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1

Ignite High Tech Startups | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia:ISI SolarIdanha, Oregon: EnergyIdylwood,

2

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

3

High-energy x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion plasmas at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-keV x-ray microscopy will be an important laser-produced plasma diagnostic at future megajoule facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF).In preparation for the construction of this facility, we have investigated several instrumentation options in detail, and we conclude that near normal incidence single spherical or toroidal crystals may offer the best general solution for high-energy x-raymicroscopy at NIF and at similar large facilities. Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes using multi-layer mirrors may also be good secondary options, particularly if apertures are used to increase the band-width limited field of view.

Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Hammel, B.A. [and others

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ignitor with stable low-energy thermite igniting system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stable compact low-energy igniting system in an ignitor utilizes two components, an initiating charge and an output charge. The initiating charge is a thermite in ultra-fine powder form compacted to 50-70% of theoretical maximum density and disposed in a cavity of a header of the ignitor adjacent to an electrical ignition device, or bridgewire, mounted in the header cavity. The initiating charge is ignitable by operation of the ignition device in a hot-wire mode. The output charge is a thermite in high-density consoladated form compacted to 90-99% of theoretical maximum density and disposed adjacent to the initiating charge on an opposite end thereof from the electrical ignition device and ignitable by the initiating charge. A sleeve is provided for mounting the output charge to the ignitor header with the initiating charge confined therebetween in the cavity.

Kelly, Michael D. (West Alexandria, OH); Munger, Alan C. (Miamisburg, OH)

1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

6

High Efficiency GDI Engine Research, with Emphasis on Ignition...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Efficiency GDI Engine Research, with Emphasis on Ignition Systems High Efficiency GDI Engine Research, with Emphasis on Ignition Systems 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

7

High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines Most accurate and detailed chemical...

8

High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition Engines High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition Engines Presentation given at DEER 2006,...

9

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ignition methods and apparatus using microwave energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ignition apparatus for a combustor includes a microwave energy source that emits microwave energy into the combustor at a frequency within a resonant response of the combustor, the combustor functioning as a resonant cavity for the microwave energy so that a plasma is produced that ignites a combustible mixture therein. The plasma preferably is a non-contact plasma produced in free space within the resonant cavity spaced away from with the cavity wall structure and spaced from the microwave emitter.

DeFreitas, Dennis Michael (Oxford, NY); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign The Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield (ICF) Campaign supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and effective nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. It supports stockpile assessment in simulations is essential to having confidence in them. More than 99 percent of the energy from a nuclear criticality is attained. The ICF program operates and conducts experiments in facilities that can create

12

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

Moses, E

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced CFD Models for High Efficiency Compression Ignition...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for high efficiency compression-ignition engines can be used to show how turbulence-chemistry interactions influence autoignition and combustion. p-19raja.pdf More Documents &...

14

Investigation of spark discharge processes and ignition systems for spark-ignited internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes an evaluation of the various types of conventional as well as high-energy ignition systems for lean burn engines. An experimental ignition system was constructed to determine the effect of ignition energy, spark plug electrode geometry and gas...

Khare, Yogesh Jayant

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Pathway to a lower cost high repetition rate ignition facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach to a high-repetition ignition facility based on direct drive with the krypton-fluoride laser is presented. The objective is development of a 'Fusion Test Facility' that has sufficient fusion power to be useful as a development test bed for power plant materials and components. Calculations with modern pellet designs indicate that laser energies well below a megajoule may be sufficient. A smaller driver would result in an overall smaller, less complex and lower cost facility. While this facility might appear to have most direct utility to inertial fusion energy, the high flux of neutrons would also be able to address important issues concerning materials and components for other approaches to fusion energy. The physics and technological basis for the Fusion Test Facility are presented along with a discussion of its applications.

Obenschain, S.P.; Colombant, D.G.; Schmitt, A.J.; Sethian, J.D.; McGeoch, M. W. [Plasma Physics Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Plex LLC, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446-5478 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

High resolution simulations of ignition capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)] have continued to evolve in light of improved physical data inputs, improving simulation techniques, and - most recently - experimental data from a growing number of NIF sub-ignition experiments. This paper summarizes a number of recent changes to the cryogenic capsule design and some of our latest techniques in simulating its performance. Specifically, recent experimental results indicated harder x-ray drive spectra in NIF hohlraums than were predicted and used in previous capsule optimization studies. To accommodate this harder drive spectrum, a series of high-resolution 2-D simulations, resolving Legendre mode numbers as high as two thousand, were run and the germanium dopant concentration and ablator shell thicknesses re-optimized accordingly. Simultaneously, the possibility of cooperative or nonlinear interaction between neighboring ablator surface defects has motivated a series of fully 3-D simulations run with the massively parallel HYDRA code. These last simulations include perturbations seeded on all capsule interfaces and can use actual measured shell surfaces as initial conditions. 3-D simulations resolving Legendre modes up to two hundred on large capsule sectors have run through ignition and burn, and higher resolution simulations resolving as high as mode twelve hundred have been run to benchmark high-resolution 2-D runs. Finally, highly resolved 3-D simulations have also been run of the jet-type perturbation caused by the fill tube fitted to the capsule. These 3-D simulations compare well with the more typical 2-D simulations used in assessing the fill tube's impact on ignition. Coupled with the latest experimental inputs from NIF, our improving simulation capability yields a fuller and more accurate picture of NIF ignition capsule performance.

Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Cook, A W; Edwards, M J; Hammel, B A; Koning, J M; Marinak, M M

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

17

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

High Performance Imaging Streak Camera for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An x-ray streak camera platform has been characterized and implemented for use at the National Ignition Facility. The camera has been modified to meet the experiment requirements of the National Ignition Campaign and to perform reliably in conditions that produce high EMI. A train of temporal UV timing markers has been added to the diagnostic in order to calibrate the temporal axis of the instrument and the detector efficiency of the streak camera was improved by using a CsI photocathode. The performance of the streak camera has been characterized and is summarized in this paper. The detector efficiency and cathode measurements are also presented.

Opachich, Y. P. [LLNL; Kalantar, D. [LLNL; MacPhee, A. [LLNL; Holder, J. [LLNL; Kimbrough, J. [LLNL; Bell, P. M. [LLNL; Bradley, D. [LLNL; Hatch, B. [LLNL; Brown, C. [LLNL; Landen, O. [LLNL; Perfect, B. H. [LLNL, HMC; Guidry, B. [LLNL; Mead, A. [NSTec; Charest, M. [NSTec; Palmer, N. [LLNL; Homoelle, D. [LLNL; Browning, D. [LLNL; Silbernagel, C. [NSTec; Brienza-Larsen, G. [NSTec; Griffin, M. [NSTec; Lee, J. J. [NSTec; Haugh, M. J. [NSTec

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

High Efficiency GDI Engine Research, with Emphasis on Ignition...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of mixture formation strategies with CFD On schedule July 2013 Integration of laser ignition system complete On schedule Sept 2013 Complete assessment of laser ignition...

20

High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Research Program for the U.S. Department of Energy. Work under this co-funded program began in August 2005 and finished in July 2010. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a low emission, high thermal efficiency engine system that met 2010 EPA heavy-duty on-highway truck emissions requirements (0.2g/bhp-hr NOx, 0.14g/bhp-hr HC and 0.01g/bhp-hr PM) with a thermal efficiency of 46%. To achieve this goal, development of diesel homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was the chosen approach. This report summarizes the development of diesel HCCI combustion and associated enabling technologies that occurred during the HECC program between August 2005 and July 2010. This program showed that although diesel HCCI with conventional US diesel fuel was not a feasible means to achieve the program objectives, the HCCI load range could be increased with a higher volatility, lower cetane number fuel, such as gasoline, if the combustion rate could be moderated to avoid excessive cylinder pressure rise rates. Given the potential efficiency and emissions benefits, continued research of combustion with low cetane number fuels and the effects of fuel distillation are recommended. The operation of diesel HCCI was only feasible at part-load due to a limited fuel injection window. A 4% fuel consumption benefit versus conventional, low-temperature combustion was realized over the achievable operating range. Several enabling technologies were developed under this program that also benefited non-HCCI combustion. The development of a 300MPa fuel injector enabled the development of extended lifted flame combustion. A design methodology for minimizing the heat transfer to jacket water, known as precision cooling, will benefit conventional combustion engines, as well as HCCI engines. An advanced combustion control system based on cylinder pressure measurements was developed. A Well-to-wheels analysis of the energy flows in a mobile vehicle system and a 2nd Law thermodynamic analysis of the engine system were also completed under this program.

None

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: The Application of High Energy Ignition and Boosting/Mixing Technology to Increase Fuel Economy in Spark Ignition Gasoline Engines by Increasing EGR Dilution Capability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the application of high...

22

Dynamics of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines with High Dilution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines with High Dilution C. J. Chiang (HCCI) engines in light of the cycle-to-cycle thermal feedback due to the high percentage of exhaust temperature is the primary mechanism for con- trolling ignition timing in an HCCI engine, especially when

Stefanopoulou, Anna

23

Utility of the US National Ignition Facility for development of inertial fusion energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demonstration of inertial fusion ignition and gain in the proposed US National Ignition Facility (NIF), along with the parallel demonstration of the feasibility of an efficient, high-repetition-rate driver, would provide the basis for a follow-on Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a facility for integrated testing of the technologies needed for inertial fusion-energy (IFE) power plants. A workshop was convened at the University of California, Berkeley on February 22--24, 1994, attended by 61 participants from 17 US organizations, to identify possible NIF experiments relevant to IFE. We considered experiments in four IFE areas: Target physics, target chamber dynamics, fusion power ethnology, and target systems, as defined in the following sections.

Logan, B.G.; Anderson, A.T.; Tobin, M.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schrock, V.E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Meier, W.R. [Schafer (W.J.) Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States); Bangerter, R.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tokheim, R.E. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Poulter Lab.; Abdou, M.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Laser spark distribution and ignition system - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced...

25

National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

other ICF high energy density facilities leading to demonstrate fusion ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The NIF is also being used to support basic science and...

26

On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis number larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.

Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ignition system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an ignition system of an internal combustion engine which consists of: a permanent magnet supported by a rotary member of the engine adapted to rotate in synchronism with a rotary shaft of the engine; a generating coil for generating an electromotive force to produce an electric current as the permanent magnet acts on the generating coil during the rotation of the rotary member; an ignition capacitor charged by the electric current generated by the generating coil; a thyristor caused to turn on by a counter electromotive force generated by the generating coil to thereby cause the ignition capacitor to begin to discharge; and an ignition coil generating a high voltage as the ignition capacitor begins to discharge, to cause a spark discharge to take place in an ignition plug of the internal combustion engine.

Kondo, T.; Ohno, S.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

28

The role of fuel in determining the high load limit of controlled auto-ignition engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) engines have the potential to increase fuel economy while lowering nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. One hurdle that is currently being faced is the engine's inability to operate at high ...

Maria, Amir Gamal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Microdischarge-assisted ignition of dielectric-barrier high-pressure glow discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the ignition of high-pressure arc lamps8 and volume dc discharges.6 Here, we employ a hybrid discharge source of uniform, nonequilibrium glow plasmas for a variety of applications at pressures of 100

Raja, Laxminarayan L.

30

Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Provide mission need report for the proposed OMEGA Extended Performance project. · October 2002: NNSA November 21, 2003 #12;2 Statements to FESAC IFE panel 10/28/03 · Ignition is a major goal for NNSA supports OFES's mission and OFES use of NNSA's ICF facilities is accepted · Defense Programs reserves right

31

Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

Moses, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Use of the National Ignition Facility for defense, energy, and basic research science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 15, 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved the Justification for Mission Need (JMN) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This action (Key Decision Zero, or KD0) commenced the conceptual design for the facility, which has resulted in a recently completed Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The JMN document defined the NIF mission elements to include laboratory fusion ignition and energy gain, weapons physics, and nuclear weapons effects testing research (NWET). NIF has a dual benefit by contributing to inertial fusion energy (IFE), industrial technology development, new basic science areas applying high power lasers, and training young scientists for future stewardship activities. For consideration of the next DOE action, Key Decision One (KD1), all mission elements of the NIF as stated in the JMN are consistent with and important to the US stockpile stewardship program, and are expected to continue to be in the vital interest of the United States for the long term. This document provides further information on the utility of NIF for stockpile stewardship, including support for a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and specific findings of four national workshops on the NIF utility for weapons physics, NWET, IFE and basic science research. The role of NIF for stockpile stewardship has been refined since a DOE meeting in Albuquerque, NM Feb. 1--2, 1994. The possible compliance of NIF research with anticipated CTBT and NPT limitations was discussed at the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation in Washington, DC on March 8, 1994.

Logan, B.G.

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose.

Benson, David A. (Albuquerque, NM); Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose. 2 figs.

Benson, D.A.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Blewer, R.S.

1990-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

High voltage ignition of high pressure microwave powered UV light sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial microwave powered (electrodeless) light sources have been limited to quiescent pressures of {approximately}300 Torr of buffer gas and metal-halide fills. The predominant reason for such restrictions has been the inability to microwave ignite the plasma due to the collisionality of higher pressure fills and/or the electronegativity of halide bulb chemistries. Commercially interesting bulb fills require electric fields for ionization that are often large multiples of the breakdown voltage for air. Many auxiliary ignition methods are evaluated for efficiency and practicality before the choice of a high-voltage system with a retractable external electrode. The scheme utilizes a high voltage pulse power supply and a novel field emission source. Acting together they create localized condition of pressure reduction and high free electron density. This allows the normal microwave fields to drive this small region into avalanche, ignite the bulb, and heat the plasma to its operating point (T{sub e} {approx} 0.5 eV). This process is currently being used in a new generation of lamps, which are using multi-atmospheric excimer laser chemistries and pressure and constituent enhanced metal-halide systems. At the present time, production prototypes produce over 900 W of radiation in a 30 nm band, centered at 308 nm. Similarly, these prototypes when loaded with metal-halide bulb fills produce over 1 kW of radiation in 30 nm wide bands, centered about the wavelength of interest.

Frank, J.D.; Cekic, M.; Wood, C.H. [Fusion U.V. Curing Systems Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

High load operation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine is set up by first identifying combinations of compression ratio and exhaust gas percentages for each speed and load across the engines operating range. These identified ratios and exhaust gas percentages can then be converted into geometric compression ratio controller settings and exhaust gas recirculation rate controller settings that are mapped against speed and load, and made available to the electronic

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

Stolz, C J

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

International Conference on Microwave and High Frequency Heating Nottingham, UK, September 2013 Underwater Microwave Ignition of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cost operation [4, 5]. Thermite reaction as a self-propagated, high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process, Localized microwave heating, underwater ignition, combustion. INTRODUCTION Self-propagated thermite reactions between metal-oxide and metals typically burn at high flame temperatures, and require high

Jerby, Eli

39

Development of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities related to the revised STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated June 2010 for the Development of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-05NT42415) project. In both the spark- (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) development activities covered in this program, the goal was to develop potential production-viable internal combustion engine system technologies that both reduce fuel consumption and simultaneously met exhaust emission targets. To be production-viable, engine technologies were also evaluated to determine if they would meet customer expectations of refinement in terms of noise, vibration, performance, driveability, etc. in addition to having an attractive business case and value. Prior to this activity, only proprietary theoretical / laboratory knowledge existed on the combustion technologies explored The research reported here expands and develops this knowledge to determine series-production viability. Significant SI and CI engine development occurred during this program within General Motors, LLC over more than five years. In the SI program, several engines were designed and developed that used both a relatively simple multi-lift valve train system and a Fully Flexible Valve Actuation (FFVA) system to enable a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process. Many technical challenges, which were unknown at the start of this program, were identified and systematically resolved through analysis, test and development. This report documents the challenges and solutions for each SOPO deliverable. As a result of the project activities, the production viability of the developed clean combustion technologies has been determined. At this time, HCCI combustion for SI engines is not considered production-viable for several reasons. HCCI combustion is excessively sensitive to control variables such as internal dilution level and charge temperature. As a result, HCCI combustion has limited robustness when variables exceed the required narrow ranges determined in this program. HCCI combustion is also not available for the entire range of production engine speeds and loads, (i.e., the dynamic range is limited). Thus, regular SI combustion must be employed for a majority of the full dynamic range of the engine. This degrades the potential fuel economy impact of HCCI combustion. Currently-available combustion control actuators for the simple valve train system engine do not have the authority for continuous air - fuel or torque control for managing the combustion mode transitions between SI and HCCI and thus, require further refinement to meet customer refinement expectations. HCCI combustion control sensors require further development to enable robust long-term HCCI combustion control. Finally, the added technologies required to effectively manage HCCI combustion such as electric cam phasers, central direct fuel injection, cylinder pressure sensing, high-flow exhaust gas recirculation system, etc. add excessive on-engine cost and complexity that erodes the production-viability business

Marriott, Craig; Gonzalez, Manual; Russell, Durrett

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High-Average-Power Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Average-Power Laser NIF-1005-11471 07BEW/dj P9765 Agenda #12;P9516NIF-0805-11197 01EIM/dj Stockpile Stewardship #12;P9504NIF-0404-08345r2 27EIM/ld Basic Science and Cosmology #12;NIF-0702-05346rIFSA Fusion Energy Campaign and point design NIF-0305-10564 23MLS/cld P8719 The NIF Laser User Optics Physics Operations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition Engines |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii HIGH PERFORMANCEDOEDepartment of Energy

42

The high-foot implosion campaign on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Foot platform manipulates the laser pulse-shape coming from the National Ignition Facility laser to create an indirect drive 3-shock implosion that is significantly more robust against instability growth involving the ablator and also modestly reduces implosion convergence ratio. This strategy gives up on theoretical high-gain in an inertial confinement fusion implosion in order to obtain better control of the implosion and bring experimental performance in-line with calculated performance, yet keeps the absolute capsule performance relatively high. In this paper, we will cover the various experimental and theoretical motivations for the high-foot drive as well as cover the experimental results that have come out of the high-foot experimental campaign. At the time of this writing, the high-foot implosion has demonstrated record total deuterium-tritium yields (9.310{sup 15}) with low levels of inferred mix, excellent agreement with implosion simulations, fuel energy gains exceeding unity, and evidence for the bootstrapping associated with alpha-particle self-heating.

Hurricane, O. A., E-mail: hurricane1@llnl.gov; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Dppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kervin, P.; Pape, S. Le; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Compression Ignition  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many| Department HIGH PERFORMANCETheEngines |

44

ENERGY PARTITIONING, ENERGY COUPLING (EPEC) EXPERIMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy-partitioning, energy-coupling (EPEC) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will simultaneously measure the coupling of energy into both ground shock and air-blast overpressure from a laser-driven target. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of seismic and air-blast phenomena caused by a nuclear weapon. In what follows, we discuss the motivation for our investigation and briefly describe NIF. Then, we introduce the EPEC experiments, including diagnostics, in more detail.

Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Dunlop, W H; Compton, S M; Kane, J O; Mirkarimi, P B; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: A Path Towards Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Arial 18 pt bold Name here Title or division here Date 00, 2008 LLNL-PRES-407907 #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 2 Two major possibilities for fusion energy #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 3 The NIF is nearing completion and will be conducting

46

Statistical Method for the Determination of the Ignition Energy of Dust Cloud-Experimental Validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of preventive safeguard to control the plants safety. The mitigation of an explosion hazard, according, using the Langlie test, for the quick determination of the explosion sensitivity of dusts. This methodStatistical Method for the Determination of the Ignition Energy of Dust Cloud- Experimental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Powder energetic materials are highly sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) ignition. This study shows that small concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to the highly reactive mixture of aluminum and copper oxide (Al + CuO) significantly reduces ESD ignition sensitivity. CNT act as a conduit for electric energy, bypassing energy buildup and desensitizing the mixture to ESD ignition. The lowest CNT concentration needed to desensitize ignition is 3.8 vol.% corresponding to percolation corresponding to an electrical conductivity of 0.04 S/cm. Conversely, added CNT increased Al + CuO thermal ignition sensitivity to a hot wire igniter.

Kade H. Poper; Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael Daniels

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ion Fast Ignition-Establishing a Scientific Basis for Inertial Fusion Energy --- Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional ?central hot spot? (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10?s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The compressed fuel is opaque to laser light. The ignition laser energy must be converted to a jet of energetic charged particles to deposit energy in the dense fuel. The original concept called for a spray of laser-generated hot electrons to deliver the energy; lack of ability to focus the electrons put great weight on minimizing the electron path. An alternative concept, proton-ignited FI, used those electrons as intermediaries to create a jet of protons that could be focused to the ignition spot from a more convenient distance. Our program focused on the generation and directing of the proton jet, and its transport toward the fuel, none of which were well understood at the onset of our program. We have developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to create a self-consistent understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our strategy was to examine the new physics emerging as we added the complexity necessary to use proton beams in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) application. From the starting point of a proton beam accelerated from a flat, isolated foil, we 1) curved it to focus the beam, 2) attached the foil to a superstructure, 3) added a side sheath to protect it from the surrounding plasma, and finally 4) studied the proton beam behavior as it passed through a protective end cap into plasma. We built up, as we proceeded, a self-consistent picture of the quasi-neutral plasma jet that is the proton beam that, for the first time, included the role of the hot electrons in shaping the jet. Controlling them?through design of the accelerating surface and its connection to the surrounding superstructure?is critical; their uniform spread across the proton accelerating area is vital, but their presence in the jet opposes focus; their electron flow away from the acceleration area reduces conversion efficiency but can also increase focusing ability. The understanding emerging from our work and the improved simulation tools we have developed allow designing structures that optimize proton beams for focused heating. Our findings include: ? The achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradient in the laser-generated hot electrons that drive the process. This bending can be suppressed using a controlled flow of hot electrons along the surrounding cone wall, which induces a local transverse focusing sheath electric field. The resultant (vacuum-focused) spot can meet IFE requirements. ? Confinement of laser-generated electrons to the proton accelerating area can be achieved by supporting targets on thin struts. That increases laser-to-proton conversion energy by ~50%. As noted above, confinement should not be total; necessary hot-electron leakage into the surrounding superstructure for proton focusing can be controlled by with the strut width/number. ? Proton jets are further modified as they enter the fuel through the superstructure?s end cap. They can generate currents during that transit that further focus the proton beams. We developed a new ion stopping module for LSP code that properly accounted for changes in stopping power with ionization (e.g. temperature), and will be using it in future studies. The improved understanding, new experimental platforms, and the self-consistent modeling capability allow researchers a new ability to investigate the interaction of large ion currents with warm dense matter. That is of direct importance to the creation and investiga

Stephens, Richard Burnite [General Atomics; Foord, Mark N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics; Beg, Farhat N. [University of California, San Diego; Schumacher, Douglass W. [The Ohio State University

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

The use of auxiliary ignition devices to improve combustion of low centane-high volatility fuels in a diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of auxiliary ignition devices to improve the combustion of low cetane-high volatility fuels in a Diesel engine is described. Previous combustion with a low cetane-high volatility fuel (with a spark plug located at the periphery of the cylinder) resulted in engine knock at heavy loads and poor engine operation at light loads. In the present investigation, several new ignition devices were used to ignite the fuel in the center of the cylinder, to allow combustion to be controlled by rate of injection. The devices used were an extended spark electrode, a fuel spray deflector, a nozzle glow ring, and a nozzle fuel cage. High speed photography and heat release were used to characterize the ignition and combustion process of the low cetane fuel in conjunction with the ignition devices. Combustion with all of the ignition devices was initiated in the center of the cylinder, significantly reducing engine knock. The use of the auxiliary ignition devices to ignite the fuel in the center of the chamber demonstrated extended operation of the Diesel engine for all of the devices tested.

Stroia, B.L.; Abata. D.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational. The NIF is the world's most energetic laser system capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in planetary interiors and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, the first integrated ignition experiment was conducted, demonstrating the successful coordination of the laser, cryogenic target system, array of diagnostics and infrastructure required for ignition demonstration. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and international communities are examining the implication of NIF ignition for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a laser with 10% electrical-optical efficiency, as well as further development and advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in the 10- to 15-year time frame. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) concept and examining in detail various technology choices, as well as the advantages of both pure fusion and fusion-fission schemes. This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF and the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition. The paper will conclude with a discussion about the need to build on the progress on NIF to develop an implementable and effective plan to achieve the promise of LIFE as a source of carbon-free energy.

