Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

2

Demand Response Technology Roadmap A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

workshop agendas, presentation materials, and transcripts. For the background to the Demand Response Technology Roadmap and to make use of individual roadmaps, the reader is...

3

Study of Energy and Demand Savings on a High Efficiency Hydraulic Pump System with Infinite Turn Down Technology (ITDT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed field measurement and verification of electrical energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings is conducted on an injection molding machine used in typical plastic manufacturing facility retrofitted with a high efficiency hydraulic pump system...

Sfeir, R. A.; Kanungo, A.; Liou, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Demand Response Technology Roadmap M  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between May 2014 and February 2015. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Demand Response Executive Sponsor Team decided upon the scope of the project in May. Two subsequent...

5

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is manual demand response where building staff receive acommercial buildings’ demand response technologies andBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-33887 UC-000 BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES Jonathan G. Koomey ............................................................................................... 2 Demand-Side Efficiency Technologies I. Energy Management Systems (EMSs

7

Energy technologies and their impact on demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

Drucker, H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-5763E Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings from in this report was coordinated by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research

9

The Role of Enabling Technologies in Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a study of the technologies that are crucial to the success of demand response programs. It takes a look at the historical development of demand response programs and analyzes how new technology is needed to enable demand response to make the transition from a small scale pilot operation to a mass market means of improving grid reliability. Additionally, the report discusses the key technologies needed to enable a large scale demand response effort and evaluates current efforts to develop and integrate these technologies. Finally, the report provides profiles of leading developers of these key technologies.

NONE

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

What is a High Electric Demand Day?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation by T. McNevin of the New Jersey Bureau of Air Quality Planning was part of the July 2008 Webcast sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Clean Energy and Air Quality Integration Initiative that was titled Role of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Improving Air Quality and Addressing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals on High Electric Demand Days.

13

Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience EPRG Working Paper EPRG0903 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 0905 Aoife... Brophy Haney, Tooraj Jamasb and Michael G. Pollitt In recent years smart metering of electricity demand has attracted attention around the world. A number of countries and regions have started deploying new metering systems; and many others have...

Brophy Haney, A; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

14

The Impact of Control Technology on the Demand Response Potential of California Industrial Refrigerated Facilities Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedDemand Response .. ..Technology on the Demand Response Potential of California

Scott, Doug

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-technologies used for demand- side management (DSM) on mini-can provide additional demand-side management based on the

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Washington: Sustainability Training for Realtors in High Demand...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sustainability Training for Realtors in High Demand March 6, 2014 - 5:50pm Addthis Demand has been high for a free and accredited Sustainability Training for Accredited Real...

17

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and G. Heffner. “Do enabling technologies affect customerAutomated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration inof Standards and Technology (NIST) along with organizations

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Impact of Control Technology on the Demand Response Potential of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-5750E The Impact of Control Technology on the Demand Response Potential of California was sponsored in part by the Demand Response Research Center which is funded

20

Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Building Systems and DR Strategies 16 Demand ResponseDemand Response Systems. ” Proceedings, 16 th National Conference on Building

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. Inbased demand response information to building controlDemand Response Standard for the Residential Sector. California Energy Commission, PIER Buildings

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Emerging Technologies for Industrial Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as demand-side management strategies for industrial consumers of electricity. An alternative strategy to replacing aging electric motors with high efficiency or ASD motors is a turbine let-down. A turbine letdown is a turbine which uses pressure reduction...

Neely, J. E.; Kasprowicz, L. M.

26

High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

energy systems with high-performance homes and showing how they align with utility peak-demand reduction interests. In addition to substantial energy savings, solar electric home...

27

Buildings sector demand-side efficiency technology summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides descriptions of the following energy efficiency technologies: energy management systems; electronic fluorescent ballasts; compact fluorescent lamps; lighting controls; room air conditioners; high albedo materials, coatings and paints; solar domestic water heaters; heat pump water heaters; energy-efficient motors; adjustable-speed drives; energy-efficient refrigerators; daylight control glazing; insulating glazing; solar control glazing; switchable glazing; tree planting; and advanced insulation. For each technology, the report provides a description of performance characteristics, consumer utility, development status, technology standards, equipment cost, installation, maintenance, conservation programs, and environmental impacts.

Koomey, J.G.; Johnson, F.X.; Schuman, J. [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

29

THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

30

California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

High Lithium Demand September 20, 2012 - 1:15pm Addthis Ever wonder how we get the materials for the advanced batteries that power our cell phones, laptops, and even some...

31

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” Incan be used to link wholesale and retail real-time prices.11 Wholesale Electricity Market Information

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Abstract--Smart Grid technology appears necessary to succeed in activating the demand through demand side management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract--Smart Grid technology appears necessary to succeed in activating the demand through recommendations regarding the instruments that should be implemented to maximize the benefits of smart grids by the European Union. The development of smart grids (SG) is a possible solution for achieving these goals [1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

The Impact of Technological Change and Lifestyles on the Energy Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand into a model of total private consumption. Private consumption is determined by economic variables of technological and socio- demographic variables on the demand for gasoline/diesel, heating and electricity. Key, households' electricity and heat consumption are growing rapidly despite of technological progress

Steininger, Karl W.

34

Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A webinar by Ethan MacCormick, VP for Services to Energy Businesses at Performance Systems Development, about On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters and how to properly monitor the installation.

35

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

congress_1252d.pdf. EPRI. 2009. Automated DemandProject – Revision 1. EPRI. Palo Alto, California: 2009.DOE DR DRAS DRRC EIS EMCS EPRI FERC FM HASP ISO ISONE LBNL

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the higher of either $500/MWH, or the wholesale electricity price in the customer?s area, during the time of the event. Exact payment arrangements differ by program provider. Day-Ahead Demand Response Program Day-Ahead Demand Response Program (DADRP...), offers retail electricity customers a chance to bid load reduction capability in New York State?s wholesale electricity market. To participate, companies bid their load reduction capability, on a day-ahead basis, into the wholesale electricity market...

Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Demonstration and Results of Grid Integrated Technologies at the Demand to Grid Laboratory (D2G Lab): Phase I Operations Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Grid Integrated Technologies at the Demand to Gridof Grid Integrated Technologies at the Demand to GridCommercial Adoption of DR Technologies Related Activities

Ghatikar, Girish

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schedules. ” www.pge.com/tariffs/. Last accessed: 4/26/10.and PG&E’s PDP rates (as a peak pricing tariff and as aproxy for TOU pricing tariff) were used. The technology

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an overview of the economic opportunities for demand responsive control technologies and strategies in commercial buildings. The economic opportunities focus on advanced controls from a building owner’s perspective. The secondary objective is to evaluate.... Table 1 outlines how DR fits into historical demand side management (DSM) concepts. Column three compares DR with energy efficiency and daily peak load management. The emphasis for DR is dynamic control and event driven building response...

Kiliccote, S.; Piette, M. A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Impact of Control Technology on the Demand Response Potential of California Industrial Refrigerated Facilities Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Usage and Conservation Technologies Used in Fruit andThe Impact of Control Technology on the Demand ResponsePrepared By VaCom Technologies La Verne, California July 30,

Scott, Doug

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High efficiency coarse-grained customised dynamically reconfigurable architecture for digital image processing and compression technologies   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digital image processing and compression technologies have significant market potential, especially the JPEG2000 standard which offers outstanding codestream flexibility and high compression ratio. Strong demand for ...

Zhao, Xin

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

Abstract --Demand Response (DR) programs are not a new concept; moreover, the key technologies for their implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract -- Demand Response (DR) programs are not a new concept; moreover, the key technologies migrate to active and dynamic demand response, under reliability criteria based on the smart grid paradigm. This article formulates a new perspective of demand response in emerging countries, based on the US

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

43

Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suite—as well as potential future suites—of thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sector’s water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options Neufville Professor of Engineering Systems Chair, ESD Education Committee #12;2 #12;3 Electricity Demand-Side Management for an Energy Efficient Future in China: Technology Options and Policy Priorities By Chia

de Weck, Olivier L.

