aceves, Salvador M.; Flowers, Daniel L.; Martinez-Frias, Joel; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Dibble, Robert

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Available Technologies: High Energy Gamma Generator  

Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. ... In addition, it can simultaneously use two or more target materials to generate photons with discrete energies.

318

Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)  

SciTech Connect

The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma?¢????s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Publications on High-Performance Schools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schools Schools Publications on High-Performance Schools Learn about building high-performance schools that incorporate energy efficiency and renewable energy in publications from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Building Energy-Efficient Schools in New Orleans: Lessons Learned This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Building Energy-Efficient Schools in New Orleans: Lessons Learned Summary This summary presents the lessons learned at five schools in New Orleans that were rebuilt using energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and Humid

320

Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system ...

Pilawa-Podgurski, R. C. N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 12 to February 18, 2011. Ninety-four participants from ten countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, ?New Data From the Energy Frontier.? There were 54 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The week?s events included a public lecture (?The Hunt for the Elusive Higgs Boson? given by Ben Kilminster from Ohio State University) and attended by 119 members of the public, and a physics caf? geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists. The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was ?Indirect and Direct Detection of Dark Matter.? It was held from February 6 to February 12, 2011. The 70 participants came from 7 countries and attended 53 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Blas Cabrera of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled ?What Makes Up Dark Matter.? There were 183 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 45 people attended the physics caf? to discuss dark matter. This report provides the attendee lists, programs, and announcement posters for each event.

multiple speakers, presenters listed on link below

2011-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C. [eds.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Ultra High-Energy Cosmic Ray Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The year 2007 has furnished us with outstanding results about the origin of the most energetic cosmic rays: a flux suppression as expected from the GZK-effect has been observed in the data of the HiRes and Auger experiments and correlations between the positions of nearby AGN and the arrival directions of trans-GZK events have been observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory. The latter finding marks the beginning of ultra high-energy cosmic ray astronomy and is considered a major breakthrough starting to shed first light onto the sources of the most extreme particles in nature. This report summarizes those observations and includes other major advances of the field, mostly presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference held in Merida, Mexico, in July 2007. With increasing statistics becoming available from current and even terminated experiments, systematic differences amongst different experiments and techniques can be studied in detail which is hoped to improve our understanding of experimental tec...

Kampert, Karl-Heinz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

325

High energy factorization at NLO: Lipatov's effective action revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss aspects of our recent derivation of the gluon Regge trajectory at two loop from Lipatov's high energy effective action. We show how the gluon Regge trajectory can be rigorously defined through renormalization of the high energy divergence of the reggeized gluon propagator. We furthermore provide some details on the determination of the two-loop reggeized gluon self-energy.

Chachamis, G; Madrigal, J D; Vera, A Sabio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission R. P. fla B. Dennis, G mission is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through-ray/gamma-ray spectroscopy 1. INTRODUCTION The primary scientific objective of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

California at Berkeley, University of

327

Test report for core drilling ignitability testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

Witwer, K.S.

1996-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

328

Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

Rapid ignition of fluidized bed boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed boiler is started up by directing into the static bed of inert and carbonaceous granules a downwardly angled burner so that the hot gases cause spouting. Air is introduced into the bed at a rate insufficient to fluidize the entire bed. Three regions are now formed in the bed, a region of lowest gas resistance, a fluidized region and a static region with a mobile region at the interface of the fluidized and static regions. Particles are transferred by the spouting action to form a conical heap with the carbonaceous granules concentrated at the top. The hot burner gases ignite the carbonaceous matter on the top of the bed which becomes distributed in the bed by the spouting action and bed movement. Thereafter the rate of air introduction is increased to fluidize the entire bed, the spouter/burner is shut off, and the entire fluidized bed is ignited.

Osborn, Liman D. (Alexandria, VA)

1976-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Design and reality for NIF ignition targets  

SciTech Connect

Advances in ICF experiments and modeling have led to improved understanding of the growth of instabilities during capsule implosion and the effects on capsule performance. This has led to more refined specifications on the characteristics of igniting capsules, all of which have solid D-T fuel layers. These specifications involve a trade-off between the interior ice surface structure, outer capsule surface structure, and time-dependent drive asymmetry.

Bernat, T.P.

1996-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

Jason M. Keith

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Visualization of Target Inspection data at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the target capsules used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure capsule surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. These instruments produce multi-gigabyte datasets which consist of tens to hundreds of files. Existing software can handle viewing a small subset of an entire dataset, but none can view a dataset in its entirety. Additionally, without an established mode of transport that keeps the target capsules properly aligned throughout the assembly process, a means of aligning the two dataset coordinate systems is needed. The goal of this project is to develop web based software utilizing WebGL which will provide high level overview visualization of an entire dataset, with the capability to retrieve finer details on demand, in addition to facilitating alignment of multiple datasets with one another based on common features that have been visually identified by users of the system.

Potter, D; Antipa, N

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

US Department of Energy - Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies and US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Inter-Agency Agreement Research on "The Analysis of Genotoxic Activities of Exhaust Emissions from Mobile Natural Gas, Diesel, and Spark-Ignition Engines"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy-Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (now the DOE-Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies) signed an Interagency Agreement (IAA) with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), No.01-15 DOE, 9/4/01, for 'The analysis of genotoxic activities of exhaust emissions from mobile natural gas, diesel, and spark-ignition engines'; subsequently modified on 3/27/02 (DOE IAG No.01-15-02M1); subsequently modified 9/02/03 (IAA Mod No. 01-15-03M1), as 'The analysis of genotoxic activities of exhaust emissions from mobile internal combustion engines: identification of engine design and operational parameters controlling exhaust genotoxicity'. The DOE Award/Contract number was DE-AI26-01CH11089. The IAA ended 9/30/06. This is the final summary technical report of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health research performed with the US Department of Energy-Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies under that IAA: (A) NIOSH participation was requested by the DOE to provide in vitro genotoxicity assays of the organic solvent extracts of exhaust emissions from a suite of in-use diesel or spark-ignition vehicles; (B) research also was directed to develop and apply genotoxicity assays to the particulate phase of diesel exhaust, exploiting the NIOSH finding of genotoxicity expression by diesel exhaust particulate matter dispersed into the primary components of the surfactant coating the surface of the deep lung; (C) from the surfactant-dispersed DPM genotoxicity findings, the need for direct collection of DPM aerosols into surfactant for bioassay was recognized, and design and developmental testing of such samplers was initiated.

William E. Wallace

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electron Linacs for High Energy Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to introduce some of the basic physical principles underlying the operation of electron linear accelerators (electron linacs). Electron linacs have applications ranging from linacs with an energy of a few MeV, such that the electrons are approximately relativistic, to future electron-positron linear colliders having a collision energy in the several-TeV energy range. For the most part, only the main accelerating linac is treated in this article.