Moses, E I

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

51

National Ignition Campaign Hohlraum Energetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first series of experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, 'The National Ignition Facility: ushering in a new age for high energy density science,' Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] tested ignition hohlraum 'energetics,' a term described by four broad goals: (1) Measurement of laser absorption by the hohlraum; (2) Measurement of the x-ray radiation flux (T{sub RAD}{sup 4}) on the surrogate ignition capsule; (3) Quantitative understanding of the laser absorption and resultant x-ray flux; and (4) Determining whether initial hohlraum performance is consistent with requirements for ignition. This paper summarizes the status of NIF hohlraum energetics experiments. The hohlraum targets and experimental design are described, as well as the results of the initial experiments. The data demonstrate low backscattered energy (< 10%) for hohlraums filled with helium gas. A discussion of our current understanding of NIF hohlraum x-ray drive follows, including an overview of the computational tools, i.e., radiation-hydrodynamics codes, that have been used to design the hohlraums. The performance of the codes is compared to x-ray drive and capsule implosion data from the first NIF experiments. These results bode well for future NIF ignition hohlraum experiments.

Meezan, N B; Atherton, L J; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Dzenitis, E G; Edwards, M J; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Jones, O S; Landen, O; London, R A; Michel, P A; Moody, J D; Milovich, J L; Schneider, M B; Thomas, C A; Town, R J; Warrick, A L; Weber, S V; Widmann, K; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; MacGowan, B J; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Nikroo, A

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Advanced CFD Models for High Efficiency Compression Ignition Engines |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative RecordsBiofuels Cost ofDepartment

53

High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency|

54

Special Feature: Energy - The Spark that Ignited DOE Supercomputing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Energy's (DOE's) first unclassified supercomputer center-the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center (CTRCC), established in 1974 at the Lawrence Livermore...

55

High Efficiency Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency| Department of

56

IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed and has high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments to be conducted by the academic community is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present a brief discussion of the unparalleled opportunities to explore frontier basic science that will be available on the NIF.

Moses, E

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ignition Control for HCCI - Agreement 9285 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartment of Energy MediaRequirements of NEPA41

59

June 11, 1999: National Ignition Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJennifer Somers AboutEnergy July 12, 2011JulyDepartment1,

60

Special Feature: Energy - The Spark that Ignited DOE Supercomputing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus Tom Fletcher,Future |CarlosSpeakers Bureau SpeakersEnergy - The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Status and Prospects of the Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion Concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast ignition is an alternate concept in inertial confinement fusion, which has the potential for easier ignition and greater energy multiplication. If realized it could improve the prospects for inertial fusion energy. It poses stimulating challenges in science and technology and the research is approaching a key stage in which the feasibility of fast ignition will be determined. This review covers the concepts, the state of the science and technology, the near term prospects and the challenges and risks involved in demonstrating high gain fast ignition.

Key, M H

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11LargeLaserLaser Seeding

63

Dynamic instabilities in spark-ignited combustion engines with high exhaust gas recirculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a cycle-resolved dynamic model for combustion instabilities in spark-ignition engines operating with high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). High EGR is important for increasing fuel efficiency and implementing advanced low-emission combustion modes such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We account for the complex combustion response to cycle-to-cycle feedback by utilizing a global probability distribution that describes the pre-spark state of in-cylinder fuel mixing. The proposed model does a good job of simulating combustion instabilities observed in both lean-fueling engine experiments and in experiments where nitrogen dilution is used to simulate some of the combustion inhibition of EGR. When used to simulate high internal EGR operation, the model exhibits a range of global bifurcations and chaos that appear to be very robust. We use the model to show that it should be possible to reduce high EGR combustion instabilities by switching from internal to external EGR. We also explain why it might be helpful to deliberately stratify the fuel in the pre-spark gas mixture. It might be possible to extend the simple approach used in this model to other chemical reaction systems with spatial inhomogeneity.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Ignition characteristics of laser-ablated aluminum at shock pressures up to 2?GPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ignition of aluminum particles under high pressure and temperature conditions is considered. The laser ablation method is used to generate oxide-free aluminum particles exposed to pressures ranging between 0.35 and 2.2?GPa. A continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser radiation heats the surface of the aluminum target until ignition is observed. We confirm ignition by a spectroscopic analysis of AlO vibronic band of 484?nm wavelength, and the radiant temperature is measured with respect to various pressures for estimating the heating energy for ignition. The ignition characteristics of the oxide-free aluminum particles exposed to extremely high pressures are reported.

Lee, Kyung-Cheol; Young Lee, Jae; Yoh, Jack J., E-mail: jjyoh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanakro, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Taira, Tsubasa [Division of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Mo Koo, Goon [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

NNSA Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion and National Ignition Facility Project Dr. Christopher J. Keane NA-16 Office of Inertial Scott L. Samuelson NA-162 NA-10 * = stationed in Albuquerque #12;5 Militarily Effective Yield Fission concepts (pulsed power fusion, "fast ignition", petawatt lasers) 4. Maintain robust national program

66

ICF & High Energy Density (HED) Research Future Directions and Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ICF activities Energy Balance FY08 Getting the Job Done First credible ignition attempt FYNSP 20 YearsICF & High Energy Density (HED) Research Future Directions and Plans Fusion Power Associates of Defense Science and Inertial Fusion National Nuclear Security Administration US Dept. of Energy #12

67

Relativistic electron beam transport for fast ignition relevant scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A crucial issue surrounding the feasibility of fast ignition, an alternative inertial confinement fusion scheme, is the ability to efficiently couple energy from an incident short-pulse laser to a high-density, pre-compressed ...

Cottrill, Larissa A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative.

Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

HIGH-MODE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR GROWTH IN NIF IGNITION CAPSULES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of short wavelength hydrodynamic stability is an essential component in the optimization of NIF ignition target designs. Using highly-resolved massively-parallel 2-D Hydra simulations, we routinely evaluate target designs up to mode numbers of 2000 ({lambda} {approx} 2 {micro}m). On the outer ablator surface, mode numbers up to {approx}300 ({lambda} {approx} 20 {micro}m) can have significant growth in CH capsule designs. At the internal fuel:ablator interface mode numbers up to {approx}2000 are important for both CH and Be designs. In addition, 'isolated features' on the capsule, such as the 'fill-tube' ({approx} 5 {micro}m scale-length) and defects, can seed short wavelength growth at the ablation front and the fuel:ablator interface, leading to the injection of {approx} 10's ng of ablator material into the central hot-spot. We are developing methods to measure high-mode mix on NIF implosion experiments. X-ray spectroscopic methods are appealing since mix into the hot-spot will result in x-ray emission from the high-Z dopant (Cu or Ge) in the ablator material (Be or CH).

Hammel, B A; Haan, S W; Clark, D; Edwards, M J; Langer, S H; Marinak, M; Patel, M; Salmonson, J; Scott, H A

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Extension of the high load limit in the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine offers diesel-like efficiency with very low soot and NOx emissions. In a HCCI engine, a premixed charge of air, fuel and burned gas is compressed to achieve ...

Scaringe, Robert J. (Robert Joseph)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

An electron/ion spectrometer with the ability of low energy electron measurement for fast ignition experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electron energy spectrometer (ESM) is one of the most fundamental diagnostics in the fast ignition experiment. It is necessary to observe the spectra down to a low energy range in order to obtain the accurate deposition efficiency toward the core. Here, we realize the suitable ESM by using a ferrite magnet with a moderate magnetic field of 0.3 T and a rectangular magnetic circuit covered with a steel plate in the inlet side.

Ozaki, T.; Sakagami, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kato, R., E-mail: ozaki@nifs.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Review of the National Ignition Campaign 2009-2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) was a multi-institution effort established under the National Nuclear Security Administration of DOE in 2005, prior to the completion of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in 2009. The scope of the NIC was the planning and preparation for and the execution of the first 3 yr of ignition experiments (through the end of September 2012) as well as the development, fielding, qualification, and integration of the wide range of capabilities required for ignition. Besides the operation and optimization of the use of NIF, these capabilities included over 50 optical, x-ray, and nuclear diagnostic systems, target fabrication facilities, experimental platforms, and a wide range of NIF facility infrastructure. The goal of ignition experiments on the NIF is to achieve, for the first time, ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory via inertial confinement fusion and to develop a platform for ignition and high energy density applications on the NIF. The goal of the NIC was to develop and integrate all of the capabilities required for a precision ignition campaign and, if possible, to demonstrate ignition and gain by the end of FY12. The goal of achieving ignition can be divided into three main challenges. The first challenge is defining specifications for the target, laser, and diagnostics with the understanding that not all ignition physics is fully understood and not all material properties are known. The second challenge is designing experiments to systematically remove these uncertainties. The third challenge is translating these experimental results into metrics designed to determine how well the experimental implosions have performed relative to expectations and requirements and to advance those metrics toward the conditions required for ignition. This paper summarizes the approach taken to address these challenges, along with the progress achieved to date and the challenges that remain. At project completion in 2009, NIF lacked almost all the diagnostics and infrastructure required for ignition experiments. About half of the 3 yr period covered in this review was taken up by the effort required to install and performance qualify the equipment and experimental platforms needed for ignition experiments. Ignition on the NIF is a grand challenge undertaking and the results presented here represent a snapshot in time on the path toward that goal. The path forward presented at the end of this review summarizes plans for the Ignition Campaign on the NIF, which were adopted at the end of 2012, as well as some of the key results obtained since the end of the NIC.

Lindl, John; Landen, Otto; Edwards, John; Moses, Ed [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Collaboration: NIC Team

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Homogenous charge compression ignition engine having a cylinder including a high compression space  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to the field of homogeneous charge compression engines. In these engines, fuel is injected upstream or directly into the cylinder when the power piston is relatively close to its bottom dead center position. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder as the power piston advances to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the power piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. Thus, the present invention divides the homogeneous charge between a controlled volume higher compression space and a lower compression space to better control the start of ignition.

Agama, Jorge R.; Fiveland, Scott B.; Maloney, Ronald P.; Faletti, James J.; Clarke, John M.

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. Science-based weapons and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) extends HEDP under extreme conditions that approach the high energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear

75

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and reliability of the Nation's nuclear weapons without nuclear testing. The program provides this capability models that are used to assess and certify the stockpile without nuclear testing. The National Ignition that approach the high-energy density (HED) environments found in a nuclear explosion. Virtually all

76

High Energy Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basic Energy Science Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing Research Pioneering...

77

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF and plans for the NIF ignition experimental program. A brief summary of the overall NIF experimental program is also presented.

Moses, E

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

78

Ignition distributor voltage generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a voltage pulse generator and ignition distributor comprising, a base, a shaft rotatably supported by the base, a distributor cap supported by the base having a center electrode and circumferentially spaced outer electrodes. The pulse generator and ignition distribution also include a first rotor driven by the shaft formed of electrical insulating material having electrically conductive means connected to the center terminal and a portion that rotates past the outer electrodes. The portion of the electrically conductive means that rotates past the outer electrodes is spaced from the outer electrodes to form a gap therebetween. A voltage pulse generator comprises a second rotor driven by the shaft, at least one permanent magnet and an annular pickup coil supported by the base. The pickup coil has inner turns and outer turns, the beginning turn of the inner turns connected to a first lead and the last turn of the outer turns connected to a second lead, the outer turns enclosing the inner turns. The pickup coil also has a circuit connected directly between the second lead and ground which is operative to provide a direct conductive path to ground for high frequency energy capacitively coupled to the outer turns from the gap discharge between the electrically conductive means of the first rotor and an outer electrode, the outer turns forming a grounded shield for the inner turns.

Boyer, J.A.

1986-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

79

Plasma channel from EP beam Direct-drive ignition is the main thrust in LLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-drive ignition; this is not an optimal configuration fordirectdrivethatrequiressphericalillumination I2093 for direct-drive experiments; it is coupled to a high-power, short-pulse laser (OMEGA EP) to explore advanced 26 kJ Scale 1:70 in energy Scale 1:1 Scale 1:1 #12;Hydro-equivalentignitiononOMEGA #12;Ignition

80

Calibration of X-ray detectors in the 8 to 115 keV energy range and their application to diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calibration of X-ray diagnostics is of paramount importance to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) fills this need by providing a wide variety of calibration and diagnostic development services in support of the ongoing research efforts at NIF. The X-ray source in the High Energy X-ray lab utilizes induced fluorescence in a variety of metal foils to produce a beam of characteristic X rays ranging from 8 to 111 keV. Presented are the methods used for calibrating a High Purity Germanium detector, which has been absolutely calibrated using radioactive check sources, compared against a silicon photodiode calibrated at Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Also included is a limited presentation of results from the recent calibration of the upgraded Filter Fluorescer X ray Spectrometer.

J. J. Lee, M. J. Haugh, G. LaCaille, and P. Torres

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Advanced ignition options for laser ICF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;FSC · With day-one hardware, the NIF can explore high-gain shock ignition - Polar Shock Ignition (uses half the NIF beams to drive the implosion: multi-FM or 2D-SSD (talk by J. Soures at this meeting) The NIF can explore advanced ignition options

83

A polar-drive shock-ignition design for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock ignition [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007)] is being pursued as a viable option to achieve ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Shock-ignition target designs use a high-intensity laser spike at the end of a low-adiabat assembly pulse to launch a spherically convergent strong shock to ignite the hot spot of an imploding capsule. A shock-ignition target design for the NIF is presented. One-dimensional simulations indicate an ignition threshold factor of 4.1 with a gain of 58. A polar-drive beam-pointing configuration for shock-ignition experiments on the NIF at 750 kJ is proposed. The capsule design is shown to be robust to the various one- and two-dimensional effects and nonuniformities anticipated on the NIF. The target is predicted to ignite with a gain of 38 when including all anticipated levels of nonuniformity and system uncertainty.

Anderson, K. S.; McKenty, P. W.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Shvydky, A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States) [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Theobald, W.; Lafon, M.; Nora, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States) [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Progress towards ignition on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory includes a precision laser system now capable of delivering 1.8 MJ at 500 TW of 0.35-?m light to a target. NIF has been operational since March 2009. A variety of experiments have been completed in support of NIF's mission areas: national security, fundamental science, and inertial fusion energy. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support its missions with nearly 60 X-ray, optical, and nuclear diagnostic systems. A primary goal of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the NIF was to implode a low-Z capsule filled with ?0.2 mg of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel via laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion and demonstrate fusion ignition and propagating thermonuclear burn with a net energy gain of ?510 (fusion yield/input laser energy). This requires assembling the DT fuel into a dense shell of ?1000 g/cm{sup 3} with an areal density (?R) of ?1.5 g/cm{sup 2}, surrounding a lower density hot spot with a temperature of ?10 keV and a ?R ?0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, or approximately an ?-particle range. Achieving these conditions demand precise control of laser and target parameters to allow a low adiabat, high convergence implosion with low ablator fuel mix. We have demonstrated implosion and compressed fuel conditions at ?8090% for most point design values independently, but not at the same time. The nuclear yield is a factor of ?310 below the simulated values and a similar factor below the alpha dominated regime. This paper will discuss the experimental trends, the possible causes of the degraded performance (the off-set from the simulations), and the plan to understand and resolve the underlying physics issues.

Edwards, M. J.; Patel, P. K.; Lindl, J. D.; Atherton, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Landen, O. L.; Moses, E. I.; Springer, P. T.; Benedetti, R.; Bernstein, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Qualification of a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have designed, built, and successfully fielded a highly efficient and gated Bragg crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It utilizes a cylindrically curved Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. Its spectral range of 7.410?keV is optimized for scattering experiments using a Zn He-? x-ray probe at 9.0 keV or Mo K-shell line emission around 18 keV in second diffraction order. The spectrometer has been designed as a diagnostic instrument manipulator-based instrument for the NIF target chamber at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Here, we report on details of the spectrometer snout, its novel debris shield configuration and an in situ spectral calibration experiment with a Brass foil target, which demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/?E = 220 at 9.8 keV.

Dppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Burns, S.; Hawreliak, J.; House, A.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Swift, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft fr Schwerionenphysik, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraus, D. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Falcone, R. W. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Self-ignition of S.I. engine model fuels: A shock tube investigation at high pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-ignition of several spark-ignition (SI) engine fuels (iso-octane, methanol, methyl tert-butyl ether and three different mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane), mixed with air, was investigated experimentally under relevant engine conditions by the shock tube technique. Typical modes of the self-ignition process were registered cinematographically. For temperatures relevant to piston engine combustion, the self-ignition process always starts as an inhomogeneous, deflagrative mild ignition. This instant is defined by the ignition delay time, {tau}{sub defl}. The deflagration process in most cases is followed by a secondary explosion (DDT). This transition defines a second ignition delay time, {tau}{sub DDT}, which is a suitable approximation for the chemical ignition delay time, if the change of the thermodynamic conditions of the unburned test gas due to deflagration is taken into account. For iso-octane at p = 40 bar, a NTC (negative temperature coefficient), behavior connected with a two step (cool flame) self-ignition at low temperatures was observed. This process was very pronounced for rich and less pronounced for stoichiometric mixtures. The results of the {tau}{sub DDT} delays of the stoichiometric mixtures were shortened by the primary deflagration process in the temperature range between 800 and 1,000 K. Various mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane were investigated. The results show a strong influence of the n-heptane fraction in the mixture, both on the ignition delay time and on the mode of self-ignition. The self-ignition of methanol and MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) is characterized by a very pronounced initial deflagration. For temperatures below 900 K (methanol: 800 K), no secondary explosion occurs. Taking into account the pressure increase due to deflagration, the measured delays {tau}{sub DDT} of the secondary explosion are shortened by up to one order of magnitude.

Fieweger, K.; Blumenthal, R.; Adomeit, G. [RWTH, Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Allegemeine Mechanik] [RWTH, Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Allegemeine Mechanik

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Stability of shocks relating to the shock ignition inertial fusion energy scheme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by the shock ignition approach to improve the performance of inertial fusion targets, we make a series of studies of the stability of shock waves in planar and converging geometries. We examine stability of shocks moving through distorted material and driving shocks with non-uniform pressure profiles. We then apply a fully 3D perturbation, following this spherically converging shock through collapse to a distorted plane, bounce and reflection into an outgoing perturbed, broadly spherical shock wave. We find broad shock stability even under quite extreme perturbation.

Davie, C. J., E-mail: c.davie10@imperial.ac.uk; Bush, I. A.; Evans, R. G. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

High energy astrophysical processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We briefly review the high energy astrophysical processes that are related to the production of high energy $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino signals and are likely to be important for the energy loss of high and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We also give examples for neutrino fluxes generated by different astrophysical objects and describe the cosmological link provided by cosmogenic neutrinos.

Todor Stanev

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Assessing the prospects for achieving double-shell ignition on the National Ignition Facility using vacuum hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of demonstrating ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2003)] has motivated a revisit of double-shell (DS) targets as a complementary path to the cryogenic baseline approach. Expected benefits of DS ignition targets include noncryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel preparation, minimal hohlraum-plasma-mediated laser backscatter, low threshold-ignition temperatures ({approx_equal}4 keV) for relaxed hohlraum x-ray flux asymmetry tolerances, and minimal (two-) shock timing requirements. On the other hand, DS ignition presents several formidable challenges, encompassing room-temperature containment of high-pressure DT ({approx_equal}790 atm) in the inner shell, strict concentricity requirements on the two shells (<3 {mu}m), development of nanoporous (<100 nm cell size) low-density (<100 mg/cc) metallic foams for structural support of the inner shell and hydrodynamic instability mitigation, and effective control of hydrodynamic instabilities on the high-Atwood-number interface between the DT fuel and the high-Z inner shell. Recent progress in DS ignition designs and required materials science advances at the nanoscale are described herein. Two new ignition designs that use rugby-shaped vacuum hohlraums are presented that utilize either 1 or 2 MJ of laser energy at 3{omega}. The capability of the National Ignition Facility to generate the requested 2 MJ reverse-ramp pulse shape for DS ignition is expected to be comparable to the planned high-contrast ({approx_equal}100) pulse shape at 1.8 MJ for the baseline cryogenic target. Nanocrystalline, high-strength, Au-Cu alloy inner shells are under development using electrochemical deposition over a glass mandrel, exhibiting tensile strengths well in excess of 790 atm. Novel, low-density (85 mg/cc) copper foams have recently been demonstrated using 10 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} nanoporous aerogels with suspended Cu particles. A prototype demonstration of an ignition DS is planned for 2008, incorporating the needed novel nanomaterials science developments and the required fabrication tolerances for a realistic ignition attempt after 2010.

Amendt, Peter; Cerjan, C.; Hamza, A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

91

Laser spark distribution and ignition system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser spark distribution and ignition system that reduces the high power optical requirements for use in a laser ignition and distribution system allowing for the use of optical fibers for delivering the low peak energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. An optical distributor distributes and delivers optical pumping energy from an optical pumping source to multiple combustion chambers incorporating laser oscillators or laser amplifiers for inducing a laser spark within a combustion chamber. The optical distributor preferably includes a single rotating mirror or lens which deflects the optical pumping energy from the axis of rotation and into a plurality of distinct optical fibers each connected to a respective laser media or amplifier coupled to an associated combustion chamber. The laser spark generators preferably produce a high peak power laser spark, from a single low power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

Woodruff, Steven (Morgantown, WV); McIntyre, Dustin L. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

92

Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ?50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Simulating x-ray Thomson scattering signals from high-density, millimetre-scale plasmas at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a model for analysing x-ray Thomson scattering data from high-density, millimetre-scale inhomogeneous plasmas created during ultra-high pressure implosions at the National Ignition Facility in a spherically convergent geometry. The density weighting of the scattered signal and attenuation of the incident and scattered x-rays throughout the target are included using radial profiles of the density, opacity, ionization state, and temperature provided by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. These simulations show that the scattered signal is strongly weighted toward the bulk of the shocked plasma and the Fermi degenerate material near the ablation front. We show that the scattered signal provides a good representation of the temperature of this highly nonuniform bulk plasma and can be determined to an accuracy of ca. 15% using typical data analysis techniques with simple 0D calculations. On the other hand, the mean ionization of the carbon in the bulk is underestimated. We suggest that this discrepancy is due to the convolution of scattering profiles from different regions of the target. Subsequently, we discuss modifications to the current platform to minimise the impact of inhomogeneities, as well as opacity, and also to enable probing of conditions more strongly weighted toward the compressed core.

Chapman, D. A., E-mail: david.chapman@awe.co.uk [Plasma Physics Group, Radiation Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kraus, D.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Gaffney, J. A.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Nilsen, J.; Pak, A.; Swift, D. C.; Dppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Gericke, D. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States); Guymer, T. M. [Plasma Physics Group, Radiation Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft fr Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Redmer, R. [Institut fr Physik, Universitt Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); and others

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions with Extended-Duration Pulses at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion ...

Gatu Johnson, Maria

95

Thermite powder ignition by localized microwaves Yehuda Meir, Eli Jerby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) for sintering of ceramic composites [14]. The magnetic (H, the microwave energy is supplied locally to the powder. It creates a confined hotspot, and initiates a self-propagating the powder prior to its ignition is simulated theoretically, taking into account the powder's temperature

Jerby, Eli

96

High Energy Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017 HEPlogo.jpg The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Computing and Storage...

97

Final Scientific and Technical Report - Practical Fiber Delivered Laser Ignition Systems for Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research has characterized advanced kagome fiber optics for their use in laser ignition systems. In comparison to past fibers used in laser ignition, these fibers have the important advantage of being relatively bend-insensitivity, so that they can be bent and coiled without degradation of output energy or beam quality. The results are very promising for practical systems. For pulse durations of ~12 ns, the fibers could deliver >~10 mJ pulses before damage onset. A study of pulse duration showed that by using longer pulse duration (~20 30 ns), it is possible to carry even higher pulse energy (by factor of ~2-3) which also provides future opportunities to implement longer duration sources. Beam quality measurements showed nearly single-mode output from the kagome fibers (i.e. M2 close to 1) which is the optimum possible value and, combined with their high pulse energy, shows the suitability of the fibers for laser ignition. Research has also demonstrated laser ignition of an engine including reliable (100%) ignition of a single-cylinder gasoline engine using the laser ignition system with bent and coiled kagome fiber. The COV of IMEP was <2% which is favorable for stable engine operation. These research results, along with the continued reduction in cost of laser sources, support our commercial development of practical laser ignition systems.

Yalin, Azer [Seaforth, LLC

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Diagnosing and controlling mix in National Ignition Facility implosion experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High mode number instability growth of ''isolated defects'' on the surfaces of National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] capsules can be large enough for the perturbation to penetrate the imploding shell, and produce a jet of ablator material that enters the hot-spot. Since internal regions of the CH ablator are doped with Ge, mixing of this material into the hot-spot results in a clear signature of Ge K-shell emission. Evidence of jets entering the hot-spot has been recorded in x-ray images and spectra, consistent with simulation predictions [Hammel et al., High Energy Density Phys. 6, 171 (2010)]. Ignition targets have been designed to minimize instability growth, and capsule fabrication improvements are underway to reduce ''isolated defects.'' An experimental strategy has been developed where the final requirements for ignition targets can be adjusted through direct measurements of mix and experimental tuning.