45

California: Geothermal Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of 2009, EERE's Geothermal Technologies Office is working with California's Simbol Materials to develop technologies that extract battery materials like lithium, manganese, and...

46

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy. “Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Metering and Demand Response in ElectricityChen, X. (2008). Demand Response-enabled Autonomous Controlfor Thermal Comfort, Demand Response, and Reduced Annual

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” In2010. “Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. McParland, "Open Automated Demand Response Communications2011. Utility & Demand Response Programs Energy ProviderAnnual Consumption (kWh) Demand Response Program Curtailment

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”.also provided through the Demand Response Research Center (of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and  Advanced Metering:  Development for Demand Response  Calculation ? Findings and Energy  Efficiency and  Demand Response with Communicating 

Page, Janie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

perspective, a demand-side management framework with threethe integration of DR in demand-side management activitiesdevelopments. The demand-side management (DSM) framework

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response in Commercial Buildings 3.1. Demand Response in Commercial Buildings ElectricityDemand Response: Understanding the DR potential in commercial buildings

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” InAutomated Demand Response for Small Commercial Buildings. ”in automated demand response programs with building control

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Machine to machine (M2M) technology in demand responsive commercial buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” Highoperate buildings to maximize demand response and minimizeDemand Response Demonstration”, 2004 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.

Watson, David S.; Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response for Small Commercial Buildings.   Lawrence small?medium buildings’ roles in demand response  efforts.  demand response for small? medium commercial buildings 

Page, Janie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specifications (OpenADR) data model capable of communicating real-time prices to electricity customers. We also show how the same data model could be used to for other types of dynamic pricing tariffs (including peak pricing tariffs, which are common throughout the United States). Customers participating in automated demand response programs with building control systems can respond to dynamic prices by using the actual prices as inputs to their control systems. Alternatively, prices can be mapped into"building operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different strategies customers could use to map prices to operation modes. Our results show that OpenADR can be used to communicate dynamic pricing within the Smart Grid and that OpenADR allows for interoperability with existing and future systems, technologies, and electricity markets.

Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

59

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

driven building response. Demand Side Management Energybuildings. Table 1 outlines how DR fits into historical demand side management (

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

Cheng, Chia-Chin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has launched the Zero-Net-Energy (ZNE) Commercial Building Initiative (CBI) in order to develop commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge energy-efficient technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. We examine how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or carbon-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies, such as photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive / demand-response technologies. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function: the minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and carbon / CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the CBI. Using a nursing home in northern California and New York with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNE building requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve ZNE. For comparison, we analyze a nursing home facility in New York to examine the effects of a flatter tariff structure and different load profiles. It has trouble reaching ZNE status and its load reductions as well as efficiency measures need to be more effective than those in the CA case. Finally, we illustrate that the multi-criteria frontier that considers costs and carbon emissions in the presence of demand response dominates the one without it.

Stadler , Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; ,, Hirohisa Aki; Lai, Judy

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

62

An examination of factors affecting high occupancy/toll lane demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, high occupancy/toll (HOT) lanes have gained increasing recognition as a potential method of managing traffic congestion. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand for high occupancy vehicle...

Appiah, Justice

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

centers. 4. Demand Response Strategies Building from theBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Building

Ghatikar, Girish

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and individuals. DEMAND RESPONSE BUILDINGS RESEARCH Recentand event driven building response. Demand Side ManagementDemand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building,

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net- Energy Buildings with Demand Response Michael Stadler,Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response 1 Michael Stadlerbuilding simulation tools, e.g. , EnergyPlus, require specification of the demand response

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial building, demand response, dynamic pricing,demand response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildingsdemand response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in on-engine testing. (2) A compressor technology that demonstrated 1.5% improvement in compressor efficiency on gas stand compared to production available compressors. (3) A power turbine with high efficiency bearing system that demonstrated excellent rotordynamic stability throughout the required speed range, up to 60,000 rpm. (4) A predicted improvement (using engine simulation) in engine thermal efficiency of 7% at the peak torque design point, when combining the technologies developed in this program.

Rich Kruiswyk

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

68

Calculating Energy and Demand Retrofit Savings for Victoria High School: Interim Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-92/12-03 Calculating Energy and Demand Retrofit Savings For Victoria High School Yue Liu, T. Agami Reddy, S. Katipamula and David E. Claridge. Interim Report Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 December... 1992 Calculating Energy and Demand Retrofit Savings For Victoria High School Yue Liu, T. Agami Reddy, S. Katipamula and David E. Claridge. Interim Report Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 December 1992 Abstract...

Liu, Y.; Reddy, T. A.; Katipamula, S.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

High Impact Technology Catalyst | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

energy-efficient commercial building technologies. Through the High Impact Technology Catalyst program, initiated in 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identifies...

70

Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

None

2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Standards and Technology (NIST). 2010. NIST Framework andof Standards and Technology (NIST). 2012. NIST Framework andOpportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers:

Ghatikar, Girish

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Review of Strategies and Technologies for Demand-Side Management on Isolated Mini-Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Appropriate Technology. Alice Springs, Australia.Report of Intermediate Technology Consultants to Overseasand Communication Technologies and Development. Atlanta, GA.

Harper, Meg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a building operations perspective, a demand-side managementdemand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table 2 provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:buildings in California. This report summarizes the integration of DR in demand-side management

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Enabling Technologies for High Penetration of Wind and Solar Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High penetration of variable wind and solar electricity generation will require modifications to the electric power system. This work examines the impacts of variable generation, including uncertainty, ramp rate, ramp range, and potentially excess generation. Time-series simulations were performed in the Texas (ERCOT) grid where different mixes of wind, solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power provide up to 80% of the electric demand. Different enabling technologies were examined, including conventional generator flexibility, demand response, load shifting, and energy storage. A variety of combinations of these technologies enabled low levels of surplus or curtailed wind and solar generation depending on the desired penetration of renewable sources. At lower levels of penetration (up to about 30% on an energy basis) increasing flexible generation, combined with demand response may be sufficient to accommodate variability and uncertainty. Introduction of load-shifting through real-time pricing or other market mechanisms further increases the penetration of variable generation. The limited time coincidence of wind and solar generation presents increasing challenges as these sources provide greater than 50% of total demand. System flexibility must be increased to the point of virtually eliminating must-run baseload generators during periods of high wind and solar generation. Energy storage also becomes increasingly important as lower cost flexibility options are exhausted. The study examines three classes of energy storage - electricity storage, including batteries and pumped hydro, hybrid storage (compressed-air energy storage), and thermal energy storage. Ignoring long-distance transmission options, a combination of load shifting and storage equal to about 12 hours of average demand may keep renewable energy curtailment below 10% in the simulated system.

Denholm, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Smart finite state devices: A modeling framework for demand response technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the ...

Turitsyn, Konstantin

76

High Electric Demand Days: Clean Energy Strategies for Improving Air Quality  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation by Art Diem of the State and Local Capacity Building Branch in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was part of the July 2008 Webcast sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Clean Energy and Air Quality Integration Initiative that was titled Role of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Improving Air Quality and Addressing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals on High Electric Demand Days.

77

Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boyd et al. : “Life-cycle energy demand and global warmingLife-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-to assess the life-cycle energy demand of its products for

Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boyd et al. : “Life-cycle energy demand and global warmingLife-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-to assess the life-cycle energy demand of its products for

Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy consumption feedback? Technological devices will not by themselves produce residentialresidential energy conservation (Bell et al. , 1996). Withdrawal of feedback

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High PerformanceEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division May 2014 ThisRevisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance

Li Ph.D., Cheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Demand Response Technology Development The objective ofin planning demand response technology RD&D by conductingNew and Emerging Technologies into the California Smart Grid

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

83

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies for both IT equipment and site infrastructure. The Power Usagetechnologies. The survey included information such as: • Site name and contacts • Energy usage •

Ghatikar, Girish

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

following participants, vendors and the reviewers:  Paul sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least technologies provided by vendors can receive and translate 

Page, Janie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Signals. ” SGIP NIST Smart Grid Collaboration Site. http://emix/. Last accessed: Open Smart Grid Users Group. “OpenADROpenADR technologies and Smart Grid standards activities.