Wilson, Perry B.; /SLAC

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Business Case Slide 29: High-Value: Energy Uses - Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uses - Description Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Value: Energy Uses - Description Description Use DUO2 as the core component of advanced energy systems Fuel cell...

338

Enabling high-temperature nanophotonics for energy applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nascent field of high-temperature nanophotonics could potentially enable many important solid-state energy conversion applications, such as thermophotovoltaic energy generation, selective solar absorption, and selective ...

Yeng, YiXiang

339

City of High Point Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The City of High Point offers the Hometown Green Program to help customers reduce energy use. Under this program, rebates are available for newly constructed energy efficient homes, heat pumps, and...

340

Laparoscopic tumor therapy using high energy electron ...  

The e-beam is transported through a laparoscopic tube proximate a target tumor for electron irradiation ... Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy spectrum of ultra high energy cosmic rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The construction of the southern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory is almost completed. Three independent measurements of the flux of the cosmic rays with energies larger than 1 EeV have been performed during the construction phase. The surface detector data collected until August 2007 have been used to establish a flux suppression at the highest energies with a 6 sigma significance. The observations of cosmic rays by the fluorescence detector allowed the extension of the energy spectrum to lower energies, where the efficiency of the surface detector is less than 100% and a change in the spectral index is expected.

Ioana C. Maris; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics  

SciTech Connect

This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Phase conjugation of high energy lasers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report we explore claims that phase conjugation of high energy lasers by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) can compensate optical aberrations associated with severely distorted laser amplifier media and aberrations induced by the atmosphere. The SBS media tested was a gas cell pressurized up to 300 psi with SF6 or Xe or both. The laser was a 10 Hz, 3J, Q-switched Nd:YAG with 25 ns wide pulses. Atmospheric aberrations were created with space heaters, helium jets and phase plates designed with a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum characterized by a Fried parameter, ro , ranging from 0.6 - 6.0 mm. Phase conjugate tests in the laboratory were conducted without amplification. For the strongest aberrations, D/ro ~ 20, created by combining the space heaters with the phase plate, the Strehl ratio was degraded by a factor of ~50. Phase conjugation in SF6 restored the peak focusable intensity to about 30% of the original laser. Phase conjugate tests at the outdoor laser range were conducted with laser amplifiers providing gain in combination with the SBS cell. A large 600,000 BTU kerosene space heater was used to create turbulence along the beam path. An atmospheric structure factor of Cn2 = 5x10-13 m2/3 caused the illumination beam to expand to a diameter 250mm and overfill the receiver. The phase conjugate amplified return could successfully be targeted back onto glints 5mm in diameter. Use of a lenslet arrays to lower the peak focusable intensity in the SBS cell failed to produce a useful phase conjugate beam; The Strehl ratio was degraded with multiple random lobes instead of a single focus. I will review literature results which show how multiple beams can be coherently combined by SBS when a confocal reflecting geometry is used to focus the laser in the SBS cell.

Bliss, David Emery; Valley, Michael T.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Bigman, Verle; Boye, Lydia Ann; Broyles, Robin Scott; Kimmel, Mark W.; Law, Ryan J.; Yoder, James R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Present and future high-energy accelerators for neutrino experiments  

SciTech Connect

There is an active neutrino program making use of the high-energy (larger than 50 GeV) accelerators both in USA at Fermilab with NuMI and at CERN in Europe with CNGS. In this paper we will review the prospects for high intensity high energy beams in those two locations during the next decade.

Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Temperature Fossil Fuel Energy System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Temperature Fossil Fuel Energy Systems Background The Advanced Research Sensors and Controls Program is leading the effort to develop sensing and control technologies and methods to achieve automated and optimized intelligent power systems. The program is led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and is implemented through research and development agreements with other

346

Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools--Tropical Island Climates provides school boards, administrators, and design staff with guidance to help them make informed decisions about energy and environmental issues important to school systems and communities. These design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of your K-12 school in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into their construction or renovation plans, schools can significantly reduce energy consumption and costs.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Capsule performance optimization in the National Ignition Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition by laser-driven hohlraums [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the OMEGA facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

Landen, O. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. K.; Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

A numerical study of transient ignition and flame characteristics of diluted hydrogen versus heated air in counterflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined experimental and numerical studies of the transient response of ignition to strained flows require a well-characterized ignition trigger. Laser deposition of a small radical pool provides a reliable method for initiating ignition of mixtures that are near the ignition limit. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations are used to quantify the sensitivity of ignition kernel formation and subsequent edge-flame propagation to the oxidizer temperature and the initial width and amplitude of O-atom deposition used to trigger ignition in an axisymmetric counterflow of heated air versus ambient hydrogen/nitrogen. The ignition delay and super-equilibrium OH concentration in the nascent ignition kernel are highly sensitive to variations in these initial conditions. The ignition delay decreases as the amplitude of the initial O-atom deposition increases. The spatial distribution and the magnitude of the OH overshoot are governed by multi-dimensional effects. The degree of OH overshoot near the burner centerline increases as the diameter of the initial O-atom deposition region decreases. This result is attributed to preferential diffusion of hydrogen in the highly curved leading portion of the edge flame that is established following thermal runaway. The edge-flame speed and OH overshoot at the leading edge of the edge flame are relatively insensitive to variations in the initial conditions of the ignition. The steady edge-flame speed is approximately twice the corresponding laminar flame speed. The rate at which the edge flame approaches its steady state is insensitive to the initial conditions and depends solely on the diffusion time scale at the edge flame. The edge flame is curved toward the heated oxidizer stream as a result of differences in the chemical kinetics between the leading edge and the trailing diffusion flame. The structure of the highly diluted diffusion flame considered in this study corresponds to Linan's 'premixed flame regime' in which only the oxidizer leaks through the reaction zone such that the flame is located at fuel lean rather than stoichiometric mixture fraction conditions. (author)

Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Frank, Jonathan H.

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

A numerical study of transient ignition and flame characteristics of diluted hydrogen versus heated air in counterflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined experimental and numerical studies of the transient response of ignition to strained flows require a well-characterized ignition trigger. Laser deposition of a small radical pool provides a reliable method for initiating ignition of mixtures that are near the ignition limit. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations are used to quantify the sensitivity of ignition kernel formation and subsequent edge-flame propagation to the oxidizer temperature and the initial width and amplitude of O-atom deposition used to trigger ignition in an axisymmetric counterflow of heated air versus ambient hydrogen/nitrogen. The ignition delay and super-equilibrium OH concentration in the nascent ignition kernel are highly sensitive to variations in these initial conditions. The ignition delay decreases as the amplitude of the initial O-atom deposition increases. The spatial distribution and the magnitude of the OH overshoot are governed by multi-dimensional effects. The degree of OH overshoot near the burner centerline increases as the diameter of the initial O-atom deposition region decreases. This result is attributed to preferential diffusion of hydrogen in the highly curved leading portion of the edge flame that is established following thermal runaway. The edge-flame speed and OH overshoot at the leading edge of the edge flame are relatively insensitive to variations in the initial conditions of the ignition. The steady edge-flame speed is approximately twice the corresponding laminar flame speed. The rate at which the edge flame approaches its steady state is insensitive to the initial conditions and depends solely on the diffusion time scale at the edge flame. The edge flame is curved toward the heated oxidizer stream as a result of differences in the chemical kinetics between the leading edge and the trailing diffusion flame. The structure of the highly diluted diffusion flame considered in this study corresponds to Linan's 'premixed flame regime' in which only the oxidizer leaks through the reaction zone such that the flame is located at fuel lean rather than stoichiometric mixture fraction conditions. (author)

Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Frank, Jonathan H. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

A numerical study of transient ignition and flame characteristics of diluted hydrogen versus heated air in counterflow.  