Hammel, B. A.; Scott, H. A.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Suter, L. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R. [University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Kyrala, G. A.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Peterson, K. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Piezoelectric Ignition of Nanocomposite Energetic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Piezoelectric initiators are a unique form of ignition for energetic material because the current and voltage are tied together by impact loading on the crystal. This study examines the ignition response of an energetic composite composed of aluminum and molybdenum trioxide nanopowders to the arc generated from a lead zirconate and lead titanate piezocrystal. The mechanical stimuli used to activate the piezocrystal varied to assess ignition voltage, power, and delay time of aluminummolybdenum trioxide for a range of bulk powder densities. Results show a high dielectric strength leads to faster ignition times because of the higher voltage delivered to the energetic. Ignition delay is under 0.4 ms, which is faster than observed with thermal or shock ignition. Electric ignition of composite energetic materials is a strong function of interparticle connectivity, and thus the role of bulk density on electrostatic discharge ignition sensitivity is a focus of this study. Results show that the ignition delay times are dependent on the powder bulk density with an optimum bulk density of 50%. Packing fractions and electrical conductivity were analyzed and aid in explaining the resulting ignition behavior as a function of bulk density.

Eric Collins; Michelle Pantoya; Andreas A. Neuber; Michael Daniels; Daniel Prentice

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ultra High Energy Fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LHC in Geneva is already operating at a total energy of $7 TeV$ and hopefully after a pause in 2012, it will attain its full capacity of $14 TeV$ in 2013. These are the highest energies achieved todate in any accelerator. It is against this backdrop that it is worthwhile to revisit very high energy collisions of Fermions (Cf. also \\cite{bgspp}). We will in fact examine their behaviour at such energies.

Burra G. Sidharth

2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency GDI Engine Research, with Emphasis on Ignition Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high efficiency...

103

Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

Moses, E

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

Westbrook, C.K.

2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

IGNITION AND LIFTOFF // A TROJAN FOR NASA // NEW DOE ENERGY CENTER USCViterbi//Engineer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S.inGreenTechnologies: an inter- disciplinary program addressing both the supply side of alternative energy sources and the demand side of energy efficiency and carbon waste management. · M.S.inHealthSystemsManagement Engineering for Better Building 17

Zhou, Chongwu

106

Ultra High Energy Behaviour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reexamine the behaviour of particles at Ultra Highe energies in the context of the fact that the LHC has already touched an energy of $7 TeV$ and is likely to attain $14 TeV$ by 2013/2014.Consequences like a possible new shortlived interaction within the Compton scale are discussed.

Burra G. Sidharth

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

High Energy Photoproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermonuclear Ignition of Dark Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermonuclear ignition of stars by nuclear fission, and the corollary, non-ignition of stars. The possibility of

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Time-resolved characterization and energy balance analysis of implosion core in shock-ignition experiments at OMEGA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-resolved temperature and density conditions in the core of shock-ignition implosions have been determined for the first time. The diagnostic method relies on the observation, with a streaked crystal spectrometer, of the signature of an Ar tracer added to the deuterium gas fill. The data analysis confirms the importance of the shell attenuation effect previously noted on time-integrated spectroscopic measurements of thick-wall targets [R. Florido et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066408 (2011)]. This effect must be taken into account in order to obtain reliable results. The extracted temperature and density time-histories are representative of the state of the core during the implosion deceleration and burning phases. As a consequence of the ignitor shock launched by the sharp intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, observed average core electron temperature and mass density reach T???1100?eV and ????2?g/cm{sup 3}; then temperature drops to T???920?eV while density rises to ????3.4?g/cm{sup 3} about the time of peak compression. Compared to 1D hydrodynamic simulations, the experiment shows similar maximum temperatures and smaller densities. Simulations do not reproduce all observations. Differences are noted in the heating dynamics driven by the ignitor shock and the optical depth time-history of the compressed shell. Time-histories of core conditions extracted from spectroscopy show that the implosion can be interpreted as a two-stage polytropic process. Furthermore, an energy balance analysis of implosion core suggests an increase in total energy greater than what 1D hydrodynamic simulations predict. This new methodology can be implemented in other ICF experiments to look into implosion dynamics and help to understand the underlying physics.

Florido, R., E-mail: ricardo.florido@ulpgc.es; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

High-temperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive: Shock-tube experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of propane has been studied in a shock tube and by computational modeling to determine the effect of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a fuel additive. MTBE and isobutene were added in amounts up to 25% of the fuel to propane-oxygen-argon mixtures in shock-tube experiments covering a range of temperatures between 1450 and 1800 K. Ignition delays were measured from chemiluminescence at 432 nm due to excited CH radicals. The temperature dependence of the ignition rates was analyzed to yield Arrhenius parameters of E{sub a}{approximately}40 kcal/mol and log (A){approximately} 9.0 sec{sup {minus}1} for the overall reaction. Reactions involving MTBE and its decomposition products were combined with an established propane mechanism in a numerical model to describe the kinetic interaction of this additive with a typical hydrocarbon fuel. The experiments and the kinetic model both show that MTBE and isobutene retard propane ignition with nearly equal efficiency. The kinetic model demonstrates that isobutene kinetics are responsible for inhibition by both MTBE and isobutene, and the specific elementary reactions which produce this behavior are identified.

Gray, J.A. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Westbrook, C.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

High-temperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive: Shock-tube experiments and modeling. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of propane has been studied in a shock tube and by computational modeling to determine the effect of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a fuel additive. MTBE and isobutene were added to amounts up to 25% of the fuel to propane-oxygen-argon mixtures to shock-tube experiments covering a range of temperatures between 1450 and 1800 K. Ignition delays were measured from chemiluminescence at 432 nm due to excited CH radicals. The temperature dependence of the ignition rates was analyzed to yield Arrhenium parameters of E{sub a}{sup {minus}}40 kcal/mol and log(A) {sup {minus}}9.0 sec{sup {minus}1} for the overall reaction. Reactions involving MTBE and its decomposition products were combined with an established propane mechanism in a numerical model to describe the kinetic interaction of this additive with a typical hydrocarbon fuel. The experiments and the kinetic model both show that MTBE and isobutene retard propane ignition with nearly equal efficiency. The kinetic model demonstrates that isobutene kinetics are responsible for inhibition by both MTBE and isobutene, and the specific elementary reactions which produce this behavior are identified. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Gray, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

High-temperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive: Shock-tube experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of propane has been studied in a shock tube and by computational modeling to determine the effect of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a fuel additive. MTBE and isobutene were added in amounts up to 25% of the fuel to propane-oxygen-argon mixtures in shock-tube experiments covering a range of temperatures between 1450 and 1800 K. Ignition delays were measured from chemiluminescence at 432 nm due to excited CH radicals. The temperature dependence of the ignition rates was analyzed to yield Arrhenius parameters of E{sub a}{approximately}40 kcal/mol and log (A){approximately} 9.0 sec{sup {minus}1} for the overall reaction. Reactions involving MTBE and its decomposition products were combined with an established propane mechanism in a numerical model to describe the kinetic interaction of this additive with a typical hydrocarbon fuel. The experiments and the kinetic model both show that MTBE and isobutene retard propane ignition with nearly equal efficiency. The kinetic model demonstrates that isobutene kinetics are responsible for inhibition by both MTBE and isobutene, and the specific elementary reactions which produce this behavior are identified.

Gray, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

High-temperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive: Shock-tube experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of propane has been studied in a shock tube and by computational modeling to determine the effect of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a fuel additive. MTBE and isobutene were added to amounts up to 25% of the fuel to propane-oxygen-argon mixtures to shock-tube experiments covering a range of temperatures between 1450 and 1800 K. Ignition delays were measured from chemiluminescence at 432 nm due to excited CH radicals. The temperature dependence of the ignition rates was analyzed to yield Arrhenium parameters of E{sub a}{sup {minus}}40 kcal/mol and log(A) {sup {minus}}9.0 sec{sup {minus}1} for the overall reaction. Reactions involving MTBE and its decomposition products were combined with an established propane mechanism in a numerical model to describe the kinetic interaction of this additive with a typical hydrocarbon fuel. The experiments and the kinetic model both show that MTBE and isobutene retard propane ignition with nearly equal efficiency. The kinetic model demonstrates that isobutene kinetics are responsible for inhibition by both MTBE and isobutene, and the specific elementary reactions which produce this behavior are identified. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Gray, J.A. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Westbrook, C.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

High Energy Neutrino Telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a review of the history, motivation and current status of high energy neutrino telescopes. Many years after these detectors were first conceived, the operation of kilometer-cubed scale detectors is finally on the horizon at both the South Pole and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new detectors will perhaps provide us the first view of high energy astrophysical objects with a new messenger particle and provide us with our first real glimpse of the distant universe at energies above those accessible by gamma-ray instruments. Some of the topics that can be addressed by these new instruments include the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the mechanisms at work in high energy astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebula and supernova remnants.

K. D. Hoffman

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

115

High-energy detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

116

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the worlds largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

Ross, P.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fusion Energy Research at The National Ignition Facility: The Pursuit of the Ultimate Clean, Inexhaustible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the" Lawrence Radiation Laboratory" In Livermore, California..." " #12;Presentation to MIT 13NIF-0709, Inexhaustible Energy Source" John D. Moody, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" " Presented to: MIT ­ PSFC by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 #12;A few memories of MIT physics

118

On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis igni- tion energy. ? 2010 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

Ju, Yiguang

119

Plasma jet ignition device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE2011 DOE Hydrogen and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE2011 DOE Hydrogen and1 DOE Hydrogen and

122

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE2011 DOE Hydrogen and1 DOE Hydrogen

123

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE2011 DOE Hydrogen and1 DOE Hydrogen09

124

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Determination of the relative resistance to ignition of selected turbopump materials in high-pressure, high-temperature, oxygen environments, volume 3. Interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data is presented from frictional heating tests on pairs of different materials. Materials tested include: Hastelloy X, Inconel 600, Invar 36, Monel K-500, Monel 400, nickel 200, silicon carbide, stainless steels 316, and zirconium copper. In tests where pairs of different materials were rubbed together, the material rated less resistant to ignition in previous tests appeared to control the resistance to ignition of the pair.

Stoltzfus, J.M.; Benz, F.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Optimization of the process of plasma ignition of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are given of experimental and theoretical investigations of plasma ignition of coal as a result of its thermochemical preparation in application to the processes of firing up a boiler and stabilizing the flame combustion. The experimental test bed with a commercial-scale burner is used for determining the conditions of plasma ignition of low-reactivity high-ash anthracite depending on the concentration of coal in the air mixture and velocity of the latter. The calculations produce an equation (important from the standpoint of practical applications) for determining the energy expenditure for plasma ignition of coal depending on the basic process parameters. The tests reveal the difficulties arising in firing up a boiler with direct delivery of pulverized coal from the mill to furnace. A scheme is suggested, which enables one to reduce the energy expenditure for ignition of coal and improve the reliability of the process of firing up such a boiler. Results are given of calculation of plasma thermochemical preparation of coal under conditions of lower concentration of oxygen in the air mixture.

Peregudov, V.S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Theoretical High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Joshua D. Taylor - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Stuart Neill, Hailin Li - National Research Council Canada...

131

HighEnergy International  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jet Production at HERA Sascha Caron, I. Phys. Institut, RWTH Aachen High­Energy Physics r ) and d?? # e,i = # # n=1 # n s (µ r )C n (µ r ) # extract # s , pdfs? QCD Montpellier 2002, Sascha­jets above E T treshhold. DIS: find jets in ``Breit frame'': 2xP + q = 0 p r q g # maximal separation between

132

Ignition Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In About |

133

Fast Ignition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home It isGasERPSpun Off From A GovernmentFast

134

Subcritical microwave coupling to femtosecond and picosecond laser ionization for localized, multipoint ignition of methane/air mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition in methane/air mixtures has been achieved using low energy seed laser pulses and an overlapping subcritical microwave pulse. It is shown that the extremely weak ionization of the laser localizes the microwave energy deposition--leading to rapid heating, high temperatures, and ignition. Multiple simultaneous localized regions of ignition are also achieved using the same microwave pulse. Interactions of the seed laser pulse and microwave heating pulse were observed using schlieren and shadowgraph to record the intensity of heating, the scale of the interaction, and for confirmation of ignition. In addition, a coupled one-dimensional gasdynamic-plasma dynamic model has been developed to follow the rapidly evolving plasma properties and the gas properties achieved through this interaction.

Michael, J. B.; Dogariu, A.; Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Reaching ignition in the tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review covers the following areas: (1) the physics of burning plasmas, (2) plasma physics requirements for reaching ignition, (3) design studies for ignition devices, and (4) prospects for an ignition project. (MOW)

Furth, H.P.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Stockpile Stewardship and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Since the completion of the construction project in March 2009, NIF has completed nearly 150 target experiments for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), High Energy Density Stewardship Science (HEDSS) in the areas of radiation transport, material dynamics at high pressure in the solid state, as well as fundamental science and other national security missions. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with over 50 X-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. NIF is now qualified for use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high yield experiments and classified experiments. DT implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 4.5 x 10{sup 14} neutrons have been achieved. A series of 43 experiments were successfully executed over a 27-day period, demonstrating the ability to perform precise experiments in new regimes of interest to HEDSS. This talk will provide an update of the progress on the NIF capabilities, NIC accomplishments, as well as HEDSS and fundamental science experimental results and an update of the experimental plans for the coming year.

Moses, E

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

National Ignition Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a key constituent of the Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF will use inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce ignition and energy gain in ICF targets, and will perform weapons physics and high-energy- density experiments in support of national security and civilian objectives. The NIF Project is a national facility involving the collaboration of several DOE laboratories and subcontractors, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). The primary mission of the NIF Project is the construction and start-up operation of laser-based facilities that will demonstrate fusion ignition in the laboratory to provide nuclear-weapons-related physics data, and secondarily, to propagate fusion burn aimed at developing a potential source of civilian energy. To support the accomplishment of this very important mission, the LLNL Laser Directorate created the NIF Project Office to organize and bring about the Project. The NIF Project Office has established this Quality Assurance Program to ensure its success. This issue of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) adds the requirements for the conduct of Title 11 design, construction, procurement, and Title III engineering. This QAPP defines and describes the program-the management system-for specifying, achieving, and assuring the quality of all NIF Project work consistent with the policies of the Laboratory and the Laser Directorate.

Wolfe, C.R.; Yatabe, J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Michigan Overview Motivation Multi-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection study in which high ignition quality fuel was found avoid NO X , PM, THC and CO...

140

High-resolution spectroscopy for Doppler-broadening ion temperature measurements of implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future implosion experiments at the national ignition facility (NIF) will endeavor to simultaneously measure electron and ion temperatures with temporal and spatial resolution in order to explore non-equilibrium temperature distributions and their relaxation toward equilibrium. In anticipation of these experiments, and with understanding of the constraints of the NIF facility environment, we have explored the use of Doppler broadening of mid-Z dopant emission lines, such as krypton He-{alpha} at 13 keV, as a diagnostic of time- and potentially space-resolved ion temperature. We have investigated a number of options analytically and with numerical raytracing, and we have identified several promising candidate spectrometer designs that meet the expected requirements of spectral and temporal resolution and data signal-to-noise ratio for gas-filled exploding pusher implosions, while providing maximum flexibility for use on a variety of experiments that potentially include burning plasma.

Koch, J. A.; Stewart, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Shepherd, R.; Schneider, M. B.; Miles, A. R.; Scott, H. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-493, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys of Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.

Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Moody, J D; Kyrala, G A; Schneider, M B; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Milovich, J L; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Berger, R L; Edwards, M J; Suter, L J; Haan, S W; Lindl, J D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Moses, E I; Scott, H A; Harte, J A; Zimmerman, G B

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

FSU High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the groups theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the non-zero neutrino masses or the overwhelming astrophysical evidence for an invisible form of matter, called dark matter, that has had a marked effect on the evolution of structure in the universe. The report highlights the main, recent, experimental achievements of the experimental group, which include the investigation of properties of the W and Z bosons; the search for new heavy stable charged particles and the search for a proposed property of nature called supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions that yield high energy photons. In addition, we report a few results from a more general search for supersymmetry at the LHC, initiated by the group. The report also highlights the group's significant contributions, both theoretical and experimental, to the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties.

Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State University; Adams, Todd [Florida State University; Askew, Andrew [Florida State University; Berg, Bernd [Florida State University; Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State University; Okui, Takemichi [Florida State University; Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State University; Reina, Laura [Florida State University; Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State University

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Analytical model for fast-shock ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ?4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ?0.3??micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

Ghasemi, S. A., E-mail: abo.ghasemi@yahoo.com; Farahbod, A. H. [Plasma Physics Research School, NSTRI, North Kargar Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sobhanian, S. [Department of Physics, Tabriz University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

High Energy Density Capacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of todays best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ignition of a deuterium micro-detonation with a gigavolt super marx generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Centurion-Halite experiment demonstrated the feasibility of igniting a deuterium-tritium micro-explosion with an energy of not more than a few megajoule, and the Mike test, the feasibility of a pure deuterium explosion with an energy of more than 10^6 megajoule. In both cases the ignition energy was supplied by a fission bomb explosive. While an energy of a few megajoule, to be released in the time required of less than 10^-9 sec, can be supplied by lasers and intense particle beams, this is not enough to ignite a pure deuterium explosion. Because the deuterium-tritium reaction depends on the availability of lithium, the non-fusion ignition of a pure deuterium fusion reaction would be highly desirable. It is shown that this goal can conceivably be reached with a "Super Marx Generator", where a large number of "ordinary" Marx generators charge (magnetically insulated) fast high voltage capacitors of a second stage Marx generator, called a "Super Marx Generator", ultimately reaching gigavolt potentials with...

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Results from high energy accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the recent experimental results obtained at high-energy colliders with emphasis on LEP and SLC results.

G. Giacomelli; B. Poli

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Semiconductor bridge, SCB, ignition of energetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories` semiconductor bridge, SCB, is now being used for the ignition or initiation of a wide variety of exeoergic materials. Applications of this new technology arose because of a need at the system level to provide light weight, small volume and low energy explosive assemblies. Conventional bridgewire devices could not meet the stringent size, weight and energy requirements of our customers. We present an overview of SCB technology and the ignition characteristics for a number of energetic materials including primary and secondary explosives, pyrotechnics, thermites and intermetallics. We provide examples of systems designed to meet the modern requirements that sophisticated systems must satisfy in today`s market environments.

Bickes, R.W.; Grubelich, M.D.; Harris, S.M.; Merson, J.A.; Tarbell, W.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Prompt Beta Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Mix in Ignited NIF Capsules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) technology is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser beam energy captured in a hohlraum. Hydrodynamical instabilities at interfaces in the ICF capsule leading to mix between the DT fue l and the ablator shell material are of fundamental physical interest and can affect the performance characteristics of the capsule. In this Letter we describe new radiochemical diagnostics for mix processes in ICF capsules with plastic or Be (0.9%Cu) ablator shells. Reactions of high-energy tritons with shell material produce high-energy $\\beta$-emitters. We show that mix between the DT fuel and the shell material enhances high-energy prompt beta emission from these reactions by more than an order of magnitude over that expected in the absence of mix.

A. C. Hayes; G. Jungman; J. C. Solem; P. A. Bradley; R. S. Rundberg

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

High energy photon emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photons, neutrons, charged particles, and fission fragments were used to study the reaction 160 + 238 U at a projectile energy of 50 MeV/u. Inverse slope values of the photon spectra were extracted for inclusive data and data of higher multiplicities...

Jabs, Harry

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

An ignition and combustion model based on the level-set method for spark ignition engine multidimensional modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the prediction accuracy of the spark ignition and combustion processes in spark ignition engines, improved ignition and flame propagation models have been developed and implemented in the CFD code, KIVA-3V. An equation to calculate the spark ignition kernel growth rate is derived that considers the effects of the spark ignition discharge energy and flow turbulence on the ignition kernel growth. In addition, a flamelet combustion model based on the G equation combustion model was developed and implemented. To test the ignition and combustion models, they were applied to a homogeneous charge pancake-shaped-combustion-chamber engine, in which experimental heat flux data from probes in the engine head and cylinder liner were available. By comparing the flame arrival timings with the simulation predictions, the ignition and combustion models were validated. In addition, the models were also applied to a homogeneous charge propane-fueled SI engine. Good agreement with experimental cylinder pressures and NO{sub x} data was obtained as a function of ignition timing, engine speed, and EGR levels. (author)

Tan, Zhichao; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Cryogenic Target Handling Systems (NCTS) Program, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NCTS. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan (PEP) for NCTS has been initiated, and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National Ignition Facility is a multi-megajoule laser facility being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) by performing experiments studying weapons physics, including fusion ignition. NIF also supports the missions of weapons effects, inertial fusion energy, and basic science in high-energy-density physics. NIF will be operated by LLNL under contract to the University of California (UC) as a national user facility. NIF is a low-hazard, radiological facility, and its operation will meet all applicable federal, state, and local Environmental Safety & Health (ES&H) requirements. The NCTS Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NIF Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan. Overall scope content and execution schedules for the High Energy Density Physics Campaign (SSP Campaign 10) are currently undergoing rebaselining and will be brought into alignment with resources expected to be available throughout the NNSA Future Years National Security Plan (FYNSP). The revised schedule for delivering this system will be decided at the national level, based on experiment campaign requirement dates that will be derived through this process. The current milestone date for achieving indirect-drive ignition on the NIF is December 2010. Maintaining this milestone requires that the cryogenic systems be complete and available for fielding experiments early enough that the planned experimental campaigns leading up to ignition can be carried out. The capability of performing non-ignition cryogenic experiments is currently required by March 2006, when the NIF's first cluster of beams is operational. Plans for cryogenic and non-cryogenic experiments on the NIF are contained in NNSA's Campaign 10 Program Plans for Ignition (MTE 10.1) and High Energy Density Sciences (MTE 10.2). As described in this document, the NCTS Program Manager is responsible for managing NIF Cryogenic Target Systems development, engineering, and deployment. Through the NIF Director, the NCTS Program Manager will put in place an appropriate Program Execution Plan (draft attached) at a later time consistent with the maturing and funding these efforts. The PEP will describe management methods for carrying out these activities.

Warner, B

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes 'day one' NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ignition of a deuterium micro-detonation with a gigavolt super marx generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Centurion-Halite experiment demonstrated the feasibility of igniting a deuterium-tritium micro-explosion with an energy of not more than a few megajoule, and the Mike test, the feasibility of a pure deuterium explosion with an energy of more than 10^6 megajoule. In both cases the ignition energy was supplied by a fission bomb explosive. While an energy of a few megajoule, to be released in the time required of less than 10^-9 sec, can be supplied by lasers and intense particle beams, this is not enough to ignite a pure deuterium explosion. Because the deuterium-tritium reaction depends on the availability of lithium, the non-fusion ignition of a pure deuterium fusion reaction would be highly desirable. It is shown that this goal can conceivably be reached with a "Super Marx Generator", where a large number of "ordinary" Marx generators charge (magnetically insulated) fast high voltage capacitors of a second stage Marx generator, called a "Super Marx Generator", ultimately reaching gigavolt potentials with an energy output of 100 megajoule. An intense 10^7 Ampere-GeV proton beam drawn from a "Super Marx Generator" can ignite a deuterium thermonuclear detonation wave in a compressed deuterium cylinder, where the strong magnetic field of the proton beam entraps the charged fusion reaction products inside the cylinder. In solving the stand-off problem, the stiffness of a GeV proton beam permits to place the deuterium target at a comparatively large distance from the wall of a cavity confining the deuterium micro-explosion.

Friedwardt Winterberg

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

FIREBALL: Fusion Ignition Rocket Engine with Ballistic Ablative Lithium Liner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermo-nuclear fusion may be the key to a high Isp, high specific power propulsion system. In a fusion system energy is liberated within, and imparted directly to, the propellant. In principle, this can overcome the performance limitations inherent in systems that require thermal power transfer across a material boundary, and/or multiple power conversion stages (NTR, NEP). A thermo-nuclear propulsion system, which attempts to overcome some of the problems inherent in the Orion concept, is described. A dense FRC plasmoid is accelerated to high velocity (in excess of 500 km/s) and is compressed into a detached liner (pulse unit). The kinetic energy of the FRC is converted into thermal and magnetic-field energy, igniting a fusion burn in the magnetically confined plasma. The fusion reaction serves as an ignition source for the liner, which is made out of detonable materials. The energy liberated in this process is converted to thrust by a pusher-plate, as in the classic Orion concept. However with this concept, the vehicle does not carry a magazine of autonomous pulse-units. By accelerating a second, heavier FRC, which acts as a piston, right behind the first one, the velocity required to initiate the fusion burn is greatly reduced.