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many| Department of4 Energy SolutionsHigh

87

Smart Finite State Devices: A Modeling Framework for Demand Response Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the following four types: (a) optional loads that can be shed, e.g. light dimming; (b) deferrable loads that can be delayed, e.g. dishwashers; (c) controllable loads with inertia, e.g. thermostatically-controlled loads, whose task is to maintain an auxiliary characteristic (temperature) within pre-defined margins; and (d) storage devices that can alternate between charging and generating. Our analysis of the devices seeks to find their optimal price-taking control strategy under a given stochastic model of the distribution market.

Turitsyn, Konstantin; Ananyev, Maxim; Chertkov, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl Champion Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl Champion May 2,...

89

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High-Efficiency Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Efficiency Combustion Engines Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High-Efficiency Combustion Engines The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) is supporting work to improve...

90

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Density...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV's Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems Vehicle Technologies Office Merit...

91

Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline Engine Downsizing Application of Synergistic Technologies to Achieve High Levels of Gasoline Engine Downsizing Discussed...

92

Advanced Combustion Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combustion Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean Combustion Advanced Combustion Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean Combustion Summary of advanced combustion research...

93

Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean,...

94

Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review 2014: Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly...

95

Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines and a Pathway to 50% Thermal Efficiency Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines and a...

96

Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology Demonstration of Highly...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SuperTruck Program - Technology Demonstration of Highly Efficient Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology Demonstration of Highly Efficient...

97

The demand for high performance computing research has been significantly increasing over the past few years. Various  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The demand for high performance computing research has been significantly increasing over the past to promote the effective use of High Performance Computing in the research environment. In addition facility has enabled cutting-edge computations material research, "Having a high-performance computing

Akhmedov, Azer

98

Generation Scheduling for Power Systems with Demand Response and a High Penetration of Wind Energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With renewable energy sources and demand response programs expanding in many power systems, traditional unit commitment and economic dispatch approaches are inadequate. The power system… (more)

Liu, Guodong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Power system balancing with high renewable penetration : the potential of demand response .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigated the ability of responsive demand to stabilize the electrical grid when intermittent renewable resources are present. The WILMAR stochastic unit commitment model… (more)

Critz, David Karl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

Linderman, R; Smith, B; Michel, B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modern Fuel Cladding in Demanding Operation - ZIRLO in Full Life High Lithium PWR Coolant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is an increasing demand to optimize the PWR water chemistry in order to minimize activity build-up in the plants and to avoid CIPS and other fuel related issues. Operation with a constant pH between 7.2 and 7.4 is generally considered an important part in achieving the optimized water chemistry. The extended long cycles currently used in most of the U.S. PWRs implies that the lithium concentration at BOC will be outside the general operating experience with such a coolant chemistry regime. With the purpose to extend the experience of high lithium coolant operation, such water chemistry has been used in a few PWRs, i.e. CPSES Unit 2 and Diablo Canyon Units 1 and 2, all with ZIRLO{sup TM} cladding. Operation with a lithium concentration up to 4.2 ppm does not show any impact of the elevated lithium, while operation with up to 6 ppm possibly produce some limited corrosion acceleration in the region of sub-nucleate boiling but has no detrimental impact under the conditions limited by current operating experience. (authors)

Kargol, Kenneth [Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Power Plant, Avila Beach, California (United States); Stevens, Jim [TXU Power, Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Glen Rose, Texas (United States); Bosma, John [Westinghouse Electric Company, Dallas, Texas (United States); Iyer, Jayashri; Wikmark, Gunnar [Westinghouse Electric Company, Columbia, South Carolina (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

High-energy electron beam technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-energy electron beam (HEEB) technology was developed under the US Department of Defense (DOD) charged-particle-beam (CPB) directed-energy program. The program's objective was advanced military weapon systems. For the past two decades, charged-particle-beam research focused on producing intense beams and the vehicles to deliver large amounts of electrical energy. The charged-particle beams of interest for weapon systems had particle energies up to 100 MeV, beam currents of tens of kiloamperes, and propagation distances in excess of 100 m. However, such high energy levels are not required for industrial uses of the technology. It is anticipated that these less-aggressive beams will provide an electrical heat source suitable for a variety of materials processing applications, including surface treatment, joining, shock hardening, phase-transformation hardening, peening, shock-wave compaction, and melting. Much more R and D is needed to transfer to industry the high-energy electron beam technology developed in the CPB program. For example, its power as a materials processing tool must be convincingly demonstrated. Also required are compact, reliable accelerators that are relatively simple to use and reasonably priced.

Danko, J.C.; Lundin, C.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Nolting, E.E. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, White Oak, MD (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Detecting...

105

Power system balancing with high renewable penetration : the potential of demand response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigated the ability of responsive demand to stabilize the electrical grid when intermittent renewable resources are present. The WILMAR stochastic unit commitment model was used to represent a version of ...

Critz, David Karl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

Hun, Diana E [ORNL; Jackson, Mark C [University of Texas at Austin; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Demand Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

108

Helping Ensure High-Quality Installation of Solar Power Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Ensure High-Quality Installation of Solar Power Technologies Helping Ensure High-Quality Installation of Solar Power Technologies April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The Midwest...

109

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Studies on High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Studies on High Capacity Cathodes for Advanced Lithium-ion Systems Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Studies on High Capacity Cathodes for Advanced Lithium-ion Systems...

110

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Temperature...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design...

111

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Takes 2015...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Takes 2015 Virginia Science Bowl 2014 Virginia High School Science Bowl The team from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, swept through the...

112

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology from...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of science and math questions and answers, the winning team was Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology from Alexandria. Team captain and high school senior,...

113

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Voltage Solid...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles...

114

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications Presentation given by...

115

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Compression...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine Operation Using Alcohol Enhancement Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine...

116

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Efficiency, Low EMI and Positioning Tolerant Wireless Charging of EVs Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency, Low EMI and Positioning Tolerant Wireless...

117

Development of Enabling Technologies for High Efficiency, Low...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines Development of Enabling Technologies for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous...

118

Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications...

119

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOE AccidentWasteZone Modeling |Demand Response

120

Nuclear power high technology colloquium: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports presenting information on technology advancements in the nuclear industry and nuclear power plant functions have been abstracted and are available on the energy data base.

Not Available

1984-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

High Impact Technology Catalyst | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Shading Attachments and Awnings Refrigeration Controls & Display Case Retrofits Heat Pump Water Heaters Commercial Fans and Blowers TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION REPORTS Field...

122

High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in each of the volumes. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems More Documents & Publications Building America Whole-House Solutions for...

123

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Wins...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wins Virginia Regional Science Bowl; St. Christopher's School, Richmond, Takes Second NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 27, 2010 - The Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology...

124

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology wins...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Bowl. Winning the daylong academic competition was the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, from Alexandria, Va. Following in second place was the...

125

Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI) Presentation Number: 015 Investigator: Patterson, Doug (Baker Hughes...

126

Request for Information: High Impact Commercial Building Technology...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO) is developing a pipeline of high impact, cost-effective, energy saving and underutilized commercial building...

127

Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

128

Feedback Controlled High Frequency Electrochemical Micromachining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microsystem and integrated circuitry components are mostly manufactured using semiconductor technologies. Fabrication using high strength metals, for demanding aerospace, mechanical, or biomedical applications, requires novel technologies which...

Ozkeskin, Fatih Mert

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Understanding technology diffusion and market adoption through modeling : implications on strategy for demand-side energy firms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deregulation shaping the Electricity industry across the world is a systems challenge cutting across interdisciplinary fields of technology, economics, public policy, environment and sociology. Decision makers that shape ...