SciTech Connect

Combined experimental and numerical studies of the transient response of ignition to strained flows require a well-characterized ignition trigger. Laser deposition of a small radical pool provides a reliable method for initiating ignition of mixtures that are near the ignition limit. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations are used to quantify the sensitivity of ignition kernel formation and subsequent edge-flame propagation to the oxidizer temperature and the initial width and amplitude of O-atom deposition used to trigger ignition in an axisymmetric counterflow of heated air versus ambient hydrogen/nitrogen. The ignition delay and super-equilibrium OH concentration in the nascent ignition kernel are highly sensitive to variations in these initial conditions. The ignition delay decreases as the amplitude of the initial O-atom deposition increases. The spatial distribution and the magnitude of the OH overshoot are governed by multi-dimensional effects. The degree of OH overshoot near the burner centerline increases as the diameter of the initial O-atom deposition region decreases. This result is attributed to preferential diffusion of hydrogen in the highly curved leading portion of the edge flame that is established following thermal runaway. The edge-flame speed and OH overshoot at the leading edge of the edge flame are relatively insensitive to variations in the initial conditions of the ignition. The steady edge-flame speed is approximately twice the corresponding laminar flame speed. The rate at which the edge flame approaches its steady state is insensitive to the initial conditions and depends solely on the diffusion time scale at the edge flame. The edge flame is curved toward the heated oxidizer stream as a result of differences in the chemical kinetics between the leading edge and the trailing diffusion flame. The structure of the highly diluted diffusion flame considered in this study corresponds to Linan's 'premixed flame regime' in which only the oxidizer leaks through the reaction zone such that the flame is located at fuel lean rather than stoichiometric mixture fraction conditions.

Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Frank, Jonathan H.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy-aware high performance computing: a taxonomy study, in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractTo reduce the energy consumption and build a sustainable computer infrastructure now becomes a major goal of the high performance community. A number of research projects have been carried out in the field of energy-aware high performance computing. This paper is devoted to categorize energy-aware computing methods for the high-end computing infrastructures, such as servers, clusters, data centers, and Grids/Clouds. Based on a taxonomy of methods and system scales, this paper reviews the current status of energy-aware HPC research and summarizes open questions and research directions of software architecture for future energy-aware HPC studies.

Chang Cai; Lizhe Wang; Samee U. Khan; Jie Tao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

High energy particles from gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review is presented of the fireball model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and of the production in GRB fireballs of high energy protons and neutrinos. Constraints imposed on the model by recent afterglow observations, which support the association of GRB and ultra-high energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources, are discussed. Predictions of the GRB model for UHECR production, which can be tested with planned large area UHECR detectors and with planned high energy neutrino telescopes, are reviewed.

Eli Waxman

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

353

Federal Energy Management Program: High-Performance Sustainable Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Performance High-Performance Sustainable Building Design for New Construction and Major Renovations to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: High-Performance Sustainable Building Design for New Construction and Major Renovations on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: High-Performance Sustainable Building Design for New Construction and Major Renovations on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: High-Performance Sustainable Building Design for New Construction and Major Renovations on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: High-Performance Sustainable Building Design for New Construction and Major Renovations on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: High-Performance Sustainable Building Design for New Construction and Major Renovations on Digg

354

Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

Lee, R.W. [comp.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Basic Research Needs for High Energy Density Laboratory Physics  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

those of high-power lasers, pulsed-power machines and particle accelerators, and advanced energy systems. Furthermore, the program will help develop the workforce needed for future...

356

Energy Efficiency in Mineral Processing Industry Using High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Energy Efficiency in Mineral Processing Industry Using High ... These studies were prepared by Tetra Tech on eight different projects at...

357

Aluminum Oxynitride Dielectrics for High Energy Density Capacitor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2006 ... Aluminum Oxynitride Dielectrics for High Energy Density Capacitor Applications by Kevin R. Bray, Richard L.C. Wu, Sandra Fries-Carr, and...

358

Baoding High Tech Industry Development Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBaodingHighTechIndustryDevelopmentZone&oldid342524" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

359

High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

360

Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell Intended Use: Deliverable to SB-TS:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Edward Moses to lead Fusion Ignition Science and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 For immediate release: 10012013 | NR-13-10-01 Edward Moses to lead Fusion Ignition Science and Applications research effort -- Jeff Wisoff appointed acting principal associate...

362

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Compression-Ignition - diesel, fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compression Ignition Engines Clean Diesel Technologies for Greener Performance Mechanical engineer Alan Kastengren examines a diesel injection nozzle used in Argonne's X-ray spray...

363

Ignition of an overheated, underdense, fusioning tokamak plasma  

SciTech Connect

Methods of igniting an overheated but underdense D-T plasma core with a cold plasma blanket are investigated using a simple two-zone model with a variety of transport scaling laws, and also using a one-dimensional transport code. The power consumption of neutral-beam injectors required to produce ignition can be reduced significantly if the underdense core plasma is heated to temperatures much higher than the final equilibrium ignition values, followed by fueling from a cold plasma blanket. It is also found that the allowed impurity concentration in the initial hot core can be greater than normally permitted for ignition provided that the blanket is free from impurities.

Singer, C.E.; Jassby, D.L.; Hovey, J.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility 15 m * Low emission combustion systems have been carefully optimized for natural gas * Future fuel diversity (including...

365

On the Piloted Ignition of Solid Fuels in Spacecraft Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

importance of the heat transfer processes in the ignition ofa measure of the heat transfer processes involved. Aninsight on the heat and mass transfer processes involved in

Fereres-Rapoport, Sonya M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

2011 Status of the Automatic Alignment System for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Automated alignment for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is accomplished using a large-scale parallel control system that directs 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path. The beams are then focused down to a 50-micron spot in the middle of the target chamber. The entire process is completed in less than 50 minutes. The alignment system commands 9,000 stepping motors for highly accurate adjustment of mirrors and other optics. 41 control loops per beamline perform parallel processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze high-resolution images of the beams and their references. This paper describes the status the NIF automatic alignment system and the challenges encountered as NIF development has transitioned from building the laser, to becoming a research project supporting a 24 hour, 7 day laser facility. NIF is now a continuously operated system where performance monitoring is increasingly more critical for operation, maintenance, and commissioning tasks. Equipment wear and the effects of high energy neutrons from fusion experiments are issues which alter alignment efficiency and accuracy. New sensors needing automatic alignment assistance are common. System modifications to improve efficiency and accuracy are prevalent. Handling these evolving alignment and maintenance needs while minimizing the impact on NIF experiment schedule is expected to be an on-going challenge for the planned 30 year operational life of NIF.

Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Burkhart, S; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V M; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; Wilson, R

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

X-ray conversion efficiency in vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

X-ray fluxes measured in the first 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were significantly higher than predicted by computational simulations employing XSN average atom atomic physics and highly flux-limited electron heat conduction. For agreement with experimental data, it was found that the coronal plasma emissivity must be simulated with a detailed configuration accounting model that accounts for x-ray emission involving all of the significant ionization states. It was also found that an electron heat conduction flux limit of f= 0.05 is too restrictive, and that a flux limit of f= 0.15 results in a much better match with the NIF vacuum hohlraum experimental data. The combination of increased plasma emissivity and increased electron heat conduction in this new high flux hohlraum model results in a reduction in coronal plasma energy and, hence, an explanation for the high ({approx}85%-90%) x-ray conversion efficiencies observed in the 235 < T{sub r} < 345 eV NIF vacuum hohlraum experiments.

Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Suter, L. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Dixit, S. N.; Landen, O. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Warrick, A.; Widmann, K.; Williams, E. A.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Are High Energy Cosmic Rays Magnetic Monopoles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that magnetic monopoles can not be associated to the highest energy cosmic rays as recently suggested. Both the observed spectrum and the arrival direction disagree with observation.

C. O. Escobar; R. A. Vzquez

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Energy Basics: High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. HID lamps use an electric arc to produce...

370

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project The Department of Energy is currently conducting research into highly energy efficient wall systems. Walls with high R-values are better insulators, and their development can help buildings come closer to having zero net energy consumption. Project Description This project seeks to develop a commercially viable wall system up to R-40 through integration of vacuum technology with the exterior insulated façade system (EIFS). Dow Corning will develop a wall system configuration of expanded polystyrene vacuum isolation panels that can be specified for R-values of 20, 30, and 40. This project also aims to develop a unitized protection system of vacuum isolation panels and to validate current code

371

Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ix Figure 1.10: (a) The NIF ignition scale cone-guided FINational Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will focus onthe injection Figure 1.10: (a) The NIF ignition scale cone-

Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Modeling the Fuel Spray and Combustion Process of the Ignition Quality Tester with KIVA-3V  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the use of KIVA-3V to develop a model that reproduces ignition behavior inside the Ignition Quality Tester, which measures the ignition delay of low-volatility fuels.

Bogin, G. E. Jr.; DeFilippo, A.; Chen, J. Y.; Chin, G.; Luecke, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Zigler, B. T.; Dean, A. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A comparison of ethanol and butanol as oxygenates using a direct-injection, spark-ignition (DISI) engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to evaluate a 'what if' scenario in terms of using butanol as an oxygenate in place of ethanol in an engine calibrated for gasoline operation. No changes to the stock engine calibration were performed for this study. Combustion analysis, efficiency, and emissions of pure gasoline, 10% ethanol, and 10% butanol blends in a modern direct-injection four-cylinder spark-ignition engine were analyzed. Data were taken at engine speeds of 1000 rpm up to 4000 rpm with load varying from 0 N m (idle) to 150 N m. Relatively minor differences existed between the three fuels for the combustion characteristics such as heat release rate, 50% mass fraction burned, and coefficient of variation in indicated mean effective pressure at low and medium engine loads. However at high engine loads the reduced knock resistance of the butanol blend forced the engine control unit to retard the ignition timing substantially, compared with the gasoline baseline and, even more pronounced, compared with the ethanol blend. Brake specific volumetric fuel consumption, which represented a normalized volumetric fuel flow rate, was lowest for the gasoline baseline fuel due to the higher energy density. The 10% butanol blend had a lower volumetric fuel consumption compared with the ethanol blend, as expected, based on energy density differences. The results showed little difference in regulated emissions between 10% ethanol and 10% butanol. The ethanol blend produced the highest peak specific NO{sub x} due to the high octane rating of ethanol and effective antiknock characteristics. Overall, the ability of butanol to perform equally as well as ethanol from an emissions and combustion standpoint, with a decrease in fuel consumption, initially appears promising. Further experiments are planned to explore the full operating range of the engine and the potential benefits of higher blend ratios of butanol.

Wallner, T.; Miers, S. A.; McConnell, S. (Energy Systems)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Polar-drive designs for optimizing neutron yields on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Polar-drive designs are proposed for producing symmetric implosions of thin-shell, DT gas-filled targets leading to high fusion-neutron yields for neutron-diagnostic development. The designs can be implemented as soon as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, B39 (1999)] is operational as they use indirect-drive phase plates. Two-dimensional simulations using the hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton and R. L. McCrory, J. Appl. Phys. 56, 108 (1984)] have shown that good low-mode uniformity can be obtained by choosing combinations of pointing and defocusing of the beams, including pointing offsets of individual beams within some of the NIF laser-beam quads. The optimizations have been carried out for total laser energies ranging from 350 kJ to 1.5 MJ, enabling the optimum pointing and defocusing parameters to be determined through interpolation for any given laser energy in this range. Neutron yields in the range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} are expected.

Cok, A. M.; Craxton, R. S.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ultra High Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ultra High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Ultra High Temperature Dictionary.png Ultra High Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid greater than 300°C is considered by Sanyal to be "ultra high temperature". "Such reservoirs are characterized by rapid development of steam saturation in the reservoir and steam fraction in the mobile fluid phase upon

376

High-speed Photography of Pyrotechnic Materials and Components with a Coppper Vapor Laser  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of the properties of energetic materials, such as burn rate and ignition energy, is of primary importance in understanding their reactions and the functioning of devices containing them. One method for recording such information is high-speed photography at rates of up to 20,000 images per second. When a copper vapor lazer is synchronized with the camera, laser-illuminated images can be recorded that detail the performance of a material or component in a manner never before possible. Recent results from high-speed photography of several pyrotechnic materials and devices will be presented. These include a pyrotechnic torch, laser ignition of high explosives, and a functioning igniter. Equilibrium chemical computations have recently been begun on the pyrotechnic torch to obtain flame compositions and temperatures. The results of these calculations, and their explanation of the change in torch function with composition, will be discussed.