Martin, Adam K.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Lee, Michael H. [Propulsion Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center XD22, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Fimognari, Peter J. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

155

High Energy Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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156

High Energy Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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157

High Energy Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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158

High Energy Physics Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministration | National

159

Thermonuclear supernova simulations with stochastic ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply an ad hoc model for dynamical ignition in three-dimensional numerical simulations of thermonuclear supernovae assuming pure deflagrations. The model makes use of the statistical description of temperature fluctuations in the pre-supernova core proposed by Wunsch & Woosley (2004). Randomness in time is implemented by means of a Poisson process. We are able to vary the explosion energy and nucleosynthesis depending on the free parameter of the model which controls the rapidity of the ignition process. However, beyond a certain threshold, the strength of the explosion saturates and the outcome appears to be robust with respect to number of ignitions. In the most energetic explosions, we find about 0.75 solar masses of iron group elements. Other than in simulations with simultaneous multi-spot ignition, the amount of unburned carbon and oxygen at radial velocities of a few 1000 km/s tends to be reduced for an ever increasing number of ignition events and, accordingly, more pronounced layering results.

W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

Musinski, Donald L. (Saline, MI); Mruzek, Michael T. (Britton, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed.

Kumpan, S

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

High-energy Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

High energy physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Research in High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

Conway, John S.

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

166

Science on high-energy lasers: From today to the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents both a concise definition of the current capabilities of high energy lasers and a description of capabilities of the NIF (National Ignition Facility). Five scientific areas are discussed (Astrophysics, Hydrodynamics, Material Properties, Plasma Physics, Radiation Sources, and Radiative Properties). In these five areas we project a picture of the future based on investigations that are being carried on today. Even with this very conservative approach we find that the development of new higher energy lasers will make many extremely exciting areas accessible to us.

Lee, R.W.; Petrasso, R.; Falcone, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostica multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20500 keV rangehas been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ?300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U K{sub ?}). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (?90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

Hohenberger, M., E-mail: mhoh@lle.rochester.edu; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Dppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lee, J. J. [National Security Technologies LLC, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 1. Engine Load Range and Downsize Downspeed Opportunity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine was used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to 87 AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicated mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. EGR provided thermodynamic advantages and was a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency for all fuel types. However, with E30, EGR was less useful for knock mitigation than gasoline or IB24. Torque densities with E30 with 15% EGR at = 1 operation were similar or better than a modern EURO IV calibration turbo-diesel engine. The results of the present study suggest that it could be possible to implement a 40% downsize + downspeed configuration (1.2 L engine) into a representative midsize sedan. For example, for a midsize sedan at a 65 miles/h cruise, an estimated fuel consumption of 43.9 miles per gallon (MPG) (engine out 102 g-CO2/km) could be achieved with similar reserve power to a 2.0 L engine with 87AKI (38.6 MPG, engine out 135 g-CO2/km). Data suggest that, with midlevel alcohol gasoline blends, engine and vehicle optimization can offset the reduced fuel energy content of alcohol gasoline blends and likely reduce vehicle fuel consumption and tailpipe CO2 emissions.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Advanced Concept Exploration for Fast Ignition Science Program, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional central hot spot (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The physics of fast ignition process was the focus of our Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program. Ignition depends critically on two major issues involving Relativistic High Energy Density (RHED) physics: The laser-induced creation of fast electrons and their propagation in high-density plasmas. Our program has developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to advance understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our program had three thrust areas: Understand the production and characteristics of fast electrons resulting from FI relevant laser-plasma interactions and their dependence on laser prepulse and laser pulse length. Investigate the subsequent fast electron transport in solid and through hot (FI-relevant) plasmas. Conduct and understand integrated core-heating experiments by comparison to simulations. Over the whole period of this project (three years for this contract), we have greatly advanced our fundamental understanding of the underlying properties in all three areas: Comprehensive studies on fast electron source characteristics have shown that they are controlled by the laser intensity distribution and the topology and plasma density gradient. Laser pre-pulse induced pre-plasma in front of a solid surface results in increased stand-off distances from the electron origin to the high density target as well as large and erratic spread of the electron beam with increasing short pulse duration. We have demonstrated, using newly available higher contrast lasers, an improved energy coupling, painting a promising picture for FI feasibility. Our detailed experiments and analyses of fast electron transport dependence on target material have shown that it is feasible to collimate fast electron beam by self-generated resistive magnetic fields in engineered targets with a rather simple geometry. Stable and collimated electron beam with spot size as small as 50-?m after >100-?m propagation distance (an angular divergence angle of 20!) in solid density plasma targets has been demonstrated with FI-relevant (10-ps, >1-kJ) laser pulses Such collimated beam would meet the required heating beam size for FI. Our new experimental platforms developed for the OMEGA laser (i.e., i) high resolution 8 keV backlighter platform for cone-in-shell implosion and ii) the 8 keV imaging with Cu-doped shell targets for detailed transport characterization) have enabled us to experimentally confirm fuel assembly from cone-in-shell implosion with record-high areal density. We have also made the first direct measurement of fast electron transport and spatial energy deposition in integrated FI experiments enabling the first experiment-based benchmarking of integrated simulation codes. Executing this program required a large team. It was managed as a collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. Th

Stephens, Richard Burnite [General Atomics; McLean, Harry M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Theobald, Wolfgang [Laboratory for Laser Energetics; Akli, Kramer U. [The Ohio State University; Beg, Farhat N. [University of California, San Diego; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [University of Nevada, Reno; Schumacher, Douglass W. [The Ohio State University; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

172

PRACTICAL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY AT HIGH ENERGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April, 1957. USAECShielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.Shielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.

McCaslin, J.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database David A. Brown 1it requires the high-energy nuclear physics com- munitys ?compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications

Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Intermittent laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in shock ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in the ignition phase of shock ignition through 1D and 2D particle-in-cell simulations in the regime of long density scale length and moderately high laser intensity. These long-term simulations show an intermittent bursting pattern of laser-plasma instabilities, resulting from a coupling of the modes near the quarter-critical-surface and those in the lower density region via plasma waves and laser pump depletion. The majority of the hot electrons are found to be from stimulated Raman scattering and of moderate energies. However, high energy electrons of preheating threat can still be generated from the two-plasmon-decay instability.

Yan, R.; Li, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Ren, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Burner ignition system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

Carignan, Forest J. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

177

Ignition enhancement for scramjet combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The process of shock-induced ignition has been investigated both computa- tionally and experimentally, with particular emphasis on the concept of radical farming. The first component (more)

McGuire, Jeffrey Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

High Country Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard"Starting a new page Jump| OpenHidroelectricaHigh

179

High Energy Density Ultracapacitors | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency| -4 Energy1 DOE

180

High Energy Density Ultracapacitors | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency| -4 Energy1 DOE0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High Energy Density Ultracapacitors | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency| -4 Energy1

182

Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

Ma, T

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Pathways to Inertial Fusion Energy Laser Direct Drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(NRL) Smoothing by Spectral Dispersion ­ SSD (LLE) DT ice preheated ablator (lower density) DT ice/sec), and ignited by a converging shock produced by high intensity spike in the laser pulse. * R. Betti et al., Phys. Shock ignited target #12;The target has to release enough energy to power the reactor... AND produce

184

Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 2. Fuel and EGR Effects on Knock-Limited Load and Speed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external-cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to that of 87AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicating mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. The results demonstrate that for all fuels, EGR is a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency but is less useful for knock mitigation with E30 than for 87AKI gasoline or IB24. Under knocking conditions, 15% EGR is found to offer 1 CA of CA50 timing advance with E30, whereas up to 5 CA of CA50 advance is possible with knock-limited 87AKI gasoline. Compared to 87AKI, both E30 and IB24 are found to have reduced adiabatic flame temperature and shorter combustion durations, which reduce knocking propensity beyond that indicated by the octane number. However, E30+0% EGR is found to exhibit the better antiknock properties than either 87AKI+15% EGR or IB24+15% EGR, expanding the knock limited operating range and engine stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. Furthermore, the fuel sensitivity (S) of E30 was attributed to reduced speed sensitivity of E30, expanding the low-speed stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. The results illustrate that intermediate alcohol gasoline blends exhibit exceptional antiknock properties and performance beyond that indicated by the octane number tests, particularly E30.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Comparison of the Recently proposed Super Marx Generator Approach to Thermonuclear Ignition with the DT Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid Concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recently proposed Super Marx generator pure deuterium micro-detonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser DT fusion-fission hybrid concept (LiFE) [1]. In a Super Marx generator a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultra-high voltage Marx generator, from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-explosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. A typical example of the LiFE concept is a fusion gain of 30, and a fission gain of 10, making up for a total gain of 300, with about 10 times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means a substantial release of fission products, as in fusion-less pure fission reactors. In the Super Marx approach for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-detonation a gain of the same magnitude can in theory be reached [2]. If feasible, the Super Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of ther...

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Simulation of hydrogen and hydrogen-assisted propane ignition in Pt catalyzed microchannel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with self-ignition of catalytic microburners from ambient cold-start conditions. First, reaction kinetics for hydrogen combustion is validated with experimental results from the literature, followed by validation of a simplified pseudo-2D microburner model. The model is then used to study the self-ignition behavior of lean hydrogen/air mixtures in a Platinum-catalyzed microburner. Hydrogen combustion on Pt is a very fast reaction. During cold start ignition, hydrogen conversion reaches 100% within the first few seconds and the reactor dynamics are governed by the ''thermal inertia'' of the microburner wall structure. The self-ignition property of hydrogen can be used to provide the energy required for propane ignition. Two different modes of hydrogen-assisted propane ignition are considered: co-feed mode, where the microburner inlet consists of premixed hydrogen/propane/air mixtures; and sequential feed mode, where the inlet feed is switched from hydrogen/air to propane/air mixtures after the microburner reaches propane ignition temperature. We show that hydrogen-assisted ignition is equivalent to selectively preheating the inlet section of the microburner. The time to reach steady state is lower at higher equivalence ratio, lower wall thermal conductivity, and higher inlet velocity for both the ignition modes. The ignition times and propane emissions are compared. Although the sequential feed mode requires slightly higher amount of hydrogen, the propane emissions are at least an order of magnitude lower than the other ignition modes. (author)

Seshadri, Vikram; Kaisare, Niket S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ignition of syngas/air and hydrogen/air mixtures at low temperatures and high pressures: Experimental data interpretation and kinetic modeling implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnitude of ignition delay observations and homogeneous kinetic calculations seen elsewhere is a result in large measure of departures of the experimental configurations from behavior dominated solely by homogeneous gas phase kinetics. In the regime of interest (higher pressures, lower temperatures), the hydrogen-oxygen chemical induction processes can be significantly perturbed by several nonhomogeneous effects, which include catalytic aberrations. The multiple perturbations that can significantly affect induction chemistry are very difficult to remove in research experiments and nearly impossible to control in engineering applications. The implications for developing lean premixing schemes for advanced syngas gas turbine applications are that designs must consider the inherent presence of these perturbations on ignition delay as well as those that might occur from potential particle contamination of the air stream exiting the compressor, if stimulated flashback into the mixing region is to be precluded.

Dryer, Frederick L.; Chaos, Marcos [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-5263 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Premix charge, compression ignition combustion system optimization Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

189

Cosmology for high energy physicists  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard big bang model of cosmology is presented. Although not perfect, its many successes make it a good starting point for most discussions of cosmology. Places are indicated where well understood laboratory physics is incorporated into the big bang, leading to successful predictions. Much less established aspects of high energy physics and some of the new ideas they have introduced into the field of cosmology are discussed, such as string theory, inflation and monopoles. 49 refs., 5 figs.

Albrecht, A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ionization energy shift of characteristic K x-ray lines from high-Z materials for plasma diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy of the characteristic x-rays emitted by high atomic number atoms in a plasma that contains energetic electrons depends on the atom's ionization. For tungsten, the ionization energy shift of the L-lines has recently been used to diagnose the plasma's ionization; the change in energy of a K-line has been measured for iridium and observed for ytterbium. Here, we present detailed computations of the ionization energy shift to K-lines of these and an additional element, dysprosium; for these atoms, some K-lines nearly coincide in energy with K-edges of slightly lower Z atoms so that a change in transmission behind a K-edge filter betrays a change in energy. The ionization energy shift of such high-energy K-lines may enable a unique diagnostic when the plasma is inside an otherwise opaque enclosure such as hohlraums used on the National Ignition Facility.

S?abkowska, K.; Szyma?ska, E.; Polasik, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toru? (Poland)] [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toru? (Poland); Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., 7844 Vervain Ct, Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States)] [Ecopulse, Inc., 7844 Vervain Ct, Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Rzadkiewicz, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock (Poland)] [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Seely, J. F. [Artep, Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Ct, Ellicott, Maryland 21042 (United States)] [Artep, Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Ct, Ellicott, Maryland 21042 (United States); Weber, B. V.; Schumer, J. W. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

High Energy Gas Fracturing Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

Schulte, R.

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8?MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6??10{sup 13} and ?0.3?g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics and/or Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

High Impact Technology Catalyst | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

energy-efficient commercial building technologies. Through the High Impact Technology Catalyst program, initiated in 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identifies...

195

Technical documentation in support of the project-specific analysis for construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information that supports or supplements the data and impact analyses presented in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project-Specific Analysis (PSA). The purposes of NIF are to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time with inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology and to conduct high- energy-density experiments ins support of national security and civilian application. NIF is an important element in the DOE`s science-based SSM Program, a key mission of which is to ensure the reliability of the nation`s enduring stockpile of nuclear weapons. NIF would also advance the knowledge of basic and applied high-energy- density science and bring the nation a large step closer to developing fusion energy for civilian use. The NIF PSA includes evaluations of the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the facility at one of five candidate site and for two design options.

Lazaro, M.A.; Vinikour, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.; Allison, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A Concept Exploration Program in Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Ignition (FI) approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) holds particular promise for fusion energy because the independently generated compression and ignition pulses allow ignition with less compression, resulting in (potentially) higher gain. Exploiting this concept effectively requires an understanding of the transport of electrons in prototypical geometries and at relevant densities and temperatures. Our consortium, which included General Atomics (GA), The Ohio State University (OSU), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), University of California, Davis (UC-Davis), and Princeton University under this grant (~$850K/yr) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under a companion grant, won awards in 2000, renewed in 2005, to investigate the physics of electron injection and transport relevant to the FI concept, which is crucial to understand electron transport in integral FI targets. In the last two years we have also been preparing diagnostics and starting to extend the work to electron transport into hot targets. A complementary effort, the Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program for Fast Ignition, was funded starting in 2006 to integrate this understanding into ignition schemes specifically suitable for the initial fast ignition attempts on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF), and during that time these two programs have been managed as a coordinated effort. This result of our 7+ years of effort has been substantial. Utilizing collaborations to access the most capable laser facilities around the world, we have developed an understanding that was summarized in a Fusion Science & Technology 2006, Special Issue on Fast Ignition. The author lists in the 20 articles in that issue are dominated by our group (we are first authors in four of them). Our group has published, or submitted 67 articles, including 1 in Nature, 2 Nature Physics, 10 Physical Review Letters, 8 Review of Scientific Instruments, and has been invited to give numerous talks at national and international conferences (including APS-DPP, IAEA, FIW). The advent of PW capabilities at Rutherford Appleton Lab (UK) and then at Titan (LLNL) (2005 and 2006, respectively), was a major step toward experiments in ultra-high intensity high-energy FI relevant regime. The next step comes with the activation of OMEGA EP at LLE, followed shortly by NIF-ARC at LLNL. These capabilities allow production of hot dense material for electron transport studies. In this transitional period, considerable effort has been spent in developing the necessary tools and experiments for electron transport in hot and dense plasmas. In addition, substantial new data on electron generation and transport in metallic targets has been produced and analyzed. Progress in FI detailed in 2 is related to the Concept Exploration Program (CEP) objectives; this section is a summary of the publications and presentations listed in 5. This work has benefited from the synergy with work on related Department of Energy (DOE) grants, the Fusion Science Center and the Fast Ignition Advanced Concept Exploration grant, and from our interactions with overseas colleagues, primarily at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, and the Institute for Laser Engineering in Japan.

Stephens, Richarad Burnite [General Atomics] [General Atomics; Freeman, Richard R. [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Van Woekom, L. D. [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Key, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; MacKinnon, Andrew J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics] [General Atomics

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

The National Ignition Facility and the Ignition Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 14-18, 2013 Debra A. Callahan Group Leader for ICF/IFE Target design Lawrence Livermore National(atm-s) Indirect drive on the NIF is within a factor of 2-3 of the conditions required for ignition Callahan -- AAAS, February 14-18, 2013 82013-047661s2.ppt NIF Ignition #12;2013-047661s2.ppt Callahan -- AAAS

198

Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky PETTER HOFVERBERG Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2006 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky Petter Hofverberg Particle

Haviland, David

199

Department of Physics High Energy Physics Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Physics High Energy Physics Group Electrical Engineer (Job ref: 0004) The High Energy and experience. A job description and an application form can be obtained from http

200

Ignition of Aluminum Particles and Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we review experimental data and models of the ignition of aluminum (Al) particles and clouds in explosion fields. The review considers: (i) ignition temperatures measured for single Al particles in torch experiments; (ii) thermal explosion models of the ignition of single Al particles; and (iii) the unsteady ignition Al particles clouds in reflected shock environments. These are used to develop an empirical ignition model appropriate for numerical simulations of Al particle combustion in shock dispersed fuel explosions.

Kuhl, A L; Boiko, V M

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effects On Beam Alignment Due To Neutron-Irradiated CCD Images At The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 192 laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are automatically aligned to the target-chamber center using images obtained through charged coupled device (CCD) cameras. Several of these cameras are in and around the target chamber during an experiment. Current experiments for the National Ignition Campaign are attempting to achieve nuclear fusion. Neutron yields from these high energy fusion shots expose the alignment cameras to neutron radiation. The present work explores modeling and predicting laser alignment performance degradation due to neutron radiation effects, and demonstrates techniques to mitigate performance degradation. Camera performance models have been created based on the measured camera noise from the cumulative single-shot fluence at the camera location. We have found that the effect of the neutron-generated noise for all shots to date have been well within the alignment tolerance of half a pixel, and image processing techniques can be utilized to reduce the effect even further on the beam alignment.

Awwal, A; Manuel, A; Datte, P; Burkhart, S

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy Star Helps Manufacturers To Achieve High Energy Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From personal electronic devices to homes and office buildings, ENERGY STAR is a recognized symbol of high quality energy performance which enables consumers, home buyers, and businesses to make informed energy decisions. Now, the U...

Dutrow, E.; Hicks, T.

203

Partial fuel stratification to control HCCI heat release rates : fuel composition and other factors affecting pre-ignition reactions of two-stage ignition fuels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion with fully premixed charge is severely limited at high-load operation due to the rapid pressure-rise rates (PRR) which can lead to engine knock and potential engine damage. Recent studies have shown that two-stage ignition fuels possess a significant potential to reduce the combustion heat release rate, thus enabling higher load without knock.

Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.; Cannella, William (Chevron USA Inc.); Yang, Yi; Dronniou, Nicolas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Oxides having high energy densities  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM describes the status of the configuration development and the integration of the major subsystem components vessel structural stiffness, this configuration makes use of the cooling jacket as nuclear shielding

206

TOWARD A STANDARD IGNITION SOURCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ignited with a small propane torch. The top center ofhead is supplied with propane. In these experiments allin the pre-mixed mode with propane alone to simulate trash

Volkingburg, David R. Van

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these values agree well with previous results and computer simulations of Ikon B performance versus R-22. The lower cooling capacity of Ikon B is not a concern unless a particular air conditioner is near its maximum cooling capacity in application. Typically, oversized A/C systems are installed by contractors to cover contingencies. In the extended run with Ikon B, which lasted about 4.5 months at 100 deg F ambient temperature and 68% compressor on time, the air conditioner performed well with no significant loss of energy efficiency. Post-run analysis of the refrigerant, compressor lubricant oil, compressor, compressor outlet tubing, and the filter/dryer showed minor effects but nothing that was considered significant. The project was very successful. All objectives were achieved, and the performance of Ikon B indicates that it can easily be retrofitted into R-22 air conditioners to give 15 - 20% energy savings and a 1 - 3 year payback of retrofit costs depending on location and use. Ikon B has the potential to be a successful commercial product.

Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Preheat of radiative shock in double-shell ignition targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the double-shell ignition target, the nonuniform preheat of the inner shell by high-energy x rays, especially the M-band line radiation and L-shell radiation from the Au hohlraum, aggravates the hydrodynamic instability that causes shell disruption. In this paper, for the first time, we propose another preheating mechanism due to the radiative shock formed in the CH foam, and also confirm and validate such preheat of radiative shock by numerical results. We also give an estimate of the improved double-shell in which the CH foam is replaced by the metallic foam to mitigate the hydrodynamic instabilities, and find that the radiative shock formed in the metallic foam produces a much stronger radiation field to preheat the inner shell, which plays a role in better controlling the instabilities. In double-shells, the preheat of radiative shock, as a potential effect on the instabilities, should be seriously realized and underlined.

Li, J. W.; He, X. T. [Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China); Pei, W. B.; Li, J. H.; Zheng, W. D.; Zhu, S. P. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China); Kang, W. [Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

High West Energy, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPowerInformation RhodeWest Energy, Inc Jump to:

211

High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context 1 Some references The following set of volumes is an outstanding summary of the field of High Energy Astrophysics and its relation to the rest of Astrophysics High Energy Astrophysics, Vols. 1,2 and 3. M.S. Longair, Cam- bridge University

Bicknell, Geoff

212

High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Compression...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Compression Ignition Engines High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Compression Ignition Engines Presentation from...

213

Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects such as ion beam divergence not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point have been analysed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

Honrubia, J J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

High Energy Cost Grants | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) SurveyHelpHelping

215

SCB thermite igniter studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on recent studies comparing the ignition threshold of temperature cycled, SCB thermite devices with units that were not submitted to temperature cycling. Aluminum/copper-oxide thermite was pressed into units at two densities, 45% of theoretical maximum density (TMD) or 47% of TMD. Half of each of the density sets underwent three thermal cycles; each cycle consisted of 2 hours at 74 C and 2 hours at {minus}54 C, with a 5 minute maximum transfer time between temperatures. The temperature cycled units were brought to ambient temperature before the threshold testing. Both the density and the thermal cycling affected the all-fire voltage. Using a 5.34 {micro}F CDU (capacitor discharge unit) firing set, the all-fire voltage for the units that were not temperature cycled increased with density from 32.99 V (45% TMD) to 39.32 V (47% TMD). The all-fire voltages for the thermally cycled units were 34.42 V (45% TMD) and 58.1 V (47% TMD). They also report on no-fire levels at ambient temperature for two component designs; the 5 minute no-fire levels were greater than 1.2 A. Units were also subjected to tests in which 1 W of RF power was injected into the bridges at 10 MHz for 5 minutes. The units survived and fired normally afterwards. Finally, units were subjected to pin-to-pin electrostatic discharge (ESD) tests. None of the units fired upon application of the ESD pulse, and all of the tested units fired normally afterwards.

Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Wackerbarth, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mohler, J.H. [Energetic Materials Associates, Inc., Vero Beach, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

National Ignition Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries &NST DivisionNational Ignition Facility

217

High-Pulse-Energy Ultrafast Laser for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Pulse-Energy Ultrafast Laser for Spectroscopy & Micromachining PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES. In addition to the OPO, a custom designed ultrafast pump source, provides high pulse energy (.res.hw.ac.uk Professor Derryck Reid (Principal Investigator) www.ultrafast.hw.ac.uk BENEFITS & APPLICATIONS: · High pulse

Painter, Kevin

218

Ignition problems in scramjet testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of H{sub 2} in heated air containing H{sub 2}O, radicals, and dust was investigated for scramjet testing. Using a reduced kinetic model for H{sub 2}{minus}O{sub 2} systems, the effects of H{sub 2}O and radicals in nozzles are discussed in relation to engine testing with vitiation heaters. Analysis using linearized rate-equations suggested that the addition of O atoms was 1.5 times more effective than the addition of H atoms for ignition. This result can be applied to the problem of premature ignition caused by residual radicals and to plasma-jet igniters. Thermal and chemical effects of dust, inevitable in storage air heaters, were studied next. The effects of heat capacity and size of dust were expressed in terms of an exponential integral function. It was found that the radical termination on the surface of dust produces an effect equivalent to heat loss. The inhibition of ignition by dust may result, if the mass fraction of dust becomes 10{sup {minus}3}.