Nath, Vivin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

PUBLISH ON DEMAND Recasting the Textbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of history helped students evaluate the sources of information and better understand the perspectives from which history is written? WHAT WE SET OUT TO DO We recast the history textbook as an edited on- demand- source documents and interactive technology. WHAT WE FOUND High school students accessed our database

Das, Rhiju

131

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Snaps Up...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Up Virginia Science Bowl Championship; Virginia Beach Schools Take 2nd, 3rd Place High School Science Bowl 1st Place The Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology...

132

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy, Long...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Energy, Long Cycle Life Lithium-ion Batteries for EV Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy, Long Cycle Life Lithium-ion Batteries for EV...

133

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

134

Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications2010. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies forenergy efficiency and demand response: Framework concepts

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Calculating Energy and Demand Retrofit Savings for Stroman High School: Interim Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As part of the LoanSTAR program, Stroman High School in Victoria Texas underwent two retrofits: a) an absorption chiller was changed to an electric vapor compression chiller, and b) an EMCS system was installed after about 5 months in the post retrofit... the pre-retrofit climate conditions. Both approaches are applied to the LoanSTAR site Stroman High School (SHS) in Victoria, Texas, in which (1) pre-retrofit data were not available , and (2) an absorption chiller was replaced by a vapor compression...

Liu, Y.; Reddy, T. A.; Katipamula, S.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011 Sila Kiliccote Deputy, Demand Response Research Center Program Manager, Building Technologies Department Environmental Energy Technologies only as needed) · Energy Efficiency strategies are permanent (occur daily) 4 #12;Demand-Side

Kammen, Daniel M.

138

High-Performance Secure Database Access Technologies for HEP Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN Laboratory will become the largest scientific instrument in the world when it starts operations in 2007. Large Scale Analysis Computer Systems (computational grids) are required to extract rare signals of new physics from petabytes of LHC detector data. In addition to file-based event data, LHC data processing applications require access to large amounts of data in relational databases: detector conditions, calibrations, etc. U.S. high energy physicists demand efficient performance of grid computing applications in LHC physics research where world-wide remote participation is vital to their success. To empower physicists with data-intensive analysis capabilities a whole hyperinfrastructure of distributed databases cross-cuts a multi-tier hierarchy of computational grids. The crosscutting allows separation of concerns across both the global environment of a federation of computational grids and the local environment of a physicist’s computer used for analysis. Very few efforts are on-going in the area of database and grid integration research. Most of these are outside of the U.S. and rely on traditional approaches to secure database access via an extraneous security layer separate from the database system core, preventing efficient data transfers. Our findings are shared by the Database Access and Integration Services Working Group of the Global Grid Forum, who states that "Research and development activities relating to the Grid have generally focused on applications where data is stored in files. However, in many scientific and commercial domains, database management systems have a central role in data storage, access, organization, authorization, etc, for numerous applications.” There is a clear opportunity for a technological breakthrough, requiring innovative steps to provide high-performance secure database access technologies for grid computing. We believe that an innovative database architecture where the secure authorization is pushed into the database engine will eliminate inefficient data transfer bottlenecks. Furthermore, traditionally separated database and security layers provide an extra vulnerability, leaving a weak clear-text password authorization as the only protection on the database core systems. Due to the legacy limitations of the systems’ security models, the allowed passwords often can not even comply with the DOE password guideline requirements. We see an opportunity for the tight integration of the secure authorization layer with the database server engine resulting in both improved performance and improved security. Phase I has focused on the development of a proof-of-concept prototype using Argonne National Laboratory’s (ANL) Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) project as a test scenario. By developing a grid-security enabled version of the ATLAS project’s current relation database solution, MySQL, PIOCON Technologies aims to offer a more efficient solution to secure database access.

Matthew Vranicar; John Weicher

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

Low technology high tritium breeding blanket concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main function of this low technology blanket is to produce the necessary tritium for INTOR operation with minimum first wall coverage. The INTOR first wall, blanket, and shield are constrained by the dimensions of the reference design and the protection criteria required for different reactor components and dose equivalent after shutdown in the reactor hall. It is assumed that the blanket operation at commercial power reactor conditions and the proper temperature for power generation can be sacrificed to achieve the highest possible tritium breeding ratio with minimum additional research and developments and minimal impact on reactor design and operation. A set of blanket evaluation criteria has been used to compare possible blanket concepts. Six areas: performance, operating requirements, impact on reactor design and operation, safety and environmental impact, technology assessment, and cost have been defined for the evaluation process. A water-cooled blanket was developed to operate with a low temperature and pressure. The developed blanket contains a 24 cm of beryllium and 6 cm of solid breeder both with a 0.8 density factor. This blanket provides a local tritium breeding ratio of approx.2.0. The water coolant is isolated from the breeder material by several zones which eliminates the tritium buildup in the water by permeation and reduces the changes for water-breeder interaction. This improves the safety and environmental aspects of the blanket and eliminates the costly process of the tritium recovery from the water. 12 refs., 13 tabs.

Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.C.; Smith, D.L.; Billone, M.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Clemmer, R.; Finn, P.A.; Hassanein, A.M.; Johnson, C.E.; Liu, Y.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

High Technology School-to-Work Program at Argonne  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne's High Technology School-to-Work Program for Chicago Public School Students. Supported by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Chicago Public Schools, Argonne National Laboratory and the City of Chicago.

None

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Patent Litigation for High Technology and Life Sciences Companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patent Litigation for High Technology and Life Sciences Companies #12;© 2005 Fenwick & West LLP Corporate (emerging growth, financings, securities, mergers & acquisitions) n Intellectual Property (patent, copyright, licensing, trademark) n Litigation (patent and other IP, securities, antitrust, employment

Shamos, Michael I.

142

Emerging High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Cell Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A Manufacturing Cost Analysis Relevant to Photovoltaic Cells Fabricated with IIIEmerging High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Cell Technologies Mike McGehee Materials Science and Engineering Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics Bay Area Photovoltaic Consortium Precourt Institute

McGehee, Michael

143

High Efficiency Engine Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHigh Efficiency

144

Multijunction Photovoltaic Technologies for High-Performance Concentrators: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multijunction solar cells provide high-performance technology pathways leading to potentially low-cost electricity generated from concentrated sunlight. The National Center for Photovoltaics at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has funded different III-V multijunction solar cell technologies and various solar concentration approaches. Within this group of projects, III-V solar cell efficiencies of 41% are close at hand and will likely be reported in these conference proceedings. Companies with well-developed solar concentrator structures foresee installed system costs of $3/watt--half of today's costs--within the next 2 to 5 years as these high-efficiency photovoltaic technologies are incorporated into their concentrator photovoltaic systems. These technology improvements are timely as new large-scale multi-megawatt markets, appropriate for high performance PV concentrators, open around the world.

McConnell, R.; Symko-Davies, M.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature Materials for High Efficiency Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

146

Microfluidic Technologies for High-Throughput Screening Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidic Technologies for High-Throughput Screening Applications Thesis by Todd Thorsen, patiently giving me advice on a large variety of subjects, ranging from microfluidics to optics of microfluidic devices for high-throughput screening applications, such as mutant enzyme libraries expressed

Quake, Stephen R.

147

High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy high power battery...

149

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEMAND RESPONSE .7 Wholesale Marketuse at times of high wholesale market prices or when systemenergy expenditure. In wholesale markets, spot energy prices

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Klamath Falls: High-Power Acoustic Well Stimulation Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acoustic well stimulation (AWS) technology uses high-power sonic waves from specific frequency spectra in an attempt to stimulate production in a damaged or low-production wellbore. AWS technology is one of the most promising technologies in the oil and gas industry, but it has proven difficult for the industry to develop an effective downhole prototype. This collaboration between Klamath Falls Inc. and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) included a series of tests using high-power ultrasonic tools to stimulate oil and gas production. Phase I testing was designed and implemented to verify tool functionality, power requirements, and capacity of high-power AWS tools. The purpose of Phase II testing was to validate the production response of wells with marginal production rates to AWS stimulation and to capture and identify any changes in the downhole environment after tool deployment. This final report presents methodology and results.