Dosser, Larry R.; Reed, John W.; Stark, Margaret A.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Quantum-Gravity phenomenology and high energy particle propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum-gravity effects may introduce relevant consequences for the propagation and interaction of high energy cosmic rays particles. Assuming the space-time foamy structure results in an intrinsic uncertainty of energy and momentum of particles, we show how low energy (under GZK) observations can provide strong constraints on the role of the fluctuating space-time structure.

R. Aloisio; P. Blasi; A. Galante; P. L. Ghia; A. F. Grillo

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

378

February 20, 1991 Thermalization of high Energy Particles in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revised February 20, 1991 Thermalization of high Energy Particles in a Cold Gas K.T. Waldeer and H to be answered are as to the thermalization time, the temporal evolution of the energy spectra of the gas T . We ask for the thermalization time and the temporal evolution of the energy spectra. We

Waldeer, Thomas

379

Some Intensive and Extensive Quantities in High-Energy Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the evolution of some statistical and thermodynamical quantities measured in difference sizes of high-energy collisions at different energies. We differentiate between intensive and extensive quantities and discuss the importance of their distinguishability in characterizing possible critical phenomena of nuclear collisions at various energies with different initial conditions.

Tawfik, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hefei Guoxuan High tech Power Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guoxuan High tech Power Energy Co Ltd Guoxuan High tech Power Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Hefei Guoxuan High-tech Power Energy Co, Ltd Place China Sector Solar Product Anhui Province - based researcher and manufacturer focused on cathode material production for lithium batteries, production of the batteries themselves and of products such as solar powered lights and e-bikes. References Hefei Guoxuan High-tech Power Energy Co, Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Hefei Guoxuan High-tech Power Energy Co, Ltd is a company located in China . References ↑ "Hefei Guoxuan High-tech Power Energy Co, Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hefei_Guoxuan_High_tech_Power_Energy_Co_Ltd&oldid=346428

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ignition of hydrogen/air mixing layer in turbulent flows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Autoignition of a scalar hydrogen/air mixing layer in homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation. An initial counterflow of unmixed nitrogen-diluted hydrogen and heated air is perturbed by two-dimensional homogeneous turbulence. The temperature of the heated air stream is chosen to be 1,100 K which is substantially higher than the crossover temperature at which the rates of the chain branching and termination reactions become equal. Three different turbulence intensities are tested in order to assess the effect of the characteristic flow time on the ignition delay. For each condition, a simulation without heat release is also performed. The ignition delay determined with and without heat release is shown to be almost identical up to the point of ignition for all of the turbulence intensities tested, and the predicted ignition delays agree well within a consistent error band. It is also observed that the ignition kernel always occurs where hydrogen is focused, and the peak concentration of HO{sub 2} is aligned well with the scalar dissipation rate. The dependence of the ignition delay on turbulence intensity is found to be nonmonotonic. For weak to moderate turbulence the ignition is facilitated by turbulence via enhanced mixing, while for stronger turbulence, whose timescale is substantially smaller than the ignition delay, the ignition is retarded due to excessive scalar dissipation, and hence diffusive loss, at the ignition location. However, for the wide range of initial turbulence fields studied, the variation in ignition delay due to the corresponding variation in turbulence intensity appears to be quite small.

Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

High-Energy Laser Ponderomotive Acceleration  

SciTech Connect

A new concept of TeV-range laser ponderomotive acceleration in a plasma is proposed. Particles are accelerated in the point-like scattering by the leading front of the laser pulse, propagating at the group velocity less than the vacuum speed of light. In this scheme, the gain in particle energy is determined by the group velocity and does not depend on laser intensity, which determines the quantum probability of acceleration. The quantum and classical analysis of the scheme proposed is presented. Estimates show that the concept proposed is a promising technique for compact laser acceleration of TeV energy range.

Smetanin, I.V.; /Lebedev Inst.; Barnes, C.; /SLAC; Nakajima, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indictor for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed. Prerequisites in order to be able to use these indicators in energy efficiency programmes are discussed. The opportunity of an internationally coordinated research activity is also presented. Since 1999, Dr. Bernard Aebischer has served as a senior scientist at CEPE (Centre for Energy Policy and Economics) of the Swiss Federal Institutes of

384

Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal March 11, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative coal-drying technology that will extract more energy from high moisture coal at less cost and simultaneously reduce potentially harmful emissions is ready for commercial use after successful testing at a Minnesota electric utility. The DryFining(TM) technology was developed with funding from the first round of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Great River Energy of Maple Grove, Minn., has selected the WorleyParsons Group to exclusively distribute licenses for the technology, which essentially uses waste heat from a power plant to reduce moisture content

385

Particulate Characteristics for Varying Engine Operation in a Gasoline Spark Ignited, Direct Injection Engine  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is a detailed investigation of particulate sizing and number count from a direct-injection spark-ignited (DISI) engine at different operating conditions. The engine is a 549 [cc] single-cylinder, four valve engine with a flat-top piston, fueled by Tier II EEE. A baseline engine operating condition, with a low number of particulates, was established and repeatability at this condition was ascertained. This baseline condition is specified as 2000 rpm, 320 kPa IMEP, 280 [bTDC] end of injection (EOI), and 25 [bTDC] ignition timing. The particle size distributions were recorded for particle sizes between 7 and 289 [nm]. The baseline particle size distribution was relatively flat, around 1E6 [dN/dlogDp], for particle diameters between 7 and 100 [nm], before dropping off to decreasing numbers at larger diameters. Distributions resulting from a matrix of different engine conditions were recorded. These varied parameters include load, air-to-fuel ratio (A/F), spark timing, injection timing, fuel rail pressure, and oil and coolant temperatures. Most conditions resulted with uni-modal type distributions usually with an increase in magnitude of particles in comparison to the baseline, with the exception of lean operation with retarded ignition timing. Further investigation revealed high sensitivity of the particle number and size distribution to changes in the engine control parameters. There was also a high sensitivity of the particle size distributions to small variations in A/F, ignition timing, and EOI. Investigations revealed the possibility of emissions oxidation in the exhaust and engine combustion instability at later EOI timings which therefore ruled out late EOI as the benchmark condition. Attempts to develop this benchmark revealed engine sensitivity to A/F and ignition timing, especially at later EOI operation

Farron, Carrie; Matthias, Nick; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Mike; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

High Energy Diffraction Microscopy: Methods, Current ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High performance computing is used to reconstruct the crystallographic orientation field on the ~2 micron length and 0.1 degree orientation scale.

387

High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity - Energy Innovation ...  

Cuprate superconductors exhibit relatively high transition temperatures, but their unit cells are complex and large. Localizing a superconducting layer to a small ...

388

High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the Omega Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 60-beam Omega laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) has been a workhorse on the frontier of laser fusion and high-energy-density physics for more than a decade. LLE scientists are currently extending the performance of this unique, direct-drive laser system by adding high-energy petawatt capabilities.

Waxer, L.J.; Maywar, D.N.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J.D.