Mitani, Tohru [National Aerospace Lab., Miyagi (Japan)] [National Aerospace Lab., Miyagi (Japan)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ?400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ?400 more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

Herrmann, H. W., E-mail: herrmann@lanl.gov; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shmayda, W. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Final Project Report "Advanced Concept Exploration For Fast Ignition Science Program"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactors. FI differs from conventional central hot spot (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using the laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10s of ns) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 ps) high intensity pulse to ignite a small region of it. There are two major physics issues concerning this concept; controlling the laser-induced generation of large electron currents and their propagation through high density plasmas. This project has addressed these two significant scientific issues in Relativistic High Energy Density (RHED) physics. Learning to control relativistic laser matter interaction (and the limits and potential thereof) will enable a wide range of applications. While these physics issues are of specific interest to inertial fusion energy science, they are also important for a wide range of other HED phenomena, including high energy ion beam generation, isochoric heating of materials, and the development of high brightness x-ray sources. Generating, controlling, and understanding the extreme conditions needed to advance this science has proved to be challenging: Our studies have pushed the boundaries of physics understanding and are at the very limits of experimental, diagnostic, and simulation capabilities in high energy density laboratory physics (HEDLP). Our research strategy has been based on pursuing the fundamental physics underlying the Fast Ignition (FI) concept. We have performed comprehensive study of electron generation and transport in fast-ignition targets with experiments, theory, and numerical modeling. A major issue is that the electrons produced in these experiments cannot be measured directlyonly effects due to their transport. We focused mainly on x-ray continuum photons from bremsstrahlung and x-ray line radiation from K-shell fluorescence. Integrated experiments, which combine target compression with short-pulse laser heating, yield additional information on target heating efficiency. This indirect way of studying the underlying behavior of the electrons must be validated with computational modeling to understand the physics and improve the design. This program execution required a large, well-organized team and it was managed by a joint Collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The Collaboration was formed 8 years ago to understand the physics issues of the Fast Ignition concept, building on the strengths of each partner. GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). Since RHED physics is pursued vigorously in many countries, international researchers have been an important part of our efforts to make progress. The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. The experimental program was carried out using the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL, the OMEGA and OMEGA EP lasers at LLE and the Texas Petawatt laser (TPW) at UT Austin. Modeling has been pursued on large computing facilities at LLNL, OSU, and UCSD using codes developed (by us and others) within the HEDLP program, commercial codes, and by leveraging existing supercomputer codes developed by the NNSA ICF program. This Consortium brought together all the componentsresources, facilities, and personnelnecessary to accomplish its aggressive goals. The ACE Program has been strongly collaborative, taking advantage of the expertise of the participating institutions to provide a research effort

STEPHENS, Richard B.; McLEAN, Harry M.; THEOBALD, Wolfgang; AKLI, Kramer; BEG, Farhat N.; SENTOKU, Yasuiko; SCHUMACHER, Douglas; WEI, Mingsheng S.

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Investigation of ignition of thermoplastics through the Hot Wire Ignition Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . , . . . . , . Ignition Temperature Ranges of PMMA, PE, Nylon and PC ' . . . Plot of Temperature Measurements for Plexiglas 1/16". . . . . . . . . . . . . Plot of Temperature Measurements for Plexiglas 1/8". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plot of Temperature Measurements... and Quintiere Materials PMMA Nylon Polyethylene Polypropylene Description Polycast, black, polymethylmeth acr ylate, 2. 5 cm Polypenco, extruded, unfilled, type 6/6, 2. 5 cm Allied Resinous products, Inc. , type tO', 2. 5 cm Poly-Hi, clear, high...

De Araujo, Luiz Claudio Bonilla

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The high energy emission from black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin of the high energy emission (X-rays and gamma-rays) from black holes is still a matter of debate. We present new evidence that hard X-ray emission in the low/hard state may not be dominated by thermal Comptonization. We present an alternative scenario for the origin of the high energy emission that is well suited to explain the high energy emission from GRO J1655-40.

M. D. Caballero-Garcia; J. M. Miller; E. Kuulkers

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermonuclear Ignition of Dark Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter is thought to be at least an order of magnitude more abundant than luminous matter in the Universe, but there has yet to be an unambiguous identification of a wholly dark, galactic-scale structure. There is, however, increasing evidence that VIRGOHI 21 may be a dark galaxy. If VIRGOHI 21 turns out to be composed of dark stars, having approximately the mass of stars found in luminous galaxies, it will pose an enigma within the framework of current astrophysical models, but will provide strong support for my concept, published in 1994 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, of the thermonuclear ignition of stars by nuclear fission, and the corollary, non-ignition of stars. The possibility of galactic thermonuclear ignition is discussed from that framework and leads to my suggestion that the distribution of luminous stars in a galaxy may simply be a reflection of the galactic distribution of the heavy elements.

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermonuclear Ignition of Dark Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter is thought to be at least an order of magnitude more abundant than luminous matter in the Universe, but there has yet to be an unambiguous identification of a wholly dark, galactic-scale structure. There is, however, increasing evidence that VIRGOHI 21 may be a dark galaxy. If VIRGOHI 21 turns out to be composed of dark stars, having approximately the same mass of stars found in luminous galaxies, it will pose an enigma within the framework of current astrophysical models, but will provide strong support for my concept, published in 1994 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, of the thermonuclear ignition of stars by nuclear fission, and the corollary, non-ignition of stars. The possibility of galactic thermonuclear ignition is discussed from that framework and leads to my suggestion that the distribution of luminous stars in a galaxy may simply be a reflection of the galactic distribution of the heavy elements.

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Multi-Megajoule NIF: Ushering In a New Era in High Energy Density Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the status of the stadium-sized National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest laser system and first operational multi-megajoule laser. The 192-beam NIF, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is 96% complete and scheduled for completion in March 2009. The NIF laser will produce nanosecond laser pulses with energies up to approximately 4 MJ in the infrared (laser wavelength = 1.053-{micro}m) and 2MJ in the ultraviolet (laser wavelength = 0.35-{micro}m). With these energies NIF will access conditions of pressure and temperature not previously available on earth, allowing it to conduct experiments in support of the nation's national security, energy, and fundamental science goals. First ignition experiments at NIF are scheduled for FY2010. This paper will provide an overview of the NIF laser and the ignition, energy, and fundamental science activities at NIF.

Keane, C; Moses, E I

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy...

227

Method for reducing ignition delay of fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of reducing ignition delay /tau/, of fuels to negligible values and negligible differences is disclosed. Fuels conditioned to have such negligible values and differences are readily used in multiple fuel engines, such fuels self-ignite substantially instantaneously when injected into an oxidant, require substantially no heat transfer from the oxidant to effect the self-ignition, and the self-ignition is sufficient to sustain continued combustion.

Hoppie, L.O.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Heating National Ignition Facility, Realistic Financial Planning...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOEEIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic...

229

Integral magnetic ignition pickup trigger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a trigger system for the ignition system of an internal combustion engine having a crankcase with a rotatable crankshaft therein, and a flywheel on one end of the crankcase connected to an end of the crankshaft. It comprises: a nonferromagnetic disk-shaped hub for connection to the crankshaft and rotatable therewith on the end opposite the flywheel; and a stationary sensor mounted adjacent the hub for detecting impulses from the magnetically responsive elements as the hub rotates and utilizing the impulses to trigger the ignition system.

King, R.

1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Multidimensional modeling of diesel ignition and combustion using a multistep kinetics model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition and combustion mechanisms in diesel engines were studied using the KIVA code, with modifications to the combustion, heat transfer, crevice flow, and spray models. A laminar-and-turbulent characteristic-time combustion model that has been used successfully for spark-ignited engine studies was extended to allow predictions of ignition and combustion in diesel engines. A more accurate prediction of ignition delay was achieved by using a multistep chemical kinetics model. The Shell knock model was implemented for this purpose and was found to be capable of predicting successfully the autoignition of homogeneous mixtures in a rapid compression machine and diesel spray ignition under engine conditions. The physical significance of the model parameters is discussed and the sensitivity of results to the model constants is assessed. The ignition kinetics model was also applied to simulate the ignition process in a Cummins diesel engine. The post-ignition combustion was simulated using both a single-step Arrhenius kinetics model and also the characteristic-time model to account for the energy release during the mixing-controlled combustion phase. The present model differs from that used in earlier multidimensional computations of diesel ignition in that it also includes state-of-the-art turbulence and spray atomization models. In addition, in this study the model predictions are compared to engine data. It is found that good levels of agreement with the experimental data are obtained using the multistep chemical kinetics model for diesel ignition modeling. However, further study is needed of the effects of turbulent mixing on post-ignition combustion.

Kong, S.C.; Reitz, R.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by neutrinos with energies similar to those of the highest energy cosmic rays.

F. Halzen

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Laser Fusion Energy The High Average Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Fusion Energy and The High Average Power Program John Sethian Naval Research Laboratory Dec for Inertial Fusion Energy with lasers, direct drive targets and solid wall chambers Lasers DPPSL (LLNL) Kr posters Snead Payne #12;Laser(s) Goals 1. Develop technologies that can meet the fusion energy

233

Ignition Delay Times of Natural Gas/Hydrogen Blends at Elevated Pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of natural gases that contain high levels of hydrogen have become a primary interest in the gas turbine market. For reheat gas turbines, understanding of the ignition delay times of high-hydrogen natural gases is important for two...

Brower, Marissa

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

High Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi Gtel Jump to: navigation,Solar Power Plant

235

Improving Collision Induced Dissociation (CID), High Energy Collision...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collision Induced Dissociation (CID), High Energy Collision Dissociation (HCD), and Electron Transfer Dissociation Improving Collision Induced Dissociation (CID), High Energy...

236

Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

Guskov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Ilin, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Technical University (Russian Federation)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

Ren-Yuan Zhu

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

LANL | Physics | High Energy Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathanMultimaterial2Recovery Act Job FairDynamic

239

High Mesa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:NetHealthHigganum, Connecticut: EnergyMesa Jump to:

240

High-energy cosmic ray interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

Engel, Ralph [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Orellana, Mariana [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Reynoso, Matias M. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata, (UNMdP-CONICET) (Argentina); Vila, Gabriela S. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

On Operational Power Reactor Regime and Ignited Spherical Tokamaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2003 version of the "cold" magnetic "Fusion without ignition" in the next 35 years, the talk.-Pitersburg, St.-Pitersburg, RF % Insutute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC "Kurchatov Ins.", Moscow, RF & Vyoptics, Inc for magnetic fusion, OPRR requires a low recycling and wall-stabilized high- plasma. Because of the small

Zakharov, Leonid E.

242

Ignition Control for HCCI  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Objectives Project Objective A multi-year CRADA between ORNL and Delphi to demonstrate a practical application of HCCI in a...

243

High Energy Evolution with Pomeron Loops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high energy/density QCD has been widely used for DIS phenomenology with a projectile particle considered as perturbative and dilute. We review some recent attempts to derive a high energy evolution kernel which treats targets and projectiles in a symmetric manner. From theoretical point of view the problem is tightly related to inclusion of Pomeron loops in the evolution. The ultimate goal is to consider high energy scatterings with both projectile and target being dense, the situation faced at RHIC and the LHC.

Michael Lublinsky

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

244

High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the D? experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

Callaghan, R.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of $10^{20}$ and $10^{13}$ eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos.

F. Halzen

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

247

Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High PerformanceEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division May 2014 ThisRevisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance

Li Ph.D., Cheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cosmic absorption of ultra high energy particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper summarizes the limits on propagation of ultra high energy particles in the Universe, set up by their interactions with cosmic background of photons and neutrinos. By taking into account cosmic evolution of these backgrounds and considering appropriate interactions we derive the mean free path for ultra high energy photons, protons and neutrinos. For photons the relevant processes are the Breit-Wheeler process as well as the double pair production process. For protons the relevant reactions are the photopion production and the Bethe-Heitler process. We discuss the interplay between the energy loss length and mean free path for the Bethe-Heitler process. Neutrino opacity is determined by its scattering off the cosmic background neutrino. We compute for the first time the high energy neutrino horizon as a function of its energy.

Ruffini, R; Xue, S -S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. ...

Atri, Dimitra

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

250

HIGH-ENERGY HEAVY-ION BEAMS AS IGNITERS FOR COMMERCIAL-SCALE INTERTIAL-FUSION POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

confined controlled thermonuclear fusion has been David L.steady succession of thermonuclear microexplosions of smallwas the detonation of thermonuclear bombs. I t was proposed

Judd, D.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

C. Marquet; H. Kowalski; T. Lappi; R. Venugopalan

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

NET-ZERO ENERGY HIGH PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Nebraska­Lincoln · Denise Kuehn, Manager, Demand Side and Sustainable Management, Omaha Public was that the largest potential for enhancing energy supplies in this country is making buildings more efficient. "-- Harvey Perlman, UNL Chancellor #12;Net-Zero Energy, High-Performance Green Buildings | 1 INTRODUCTION

Farritor, Shane

253

Fast Ignition Program Presented at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-The advantages are significant · Efficiency ­ Typical energy efficiency for conversion of 1053 nm hot gas #12;FI program leverages both NNSA and international capabilities · Laser coupling States program is important ­ Nova was first PW in `96 ­ Proceeding with DoE high energy PW initiative

254

Multi-timescale modeling of ignition and flame regimes of n-heptane-air mixtures near spark assisted homogeneous charge compression ignition conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flame regimes of ignition and flame propagation as well as transitions between different flame regimes of n-heptane-air mixtures in a one-dimensional, cylindrical, spark assisted homogeneously charged compression ignition (HCCI) reactor are numerically modeled using a multi-timescale method with reduced kinetic mechanism. It is found that the initial mixture temperature and pressure have a dramatic impact on flame dynamics. Depending on the initial temperature gradient, there exist at least six different combustion regimes, an initial single flame front propagation regime, a coupled low temperature and high temperature double-flame regime, a decoupled low temperature and high temperature double-flame regime, a low temperature ignition regime, a single high temperature flame regime, and a hot ignition regime. The results show that the low temperature and high temperature flames have distinct kinetic and transport properties as well as flame speeds, and are strongly influenced by the low temperature chemistry. The pressure and heat release rates are affected by the appearance of different flame regimes and the transitions between them. Furthermore, it is found that the critical temperature gradient for ignition and acoustic wave coupling becomes singular at the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) region. The results show that both the NTC effect and the acoustic wave propagation in a closed reactor have a dramatic impact on the ignition front and acoustic interaction.

Ju, Yiguang; Sun, Wenting; Burke, M. P.; Gou, Xiaolong; Chen, Zheng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

Relativistic Laser Plasma Research for Fast Ignition Laser Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reviewed are the present status and future prospects of the laser fusion research at the ILE (Institute of Laser Engineering) Osaka. The Gekko XII and Peta Watt laser system have been operated for investigating the fast ignition, the relativistic laser plasma interactions and so on. In particular, the fast ignition experiments with cone shell target have been in progress as the UK and US-Japan collaboration programs. In the experiments, the imploded high density plasmas are heated by irradiating 500 J level peta watt laser pulse. The thermal neutron yield is found to increase by three orders of magnitude by injecting the peta watt laser into the cone shell target. Transport of relativistic high density electron is the critical issue as the basic physics for understanding the dense plasma heating process. By the theory, simulation and experiment, the collective phenomena in the interactions of intense relativistic electron current with dense plasmas has been investigated to find the formation of self organized flow as the result of filamentation (Weibel) instability. Through the present understanding, the new project, FIREX-I has started recently to prove the principle of the fast ignition scheme. Keywords: fast ignition, peta watt laser, relativistic electron, weibel instability

Mima Kunioki; Tanaka Kazuo. A; Kodama Ryosuke; Johzaki Tomohiro; Nagatomo Hideo; Shiraga Hiroyuki; Miyanaga Noriaki; Azechi Hiroshi; Nakai Mitsuo; Norimatsu Takayoshi; Nagai Keiji; Sunahara Atsushi; Nishihara Katsunobu; Taguchi Toshihiro; Sakagami Hitoshi; Sentoku Yasuhiko; Ruhl Hartmut

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and ...

Vogt, D A B R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

Widom, A; Larsen, L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava; L. Larsen

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

260

Astronomy with ultra high-energy particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent measurements of the properties of cosmic rays above 10^17 eV are summarized and implications on our contemporary understanding of their origin are discussed. Cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10^20 eV have been measured, they are the highest-energy particles in the Universe. Particles at highest energies are expected to be only marginally deflected by magnetic fields and they should point towards their sources on the sky. Recent results of the Pierre Auger Observatory have opened a new window to the Universe - astronomy with ultra high-energy particles.

Joerg R. Hoerandel

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fusion and Ignition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours,FrequentlyFunded ResearchPrograms

262

High Brightness Beam Applications: Energy Recovered Linacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first part of the paper some general statements are made regarding applications suitable for utilizing energy recovered linacs (ERLs) by contrasting their potential performance to that of single pass linacs and storage rings. As a result of their potential for extremely good beam quality in combination with high average beam current, ERLs have been used and considered as drivers of both free electron laser and partially coherent photon sources, from THz through X-rays; as a suitable technology for high energy electron cooling; and as a continuous or semi-continuous electron beam source for high energy colliders. At present, beam requirements tend to be highly matched to end use requirements. By reviewing some of the many examples which have either been reduced to practice, or are being explored presently, one can develop an appreciation for the wide range of parameters being considered in ERL applications.

Geoffrey A. Krafft

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Igniter containing titanium hydride and potassium perchlorate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive device is described which employs a particular titanium hydride-potassium perchlorate composition directly ignitible by an electrical bridgewire.

Dietzel, Russel W. (Albuquerque, NM); Leslie, William B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A new metric of the low-mode asymmetry for ignition target designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility, the measured neutron yield and hot spot pressure are significantly lower than simulations. Understanding the underlying physics of the deficit is essential to achieving ignition. This paper investigates the low-mode areal density asymmetry in the main fuel of ignition capsule. It is shown that the areal density asymmetry breaks up the compressed shell and significantly reduces the conversion of implosion kinetic energy to hot spot internal energy, leading to the calculated hot spot pressure and neutron yield quite close to the experimental data. This indicates that the low-mode shell areal density asymmetry can explain part of the large discrepancy between simulations and experiments. Since only using the hot spot shape term could not adequately characterize the effects of the shell areal density asymmetry on implosion performance, a new metric of the low-mode asymmetry is developed to accurately measure the probability of ignition.

Gu, Jianfa, E-mail: gu-jianfa@iapcm.ac.cn; Dai, Zhensheng; Fan, Zhengfeng; Zou, Shiyang, E-mail: zou-shiyang@iapcm.ac.cn; Ye, Wenhua; Pei, Wenbing; Zhu, Shaoping [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

Parsa, Z. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Institute for Theoretical Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Control of Thermal Ignition in Gasoline Engines C. J. Chiang and A. G. Stefanopoulou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(HCCI) en- gine, is fundamentally different from the spark ignition (SI) and the compression ignition

Stefanopoulou, Anna

269

High-energy electron beam technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-energy electron beam (HEEB) technology was developed under the US Department of Defense (DOD) charged-particle-beam (CPB) directed-energy program. The program's objective was advanced military weapon systems. For the past two decades, charged-particle-beam research focused on producing intense beams and the vehicles to deliver large amounts of electrical energy. The charged-particle beams of interest for weapon systems had particle energies up to 100 MeV, beam currents of tens of kiloamperes, and propagation distances in excess of 100 m. However, such high energy levels are not required for industrial uses of the technology. It is anticipated that these less-aggressive beams will provide an electrical heat source suitable for a variety of materials processing applications, including surface treatment, joining, shock hardening, phase-transformation hardening, peening, shock-wave compaction, and melting. Much more R and D is needed to transfer to industry the high-energy electron beam technology developed in the CPB program. For example, its power as a materials processing tool must be convincingly demonstrated. Also required are compact, reliable accelerators that are relatively simple to use and reasonably priced.

Danko, J.C.; Lundin, C.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Nolting, E.E. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, White Oak, MD (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A high energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics studies in the energy range from 20 MeV to 1000 MeV is considered. The proposed concept uses a stack of silicon micro-strip detectors where they play the roles of both a converter and a tracker. The purpose of this paper is to outline the parameters of such a polarimeter and to estimate the productivity of measurements. Our study supported by a Monte Carlo simulation shows that with a one-year observation period the polarimeter will provide 5.5 % accuracy of the polarization degree for a photon energy of 100 MeV, which would be a significant advance relative to the currently explored energy range of a few MeV. The proposed polarimeter design could easily be adjusted to the specific photon energy range to maximize efficiency if needed.

Eingorn, Maxim; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Urciuoli, Guido Maria; De Persio, Fulvio; Meddi, Franco

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooldown of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) with the baseline liquid nitrogen cooling system was analyzed. On the basis of this analysis and present knowledge of the two-phase heat transfer, the current baseline CIT can be cooled down in about 1.5 h. An extensive heat transfer test program is recommended to reduce uncertainty in the heat transfer performance and to explore methods for minimizing the cooldown time. An alternate CIT cooldown system is described which uses a pressurized gaseous helium coolant in a closed-loop system. It is shown analytically that this system will cool down the CIT well within 1 h. Confidence in this analysis is sufficiently high that a heat transfer test program would not be necessary. The added cost of this alternate system is estimated to be about $5.3 million. This helium cooling system represents a reasonable backup approach to liquid nitrogen cooling of the CIT. 3 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Keeton, D.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

ENHANCED IGNITION FOR I.C. ENGINES WITH PREMIXED CHARGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Igniter for Internal Combustion Engines," SAE Paper 760764.Emissions from an Internal Combustion Engine,'' Combusti and11 Laser Ignited Internal Combustion Engine -An Experimental

Dale, J.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Improving the Efficiency of Spark Ignited, Stoichiometric Natural...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Spark Ignited, Stoichiometric Natural Gas Engines Improving the Efficiency of Spark Ignited, Stoichiometric Natural Gas Engines This work focused on using camless engine technology...

274

Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

275

alcohol ignition interlock: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE), a tokamak designed for burning plasma research. Engineering 58 The National Ignition Campaign Presentation to Plasma Physics and...

276

Stimulated scattering in laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments, one often encounters a k?{sub D} range of 0.15?ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Large-scale simulations of the hohlraum plasma show that the SRS wavelength spectrum peaks below 600?nm, consistent with most measured NIF spectra, and that nonlinear trapping in the presence of plasma gradients determines the SRS spectral peak. Collisional effects on SRS, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), LDI, and re-scatter, together with three dimensional effects, are examined. Effects of collisions are found to include de-trapping as well as cross-speckle electron temperature variation from collisional heating, the latter of which reduces gain, introduces a positive frequency shift that counters the trapping-induced negative frequency shift, and affects SRS and SBS saturation. Bowing and breakup of ion-acoustic wavefronts saturate SBS and cause a dramatic, sharp decrease in SBS reflectivity. Mitigation of SRS and SBS in the strongly nonlinear trapping regime is discussed.

Yin, L., E-mail: lyin@lanl.gov; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Finnegan, S. M.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kirkwood, R. K.; Milovich, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Multi-strike ignition to improve performance, reduce misfiring of large gas engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New product and application information is now available on the advanced `CPU-2OOO` digital ignition system introduced by Altronic earlier this year for large-bore gas engines and integral compressors. The system is designed to improve performance, reduce misfiring, and be easily retrofitted to existing large-bore engines. including those that are being converted to lean-burn combustion in order to reduce emissions. To do this, the CPU-2OOO system features a selectable multi-striking mode, a selectable energy level and second spark plug cut-off control, a choice of global or individual cylinder timing control, and a high-energy long-duration spark. The 24 Vdc-powered system also offers comprehensive display and communications capabilities, plus system diagnostics and self-test functions. The system uses existing Altronic II-CPU coils, pickups, primary wiring harnesses and other hardware, allowing for easy upgrades of existing II-CPU installations. Also, a detonation avoidance system is being developed as an option for engine protection. Altronic says the field tests have demonstrated the ability of the CPU-20OO system to ignite extra-lean mixtures created when turbochargers are added to engines that previously operated at much richer levels. NO{sub x} emissions have been reduced by as much as 88%, to less than 2.7 g/kWh.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fusion Ignition Research Experiment Engineering Status Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the world. The FIRE web site has been chosen as a selection for the Scout Report for Science and EngineeringFusion Ignition Research Experiment -FIRE- Engineering Status Report For Fiscal Year 2000 Issued on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE), a tokamak designed for burning plasma research. Engineering

279

Innovative High Energy Density Capacitor Design Offers Potential...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

like TroyCap's High Density Energy Nanolaminate Capacitor (HEDCAP) that may offer new clean energy applications to meet the nation's strategic energy goals and secure...

280

Interface Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium Ion Batteries. Interface Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract: Li-rich, Mn-rich...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

282

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications Presentation given by...

283

Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

284

Novel and Optimized Materials Phases for High Energy Density...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Novel and Optimized Materials Phases for High Energy Density Batteries Novel and Optimized Materials Phases for High Energy Density Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

285

TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries. TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries. Abstract: We will...