Black, Brian

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

151

SwRI's HEDGE Technology for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Gasoline...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SwRI's HEDGE Technology for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Gasoline Engines SwRI's HEDGE Technology for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Gasoline Engines Presentation given at the...

152

Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Martin Aspen. 2006. Demand Response Enabling TechnologiesDon. 2007. “Pricing for Demand Response from Residential andthe Level of Demand Response,” Power Point Presentation, 24

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

When it comes to Demand Response, is FERC its Own Worst Enemy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

made between traditional demand response (DR) programs andpricing. Traditional demand response programs typically payFor overviews of demand response technologies and program

Bushnell, James; Hobbs, Benjamin; Wolak, Frank A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity2006. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and2010. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” LBNL Reportautomated Demand Response (DR) technologies in buildings.Automated Demand Response is initiated at a building or

Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implement demand response programs involving buildingbased demand response (DR) technologies in real buildings.BUILDING AUDITS Introduction Customers’ attitudes to prospective utility demand response

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

158

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery voltage. NOTE: This device does not control the thermoelectric air conditioner on the plastic model house.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relative humidity sensors, one mote with solar radiation andsensors and actuators. A study of a variety of solar,sensor was located under the eave of the roof and the other exposed to solar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global and diffuse solar radiation sensors, wind directionfrom a crude radiation sensor. Solar Radiation Conductiosensor data (Temperature, motion, relative humidity, solar

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ce Temperature sensors Smart Meter Motion sensors Figure 1:In these early ideas the “smart meter” was simulated on ameter to be compatible with a variety of dynamic tariff structures. The “smart

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occupied Bay Area house under study. Passive Proximity ACPASSIVE PROXIMITY AC CURRENT SENSOR 27 WIRELESSLY CONTROLLED MONITORING-OUTLETS28 WIRELESS MONITORING OF A TEST HOUSE House Meter”. ) Some final observations for sensors a) Size matters: Though the passive

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette Program Development and Outreach Response Research Plan #12;2 Demand Response Research Center Objective Scope Stakeholders Develop, prioritize, conduct and disseminate multi- institutional research to facilitate Demand Response. Technologies

165

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

166

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

167

Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5... for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 5 What is Demand Response? ?The temporary reduction of electricity demanded from the grid by an end-user in response to capacity shortages, system reliability events, or high wholesale...

168

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine Operation Using Alcohol Enhancement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Massachusetts Institute of Technology at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

169

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-Enhanced PCCI - Mixed Mode Combustion Variable Valve Actuation Variable Intake Swirl Turbo Technology Electrically Driven Components Aftertreatment Turbo Technology...

171

High Technology Centrifugal Compressor for Commercial Air Conditioning Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

R&D Dynamics, Bloomfield, CT in partnership with the State of Connecticut has been developing a high technology, oil-free, energy-efficient centrifugal compressor called CENVA for commercial air conditioning systems under a program funded by the US Department of Energy. The CENVA compressor applies the foil bearing technology used in all modern aircraft, civil and military, air conditioning systems. The CENVA compressor will enhance the efficiency of water and air cooled chillers, packaged roof top units, and other air conditioning systems by providing an 18% reduction in energy consumption in the unit capacity range of 25 to 350 tons of refrigeration The technical approach for CENVA involved the design and development of a high-speed, oil-free foil gas bearing-supported two-stage centrifugal compressor, CENVA encompassed the following high technologies, which are not currently utilized in commercial air conditioning systems: Foil gas bearings operating in HFC-134a; Efficient centrifugal impellers and diffusers; High speed motors and drives; and System integration of above technologies. Extensive design, development and testing efforts were carried out. Significant accomplishments achieved under this program are: (1) A total of 26 builds and over 200 tests were successfully completed with successively improved designs; (2) Use of foil gas bearings in refrigerant R134a was successfully proven; (3) A high speed, high power permanent magnet motor was developed; (4) An encoder was used for signal feedback between motor and controller. Due to temperature limitations of the encoder, the compressor could not operate at higher speed and in turn at higher pressure. In order to alleviate this problem a unique sensorless controller was developed; (5) This controller has successfully been tested as stand alone; however, it has not yet been integrated and tested as a system; (6) The compressor successfully operated at water cooled condensing temperatures Due to temperature limitations of the encoder, it could not be operated at air cooled condensing temperatures. (7) The two-stage impellers/diffusers worked well separately but combined did not match well.

Ruckes, John

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy consumed by buildings accounts for one third of the world?s total primary energy use. Associated with the conscious of energy savings in buildings, High Performance Buildings (HPBs) has surged across the world, with wide promotion and adoption of various performance rating and certification systems. It is valuable to look into the actual energy performance of HPBs and to understand their influencing factors. To shed some light on this topic, this paper conducted a series of portfolio analysis based on a database of 51 high performance office buildings across the world. Analyses showed that the actual site Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of the 51 buildings varied by a factor of up to 11, indicating a large scale of variation of the actual energy performance of the current HPBs. Further analysis of the correlation between EUI and climate elucidated ubiquitous phenomenon of EUI scatter throughout all climate zones, implying that the weather is not a decisive factor, although important, for the actual energy consumption of an individual building. On the building size via EUI, analysis disclosed that smaller buildings have a tendency to achieving lower energy use. Even so, the correlation is not absolute since some large buildings demonstrated low energy use while some small buildings performed opposite. Concerning the technologies, statistics indicated that the application of some technologies had correlations with some specific building size and climate characteristic. However, it was still hard to pinpoint a set of technologies which was directly correlative with a group of low EUI buildings. It is concluded that no a single factor essentially determines the actual energy performance of HPBs. To deliver energy-efficient buildings, an integrated design taking account of climate, technology, occupant behavior as well as operation and maintenance should be implemented.

Li , Cheng; Hong , Tianzhen

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Harnessing the power of demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability program was to mature a production-ready supply chain for reliable 250°C FPE (fluorinated polyester) film capacitors by 2011. These high-temperature film capacitors enable both the down hole drilling and aerospace industries by enabling a variety of benefits including: ? Deeper oil exploration in higher temperature and pressure environments ? Enabling power electronic and control equipment to operate in higher temperature environments ? Enabling reduced cooling requirements of electronics ? Increasing reliability and life of capacitors operating below rated temperature ? Enabling capacitors to handle higher electrical losses without overheating. The key challenges to bringing the FPE film capacitors to market have been manufacturing challenges including: ? FPE Film is difficult to handle and wind, resulting in poor yields ? Voltage breakdown strength decreases when the film is wound into capacitors (~70% decrease) ? Encapsulation technologies must be improved to enable higher temperature operation ? Manufacturing and test cycle time is very long As a direct result of this program most of the manufacturing challenges have been met. The FPE film production metalization and winding yield has increased to over 82% from 70%, and the voltage breakdown strength of the wound capacitors has increased 270% to 189 V/?m. The high temperature packaging concepts are showing significant progress including promising results for lead attachments and hermetic packages at 200°C and non-hermetic packages at 250°C. Manufacturing and test cycle time will decrease as the market for FPE capacitors develops.