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

389

Machine learning for event selection in high energy physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field of high energy physics aims to discover the underlying structure of matter by searching for and studying exotic particles, such as the top quark and Higgs boson, produced in collisions at modern accelerators. Since such accelerators are extraordinarily ... Keywords: Event selection, Evolutionary computation, High energy physics, Machine learning, Neural networks

Shimon Whiteson; Daniel Whiteson

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Low emissions compression ignited engine technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for operating a compression ignition engine having a cylinder wall, a piston, and a head defining a combustion chamber. The method and apparatus includes delivering fuel substantially uniformly into the combustion chamber, the fuel being dispersed throughout the combustion chamber and spaced from the cylinder wall, delivering an oxidant into the combustion chamber sufficient to support combustion at a first predetermined combustion duration, and delivering a diluent into the combustion chamber sufficient to change the first predetermined combustion duration to a second predetermined combustion duration different from the first predetermined combustion duration.

Coleman, Gerald N. (Dunlap, IL); Kilkenny, Jonathan P. (Peoria, IL); Fluga, Eric C. (Dunlap, IL); Duffy, Kevin P. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

391

First observations of power MOSFET burnout with high energy neutrons  

SciTech Connect

Single event burnout was seen in power MOSFETs exposed to high energy neutrons. Devices with rated voltage {ge}400 volts exhibited burnout at substantially less than the rated voltage. Tests with high energy protons gave similar results. Burnout was also seen in limited tests with lower energy protons and neutrons. Correlations with heavy-ion data are discussed. Accelerator proton data gave favorable comparisons with burnout rates measured on the APEX spacecraft. Implications for burnout at lower altitudes are also discussed.

Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Normand, E.; Majewski, P.P. [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States); Wender, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy Conservation and Pomeron Loops in High Energy Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a formalism which modifies the Mueller Dipole Model such that it incorporates energy-momentum conservation and also important colour suppressed effects. We implement our formalism in a Monte Carlo simulation and compare the results to inclusive data from HERA and the Tevatron, where we see that there is a good agreement between the data and our model.

Emil Avsar

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

393

High Voltage Safety Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Voltage Safety Act High Voltage Safety Act High Voltage Safety Act < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting The purpose of the High Voltage Safety Act is to prevent injury to persons and property and interruptions of utility service resulting from accidental or inadvertent contact with high-voltage electric lines by providing that no work shall be done in the vicinity of such lines unless and until the owner or operator thereof has been notified of such work and has taken the appropriate safety measures. The Georgia Public Service Commission requires

394

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Planning for the National Ignition Campaign on NIF Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning for the National Ignition Campaign on NIF Presentation to Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting Dec 3-4, 2008 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory John Lindl NIF Programs Chief Scientist a clearly defined path forward to achievement of ignition on NIF ·An extensive scientific data base forms

396

Shock Timing Techniques for Ignition Capsules on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a series of shock trajectory measurements in planar liquid deuterium targets will set the pulse shape they use for ignition capsules at the National Ignition Facility. They discuss outstanding issues for this concept, in particular, ideas for certifying that the drive on a planar sample is the same as on a spherical capsule.

Munro, D H; Haan, S W; Collins, G W; Celliers, P M

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

High Energy Physics Division, ANL Lattice QCD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Physics Division, ANL Lattice QCD in extreme environments D. K. Sinclair (HEP, Argonne) J. B. Kogut (Physics, Illinois) D. Toublan (Physics, Illinois) 1 Lattice QCD Quantum chromodynamics(QCD) de- scribes Hadrons and their strong inter- actions. Hadrons consist of quarks held together by gluons. Lattice QCD is QCD on a 4-dimensional (space-time) lattice. Allows numerical simulation of the functional integrals which define this quantum field theory, and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Physics - properties of hadrons (masses, etc.), hadronic matrix elements (HEP), hadronic matter at finite temperature and/or densities (RHIC, early universe, neutron stars). 2 Computational Methods * Functional integral is mapped to the partition function for a classical sys- tem. Molecular-dynamics methods are used to calculate the observables for this classical system.

398

High Point, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point, Florida: Energy Resources Point, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.546844°, -82.525575° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.546844,"lon":-82.525575,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

399

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 1 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Buildings Technologies Program Date: September 30, 2011 ENERGY STAR ® Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 11:00 AM Eastern. There is no call in number. The audio will be sent through your computer speakers. All questions will be submitted via typing. Video of presenters Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 3 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Building America Program: Introduction Building Technologies Program Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes

400

Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology Department of Energy Lauds Highly Efficient Industrial Technology November 30, 2007 - 4:45pm Addthis DOE Celebrates One-Year Anniversary of Operation of the Energy Efficient "Super Boiler" WASHINGTON, DC - Representing important technology transfer from Department of Energy (DOE) labs to the marketplace, DOE today announced the successful one-year operation of the first generation "Super Boiler," which can deliver 94 percent thermal efficiency, while producing fewer emissions than conventional boiler technologies. By 2020, this technology could save more than 185 trillion British Thermal Units (Btus) of energy - equivalent to the natural gas consumed by more than two million households. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Temperature Cements High Temperature Cements Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High Temperature Cements Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

402

MHL High Speed Cavitation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Speed Cavitation High Speed Cavitation Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL High Speed Cavitation Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 0.8 Beam(m) 0.2 Depth(m) 0.2 Cost(per day) $2000(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 25.9 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 25.9 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers Number of channels 16 Bandwidth(kHz) 20 Cameras Yes

403

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 15340 of 31,917 results. 31 - 15340 of 31,917 results. Download Heating National Ignition Facility, Realistic Financial Planning & Rapid Modification Lessons Learned Report Apr 2010 http://energy.gov/management/downloads/heating-national-ignition-facility-realistic-financial-planning-rapid Download Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Dec 2010 http://energy.gov/management/downloads/highly-enriched-uranium-materials-facility-major-design-changes-latelessons Article Latest 200 Area Demolition Offers Snapshot of Hanford Cleanup Progress: Recovery Act Funding Allows Demolition of Power Houses Ahead of Schedule RICHLAND, WASH. - Today's safe and successful explosive demolition at Hanford's 200 Area by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M

404

Cross Section to Multiplicity Ratios at Very High Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent data from the LHC makes it possible to examine an old speculation that at very high energy the total multiplicity and the cross section in elementary particle interactions vary in parallel with energy. Using fits incorporating the new data, it appears that the ratios of the total, elastic, and inelastic cross sections to the average multiplicity N can in fact approach constants at very high energy. The approach to the limit is however quite slow for the total and inelastic cross sections and is not yet reached at LHC energies. The elastic ratio sigma^{el}/N at 7 TeV, however, is not far from its asymptotic value.