286

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Federal High Performance Computing Data Centers Case study...

287

Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature...

288

USABC Energy Storage Testing - High Power and PHEV Development...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Storage Testing - High Power and PHEV Development USABC Energy Storage Testing - High Power and PHEV Development Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

289

Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum Energy-Efficient Melting and Direct Delivery of High Quality Molten Aluminum itmdelivery.pdf More...

290

Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for...

291

Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping This factsheet describes a...

292

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program...

293

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes This presentation is from the Building America...

294

HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS SEMINAR, 19931996 1993 Seminars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS SEMINAR, 1993­1996 1993 Seminars 10/4 Joseph Boudreau Measuring the Z 0 from ZEUS University of Wisconsin 10/25 Thomas E. Browder Unsolved Problems in B Physics Cornell Ecole Normale Superieure 4/4 Naoya Hata Solar Neutrinos: Hint for Neutrino Mass University

295

Density Estimation Trees in High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density Estimation Trees can play an important role in exploratory data analysis for multidimensional, multi-modal data models of large samples. I briefly discuss the algorithm, a self-optimization technique based on kernel density estimation, and some applications in High Energy Physics.

Anderlini, Lucio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Heavy Flavors in High Energy ep Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most recent measurements of open charm and beauty production in high energy ep collisions at HERA are reviewed. The measurements explored the different aspects of quantum chromodynamics involved in the process of heavy flavor production. The results are compared with perturbative theoretical calculations at next-to-leading order.

Meng Wang

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

297

Correlations in the high-energy photoeffect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine correlations in high-energy photoeffect, utilizing a perturbative treatment of the effects beyond the independent particle approximation (IPA) in the high-energy photoionization of states with arbitrary values of the angular momenta l. The dominant mechanism of IPA breaking is discussed. The dependence of IPA breaking contributions on the parameters 1/Z and {alpha}Z is analyzed. In the general case the amplitude is expressed as a linear combination of IPA amplitudes. The development of precise experiments, together with the demonstration that there is substantial cancellation among the nonrelativistic partial correlations amplitudes in many cases, particularly for ground-state atoms, makes a relativistic approach to the problem desirable, even at relatively low values of photon energy.

Drukarev, E. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg 188300 (Russian Federation); Pratt, R. H. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

Patrick Slane

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

Slane, Patrick

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Managing transient behaviors of a dual mode spark ignition-- controlled auto ignition engine with a variable valve timing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasoline Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine has the potential of providing better fuel economy and emissions characteristics than current spark ignition engines. One implementation of this technology ...

Santoso, Halim G. (Halim Gustiono), 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CARBON DEFLAGRATION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA. I. CENTRALLY IGNITED MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A leading model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) begins with a white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass that ignites a degenerate thermonuclear runaway close to its center and explodes. In a series of papers, we shall explore the consequences of ignition at several locations within such dwarfs. Here we assume central ignition, which has been explored before, but is worth revisiting, if only to validate those previous studies and to further elucidate the relevant physics for future work. A perturbed sphere of hot iron ash with a radius of {approx}100 km is initialized at the middle of the star. The subsequent explosion is followed in several simulations using a thickened flame model in which the flame speed is either fixed-within the range expected from turbulent combustion-or based on the local turbulent intensity. Global results, including the explosion energy and bulk nucleosynthesis (e.g., {sup 56}Ni of 0.48-0.56 M{sub Sun }) turn out to be insensitive to this speed. In all completed runs, the energy released by the nuclear burning is adequate to unbind the star, but not enough to give the energy and brightness of typical SNe Ia. As found previously, the chemical stratification observed in typical events is not reproduced. These models produce a large amount of unburned carbon and oxygen in central low velocity regions, which is inconsistent with spectroscopic observations, and the intermediate mass elements and iron group elements are strongly mixed during the explosion.

Ma, H.; Woosley, S. E.; Malone, C. M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Almgren, A.; Bell, J. [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

second resulting from a thermonuclear explosion of materialresult from the thermonuclear burning of a carbon-oxygensensitive to how the thermonuclear runaway is ignited (

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser The Heart of the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a world-class laser fusion machine that is currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The 192 laser beams that converge on the target at the output of the NIF laser system originate from a low power fiber laser in the Master Oscillator Room (MOR). The MOR is responsible for generating the single pulse that seeds the entire NIF laser system. This single pulse is phase-modulated to add bandwidth, and then amplified and split into 48 separate beam lines all in single-mode polarizing fiber. Before leaving the MOR, each of the 48 output beams are temporally sculpted into high contrast shapes using Arbitrary Waveform Generators. The 48 output beams of the MOR are amplified in the Preamplifier Modules (PAMs), split and amplified again to generate 192 laser beams. The 192 laser beams are frequency converted to the third harmonic and then focused at the center of a 10-meter diameter target chamber. The MOR is an all fiber-based system utilizing highly reliable Telecom-Industry type hardware. The nearly 2,000,000 joules of energy at the output of the NIF laser system starts from a single fiber oscillator that fits in the palm of your hand. This paper describes the design and performance of the laser source that provides the precision light to the National Ignition Facility. Shown below is a simplified diagram illustrating the MOR's basic functions.

Browning, D F; Erbert, G V

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ignition quality determination of diesel fuels from hydrogen type distribution of hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen types of diesel like hydrocarbon fuels which have dominant effect on the ignition quality have been identified. A scheme of characterizing the chemistry of hydrocarbon fuels in terms of these hydrogen types using proton nuclear resonance spectrometry has been proposed. Using this analysis technique on 70 different diesel fuels, whose cetane numbers were determined on a number of standard cetane rating engines, an empirical expression which relates the ignition quality to the hydrogen type distribution of the fuels has been developed. The developed expression and the relationship between the ignition delay and cetane number imply that the effective activation energy term in the usual semiempirical ignition delay expression is not a constant for a given fuel but is a function of pressure and temperature as well as the fuel chemistry.

Gulder, O.L.; Glavincevski, B.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Analysis of ignition behavior in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine using propane and methane as primary fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental analyses of the ignition delay (ID) behavior for diesel-ignited propane and diesel-ignited methane dual fuel combustion. Two sets of experiments were performed at a constant speed (1800 rev/min) using a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine with the stock ECU and a wastegated turbocharger. First, the effects of fuel-air equivalence ratios (???© pilot ?¢???¼ 0.2-0.6 and ???© overall ?¢???¼ 0.2-0.9) on IDs were quantified. Second, the effects of gaseous fuel percent energy substitution (PES) and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) (from 2.5 to 10 bar) on IDs were investigated. With constant ???© pilot (> 0.5), increasing ???© overall with propane initially decreased ID but eventually led to premature propane autoignition; however, the corresponding effects with methane were relatively minor. Cyclic variations in the start of combustion (SOC) increased with increasing ???© overall (at constant ???© pilot), more significantly for propane than for methane. With increasing PES at constant BMEP, the ID showed a nonlinear (initially increasing and later decreasing) trend at low BMEPs for propane but a linearly decreasing trend at high BMEPs. For methane, increasing PES only increased IDs at all BMEPs. At low BMEPs, increasing PES led to significantly higher cyclic SOC variations and SOC advancement for both propane and methane. Finally, the engine ignition delay (EID) was also shown to be a useful metric to understand the influence of ID on dual fuel combustion.

Polk, A. C.; Gibson, C. M.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

306

Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac and AGS to RHIC to CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

High Energy Polarization of Blazars : Detection Prospects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (wit...

Chakraborty, Nachiketa; Fields, Brian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

High energy photon-photon collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrodynamic instabilities in beryllium targets for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beryllium ablators offer higher ablation velocity, rate, and pressure than their carbon-based counterparts, with the potential to increase the probability of achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. We present here a detailed hydrodynamic stability analysis of low (NIF Revision 6.1) and high adiabat NIF beryllium target designs. Our targets are optimized to fully utilize the advantages of beryllium in order to suppress the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. This results in an implosion that resists breakup of the capsule, and simultaneously minimizes the amount of ablator material mixed into the fuel. We quantify the improvement in stability of beryllium targets relative to plastic ones, and show that a low adiabat beryllium capsule can be at least as stable at the ablation front as a high adiabat plastic target.

Yi, S. A., E-mail: austinyi@lanl.gov; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Programmable Beam Spatial Shaping System for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system of customized spatial light modulators has been installed onto the front end of the laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The devices are capable of shaping the beam profile at a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain. Their primary function is to introduce 'blocker' obscurations at programmed locations within the beam profile. These obscurations are positioned to shadow small, isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. The modulators were designed to enable a drop-in retrofit of each of the 48 existing Pre Amplifier Modules (PAMs) without compromising their original performance specifications. This was accomplished by use of transmissive Optically Addressable Light Valves (OALV) based on a Bismuth Silicon Oxide photoconductive layer in series with a twisted nematic liquid crystal (LC) layer. These Programmable Spatial Shaper packages in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy have provided a robust approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics on NIF.

Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Scanlan, M; Haynam, C; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Budge, T; Henesian, M; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J M

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12, 2004DepartmentWaste HeatStructuresHigh Energy

313

New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOETowardExecutiveRateEnergyDepartmentEnergyHigh

314

New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOETowardExecutiveRateEnergyDepartmentEnergyHigh0 DOE

315

New INL High Energy Battery Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOETowardExecutiveRateEnergyDepartmentEnergyHigh0

316

High-Energy Neutrinos from Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce neutrino astronomy from the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. Although the discovery of cosmic rays dates back close to a century, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. We review the facts as well as the speculations about the sources. Among these gamma ray bursts and active galaxies represent well-motivated speculations because these are also the sources of the highest energy gamma rays, with emission observed up to 20 TeV, possibly higher. We discuss why cosmic accelerators are also expected to be cosmic beam dumps producing high-energy neutrino beams associated with the highest energy cosmic rays. Cosmic ray sources may produce neutrinos from MeV to EeV energy by a variety of mechanisms. The important conclusion is that, independently of the specific blueprint of the source, it takes a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory to detect the neutrino beam associated with the highest energy cosmic rays and gamma rays. The technology for commissioning such instruments exists.

F. Halzen

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Constraints of Dark Energy at High Redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constrains of dark energy (DE) at high redshift from current and mock future observational data are obtained. It is found that present data give poor constraints of DE even beyond redshift z=0.4, and mock future 2298 type Ia supernove data only give a little improvement of the constraints. We analyze in detail why constraints of DE decrease rapidly with the increasing of redshift. Then we try to improve the constraints of DE at high redshift. It is shown that the most efficient way is to improve the error of observations.

Qiping Su; Rong-Gen Cai

2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

High Risk Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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321

High Temperature Superconductivity Partners | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many| Department HIGH PERFORMANCEThe HighMap

322

High energy density redox flow device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

STATE RESEARCH CENTER OF RUSSIA INSTITUTE FOR HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATE RESEARCH CENTER OF RUSSIA INSTITUTE FOR HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS - High Energy Physics Energy Physics" BNPI, Novosibirsk, September 2010 #12;2 STATE RESEARCH CENTER OF RUSSIA INSTITUTE

324

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Data Preservation in High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data from high-energy physics experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. However, until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use, and many important and complex data sets have simply been lost. While the current focus is on the LHC at CERN, in the current period several important and unique experimental programs at other facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, b-factories and the Tevatron. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis (DPHEP) was convened at the end of 2008. The group now aims to publish a full and detailed review of the present status of data preservation in high energy physics. This contribution summarises the results of the DPHEP study group, describing the challenges of data preservation in high energy physics and the group's first conclusions and recommendations. The physics motivation for data preservation, generic computing and preservation models, technological expectations and governance aspects at local and international levels are examined.

Roman Kogler; David M. South; Michael Steder

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240?eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

Moore, A. S., E-mail: alastair.moore@physics.org; Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

329

Target area and diagnostic interface issues on the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Program. It will be used for experiments for inertial confinement fusion ignition, high energy density science, and basic science. Many interface issues confront the experimentalist who wishes to design, fabricate, and install diagnostics, and to help this process, a set of standards and guideline documents is being prepared. Compliance with these will be part of a formal diagnostic design review process. In this article we provide a short description of each, with reference to more complete documentation. The complete documentation will also be available through the NIF Diagnostics web page. Target area interface issues are grouped into three categories. First are the layout and utility interface issues which include the safety analysis report, target area facility layout; target chamber port locations; diagnostic interferences and envelopes; utilities and cable tray distribution; and timing and fiducial systems. Second are the environment interface issues which include radiation electromagnetic interference/electromagnetic pulse effects and mitigation; electrical grounding, shielding, and isolation; and cleanliness and vacuum guidelines. Third are the operational interface issues which include manipulator based target diagnostics, diagnostic alignment, shot life cycle and setup, diagnostic controllers; integrated computer control system; shot data archival; classified operations; and remote operations.

Bell, Perry; Lee, Dean; Wootton, Alan; Mascio, Bill; Kimbrough, Joe; Sewall, Noel; Hibbard, Wilthea; Dohoney, Pat; Landon, Mark; Christianson, George (and others) [and others

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

Alp, Ercan E. (Bolingbrook, IL); Mooney, Timothy M. (Westmont, IL); Toellner, Thomas (Green Bay, WI)

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Target Diagnostics Supports NIF's Path to Ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics requirements derived from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experimental campaigns are leading to a wide variety of target diagnostics. Software development for the control and analysis of these diagnostics is included in the NIF Integrated Computer Control System, Diagnostic Control System and Data Visualization. These projects implement the configuration, controls, data analysis and visual representation of most of these diagnostics. To date, over 40 target diagnostics have been developed to support NIF experiments. In 2011 diagnostics were developed or enhanced to measure Ignition performance in a high neutron yield environment. Performance is optimized around four key variables: Adiabat (a) which is the strength and timing of four shocks delivered to the target, Velocity (V) of the imploding target, Mix (M) is the uniformity of the burn, and the Shape (S) of the imploding Deuterium Tritium (DT) hot spot. The diagnostics used to measure each of these parameters is shown in figure 1. Adiabat is measured using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) diagnostic consisting of three streak cameras. To provide for more accurate adiabat measurements the VISAR streak cameras were enhanced in FY11 with a ten comb fiducial signal controller to allow for post shot correction of the streak camera sweep non-linearity. Mix is measured by the Neutron Time of Flight (NTOF) and Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostics. To accommodate high neutron yield shots, NTOF diagnostic controls are being modified to use Mach Zehnder interferometer signals to allow the digitizers to be moved from near the target chamber to the neutron shielded diagnostic mezzanine. In December 2011 the first phase of RAGS diagnostic commissioning will be completed. This diagnostic will analyze the tracers that are added to NIF target capsules that undergo nuclear reactions during the shot. These gases are collected and purified for nuclear counting by the RAGS system. Three new instrument controllers were developed and commissioned to support this diagnostic. A residual-gas analyzer (RGA) instrument measures the gas content at various points in the system. The Digital Gamma Spectrometer instrument measures the radiological spectrum of the decaying gas isotopes. A final instrument controller was developed to interface to a PLC based Gas collection system. In order to support the implosion velocity measurements an additional Gated X-ray Detector (GXD) diagnostic was tested and commissioned. This third GXD views the target through a slit contained in its snout and allows the other GXD diagnostics to be used for measuring the shape on the same shot. In order to measure the implosion shape in a high neutron environment, Actide Readout In A Neutron Environment (ARIANE) and Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostics were commissioned. The controls for ARIANE, a fixed port gated x-ray imager, contain a neutron shielded camera and micro channel plate pulser with its neutron sensitive electronics located in the diagnostic mezzanine. The NI diagnostic is composed of two Spectral Instruments SI-1000 cameras located 20M from the target and provides neutron images of the DT hot spot for high yield shots. The development and commissioning of these new or enhanced diagnostics in FY11 have provided meaningful insight that facilitates the optimization of the four key Ignition variables. In FY12 they will be adding three new diagnostics and enhancing four existing diagnostics in support of the continuing optimization series of campaigns.

Shelton, R

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

Modeling of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) of methane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of piston engines on a compression ignition cycle using a lean, homogeneous charge has many potential attractive features. These include the potential for extremely low NO{sub x} and particulate emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency and not requiring the expensive high pressure injection system of the typical modem diesel engine. Using the HCT chemical kinetics code to simulate autoignition of methane-air mixtures, we have explored the ignition timing, burn duration, NO{sub x} production, indicated efficiency and power output of an engine with a compression ratio of 15:1 at 1200 and 2400 rpm. HCT was modified to include the effects of heat transfer. This study used a single control volume reaction zone that varies as a function of crank angle. The ignition process is controlled by varying the intake equivalence ratio and varying the residual gas trapping (RGT). RGT is internal exhaust gas recirculation which recycles both heat and combustion product species. It is accomplished by varying the timing of the exhaust valve closure. Inlet manifold temperature was held constant at 330 Kelvins. Results show that there is a narrow range of operational conditions that show promise of achieving the control necessary to vary power output while keeping indicated efficiency above 50% and NO{sub x} levels below 100 ppm.

Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.M.; Westbrook, C.; Pitz, W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering

Adams, T.

334

National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

High Efficiency Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load limit Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit...

336

High Efficiency Fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 PM gbhp-hr NOx gbhp-hr 1988 1991 2004 2007 2010 * SI gasoline engine with 3-Way Catalyst: Thermal Efficiency 30% * Diesel engines are the most...

337

Photoresist integrity during high energy implant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoresist integrity was evaluated on a commercial high-energy ion implanter operated up to the specified energy (1.7 MeV B or 3.0 MeV P) and power (1.0 MeV B at 1000 p{mu}A or 2.0 MeV P at 500 p{mu}A) limits. SEM Cross-sectional analysis of several photoresists showed that the proper cooling was maintained to avoid significant photoresist degradation. Photoresist shrinkage was observed, resulting in thickness reductions up to 22% and significant changes in sidewall slope. Little asymmetry was observed when photoresist was implanted at a 7{degrees} tilt. At the specified power limits, photoresist outgassing prevented smooth implant operation unless pressure compensation was implemented.

Parrill, T.M. [Texas Instruments Productization, Dallas, TX (United States); Jones, M. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Jain, A. [Texas Indstruments Semiconductor Process and Development Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

The National Ignition Facility: Status of Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bruce Warner Deputy Associate Director, NIF Programs Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory October 11, 2005 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L2 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL P9266 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L28 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL National Ignition FacilityNational Ignition Facility P9292 San

339

High Energy Density Utracapacitors: Low-Cost, High Energy and Power Density, Nanotube-Enhanced Ultracapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FastCAP is improving the performance of an ultracapacitora battery-like electronic device that can complement, and possibly even replace, an HEV or EV battery pack. Ultracapacitors have many advantages over conventional batteries, including long lifespans (over 1 million cycles, as compared to 10,000 for conventional batteries) and better durability. Ultracapacitors also charge more quickly than conventional batteries, and they release energy more quickly. However, ultracapacitors have fallen short of batteries in one key metric: energy densityhigh energy density means more energy storage. FastCAP is redesigning the ultracapacitors internal structure to increase its energy density. Ultracapacitors traditionally use electrodes made of irregularly shaped, porous carbon. FastCAPs ultracapacitors are made of tiny, aligned carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide a regular path for ions moving in and out of the ultracapacitors electrode, increasing the overall efficiency and energy density of the device.

None

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Future high energy colliders. Formal report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

Parsa, Z. [ed.] [ed.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministrationHigh

342

High Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi Gtel Jump to: navigation,Solar Power PlantWells GeothermalHigh

343

High Energy Physics Division, ANL Lattice QCD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in the Madison SymmetricHigh Carbon Fly

344

High Performance Valve Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHighMetalEnergyMaterials

345

High Plains Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPowerInformation Rhode IslandInformationHigh

346

Engineering of High Energy Cathode Material | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12, 2004DepartmentWaste HeatStructures |DonHigh

347

Engineering of high energy cathode material | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12, 2004DepartmentWaste HeatStructuresHigh

348

Search for High Energy Density Cathode Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 RoadmapProgram| Department1Scott MinosHigh Energy Density

349

High Bridge, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:NetHealthHigganum, Connecticut: Energy ResourcesHigh

350

Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Climates Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and Humid Climates School districts around the country are finding that the smart energy choices can help them...

351

University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Overview of the gamma reaction history diagnostic for the national ignition facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has a need for measuring gamma radiation as part of a nuclear diagnostic program. A new gamma-detection diagnostic uses 900 off-axis parabolic mirrors to rel ay Cherenkov light from a volume of pressurized gas. This non imaging optical system has the high-speed detector placed at a stop position with the Cherenkov light delayed until after the prompt gammas have passed through the detector. Because of the wavelength range (250 to 700 nm), the optical element surface finish was a key design constraint. A cluster of four channels (each set to a different gas pressure) will collect the time histories for different energy ranges of gammas.

Kim, Yong Ho [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Scott C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, Joseph M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Carl S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Malone, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cox, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frogget, Brent C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaufman, Morris I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tunnell, Thomas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tibbitts, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Palagi, Martin J [NST/LAS VEGAS; Stoeffl, Wolfgang [LLNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Simulation of Radiation Backgrounds associated with the HEXRI Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments resulting in a significant neutron yield are scheduled to start in 2010 at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A wide range of diagnostics will be used to measure several parameters of implosion such as the core and fuel shape, temperatures and densities, and neutron yield. Accurate evaluations of the neutron and gamma backgrounds are important for several diagnostics, such as the High Energy X-ray Imager (HEXRI). Several Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to identify the expected signal to background ratios at several potential locations for the HEXRI diagnostics. Gamma backgrounds were significantly reduced by using tungsten collimators. The collimators resulted in the reduction of the gamma background at the HEXRI scintillators by more than an order of magnitude during the first 40 ns following a THD shot.

Khater, H; Dauffy, L; Tommasini, R; Eckart, M; Eder, D

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

354

On fuel selection in controlled auto-ignition engines : the link between intake conditions, chemical kinetics, and stratification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research is to examine the impact fuel selection can have on the high-load limit in a stratified Compression Auto-Ignition (CAI) engine. This was accomplished by first studying the validity of the ...

Maria, Amir Gamal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

2924 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2008 Kinetic Ignition Enhancement of H2 Versus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, any type of enhancement of ignition in high- speed flow is complicated by the coupling of heat and rad 12, 2008. This work was supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant

Ju, Yiguang

356

New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the proposed work was to use electrospinning technology to integrate dissimilar materials (lithium alloy and carbon) into novel composite nanofiber anodes, which simultaneously had high energy density, reduced cost, and improved abuse tolerance. The nanofiber structure allowed the anodes to withstand repeated cycles of expansion and contraction. These composite nanofibers were electrospun into nonwoven fabrics with thickness of 50 ?m or more, and then directly used as anodes in a lithium-ion battery. This eliminated the presence of non-active materials (e.g., conducting carbon black and polymer binder) and resulted in high energy and power densities. The nonwoven anode structure also provided a large electrode-electrolyte interface and, hence, high rate capacity and good lowtemperature performance capability. Following are detailed objectives for three proposed project periods. During the first six months: Obtain anodes capable of initial specific capacities of 650 mAh/g and achieve ~50 full charge/discharge cycles in small laboratory scale cells (50 to 100 mAh) at the 1C rate with less than 20 percent capacity fade; In the middle of project period: Assemble, cycle, and evaluate 18650 cells using proposed anode materials, and demonstrate practical and useful cycle life (750 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade) in 18650 cells with at least twice improvement in the specific capacity than that of conventional graphite electrodes; At the end of project period: Deliver 18650 cells containing proposed anode materials, and achieve specific capacities greater than 1200 mAh/g and cycle life longer than 5000 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade.

Zhang, Xiangwu; Fedkiw, Peter; Khan, Saad; Huang, Alex; Fan, Jiang

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Develop high energy high power Li-ion battery cathode materials : a first principles computational study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as cathode materials for Li-ion battery. Physica B-CondensedHigh Energy High Power Li-ion Battery Cathode Materials AHigh Energy High Power Li-ion Battery Cathode Materials A

Xu, Bo; Xu, Bo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kasei * Focused on High Capacity Manganese Rich (HCMR TM ) cathodes & Silicon-Carbon composite anodes for Lithium ion batteries * Envia's high energy Li-ion battery materials...

359

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Density...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV's Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems Vehicle Technologies Office Merit...

360

High Speed Flywheels for Integrated Energy Storage and Attitude Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Speed Flywheels for Integrated Energy Storage and Attitude Control Christopher D. Hall. Decomposition of the space of internal torques separates the attitude control functionfrom the energy storage simultaneously performing energy storage and extraction operations. 1 Introduction The power engineering

Hall, Christopher D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

362

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy, Long...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Energy, Long Cycle Life Lithium-ion Batteries for EV Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy, Long Cycle Life Lithium-ion Batteries for EV...

363

New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks June 11, 2009 -...