None

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weyerhaeuser operates the world's only commercial high-temperature black liquor gasifier at its pulp mill in New Bern, NC. The unit was started-up in December 1996 and currently processes about 15% of the mill's black liquor. Weyerhaeuser, Chemrec AB (the gasifier technology developer), and the U.S. Department of Energy recognized that the long-term, continuous operation of the New Bern gasifier offered a unique opportunity to advance the state of high temperature black liquor gasification toward the commercial-scale pressurized O2-blown gasification technology needed as a foundation for the Forest Products Bio-Refinery of the future. Weyerhaeuser along with its subcontracting partners submitted a proposal in response to the 2004 joint USDOE and USDA solicitation - 'Biomass Research and Development Initiative'. The Weyerhaeuser project 'Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification' was awarded USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42259 in November 2004. The overall goal of the DOE sponsored project was to utilize the Chemrec{trademark} black liquor gasification facility at New Bern as a test bed for advancing the development status of molten phase black liquor gasification. In particular, project tasks were directed at improvements to process performance and reliability. The effort featured the development and validation of advanced CFD modeling tools and the application of these tools to direct burner technology modifications. The project also focused on gaining a fundamental understanding and developing practical solutions to address condensate and green liquor scaling issues, and process integration issues related to gasifier dregs and product gas scrubbing. The Project was conducted in two phases with a review point between the phases. Weyerhaeuser pulled together a team of collaborators to undertake these tasks. Chemrec AB, the technology supplier, was intimately involved in most tasks, and focused primarily on the design, specification and procurement of facility upgrades. Chemrec AB is also operating a pressurized, O2-blown gasifier pilot facility in Piteaa, Sweden. There was an exchange of knowledge with the pressurized projects including utilization of the experimental results from facilities in Piteaa, Sweden. Resources at the Georgia Tech Research Corporation (GTRC, a.k.a., the Institute of Paper Science and Technology) were employed primarily to conduct the fundamental investigations on scaling and plugging mechanisms and characterization of green liquor dregs. The project also tapped GTRC expertise in the development of the critical underlying black liquor gasification rate subroutines employed in the CFD code. The actual CFD code development and application was undertaken by Process Simulation, Ltd (PSL) and Simulent, Ltd. PSL focused on the overall integrated gasifier CFD code, while Simulent focused on modeling the black liquor nozzle and description of the black liquor spray. For nozzle development and testing Chemrec collaborated with ETC (Energy Technology Centre) in Piteae utilizing their test facility for nozzle spray investigation. GTI (Gas Technology Institute), Des Plains, IL supported the team with advanced gas analysis equipment during the gasifier test period in June 2005.

Craig Brown; Ingvar Landalv; Ragnar Stare; Jerry Yuan; Nikolai DeMartini; Nasser Ashgriz

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Combined technologies enable high-pressure slickline work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operators conducting wireline operations can combine the attributes of the slickline grease head and conventional stuffing box to enable work in gas wells at wellhead pressures above 15,000 psi. Wireline/slickline work in high-pressure wells requires meeting the dual challenges of well control and freedom of movement (up and down) for the lines. In a notable application of the combined-technology technique, an operator offshore Louisiana attempted to conduct wireline operations in an 18,000-ft gas and condensate well with 15,600 psi wellhead pressure, using a standard slickline stuffing box to contain the pressure. The standard equipment could not perform the needed function, which involved several trips to depths of 5,000 ft and 18,000 ft. Using a combined-technology, flow-tube stuffing box, the operator was able to conduct the wireline operation without incident; the control arrangement resulted in use of only 3 gal of lubricating oil throughout the job. Post-job analysis of the packing showed only the minimal wear normally associated with low-pressure wireline operations. Although slickline work can be performed in low-pressure gas wells without using the flow-tube stuffing box, the device and the oil used with it isolate the stuffing-box packing from the dry gases, reducing friction swell. This isolation speeds up the operation and reduces packing wear.

Davis, G. [Halliburton Energy Services Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); West, T. [Halliburton Energy Services Inc., Houma, LA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Emergent process methods for high-technology ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present conference covers colloidal processing of advanced ceramics, novel power-forming and powder-processing methods, the derivation of ceramics by polymer processing, chemical vapor deposition techniques, ion beam deposition methods, the laser and ion beam modification of surfaces, hot isostatic pressing and dynamic compaction, shock conditioning and subsequent densification of ceramics, and very high pressure processing methods. Specific attention is given to the preparation of shaped glasses by the sol-gel method, the synthesis of powders and thin films by laser-induced gas phase reactions, the plasma sintering of ceramics, laser chemical vapor deposition, the microstructure and mechanical properties of ion-implanted ceramics, a computer simulation of dynamic compaction, shock-induced modification of inorganic powders, and diamond anvil technology.

Davis, R.F.; Palmour, H. III; Porter, R.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Summary of multiterminal high-voltage direct current transmission technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the present state of multiterminal (MT) high-voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission. The purpose is to reassess the need for HVDC circuit breakers and to identify needed research for MT HVDC. The fundamentals of this technology are presented, and previous research and development is reviewed. Although no MT HVDC systems have yet been built, many concepts have been proposed. Some require a dc breaker, and others do not. Both options have advantages and disadvantages for various applications, so the selection will depend on the proposed application. Research is needed to define operating characteristics of various MT HVDC systems. In some applications, dc breakers will be useful, so research into HVDC interruption should continue. Also, dc fault detection and control algorithms for MT systems should be studied.

Biggs, R.B.; Jewell, W.T.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High-lift chemical heat pump technologies for industrial processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally industrial heat pumps (IHPs) have found applications on a process specific basis with reject heat from a process being upgraded and returned to the process. The IHP must be carefully integrated into a process since improper placement may result in an uneconomic application. Industry has emphasized a process integration approach to the design and operation of their plants. Heat pump applications have adopted this approach and the area of applicability was extended by utilizing a process integrated approach where reject heat from one process is upgraded and then used as input for another process. The DOE IHP Program has extended the process integration approach of heat pump application with a plant utility emphasis. In this design philosophy, reject heat from a process is upgraded to plant utility conditions and fed into the plant distribution system. This approach has the advantage that reject heat from any pr@s can be used as input and the output can be used at any location within the plant. Thus the approach can be easily integrated into existing industrial applications and all reject heat streams are potential targets of opportunity. The plant utility approach can not be implemented without having heat pumps with high-lift capabilities (on the order of 65{degree}C). Current heat pumps have only about half the lift capability required. Thus the current emphasis for the DOE IHP Program is the development of high lift chemical heat pumps that can deliver heat more economically to higher heat delivery temperatures. This is achieved with innovative cooling (refrigeration) and heating technologies which are based on advanced cycles and advanced working fluids or a combination of both. This paper details the plan to develop economically competitive, environmentally acceptable heat pump technologies that are capable of providing the delivery temperature and lift required to supply industrial plant utility-grade process heating and/or cooling.

Olszewski, M.; Zaltash, A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to involve more explicit alignment with BPA's newest demand-side roadmap resource, the Demand Response Technology Roadmap. 1 Roadmap chapters have been arranged in stand-alone...

183

Program Design Analysis using BEopt Building Energy Optimization Software: Defining a Technology Pathway Leading to New Homes with Zero Peak Cooling Demand; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An optimization method based on the evaluation of a broad range of different combinations of specific energy efficiency and renewable-energy options is used to determine the least-cost pathway to the development of new homes with zero peak cooling demand. The optimization approach conducts a sequential search of a large number of possible option combinations and uses the most cost-effective alternatives to generate a least-cost curve to achieve home-performance levels ranging from a Title 24-compliant home to a home that uses zero net source energy on an annual basis. By evaluating peak cooling load reductions on the least-cost curve, it is then possible to determine the most cost-effective combination of energy efficiency and renewable-energy options that both maximize annual energy savings and minimize peak-cooling demand.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of Enabling Technologies for High Efficiency, Low...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comments Barriers Approach Performance Measures and Accomplishments Technology Transfer Collaborations PublicationsPatents Plans for Next Fiscal Year ...

187

Advanced Combustion Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Efficiency Improvement Controls Variable Valve Actuation Variable Intake Swirl Turbo Technology Electrically Driven Components Aftertreatment Integration of Cummins...

188

Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology Demonstration of Highly...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

On Program Participants - Collaborations Cummins Inc. - Cummins Fuel Systems - Cummins Turbo Technologies - Cummins Emissions Solutions - Cummins Electronics - Cummins Filtration...