M. M. Block; L. Stodolsky

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

405

High energy, low frequency, ultrasonic transducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide bandwidth, ultrasonic transducer to generate nondispersive, extensional, pulsed acoustic pressure waves into concrete reinforced rods and tendons. The wave propagation distance is limited to double the length of the rod. The transducer acoustic impedance is matched to the rod impedance for maximum transfer of acoustic energy. The efficiency of the transducer is approximately 60 percent, depending upon the type of active elements used in the transducer. The transducer input energy is, for example, approximately 1 mJ. Ultrasonic reflections will occur at points along the rod where there are changes of one percent of a wavelength in the rod diameter. A reduction in the rod diameter will reflect a phase reversed echo, as compared with the reflection from an incremental increase in diameter. Echo signal processing of the stored waveform permits a reconstruction of those echoes into an image of the rod. The ultrasonic transducer has use in the acoustic inspection of long (40+foot) architectural reinforcements and structural supporting members, such as in bridges and dams.

Brown, Albert E. (Hayward, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy01osti/30171.pdf References: High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap[1] Overview "This technology roadmap describes the vision and strategies for addressing these challenges developed by representatives of the buildings industry. Collaborative research, development, and deployment of new technologies, coupled with an integrated "whole-buildings" approach, can shape future

407

NREL: Energy Analysis: High Renewable Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Renewable Generation High Renewable Generation Feasibility of Higher Levels of Renewable Electricity Deployment As requirements for renewable electricity generation increase, with some states now requiring as much as 30% renewables in their renewable portfolio standards (RPS), the question arises: how much can renewables contribute to future electricity demand? NREL's grid integration studies use state-of-the-art modeling and analysis techniques to evaluate the operational and infrastructure impacts of higher wind and solar penetrations at regional and national scales. NREL's grid integration studies show that: The U.S. electric system is operable with 20%-50% variable generation from wind and solar power in the regional and national scenarios examined to date. Increased electric system flexibility, needed to enable electricity

408

High Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Valley Geothermal Project High Valley Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.863611111111°, -122.80138888889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.863611111111,"lon":-122.80138888889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

409

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - High Economic Growth Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Tables (2007-2035) Economic Growth Tables (2007-2035) Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Main High Economic Growth Tables (2007- 2035) Table Title Formats Summary High Economic Growth Case Tables PDF Gif Year-by-Year High Economic Growth Case Tables Excel Gif Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Excel Gif Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Excel Gif Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions Excel Gif

410

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - High Price Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6-2030) 6-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 XLS GIF Spreadsheets are provided in Excel High Price Case Tables (2006-2030) Table Title Formats Summary High Price Case Tables PDF GIF High Price Case Tables XLS GIF Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary XLS GIF Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption XLS GIF Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions XLS GIF Table 9. Electricity Generating Capacity

411

Home Performance with Energy Star High Efficiency Measure Incentive (HEMI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Performance with Energy Star High Efficiency Measure Incentive Home Performance with Energy Star High Efficiency Measure Incentive (HEMI) Home Performance with Energy Star High Efficiency Measure Incentive (HEMI) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate $3,000 Program Info State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 10% of project costs Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York State Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers an incentive for homeowners of 1-4 homes that participate in the Home Performance with Energy Star program. The program entitles the participant

412

The National Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Facility Data Requirements Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL SC08 BOF: Computing with Massive and Persistent Data LLNL-PRES-408909. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344 2 Target chamber One Terabyte of data to be downloaded in ~50 Minutes for each shot. 5 Full Aperture Backscatter Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) X-ray imager Streaked x-ray detector VISAR Velocity Measurements Static x-ray imager FFLEX Hard x-ray spectrometer Near Backscatter Imager DANTE Soft x-ray temperature Diagnostic Alignment System Cross Timing System Each Diagnostic Produces Data that Requires Analysis 6 Tools are being built to manage and integrate:

413

Fielding of an Imaging VISAR Diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. As a core NIF early light diagnostic, this system measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. A 659.5 nm VISAR probe laser illuminates the target. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 33-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) interferometers. Both streak cameras and CCD cameras record the images. Total track is 75 feet. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing for other experimenters to use that port. The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. Along with special coatings on the mirrors, cutoff filters reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, for passive shock breakout light, or for thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). Finite Element Analysis was performed on all mounting structures. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts, so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. A two-color laser alignment scheme is discussed.

Malone, R; Bower, J; Capelle, G; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Kauffman, M; Lare, G; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Montelongo, S; Thomas, T; Tunnell, T; Watts, P

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Catalytic igniters and their use to ignite lean hydrogen-air mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure describes a catalytic igniter which can ignite a hydrogen-air mixture as lean as 5.5% hydrogen with induction times ranging from 20 s to 400 s, under conditions which may be present during a loss-of-liquid-coolant accident at a light water nuclear reactor. It is comprised of (1) a perforate catalytically active substrate, such as a platinum coated ceramic honeycomb or wire mesh screen, through which heated gases produced by oxidation of the mixture can freely flow and (2) a plurality of thin platinum wires mounted in a thermally conductive manner on the substrate and positioned thereon so as to be able to receive heat from the substrate and the heated gases while also in contact with unoxidized gases.

McLean, W.J.; Thorne, L.R.; Volponi, J.V.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

International Europhysics Conference on High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the huge interaction rates and the tough experimental environment of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy s 14 TeV and luminosities of up to 10 34 cm 2 s 1, one of the experimental challenges at the LHC is the triggering of interesting events. In the ATLAS experiment a three-level tigger system is foreseen for this purpose. The first-level trigger is implemented in custom hardware and has been designed to reduce the data rate from the initial bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to around 75 kHz. Its event selection is based on information from the calorimeters and dedicated muon detectors. This article gives an overview over the full first-level trigger system including the Calorimeter Trigger, the Muon Trigger and the Central Trigger Processor. In addition, recent results are reported that have been obtained from test-beam studies performed at CERN where the full first-level trigger chain was established successfully for the first time and

Johannes Haller

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

High-current pulses from inductive energy stores  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting inductive energy stores can be used for high power pulse supplies if a suitable current multiplication scheme is used. The concept of an inductive Marx generator is superior to a transformer. A third scheme, a variable flux linkage device, is suggested; in multiplying current it also compresses energy. Its function is in many ways analogous to that of a horsewhip. Superconductor limits indicate that peak power levels of TW can be reached for stored energies above 1 MJ.

Wipf, S.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic 1: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHECs). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000

418

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

419

Comments of the Western Interstate Energy Board's High-Level...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Counsel's Notice of Inquiry concerning the preparation of a report to Congress on the Price-Anderson Act. Comments of the Western Interstate Energy Board's High-Level Radioactive...

420

Department of Energy Laboratories, Researchers to Showcase High...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Department of Energy Laboratories, Researchers to Showcase High Performance Computing Expertise at SC07 Conference News In the News 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 In...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Annual Energy Outlook 2007 - High Price Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price Case Tables (2004-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in Excel High Price Case Tables (2004-2030) Table Title...

422

Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - High Price Case Tables  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Price Case Tables (2005-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in Excel High Price Case Tables (2005-2030) Table Title...