364

High Energy Resummation in Quantum ChromoDynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I discuss different aspects of high energy resummation in Quantum Chromo-Dynamics and its relevance for precision physics at hadron colliders. The high energy factorisation theorem is presented and discussed ...

Marzani, Simone

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ignition Control for HCCI | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department-2023 Idaho4 AUDIT REPORT MANAGEMENT OF1HCCI

366

Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Technologies Office...

367

Fast Search Techniques for High Energy Pulsars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modified versions of two "standard" pulsar search techniques are presented that allow large-scale searches for pulsations in long duration high-energy data sets using relatively modest amounts of computer time. For small numbers of photons (N_phot <~ 10^4), optimized brute-force epoch folding searches are preferred. For larger numbers of photons, advanced Fourier domain acceleration searches are used. Using these techniques, my collaborators and I have searched Chandra observations of the CasA supernova remnant (SNR) point source and the isolated neutron star RX J1856.5-3754 for pulsations, and confirmed the 65.6 ms pulsar in the 3C 58 SNR during a blind search of archival RXTE data.

Scott M. Ransom

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 5 / 8 #12;Jobs User submit job if failing Output of job downloaded on local computer Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energyData mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier SOSCIP July 3, 2014 Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP

Prodiæ, Aleksandar

370

High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Kinetic modelling of a surrogate diesel fuel applied to 3D auto-ignition in HCCI engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prediction of auto-ignition delay times in HCCI engines has risen interest on detailed chemical models. This paper described a validated kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of a model Diesel fuel (n-decane and ?-methylnaphthalene). The 3D model for the description of low and high temperature auto-ignition in engines is presented. The behavior of the model fuel is compared with that of n-heptane. Simulations show that the 3D model coupled with the kinetic mechanism can reproduce experimental HCCI and Diesel engine results and that the correct modeling of auto-ignition in the cool flame region is essential in HCCI conditions.

Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, Ren; Battin-Leclerc, Frdrique; Jay, S; Da Cruz, A Pires

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A study of ignition and combustion characteristics of isolated coal water slurry droplet using digital image processing technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at constant pressure Coal water slurry Diffusion coefficient (Damkohler number) Activation energy Higher heating value Gasification rate constant Flame lift off distance Mass of CWS drop Number of coal particles in a single CWS drop Prandtl number... Parameters. . . II. 2. Coal Ignition and Combustion . . 13 II. 2. 1. Introduction. II. 2. 2. Pyrolysis. . . . . . II. 2. 3. Volatiles Oxidation. . . 13 . . 15 . . 16 II. 2. 4. Ignition. II. 2. 5. Coal Combustion . . . . 16 . . 17 CHAPTER Page 11...

Bhadra, Tanmoy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The High Energy Telescope on EXIST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed next generation multi-wavelength survey mission. The primary instrument is a High Energy telescope (HET) that conducts the deepest survey for Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs), obscured-accreting and dormant Supermassive Black Holes and Transients of all varieties for immediate followup studies by the two secondary instruments: a Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) and an Optical/Infrared Telescope (IRT). EXIST will explore the early Universe using high redshift GRBs as cosmic probes and survey black holes on all scales. The HET is a coded aperture telescope employing a large array of imaging CZT detectors (4.5 m^2, 0.6 mm pixel) and a hybrid Tungsten mask. We review the current HET concept which follows an intensive design revision by the HET imaging working group and the recent engineering studies in the Instrument and Mission Design Lab at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The HET will locate GRBs and transients quickly (<10-30 sec) and accurately (< 20") f...

Hong, J; Allen, B; Barthelmy, S D; Skinner, G K; Gehrels, N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Effective area records sensitivity as a function of energy Energy redistribution matrix can vary with energy/location Point Spread Functions can vary with energy and location Exposure Map shows how effective area variesCalibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Computation Back to Calibration Uncertainty

van Dyk, David

375

Development and Benchmarking of a Hybrid PIC Code For Dense Plasmas and Fast Ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation processes play an important role in the study of both fast ignition and other inertial confinement schemes, such as plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion, both in their effect on energy balance, and in generating diagnostic signals. In the latter case, warm and hot dense matter may be produced by the convergence of a plasma shell formed by the merging of an assembly of high Mach number plasma jets. This innovative approach has the potential advantage of creating matter of high energy densities in voluminous amount compared with high power lasers or particle beams. An important application of this technology is as a plasma liner for the flux compression of magnetized plasma to create ultra-high magnetic fields and burning plasmas. HyperV Technologies Corp. has been developing plasma jet accelerator technology in both coaxial and linear railgun geometries to produce plasma jets of sufficient mass, density, and velocity to create such imploding plasma liners. An enabling tool for the development of this technology is the ability to model the plasma dynamics, not only in the accelerators themselves, but also in the resulting magnetized target plasma and within the merging/interacting plasma jets during transport to the target. Welch pioneered numerical modeling of such plasmas (including for fast ignition) using the LSP simulation code. Lsp is an electromagnetic, parallelized, plasma simulation code under development since 1995. It has a number of innovative features making it uniquely suitable for modeling high energy density plasmas including a hybrid fluid model for electrons that allows electrons in dense plasmas to be modeled with a kinetic or fluid treatment as appropriate. In addition to in-house use at Voss Scientific, several groups carrying out research in Fast Ignition (LLNL, SNL, UCSD, AWE (UK), and Imperial College (UK)) also use LSP. A collaborative team consisting of HyperV Technologies Corp., Voss Scientific LLC, FAR-TECH, Inc., Prism Computational Sciences, Inc. and Advanced Energy Systems Inc. joined efforts to develop new physics and numerical models for LSP in several key areas to enhance the ability of LSP to model high energy density plasmas (HEDP). This final report details those efforts. Areas addressed in this research effort include: adding radiation transport to LSP, first in 2D and then fully 3D, extending the EMHD model to 3D, implementing more advanced radiation and electrode plasma boundary conditions, and installing more efficient implicit numerical algorithms to speed complex 2-D and 3-D computations. The new capabilities allow modeling of the dominant processes in high energy density plasmas, and further assist the development and optimization of plasma jet accelerators, with particular attention to MHD instabilities and plasma/wall interaction (based on physical models for ion drag friction and ablation/erosion of the electrodes). In the first funding cycle we implemented a solver for the radiation diffusion equation. To solve this equation in 2-D, we used finite-differencing and applied the parallelized sparse-matrix solvers in the PETSc library (Argonne National Laboratory) to the resulting system of equations. A database of the necessary coefficients for materials of interest was assembled using the PROPACEOS and ATBASE codes from Prism. The model was benchmarked against Prism's 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code HELIOS, and against experimental data obtained from HyperV's separately funded plasma jet accelerator development program. Work in the second funding cycle focused on extending the radiation diffusion model to full 3-D, continued development of the EMHD model, optimizing the direct-implicit model to speed up calculations, add in multiply ionized atoms, and improved the way boundary conditions are handled in LSP. These new LSP capabilities were then used, along with analytic calculations and Mach2 runs, to investigate plasma jet merging, plasma detachment and transport, restrike and advanced jet accelerator design. In addition, a strong linkage to diagnostic measureme

Witherspoon, F. Douglas [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Welch, Dale R. [Voss Scientific, LLC; Thompson, John R. [FAR-TECH, Inc.; MacFarlane, Joeseph J. [Prism Computational Sciences Inc.; Phillips, Michael W. [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc.; Bruner, Nicki [Voss Scientific, LLC; Mostrom, Chris [Voss Scientific, LLC; Thoma, Carsten [Voss Scientific, LLC; Clark, R. E. [Voss Scientific, LLC; Bogatu, Nick [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Kim, Jin-Soo [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Galkin, Sergei [FAR-TECH, Inc.; Golovkin, Igor E. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc.; Woodruff, P. R. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc.; Wu, Linchun [HyperV Technologies Corp.; Messer, Sarah J. [HyperV Technologies Corp.

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

National Ignition Facility core x-ray streak camera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) core x-ray streak camera will be used for laser performance verification experiments as well as a wide range of physics experiments in the areas of high-energy-density science, inertial confinement fusion, and basic science. The x-ray streak camera system is being designed to record time-dependent x-ray emission from NIF targets using an interchangeable family of snouts for measurements such as one-dimensional (1D) spatial imaging or spectroscopy. the NIF core x-ray streak camera will consist of an x-ray-sensitive photocathode that detects x rays with 1D spatial resolution coupled to an electron streak tube to detect a continuous time history of the x rays incident on the photocathode over selected time periods. A charge-coupled-device (CCD) readout will record the signal from the streak tube. The streak tube, CCD, and associated electronics will reside in an electromagnetic interference, and electromagnetic pulse protected, hermetically sealed, temperature-controlled box whose internal pressure is approximately 1 atm. The streak tube itself will penetrate through the wall of the box into the target chamber vacuum. We are working with a goal of a spatial resolution of 15 lp/mm with 50% contrast transfer function at the photocathode and adjustment sweep intervals of 1--50 ns. The camera spectral sensitivity extends from soft x rays to 20 keV x rays, with varying quantum efficiency based on photocathode selection. The system will have remote control, monitoring, and Ethernet communications through an embedded controller. The core streak camera will be compatible with the instrument manipulators at the OMEGA (University of Rochester) and NIF facilities.

Kimbrough, J. R.; Bell, P. M.; Christianson, G. B.; Lee, F. D.; Kalantar, D. H.; Perry, T. S.; Sewall, N. R.; Wootton, A. J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager.

Clobes, A.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fuel effects in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Homogenous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion is a new method of burning fuel in internal combustion (IC) engines. In an HCCI engine, the fuel and air are premixed prior to combustion, like in a spark-ignition ...

Angelos, John P. (John Phillip)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The ePLAS Code for Ignition Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) presents unique opportunities for the extraction of clean energy from Fusion. Intense lasers and particle beams can create and interact with such plasmas, potentially yielding sufficient energy to satisfy all our national needs. However, few models are available to help aid the scientific community in the study and optimization of such interactions. This project enhanced and disseminated the computer code ePLAS for the early understanding and control of Ignition in ICF. ePLAS is a unique simulation code that tracks the transport of laser light to a target, the absorption of that light resulting in the generation and transport of hot electrons, and the heating and flow dynamics of the background plasma. It uses an implicit electromagnetic field-solving method to greatly reduce computing demands, so that useful target interaction studies can often be completed in 15 minutes on a portable 2.1 GHz PC. The code permits the rapid scoping of calculations for the optimization of laser target interactions aimed at fusion. Recent efforts have initiated the use of analytic equations of state (EOS), K-alpha image rendering graphics, allocatable memory for source-free usage, and adaption to the latest Mac and Linux Operating Systems. The speed and utility of ePLAS are unequaled in the ICF simulation community. This project evaluated the effects of its new EOSs on target heating, compared fluid and particle models for the ions, initiated the simultaneous use of both ion models in the code, and studied long time scale 500 ps hot electron deposition for shock ignition. ePLAS has been granted EAR99 export control status, permitting export without a license to most foreign countries. Beta-test versions of ePLAS have been granted to several Universities and Commercial users. The net Project was aimed at achieving early success in the laboratory ignition of thermonuclear targets and the mastery of controlled fusion power for the nation.

Mason, Rodney J

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

Design and Construction of a Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas Cherenkov detectors have been used to convert fusion gammas into photons to achieve gamma reaction history (GRH) measurements. These gas detectors include a converter, pressurized gas volume, relay optics, and a photon detector. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using 90 Off-Axis Parabolic mirrors efficiently collects signal from fusion gammas with 8-ps time dispersion.1 Fusion gammas are converted to Compton electrons, which generate broadband Cherenkov light (our response is from 250 to 700 nm) in a pressurized gas cell. This light is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. The detector optics collect light from a 125-mm-diameter by 600-mm-long interchangeable gas (CO2 or SF6) volume. Because light is collected from source locations throughout the gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than at an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation locations along the gas cell. This design incorporates a fixed time delay that allows the detector to recover from prompt radiation. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they traverse the gas volume. A Monte Carlo model of the conversion process from gammas to Cherenkov photons is used to generate photon trajectories. The collection efficiencies for different gamma energies are evaluated. At NIF, a cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range, as well as different gamma energy thresholds. This GRH design is compared to a gas Cherenkov detector that utilizes a Cassegrain reflector now used at the OMEGA laser facility. 1. R. M. Malone, H. W. Herrmann, W. Stoeffl, J. M. Mack, C. S. Young, Gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility using 90 off-axis parabolic mirrors, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E532 (2008).

R.M. Malone, B.C. Cox, B.C. Frogget, M.I. Kaufman, T.W. Tunnell; H.W. Herrmann, S.C. Evans, J.M. Mack, C.S. Young; W. Stoeffl

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOEEIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic...

382

Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma?¢????s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

383

Data Preservation in High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; /SLAC; Le Diberder, Francois; /Orsay, LAL; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; /SLAC; Bellis, Matt; /Stanford U.; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab; Konigsberg, Jacobo; /Florida U.; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, Donatella; /INFN, Padua; Denisov, Dmitri; /Fermilab; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; /Manchester U.; Li, Qizhong; /Fermilab; Varnes, Erich; /Arizona U.; Jonckheere, Alan; /Fermilab; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode () ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system ...

Pilawa-Podgurski, R. C. N.

386

The Role of Viscosity in TATB Hot Spot Ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of dissipative effects, such as viscosity, in the ignition of high explosive pores is investigated using a coupled chemical, thermal, and hydrodynamic model. Chemical reactions are tracked with the Cheetah thermochemical code coupled to the ALE3D hydrodynamic code. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the viscosity of liquid TATB. We also analyze shock wave experiments to obtain an estimate for the shock viscosity of TATB. Using the lower bound liquid-like viscosities, we find that the pore collapse is hydrodynamic in nature. Using the upper bound viscosity from shock wave experiments, we find that the pore collapse is closest to the viscous limit.

Fried, L E; Zepeda-Ruis, L; Howard, W M; Najjar, F; Reaugh, J E

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current pinhole x ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is limited in resolution and signal throughput to the detector for Inertial Confinement Fusion applications, due to the viable range of pinhole sizes (1025 ?m) that can be deployed. A higher resolution and throughput diagnostic is in development using a Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope system (KBM). The system will achieve <9 ?m resolution over a 300 ?m field of view with a multilayer coating operating at 10.2 keV. Presented here are the first images from the uncoated NIF KBM configuration demonstrating high resolution has been achieved across the full 300 ?m field of view.

Pickworth, L. A., E-mail: pickworth1@llnl.gov; McCarville, T.; Decker, T.; Pardini, T.; Ayers, J.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Brejnholt, N. F.; Izumi, N.; Mirkarimi, P.; Pivovaroff, M.; Smalyuk, V.; Vogel, J.; Walton, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nuclear and High-Energy Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There has never been a more exciting time in the overlapping areas of nuclear physics, particle physics and relativistic astrophysics than today. Orbiting observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), Chandra X-ray satellite, and the X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM) have extended our vision tremendously, allowing us to see vistas with an unprecedented clarity and angular resolution that previously were only imagined, enabling astrophysicists for the first time ever to perform detailed studies of large samples of galactic and extragalactic objects. On the Earth, radio telescopes (e.g., Arecibo, Green Bank, Parkes, VLA) and instruments using adaptive optics and other revolutionary techniques have exceeded previous expectations of what can be accomplished from the ground. The gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA VIRGO, and Geo-600 are opening up a window for the detection of gravitational waves emitted from compact stellar objects such as neutron stars and black holes. Together with new experimental forefront facilities like ISAC, ORLaND and RIA, these detectors provide direct, quantitative physical insight into nucleosynthesis, supernova dynamics, accreting compact objects, cosmic-ray acceleration, and pair-production in high energy sources which reinforce the urgent need for a strong and continuous feedback from nuclear and particle theory and theoretical astrophysics. In my lectures, I shall concentrate on three selected topics, which range from the behavior of superdense stellar matter, to general relativistic stellar models, to strange quark stars and possible signals of quark matter in neutron stars.

Fridolin Weber

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 12 to February 18, 2011. Ninety-four participants from ten countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, ?New Data From the Energy Frontier.? There were 54 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The week?s events included a public lecture (?The Hunt for the Elusive Higgs Boson? given by Ben Kilminster from Ohio State University) and attended by 119 members of the public, and a physics caf? geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists. The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was ?Indirect and Direct Detection of Dark Matter.? It was held from February 6 to February 12, 2011. The 70 participants came from 7 countries and attended 53 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Blas Cabrera of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled ?What Makes Up Dark Matter.? There were 183 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 45 people attended the physics caf? to discuss dark matter. This report provides the attendee lists, programs, and announcement posters for each event.

multiple speakers, presenters listed on link below

2011-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

390

Machine Protection and High Energy Density States in Matter for High Energy Hadron Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest accelerator in the world. It is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7TeV. The energy stored in each beam is 362MJ, sufficient to melt 500kg of copper. An accidental release of even a small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. Machine protection systems are essential to safely operate the accelerator and handle all possible accidents. This thesis deals with the study of different failure scenarios and its possible consequences. It addresses failure scenarios ranging from low intensity losses on high-Z materials and superconductors to high intensity losses on carbon and copper collimators. Low beam losses are sufficient to quench the superconducting magnets and the stabilized superconducting cables (bus-bars) that connects the main magnets. If this occurs and the energy from the bus-bar is not extracted fast enough it can lead to a situation similar to the accident in 2008 at LHC during pow...

Blanco Sancho, Juan; Schmidt, R

391

Preparation for Ignition Experiments on the NIF Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-5, 2007 John Lindl NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore NationalPreparation for Ignition Experiments on the NIF Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting December 4

392

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 #12;The NIF Directorate Chief Scientist Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Work performed under the auspices of the UThe Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF Maxwell

393

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission R. P. fla B. Dennis, G mission is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through-ray/gamma-ray spectroscopy 1. INTRODUCTION The primary scientific objective of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

California at Berkeley, University of

394

Impact of cetane improvers on ignition delay times of several alternative biofuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofuel technology could be approaching one of its greatest development milestones--being accepted as a standard item on new vehicle technology. In particular, the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) lists the evaluation and possible utilization of alternative fuels as one of the technological focuses to be evaluated by the year 2000. Synergy 2010, Ford`s newest Taurus model concept car, includes the use of a 20:1 compression-ratio, compression-ignition (CI) engine as the preferred engine. The preferred fuels include diesel, gasoline, and methanol. Cetane improvers make methanol fuel practical with a 20:1 compression ratio engine such as that proposed with Synergy 2010 and are a key technology for biofuel success. CI engines have a high probability of becoming the preferred engines for PNGV vehicles since CI engines are 20% to 30% more efficient than spark-ignition engines. In addition, CI engines allow a wider range of viable biofuels to be used. This paper is on the impact of cetane improvers on methanol and other biofuels. Fuels are evaluated through ignition delay time studies in a constant volume combustor. Ignition delay times measured at several temperatures and with biofuels of different compositions provide much more data than conventional cetane numbers and provide an understanding which is essential to engineer biofuels for the best possible performance in new engines. Ignition delay times are reported for several biofuels including mixtures containing biodiesel, methanol, and syrup.

Suppes, G.J. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Bryan, M.; Chen, Z. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Comparative studies of methane and propane as fuels for spark ignition and compression ignition engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the combustion characteristics of the two fuels and sets out to consider their respective performance in both spark ignition and compression ignition engines. Results of comparative tests involving spark ignition engines over a wide range of operating conditions are presented and discussed. Some of the performance characteristics considered are those relating to power output, efficiency, tendency to knock, cyclic variations, optimum spark requirements and exhaust emissions. Similarly, some of the performance characteristics in compression ignition engines considered include power output, efficiency, tendency towards knock and autoignition, exhaust emissions and low operational temperature problems. Finally, the relative operational safety aspects of the two fuels are evaluated. It is then suggested that in this regard, methane has some excellent physical, chemical and combustion characteristics that makes it a particularly safe fuel.

Karim, G.A.; Wierzba, I.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Phase conjugation of high energy lasers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report we explore claims that phase conjugation of high energy lasers by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) can compensate optical aberrations associated with severely distorted laser amplifier media and aberrations induced by the atmosphere. The SBS media tested was a gas cell pressurized up to 300 psi with SF6 or Xe or both. The laser was a 10 Hz, 3J, Q-switched Nd:YAG with 25 ns wide pulses. Atmospheric aberrations were created with space heaters, helium jets and phase plates designed with a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum characterized by a Fried parameter, ro , ranging from 0.6 - 6.0 mm. Phase conjugate tests in the laboratory were conducted without amplification. For the strongest aberrations, D/ro ~ 20, created by combining the space heaters with the phase plate, the Strehl ratio was degraded by a factor of ~50. Phase conjugation in SF6 restored the peak focusable intensity to about 30% of the original laser. Phase conjugate tests at the outdoor laser range were conducted with laser amplifiers providing gain in combination with the SBS cell. A large 600,000 BTU kerosene space heater was used to create turbulence along the beam path. An atmospheric structure factor of Cn2 = 5x10-13 m2/3 caused the illumination beam to expand to a diameter 250mm and overfill the receiver. The phase conjugate amplified return could successfully be targeted back onto glints 5mm in diameter. Use of a lenslet arrays to lower the peak focusable intensity in the SBS cell failed to produce a useful phase conjugate beam; The Strehl ratio was degraded with multiple random lobes instead of a single focus. I will review literature results which show how multiple beams can be coherently combined by SBS when a confocal reflecting geometry is used to focus the laser in the SBS cell.

Bliss, David Emery; Valley, Michael T.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Bigman, Verle; Boye, Lydia Ann; Broyles, Robin Scott; Kimmel, Mark W.; Law, Ryan J.; Yoder, James R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

Hayden, Yuiko T. (Clarks Summit, PA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hayden, Joseph S. (Clarks Summit, PA); Campbell, John H. (Livermore, CA); Aston, Mary Kay (Moscow, PA); Elder, Melanie L. (Dublin, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

399

Analyzing High Energy Physics Data Using Databases: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analyzing High Energy Physics Data Using Databases: A Case Study R. Grossman, X. &in, D. Valsamis. Nixdorf, B. Scipioni, T. Song Superconducting Supercollider Laboratory Abstract We describe the initial experimental data from high energy physics. At this time, we have designed two proto- types to analyze high

Grossman, Robert

400

UCRL-PRES-225531 National ignition facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title Page UCRL-PRES-225531 #12;National ignition facility #12;NIF is 705,000 #12;NIF laser system #12;NIF us 885 #12;NIF-0506-11956 Laser bay 2 #12;Switchyard 2 #12;Target chamber in the air #12 experiments on NIF have demonstrated #12;21 1 MJ shaping results: Comparison of requested vs measured 3 pulse

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Impacts assessment for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the economic and other impacts that will be created by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction and ongoing operation, as well as the impacts that may be created by new technologies that may be developed as a result of NIF development and operation.

Bay Area Economics

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first-stage (when observed) and second-stage ignition delay times and of heat release rate. The experimental and computational results are used to gain insight into low and intermediate temperature processes during gasoline ignition.

Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Renewable Energy Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario Workshop Series Report INLEXT-10-18930 December 2009 The 2005 Billion-Ton Study a (BTS) esti- mates the...

404

Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity & Solar Thermal HW Module Electricity Solar thermal space heating Baseline Solar Thermal Inverte r To Grid 2012 GMZ Energy, Proprietary and Confidential Bosch -...

405

High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non--Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by the authors of the paper [N. K. Yamaleev...

406

High density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of the isospin asymmetry in nuclei and neutron stars, with an emphasis on the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy, is discussed. The symmetry energy is obtained using the isoscalar as well as isovector components of the density dependent M3Y effective interaction. The constants of density dependence of the effective interaction are obtained by reproducing the saturation energy per nucleon and the saturation density of spin and isospin symmetric cold infinite nuclear matter. Implications for the density dependence of the symmetry energy in case of a neutron star are discussed, and also possible constraints on the density dependence obtained from finite nuclei are compared.

D. N. Basu; Tapan Mukhopadhyay

2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

HiResHiRes Mapping the HighMapping the High Energy UniverseEnergy Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HiResHiRes ­­ Mapping the HighMapping the High Energy UniverseEnergy Universe Stefan Westerhoff Columbia University HiRes Collaboration Fermilab Wine & Cheese Seminar 24 October 2003 #12;Particle-rays · Gamma-ray Astronomy ­ photons from MeV to TeV · Cosmic Rays ­ protons and heavier nuclei with energies

408

Low Cost Components: Advanced High Power & High Energy Battery...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08amine2.pdf More Documents & Publications Engineering of High...