189

3-D MAPPING TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research investigated four techniques that could be applicable for mapping of solids remaining in radioactive waste tanks at the Savannah River Site: stereo vision, LIDAR, flash LIDAR, and Structure from Motion (SfM). Stereo vision is the least appropriate technique for the solids mapping application. Although the equipment cost is low and repackaging would be fairly simple, the algorithms to create a 3D image from stereo vision would require significant further development and may not even be applicable since stereo vision works by finding disparity in feature point locations from the images taken by the cameras. When minimal variation in visual texture exists for an area of interest, it becomes difficult for the software to detect correspondences for that object. SfM appears to be appropriate for solids mapping in waste tanks. However, equipment development would be required for positioning and movement of the camera in the tank space to enable capturing a sequence of images of the scene. Since SfM requires the identification of distinctive features and associates those features to their corresponding instantiations in the other image frames, mockup testing would be required to determine the applicability of SfM technology for mapping of waste in tanks. There may be too few features to track between image frame sequences to employ the SfM technology since uniform appearance may exist when viewing the remaining solids in the interior of the waste tanks. Although scanning LIDAR appears to be an adequate solution, the expense of the equipment ($80,000-$120,000) and the need for further development to allow tank deployment may prohibit utilizing this technology. The development would include repackaging of equipment to permit deployment through the 4-inch access ports and to keep the equipment relatively uncontaminated to allow use in additional tanks. 3D flash LIDAR has a number of advantages over stereo vision, scanning LIDAR, and SfM, including full frame time-of-flight data (3D image) collected with a single laser pulse, high frame rates, direct calculation of range, blur-free images without motion distortion, no need for precision scanning mechanisms, ability to combine 3D flash LIDAR with 2D cameras for 2D texture over 3D depth, and no moving parts. The major disadvantage of the 3D flash LIDAR camera is the cost of approximately $150,000, not including the software development time and repackaging of the camera for deployment in the waste tanks.

Marzolf, A.; Folsom, M.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency VCR Engine with Variable Valve Actuation and new Supercharging Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Envera LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high efficiency VCR engine...

192

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high.  Demand response helps to manage building electricity Building  Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.  Non?Residential Building in California.   Demand Response 

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

DEMAND SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the response of travelers to real-time pre- trip information. The demand simulator is an extension of dynamicDEMAND SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT Constantinos Antoniou, Moshe Ben-Akiva, Michel Bierlaire, and Rabi Mishalani Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract

Bierlaire, Michel

194

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” Highdemand-response technologies in large commercial and institutional buildings.building method California Independent System Operator (Cal ISO)’s Demand Response

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

Arun Majumdar

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Enhanced High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about enhanced...

197

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Speed Joining...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

198

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management Annelize Victor Michael Brodkorb Sr. Business Consultant Business Development Manager Aspen Technology, Inc. Aspen Technology España, S.A. Houston, TX Barcelona, Spain ABSTRACT To remain... competitive, manufacturers must capture opportunities to increase bottom-line profitability. The goal of this paper is to present a new methodology for reducing energy costs – “Demand-Side Energy Management.” Learn how process manufacturers assess energy...

Victor, A.; Brodkorb, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

200

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency GDI Engine Research, with Emphasis on Ignition Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high efficiency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature Aluminum Alloys (Agreement ID:24034) Project ID:18518  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

202

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Speed Joining of Dissimilar Alloy Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

203

Scenarios of Global Municipal Water-Use Demand Projections over the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper establishes three future projections of global municipal water use to the end of the 21st century: A reference business-as usual (BAU) scenario, a High Technological Improvement (High Tech) scenario and a Low Technological Improvement (Low Tech) scenario. A global municipal water demand model is constructed using global water use statistics at the country-scale, calibrated to the base year of 2005, and simulated to the end of the 21st century. Since the constructed water demand model hinges on socioeconomic variables (population, income), water price, and end-use technology and efficiency improvement rates, projections of those input variables are adopted to characterize the uncertainty in future water demand estimates. The water demand model is linked to the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a global change integrated assessment model. Under the reference scenario, the global total water withdrawal increases from 466 km3/year in 2005 to 941 km3/year in 2100,while withdrawals in the high and low tech scenarios are 321 km3/ year and 2000 km3/ year, respectively. This wide range (321-2000 km3/ year) indicates the level of uncertainty associated with such projections. The simulated global municipal demand projections are most sensitive to population and income projections, then to end-use technology and efficiency projections, and finally to water price. Thus, using water price alone as a policy measure to reduce municipal water use may substantiate the share of municipal water price of people’s annual incomes.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Davies, Evan; Eom, Jiyong

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

Technology Transfer Webinar on November 12: High-Performance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOEOE and EPRI will host a technology transfer webinar on Wednesday, November 12, 2014 from noon to 2 p.m. (ET). The purpose of this open webinar is to disseminate results and...

205

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Daikin Advanced Lithium Ion Battery TechnologyHigh Voltage Electrolyte  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Daikin America at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Daikin advanced lithium ion...

206

How to Get More Response from Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite all the rhetoric, demand response's contribution to meet peak load will remain elusive in the absence of enabling technology and standardized business protocols. (author)

Neumann, Scott; Sioshansi, Fereidoon; Vojdani, Ali; Yee, Gaymond

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Using Partnerships to Drive Demand and Provide Services in Communities...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial Financing Products Information Technology Tools for Multifamily...

208

Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings,Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings",demand response and energy efficiency functions into the design of buildings,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Magnetospheric application of high-altitude long-duration balloon technology: Daylight auroral observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetospheric application of high-altitude long-duration balloon technology: Daylight auroral; accepted 12 February 2007 Abstract Daylight auroral imaging is a proposed application of the NASA high

Lummerzheim, Dirk

211

THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO THE CENTER FOR HIGH TECHNOLOGY MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO THE CENTER FOR HIGH TECHNOLOGY MATERIALS Photonic Crystals: Part I.J. Malloy1 1Center for High Technology Materials University of New Mexico 2Lockheed Martin Denver, Colorado 3Electrical and Computer Engineering Department University of New Mexico #12;THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW

Mojahedi, Mohammad

212

Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening Eric Brouzesa,b,1 (received for review March 31, 2009) We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range

Perrimon, Norbert

213

High-Tech Tools for Teaching Physics: the Physics Education Technology Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MS #06-020 High-Tech Tools for Teaching Physics: the Physics Education Technology Project Noah Teaching and Learning September 15, 2006 #12;MS #06-020 High-Tech Tools for Teaching Physics: the Physics the Physics Education Technology (PhET) project, identifies features of these educational tools

Colorado at Boulder, University of

214

New and Underutilized Technology: High Bay LED Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following information outlines key deployment considerations for high bay LED lighting within the Federal sector.

215

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature DC-Bus Capacitors Cost Reduction and Performance Improvements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Sigma Technologies International at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

216

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Using Belief Functions to Forecast Demand for Mobile Satellite Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Belief Functions to Forecast Demand for Mobile Satellite Services Peter McBurney and Simon.j.mcburney,s.d.parsonsg@elec.qmw.ac.uk Abstract. This paper outlines an application of belief functions to forecasting the demand for a new service in a new category, based on new technology. Forecasting demand for a new product or service

McBurney, Peter

220

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy-2 Demand Forecast Disaggregation......................................................1-4 Statewide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Exide eyeing technology for high-powered battery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exide Corp. said recently it may soon produce a graphite battery with more than three times the power of today's most advanced production batteries--but with half their weight, far smaller size, and only a third the cost. The Reading-based Exide, the world's largest maker of lead-acid batteries, said it has preliminarily agreed to pay $20 million for a controlling interest in Lion Compact Energy, a privately held company that's researching dual-graphite battery technology said to be cleaner cheaper and more efficient. Exide hopes to turn the technology into the products; it said initial applications include smaller battery-operated devices such as cell phones, cameras, laptop computers, power tools and certain military equipment. Larger devices would follow, and could include wheel chairs, motorcycles, replacement for lead-acid batteries in cars and trucks and, potentially, all-electric vehicles.