423

Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Free energy of Lorentz-violating QED at high temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the one- and two-loop contribution to the free energy in QED with the Lorentz symmetry breaking introduced via constant CPT-even Lorentz-breaking parameters at the high temperature limit. We find the impact of the Lorentz-violating term for the free energy and carry out a numerical estimation for the Lorentz-breaking parameter.

M. Gomes; T. Mariz; J. R. Nascimento; A. Yu. Petrov; A. F. Santos; A. J. da Silva

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

425

High Resolution Solar Energy Resource Assessment within the UNEP Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Resolution Solar Energy Resource Assessment within the UNEP Project High Resolution Solar Energy Resource Assessment within the UNEP Project SWERA Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): To expand the world wide use of renewable energy a consistent, reliable, verifiable, and easily accessible database of solar energy resources is needed. Within the UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme) Project SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment, http://swera.unep.net), funded by GEF (Global Environment Facility), a global database of solar and wind energy resources will be set up. SWERA will provide, beside the wind products, global horizontal irradiance, which is mostly used to plan photovoltaic systems, and direct normal irradiance, which is needed for solar concentrating systems. For selected countries throughout the world, additionally high resolution data will be produced which is required to plan solar energy systems in detail. Within SWERA, the partners DLR, SUNY and INPE calculate solar irradiance with high temporal resolution of 1 hour and with a spatial resolution of 10km x 10km. By processing data from geostationary satellites we provide solar irradiance data for Cuba, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Brazil, Ghana, Ethiopia, Kenya, China, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and Bangladesh. In this paper we describe the ongoing work of developing this high resolution solar irradiance tx_metadatatool and cross-checking of the used solar irradiance algorithms for various satellite data.

426

Fossil Plant High Energy Piping Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for high-energy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utility's inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, a number of major failures of fossil high-energy piping have been associated with flow-accelerated corrosion of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seam-welded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these well-documented failures, most utilities experience fai...

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fossil Plant High-Energy Piping Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for high-energy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utility's inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, a number of major failures of fossil high-energy piping have been associated with flow-accelerated corrosion of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seam-welded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these well-documented failures, most utilities experience fai...

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

428

Extending operating range of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine via cylinder deactivation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An HCCI engine has the ability to operate over a large load range by utilizing a lower cetane distillate diesel fuel to increase ignition delay. This permits more stable operation at high loads by avoidance of premature combustion before top dead center. During low load conditions, a portion of the engines cylinders are deactivated so that the remaining cylinders can operate at a pseudo higher load while the overall engine exhibits behavior typical of a relatively low load.

Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL); Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

High Energy Batteries for Hybrid Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EnerDel batteries have already been employed successfully for electric vehicle (EV) applications. Compared to EV applications, hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) bus applications may be less stressful, but are still quite demanding, especially compared to battery applications for consumer products. This program evaluated EnerDel cell and pack system technologies with three different chemistries using real world HEV-Bus drive cycles recorded in three markets covering cold, hot, and mild climates. Cells were designed, developed, and fabricated using each of the following three chemistries: (1) Lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC) - hard carbon (HC); (2) Lithium manganese oxide (LMO) - HC; and (3) LMO - lithium titanium oxide (LTO) cells. For each cell chemistry, battery pack systems integrated with an EnerDel battery management system (BMS) were successfully constructed with the following features: real time current monitoring, cell and pack voltage monitoring, cell and pack temperature monitoring, pack state of charge (SOC) reporting, cell balancing, and over voltage protection. These features are all necessary functions for real-world HEV-Bus applications. Drive cycle test data was collected for each of the three cell chemistries using real world drive profiles under hot, mild, and cold climate conditions representing cities like Houston, Seattle, and Minneapolis, respectively. We successfully tested the battery packs using real-world HEV-Bus drive profiles under these various climate conditions. The NMC-HC and LMO-HC based packs successfully completed the drive cycles, while the LMO-LTO based pack did not finish the preliminary testing for the drive cycles. It was concluded that the LMO-HC chemistry is optimal for the hot or mild climates, while the NMC-HC chemistry is optimal for the cold climate. In summary, the objectives were successfully accomplished at the conclusion of the project. This program provided technical data to DOE and the public for assessing EnerDel technology, and helps DOE to evaluate the merits of underlying technology. The successful completion of this program demonstrated the capability of EnerDel battery packs to satisfactorily supply all power and energy requirements of a real-world HEV-Bus drive profile. This program supports green solutions to metropolitan public transportation problems by demonstrating the effectiveness of EnerDel lithium ion batteries for HEV-Bus applications.

Bruce Lu

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM -- PHASE III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the third year's effort towards a 3-year program conducted by the Engines & Energy Conversion Laboratory (EECL) at Colorado State University (CSU) to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. Research activities for the overall program were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. Commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. Two earlier phases of development precede this report. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of retrofit micropilot ignition (RMI) systems for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios under laboratory conditions at the EECL. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system at the EECL for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. These laboratory results were enhanced, then verified via a field demonstration project during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program. An Implementation Team of qualified engine retrofit service providers was assembled to install the retrofit micropilot ignition system for an engine operated by El Paso Pipeline Group at a compressor station near Window Rock, Arizona. Testing of this demonstration unit showed that the same benefits identified by laboratory testing at CSU, i.e., reduced fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (NOx, THC, CO, and CH2O). Installation efforts at Window Rock were completed towards the end of the budget period, which did not leave sufficient time to complete the durability testing. These efforts are ongoing, with funding provided by El Paso Pipeline Group, and the results will be documented in a report. Commercialization of the retrofit micropilot ignition (RMI) technology is awaiting a ''market pull'', which is expected to materialize as the results of the field demonstration become known and accepted. The Implementation Team, comprised of Woodward Governor Company, Enginuity LLC, Hoerbiger Corporation of America, and DigiCon Inc., has direct experience with the technology development and implementation, and stands ready to promote and commercialize the RMI system.

Scott Chase; Daniel Olsen; Ted Bestor

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Edward Moses Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

432

Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of different fuels  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of methane (CH{sub 4}), n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and dimethyl ether (DME) were studied experimentally in a Pt-coated monolith catalytic reactor. It is concluded that DME has the lowest catalytic ignition temperature and the least required H{sub 2} flow, while CH{sub 4} has the highest catalytic ignition temperature and the highest required H{sub 2} flow among the three fuels. (author)

Zhong, Bei-Jing; Yang, Fan [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Qing-Tao [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang 621000 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Rod Mahdavi, P.E. LEED A.P. September 2013 2 Contacts Rod Mahdavi, P.E. LEED AP Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (510) 495-2259 rmahdavi@lbl.gov For more information on FEMP: Will Lintner, P.E. Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy (202) 586-3120 william.lintner@ee.doe.gov 3 Contents Executive Summary .................................................................................................... 6 Overview .................................................................................................................... 7