409

Energy spectrum of ultra high energy cosmic rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The construction of the southern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory is almost completed. Three independent measurements of the flux of the cosmic rays with energies larger than 1 EeV have been performed during the construction phase. The surface detector data collected until August 2007 have been used to establish a flux suppression at the highest energies with a 6 sigma significance. The observations of cosmic rays by the fluorescence detector allowed the extension of the energy spectrum to lower energies, where the efficiency of the surface detector is less than 100% and a change in the spectral index is expected.

Ioana C. Maris; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

High energy particles from gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review is presented of the fireball model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and of the production in GRB fireballs of high energy protons and neutrinos. Constraints imposed on the model by recent afterglow observations, which support the association of GRB and ultra-high energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources, are discussed. Predictions of the GRB model for UHECR production, which can be tested with planned large area UHECR detectors and with planned high energy neutrino telescopes, are reviewed.

Eli Waxman

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

Comment on the $?^+$-production at high energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the cross sections of the $\\Theta^+$-pentaquark production in different processes decrease with energy faster than the cross sections of production of the conventional three-quark hyperons. Therefore, the threshold region with the initial energy of a few GeV or less seemsto be more favorable for the production and experimental study of $\\Theta^+$-pentaquark.

A. I. Titov; A. Hosaka; S. Date'; Y. Ohashi

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Service Members Aim High-- for Energy Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Service members are helping reduce our dependency on oil, and saving taxpayers' money, with their energy-saving efforts. Operation Change Out has cut $26.3 million in total energy costs and helped prevent more than 396 lbs. of carbon dioxide.

413

The origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We briefly discuss some open problems and recent developments in the investigation of the origin and propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs).

Pasquale Blasi

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

414

Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

Lee, R.W. [comp.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development of Novel Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Development of Novel Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range Development of Novel Electrolytes...

416

Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

417

High energy eigenfunctions of one-dimensional Schrdinger ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High energy eigenfunctions of one-dimensional. Schrdinger operators with polynomial. potentials. A. Eremenko?, A. Gabrielov and B. Shapiro. October 5, 2007.

418

QCD and High Energy Interactions: Moriond 2014 Theory Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article summarizes new theoretical developments, ideas and results that were presented at the 2014 Moriond "QCD and High Energy Interactions".

Thomas Gehrmann

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Activities for Engaging High School Students in Energy Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PARCI-CARES Harry Bolson, LEED Green Associate Washington University in St. Louis PARCI-CARES Activities for Engaging High School Students in Energy Studies Activities for...

420

Energy Savings Potential and Opportunities for High-Efficiency...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sponsored this assignment and provided comments on draft versions of the report. iii Energy Savings Potential and Opportunities for High-Efficiency Electric Motors in Residential...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam...

422

Development of High Energy Cathode Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

deposits). Al-coated cell can is suitable for high-voltage cathodes. Polyethylene-based separators (such as Celgard K1640) are stable at high V. Carbon Additives...

423

High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be observed behind high-density materials, such as depleted uranium or tungsten. Comparison of the high (bottom half) and foam (center teeth) phantom could be viewed through 76 mm of depleted uranium. Some ~ 3

424

Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

SIMULATION OF RADIATION BACKGROUNDS ASSOCIATED WITH NUCLEAR DIAGNOSTICS IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments resulting in a significant neutron yield are scheduled to start in 2010 at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Several experiments utilizing Tritium-Hydrogen-Deuterium (THD) and Deuterium-Tritium (DT) targets are scheduled as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). A wide range of diagnostics will be used to measure several parameters of implosion such as the core and fuel shape, temperatures and densities, and neutron yield. Accurate evaluations of the neutron and gamma backgrounds are important for several diagnostics, such as the High Energy X-ray Imager (HEXRI) and Neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF). Several sources of neutron and gamma backgrounds will impact the accuracy of the diagnostics measurements. Fusion neutrons generated by fuel burn and secondary neutrons resulting from the fusion neutrons interaction with structures present inside and outside the Target Chamber (TC) contribute to the neutron background. In the meantime, X-rays emitted from the implosion, X-rays resulting from Laser Plasma Interaction (LPI) of NIF beams with the hohlraum, and gamma-rays induced by neutron interactions with different structures inside and outside the TC contribute to the gamma background. A detailed model has been developed of the NIF facility and all structures inside the TC. Several Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to identify the expected signal-to- background ratios at several potential locations for the HEXRI and nTOF diagnostics. Gamma backgrounds associated with HEXRI were significantly reduced by using a tungsten collimator. The collimator resulted in the reduction of the gamma background at the HEXRI scintillator by more than an order of magnitude during the first 40 ns following a THD shot. The nTOF20 detectors inside the Neutron Spectrometry room are exposed to low levels of neutron and gamma background during yield shots.

Khater, H; Dauffy, L; Tommasini, R; Eckart, M; Eder, D

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

426

Experimental investigation of piston heat transfer under conventional diesel and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion regimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The piston of a heavy-duty single-cylinder research engine was instrumented with 11 fast-response surface thermocouples, and a commercial wireless telemetry system was used to transmit the signals from the moving piston. The raw thermocouple data were processed using an inverse heat conduction method that included Tikhonov regularization to recover transient heat flux. By applying symmetry, the data were compiled to provide time-resolved spatial maps of the piston heat flux and surface temperature. A detailed comparison was made between conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion operations at matched conditions of load, speed, boost pressure, and combustion phasing. The integrated piston heat transfer was found to be 24% lower, and the mean surface temperature was 25 C lower for reactivity-controlled compression ignition operation as compared to conventional diesel combustion, in spite of the higher peak heat release rate. Lower integrated piston heat transfer for reactivity-controlled compression ignition was found over all the operating conditions tested. The results showed that increasing speed decreased the integrated heat transfer for conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. The effect of the start of injection timing was found to strongly influence conventional diesel combustion heat flux, but had a negligible effect on reactivity-controlled compression ignition heat flux, even in the limit of near top dead center high-reactivity fuel injection timings. These results suggest that the role of the high-reactivity fuel injection does not significantly affect the thermal environment even though it is important for controlling the ignition timing and heat release rate shape. The integrated heat transfer and the dynamic surface heat flux were found to be insensitive to changes in boost pressure for both conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. However, for reactivity-controlled compression ignition, the mean surface temperature increased with changes in boost suggesting that equivalence ratio affects steady-state heat transfer.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL; Hendricks, Terry Lee [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Ghandhi, Jaal B [University of Wisconsin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

High Impact Technology Catalyst | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi National Accelerator LaboratoryHotOctoberRequest for

428

Experimental study and modeling of dodecane ignition in a diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two experiments have been performed under conditions as close as possible to those existing in a diesel engine. The first is oxidation of n-dodecane in a motored diesel engine running under conditions close to ignition but avoiding it. The progress of chemical reactions is followed by measurements of the global temperature increase {Delta}T of the exhaust gases, and by continuous sampling of the combustion chamber gases, to measure the concentrations of hydroperoxides and molecular hydrogen; about 4.2% of the energy introduced as hydrocarbon is consumed, thus showing significant transformations during the ignition delay of n-dodecane. The location of the maximum concentration of hydroperoxides coincides with the fuel jet`s edge. Tarlike compounds are present in the unburnt dodecane at the engine exhaust. The second experiment is the study of ignition delay of an n-dodecane spray in an oxidation chamber filled with air, between 715 and 760 K and 15 and 25 bar. A reduced mechanism of 32 reactions, with three types of branching due to the species (RO{sub 2}, RO{sub 2}H), (HO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), and H, enable one to predict the ignition delay. Computer simulations are made with the KIVA II code. They show good agreement between the experimental and the calculated ignition delays. They also indicate that, during the ignition delay, reactions occur first at the boundary of the fuel spray. A temperature increase of about 100 K takes place at the hottest points, which correspond to concentration maxima of the three branching species. Time-dependent evolutions of average concentrations show that RO{sub 2}H reaches a maximum first, then H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and lastly the H atom.

Sahetchian, K. [CNRS, Saint-Cyr-l`Ecole (France). Lab. de Mecanique Physique] [CNRS, Saint-Cyr-l`Ecole (France). Lab. de Mecanique Physique; Champoussin, J.C.; Brun, M. [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully (France). Lab. de Machines Thermiques] [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully (France). Lab. de Machines Thermiques

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ignition and extinction phenomena in helium micro hollow cathode discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) were produced using 250??m thick dielectric layer of alumina sandwiched between two nickel electrodes of 8??m thickness. A through cavity at the center of the chip was formed by laser drilling technique. MHCD with a diameter of few hundreds of micrometers allowed us to generate direct current discharges in helium at up to atmospheric pressure. A slowly varying ramped voltage generator was used to study the ignition and the extinction periods of the microdischarges. The analysis was performed by using electrical characterisation of the V-I behaviour and the measurement of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms density by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. At the ignition of the microdischarges, 2??s long current peak as high as 24?mA was observed, sometimes followed by low amplitude damped oscillations. At helium pressure above 400?Torr, an oscillatory behaviour of the discharge current was observed just before the extinction of the microdischarges. The same type of instability in the extinction period at high pressure also appeared on the density of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms, but delayed by a few ?s relative to the current oscillations. Metastable atoms thus cannot be at the origin of the generation of the observed instabilities.

Kulsreshath, M. K.; Schwaederle, L.; Dufour, T.; Lefaucheux, P.; Dussart, R. [GREMI, CNRS/Universit d'Orlans (UMR7344), Orlans (France); Sadeghi, N. [LIPhy, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier (UMR5588), Grenoble (France); Overzet, L. J. [GREMI, CNRS/Universit d'Orlans (UMR7344), Orlans (France); PSAL, UTDallas, Richardson, Texas 75080-3021 (United States)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

DC High School Science Bowl Regionals | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DC High School Science Bowl Regionals DC High School Science Bowl Regionals February 22, 2014 1:15PM to 8:15PM EST Department of Energy headquarters - 1000 Independence Ave SW,...

431

COLLOQUIUM: In Pursuit of Ignition on the National Ignition Facility |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science,Principles of CollectivePrinceton Plasma

432

PRACTICAL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY AT HIGH ENERGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Chupp, E. L. "Cosmic Ray Neutron Energy Spectrum." Phys.Study of Cosmic-Ray Neutrons." National Aero nautics andStudy of Cosmic-Ray Neutrons: Mid-Latitude Flights." Health

McCaslin, J.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

On the role of energy conservation in high-energy nuclear scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the role of energy conservation in high-energy nuclear scattering H J Drescher1 , M Hladik1-relativistic energies do not treat energy conservation in a consistent fashion. Demanding theoretical consistency), but energy conservation is not taken care of in cross section calculations. This is a serious problem

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

434

Detailed Analysis and Control Issues of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a new combustion technology that may develop as an alternative to diesel engines with high efficiency and low NOx and particulate matter emissions. This paper describes the HCCI research activities being currently pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at the University of California Berkeley. Current activities include analysis as well as experimental work.

Aceves, Salvador M.; Flowers, Daniel L.; Martinez-Frias, Joel; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Dibble, Robert

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

435

Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. C. Wilson4 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA 2. INTRODUCTION A. Indirect-drive design The National Ignition Facility (NIF)1 is a 192 beam, 1.8 MJ 0.35 lm laser hohlraum target4 and NIF laser5 ) are shown in Fig. 1. A cm long high Z cylindrical hohlraum, currently

436

Large Eddy Simulation of laser ignition and compressible reacting flow in a rocket-like  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion devices. The technical needs for internal-combustion (IC) engines and aircraft combustors have in a rocket engine is a critical problem for combustion cham- ber design. Delayed ignition may lead to high without failure. The combustion initiation in rocket engines is usually based on pyrotechnic devices

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

437

Bellevue High School | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass Facility JumpBedfordBelize: EnergyBelle Mead,

438

Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessinSupportingEnergy Engaging HispanicEngineer End

439

The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a 3-year research program conducted by the Engines & Energy Conversion Laboratory (EECL) at Colorado State University (CSU) to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. Research activities for the overall program were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. An extensive state-of-art review was conducted to leverage the existing body of knowledge of micropilot ignition with respect to retrofit applications. Additionally, commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of micropilot ignition for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios under laboratory conditions at the EECL. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase I were to develop a single-cylinder test chamber to study the injection of pilot fuel into a combustion cylinder and to develop, install and test a multi-cylinder micropilot ignition system for a 4-cylinder, natural gas test engine. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support these two (2) primarily elements in a stepwise fashion. Task-specific approaches and results are documented in this report. The four-cylinder prototype data was encouraging for the micro-pilot ignition technology when compared to spark ignition. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system at the EECL for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. The primary elements of Micropilot Phase II were to evaluate the results for the 4-cylinder system prototype developed for Phase I, then optimize this system and prepare the technology for the field demonstration phase in Year 3. In all, there were twelve (12) tasks defined and executed to support objectives in a stepwise fashion. The optimized four-cylinder system data demonstrated significant progress compared to Phase I results, as well as traditional spark ignition systems. These laboratory results were enhanced, then verified via a field demonstration project during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program. An Implementation Team of qualified engine retrofit service providers was assembled to install the retrofit micropilot ignition system on an engine operated by El Paso Pipeline Group at a compressor station near Window Rock, Arizona. Testing of this demonstration unit showed that the same benefits identified by laboratory testing at CSU, i.e., reduced fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (NOx, THC, CO, and CH2O). Commercialization of the retrofit micropilot ignition technology is awaiting a ''market pull'', which is expected to materialize as the results of the field demonstration become known and accepted. The Implementation Team, comprised of Woodward Governor Company, Enginuity LLC, Hoerbiger Corporation of America, and DigiCon Inc., has direct experience with the technology development and implementation, and stands ready to promote and commercialize the retrofit micropilot ignition system.

Scott Chase; Daniel Olsen; Ted Bestor

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High Energy Two-Body Deuteron Photodisintegration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The differential cross section for twobody deuteron photodisintegration was measured at photon energies between 0.8 and 4.0 GeV and centerofmass angles theta_cm =37deg, 53deg, 70deg, and 90deg as part of CEBAF experiment E89012. Constituent counting rules predict a scaling of this cross section at asymptotic energies. In previous experiments this scaling has surprisingly been observed at energies between 1.4 and 2.8 GeV at 90deg. The results from this experiment are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements at lower energies. The data at 70deg and 90deg show a constituent counting rule behavior up to 4.0 GeV photon energy. The 37deg and 53deg data do not agree with the constituent counting rule prediction. The new data are compared with a variety of theoretical models inspired by quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and traditional hadronic nuclear physics.

Terburg, Bart

1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in theinPlastics -␤,of Energy

443

A Highly Configurable Cache for Low Energy Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Highly Configurable Cache for Low Energy Embedded Systems CHUANJUN ZHANG San Diego State University and FRANK VAHID and WALID NAJJAR University of California, Riverside Energy consumption is a major for about 50% of the total energy consumed in these systems. The performance of a given cache architecture

Najjar, Walid A.

444

Neutron-Proton High-Energy Charge Exchange Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high energy proton-neutron charge exchange scattering reaction is studied in an effective hadron model for the energy range of s from 45.9 to 414.61 GeV*GeV. The main features of the observed differential cross section, the forward peak and the scaling behavior over a large energy region, are well reproduced.

Y. Yan; R. Tegen; T. Gutsche; V. E. Lyubovitskij; Amand Faessler

2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Some Intensive and Extensive Quantities in High-Energy Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the evolution of some statistical and thermodynamical quantities measured in difference sizes of high-energy collisions at different energies. We differentiate between intensive and extensive quantities and discuss the importance of their distinguishability in characterizing possible critical phenomena of nuclear collisions at various energies with different initial conditions.

A. Tawfik

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

Participation in High Energy Physics at the University of Chicago  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers research at the University of Chicago in theoretical high energy physics and its connections to cosmology, over the period Nov. 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. This research is divided broadly into two tasks: Task A, which covers a broad array of topics in high energy physics; and task C, primarily concerned with cosmology.

Martinec, Emil J. [University of Chicago

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

447

High energy cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos from AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The author reviews a model for the emission of high energy cosmic rays, gamma-rays and neutrinos from AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) that he has proposed since 1985. Further discussion of the knee energy phenomenon of the cosmic ray energy spectrum requires the existence of a heavy particle with mass in the knee energy range. A possible method of detecting such a particle in the Pierre Auger Project is suggested. Also presented is a relation between the spectra of neutrinos and gamma-rays emitted from AGN. This relation can be tested by high energy neutrino detectors such as ICECUBE, the Mediterranean Sea Detector and possibly by the Pierre Auger Project.

Yukio Tomozawa

2008-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

448

Advanced High Energy and High Power Battery Systems for Automotive Applications Khalil Amine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dependent Industry 41% Oil-dependent 17% Oil-dependent 72% 22% 1% 5% U.S. Oil Consumption by End-use Sector 199.30am Advanced High Energy and High Power Battery Systems for Automotive Applications Khalil Amine Argonne National Laboratory Abstract To meet the high-energy requirem ent that can enab le the 40-miles

Levi, Anthony F. J.

449

Direct numerical simulation of ignition front propagation in a constant volume with temperature inhomogeneities. I. Fundamental analysis and diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of thermal stratification on autoignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed hydrogen/air chemistry with a view to providing better understanding and modeling of combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression-ignition engines. Numerical diagnostics are developed to analyze the mode of combustion and the dependence of overall ignition progress on initial mixture conditions. The roles of dissipation of heat and mass are divided conceptually into transport within ignition fronts and passive scalar dissipation, which modifies the statistics of the preignition temperature field. Transport within ignition fronts is analyzed by monitoring the propagation speed of ignition fronts using the displacement speed of a scalar that tracks the location of maximum heat release rate. The prevalence of deflagrative versus spontaneous ignition front propagation is found to depend on the local temperature gradient, and may be identified by the ratio of the instantaneous front speed to the laminar deflagration speed. The significance of passive scalar mixing is examined using a mixing timescale based on enthalpy fluctuations. Finally, the predictions of the multizone modeling strategy are compared with the DNS, and the results are explained using the diagnostics developed. (author)

Chen, Jacqueline H.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Sankaran, Ramanan [Reacting Flow Research Department, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9051, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Mason, Scott D. [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Im, Hong G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Clusters in Very High Energy Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arrival directions of cosmic rays with the energy E>4.10^{19} eV are analyzed by using data of the Yakutsk and AGASA (Japan) extensive air showers (EAS) arrays. It is supposed that the clusters can be formed as a result of decay of superheavy particles. The consequences of this supposition compare with experimental data.

A. A. Mikhailov

2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

451

High energy octupole resonance in Sn-116  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The region of excitation energy from 7 less than or equal to E(x) less than or equal to 38 MeV in Sn-116 was studied with inelastic scattering of 240 MeV alpha particles. Parameters obtained for the isoscalar giant monopole resonance...

Clark, HL; Youngblood, David H.; Lui, YW.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

453

Optical and electrical investigations into cathode ignition and diode closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temporal behavior of high-power diodes is closely related to the impedance collapse caused by the movement of the cathode and/or anode plasmas. This impedance collapse can be especially problematic when a constant power electron beam is required. This is the case for the very large area (square meters) diodes used to pump the amplifiers within the Aurora KrF laser system. The electron beam technology development program at Los Alamos utilizes the Electron Beam Test Facility (EGTF) to study diode physics in an attempt to better understand the basic phenomenology of ignition and closure. A combination of optical and electric diagnostics has been fielded on the Electron Beam Test Facility to study ignition and closure in large area electron beam diodes. A four-channel framing camera is used to observe the formation of microplasmas on the surface of the cathode and the subsequent movement of these plasmas toward the anode. Additionally, a perveance model is used to extract information about this plasma from voltage and current profiles. Results from the two diagnostics are compared. Closure velocity measurements are presented showing little dependence on applied magnetic field for both velvet and carbon felt emitters. We also report the first observation of the screening effect in large area cold cathode diodes. 13 refs., 11 figs.

Coogan, J.J.; Rose, E.A.; Shurter, R.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Target diagnostic system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of recent progress on the design of a diagnostic system proposed for ignition target experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be presented. This diagnostic package contains an extensive suite of optical, x-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron diagnostics that enable measurements of the performance of both direct and indirect driven NIF targets. The philosophy used in designing all of the diagnostics in the set has emphasized redundant and independent measurement of fundamental physical quantities relevant to the operation of the NIF target. A unique feature of these diagnostics is that they are being designed to be capable of operating, in the high radiation, EMP, and debris backgrounds expected on the NIF facility. The diagnostic system proposed can be categorized into three broad areas: laser characterization, hohlraum characterization, and capsule performance diagnostics. The operating principles of a representative instrument from each class of diagnostic employed in this package will be summarized and illustrated with data obtained in recent prototype diagnostic tests.

Leeper, R.J.; Chandler, G.A.; Cooper, G.W.; Derzon, M.S. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Visualization of Target Inspection data at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the target capsules used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure capsule surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. These instruments produce multi-gigabyte datasets which consist of tens to hundreds of files. Existing software can handle viewing a small subset of an entire dataset, but none can view a dataset in its entirety. Additionally, without an established mode of transport that keeps the target capsules properly aligned throughout the assembly process, a means of aligning the two dataset coordinate systems is needed. The goal of this project is to develop web based software utilizing WebGL which will provide high level overview visualization of an entire dataset, with the capability to retrieve finer details on demand, in addition to facilitating alignment of multiple datasets with one another based on common features that have been visually identified by users of the system.

Potter, D; Antipa, N

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energy Conservation and Pomeron Loops in High Energy Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a formalism which modifies the Mueller Dipole Model such that it incorporates energy-momentum conservation and also important colour suppressed effects. We implement our formalism in a Monte Carlo simulation and compare the results to inclusive data from HERA and the Tevatron, where we see that there is a good agreement between the data and our model.

Emil Avsar

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

US Department of Energy - Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies and US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Inter-Agency Agreement Research on "The Analysis of Genotoxic Activities of Exhaust Emissions from Mobile Natural Gas, Diesel, and Spark-Ignition Engines"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy-Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (now the DOE-Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies) signed an Interagency Agreement (IAA) with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), No.01-15 DOE, 9/4/01, for 'The analysis of genotoxic activities of exhaust emissions from mobile natural gas, diesel, and spark-ignition engines'; subsequently modified on 3/27/02 (DOE IAG No.01-15-02M1); subsequently modified 9/02/03 (IAA Mod No. 01-15-03M1), as 'The analysis of genotoxic activities of exhaust emissions from mobile internal combustion engines: identification of engine design and operational parameters controlling exhaust genotoxicity'. The DOE Award/Contract number was DE-AI26-01CH11089. The IAA ended 9/30/06. This is the final summary technical report of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health research performed with the US Department of Energy-Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies under that IAA: (A) NIOSH participation was requested by the DOE to provide in vitro genotoxicity assays of the organic solvent extracts of exhaust emissions from a suite of in-use diesel or spark-ignition vehicles; (B) research also was directed to develop and apply genotoxicity assays to the particulate phase of diesel exhaust, exploiting the NIOSH finding of genotoxicity expression by diesel exhaust particulate matter dispersed into the primary components of the surfactant coating the surface of the deep lung; (C) from the surfactant-dispersed DPM genotoxicity findings, the need for direct collection of DPM aerosols into surfactant for bioassay was recognized, and design and developmental testing of such samplers was initiated.

William E. Wallace

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Ignition quality determination of marine diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition quality of heavy marine diesel fuels is considered to be an important parameter. The standard procedures used to quantify this parameter for distillate fuels are not applicable to residual fuels. Proton NMR Spectroscopy was demonstrated to be an effective tool to characterize the ''global'' fuel composition of commercially available fuels covering a wide range of ignition quality. Proton NMR data from these fuels were used to determine a cetane number (CNp) for the heavy fuels using procedures previously reported for distillate fuels. The validity of this instrumental technique for determining CNp was corroborated by actual ASTM D 613 engine tests on a number of commercially available fuels, run as blends with secondary reference fuels. Viscosity and density values of the analyzed heavy fuels were regressed against predicted cetane numbers to obtain a correlation expression.

Gulder, O.L.; Glavincevski, B.; Kassinger, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Transport Simulations for Fast Ignition on NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are designing a full hydro-scale cone-guided, indirect-drive FI coupling experiment, for NIF, with the ARC-FIDO short-pulse laser. Current rad-hydro designs with limited fuel jetting into cone tip are not yet adequate for ignition. Designs are improving. Electron beam transport simulations (implicit-PIC LSP) show: (1) Magnetic fields and smaller angular spreads increase coupling to ignition-relevant 'hot spot' (20 um radius); (2) Plastic CD (for a warm target) produces somewhat better coupling than pure D (cryogenic target) due to enhanced resistive B fields; and (3) The optimal T{sub hot} for this target is {approx} 1 MeV; coupling falls by 3x as T{sub hot} rises to 4 MeV.

Strozzi, D J; Tabak, M; Grote, D P; Cohen, B I; Shay, H D; Town, R J; Kemp, A J; Key, M

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

460

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high energy ignition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


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