NONE

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology wins...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bowl February 15, 2006 TJHSST Finishing in first place at the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl was the team from the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and...

223

Development of Enabling Technologies for High Efficiency, Low...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

high BMEP * Robust combustion control - Transient control of HCCI - Combustion feedback sensors - Combustion mode switching Gap Analysis * Evaluate Production readiness *...

224

High-level waste vitrification off-gas cleanup technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brief overview is intended to be a basis for discussion of needs and problems existing in the off-gas clean-up technology. A variety of types of waste form and processes are being developed in the United States and abroad. A description of many of the processes can be found in the Technical Alternative Documents (TAD). Concurrently, off-gas processing systems are being developed with most of the processes. An extensive review of methodology as well as decontamination factors can be found in the literature. Since it is generally agreed that the most advanced solidification process is vitrification, discussion here centers about the off-gas problems related to vitrification. With a number of waste soldification facilities around the world in operation, it can be shown that present technology can satisfy the present requirement for off-gas control. However, a number of areas within the technology base show potential for improvement. Fundamental as well as verification studies are needed to obtain the improvements.

Hanson, M.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

MURRAY, UNIVERSITY LEADERS AND TECHNOLOGY EXECUTIVES OPEN MASSACHUSETTS GREEN HIGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC). The new Center will keep Massachusetts have come together to support the creation of the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center.C. "The Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center is an indicator of the great potential

Needleman, Daniel

226

Impacts of High Resolution Extreme Events on U.S. Energy Demand and CO{sub 2} Emissions in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported in these areas: Validation of temperature and precipitation extremes; Time of emergence of severe heat stress in the United States; Quantifying the effects of temperature extremes on energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions.

Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

228

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

229

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Industrial Demand-Side Management in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of programs result in lower consumption and/or lower peak demand, and ultimately reduce the need to build new capacity. Hence demand-side management can be used as a resource option to be considered alongside more traditional supply-side resources in a...INDUSTRIAL DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT IN TEXAS Danielle Jaussaud Economic Analysis Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The industrial sector in Texas is highly energy intensive and represents a large share...

Jaussaud, D.

231

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

232

OCIO Technology Summit: High Performance Computing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, applied engineeringTVAOCIO Technology

233

New Demand for Old Food: the U.S. Demand for Olive Oil Bo Xiong, William Matthews, Daniel Sumner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Demand for Old Food: the U.S. Demand for Olive Oil Bo Xiong, William Matthews, Daniel Sumner, demand for oils differentiated by origin and quality is price-elastic. These olive oils are highly of olive oil and the spread of Mediterranean diet contribute significantly to the rising demand

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

234

Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

On advancement of high speed atomic force microscope technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a developing process in which nanoscale objects, such as crystal structures or strands of DNA, can be imaged at rates fast enough to watch processes as they occur. Although current ...

SooHoo, Kimberly E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fuel Cells - The Reality of a High Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fuel cell power plant is an energy conversion device which can continuously transform the chemical energy of natural gas into utility grade electricity and usable heat. The characteristics of high electrical conversion efficiencies (40 to 55...

Cuttica, J. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling supermarket refrigeration energy use and demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model has been developed that can predict the performance of supermarket refrigeration equipment to within 3% of field test measurements. The Supermarket Refrigeration Energy Use and Demand Model has been used to simulate currently available refrigerants R-12, R-502 and R-22, and is being further developed to address alternative refrigerants. This paper reports that the model is expected to be important in the design, selection and operation of cost-effective, high-efficiency refrigeration systems. It can profile the operation and performance of different types of compressors, condensors, refrigerants and display cases. It can also simulate the effects of store humidity and temperature on display cases; the efficiency of various floating head pressure setpoints, defrost alternatives and subcooling methods; the efficiency and amount of heat reclaim from refrigeration systems; and the influence of other variables such as store lighting and building design. It can also be used to evaluate operational strategies such as variable-speed drive or cylinder unloading for capacity control. Development of the model began in 1986 as part of a major effort, sponsored by the U.S. electric utility industry, to evaluate energy performance of then conventional single compressor and state-of-the-art multiplex refrigeration systems, and to characterize the contribution of a variety of technology enhancement features on system energy use and demand.

Blatt, M.H.; Khattar, M.K. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (US)); Walker, D.H. (Foster Miller Inc., Waltham, MA (US))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Strength, Light-Weight Engines for Heavy Duty Trucks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high strength,...

239

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Performance DC Bus Film Capacitor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by GE Global Research at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high performance DC bus...

240

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Voltage Solid Polymer Batteries for Electric Drive Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Seeo, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-voltage solid polymer...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium batteries...

242

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: New High-Energy Electrochemical Couple for Automotive Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a new high-energy...

243

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by 3M at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy novel cathode / alloy...

244

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2013: Accelerating Predictive Simulation of IC Engines with High Performance Computing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about simulating internal combustion engines using high performance computing.

245

Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

Per F. Peterson

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Metal-Based High Capacity Li-Ion Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Binghamton University-SUNY at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about metal-based high...

247

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Capacity Polyanion Cathodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by The University of Texas at Austin at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

248

High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design of High Performance, High Energy Cathode Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about design...

250

High Penetration, Grid Connected Photovoltaic Technology Codes and Standards: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the interim status in identifying and reviewing photovoltaic (PV) codes and standards (C&S) and related electrical activities for grid-connected, high-penetration PV systems with a focus on U.S. electric utility distribution grid interconnection.

Basso, T. S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Photovoltaics for demand-side management: Opportunities for early commercialization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, interest in utilizing photovoltaics (PV) in a demand-side management (DSM) role has been increasing. Research has shown that many utilities across the US have a good match between peak loads and the availability of the solar resource. Maximum value for PV in DSM applications can be achieved by incorporating a dispatching capability to PV systems (through the addition of storage). This enables utilities to evaluate PV systems as a peak-shaving technology. To date, peak-shaving has been a high-value DSM application for US utilities. The authors analysis of the value of dispatchable PV-DSM systems indicates that small-scale, customer-sited systems are approaching competitive cost levels in several regions of the US that have favorable load matching and high demand charges. This paper presents the results of an economic analysis for high-value PV-DSM systems located in the service territories of five case study utilities. The results suggest that PV is closer to commercialization when viewed as a DSM technology relative to analyses that focus on the technology as a supply-side option.

Byrne, J.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C.; Wang, Y.D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power, Newark, DE (United States); Wallace, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Lighting Business Case -- A Report Analyzing Lighting Technology Opportunities with High Return on Investment Energy Savings for the Federal Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes lighting technology opportunities with high return on investment energy savings for the Federal sector.

Jones, Carol C.; Richman, Eric E.

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Failure Rate Data Analysis for High Technology Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding component reliability helps designers create more robust future designs and supports efficient and cost-effective operations of existing machines. The accelerator community can leverage the commonality of its high-vacuum and high-power systems with those of the magnetic fusion community to gain access to a larger database of reliability data. Reliability studies performed under the auspices of the International Energy Agency are the result of an international working group, which has generated a component failure rate database for fusion experiment components. The initial database work harvested published data and now analyzes operating experience data. This paper discusses the usefulness of reliability data, describes the failure rate data collection and analysis effort, discusses reliability for components with scarce data, and points out some of the intersections between magnetic fusion experiments and accelerators.

L. C. Cadwallader

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Emergent process methods for high-technology ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixty-eight papers are arranged under the headings of: science of colloidal processing, novel powder-forming and powder-processing methods, ceramics derived by polymer processing, chemical vapor deposition, ion-beam deposition, laser and ion-beam modification of surfaces, hot isostatic pressing, dynamic compaction, shock synthesis (shock conditioning and subsequent densification), and very high pressure processing. Seven of the papers are abstracted separately; four of the remaining have been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Davis, R.F.; Palmour, H. III; Porter, R.L. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

High-Efficiency Engine Technologies Session Introduction | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii HIGH PERFORMANCEDOEDepartment

256

Hybrid electrodialysis reverse osmosis system design and its optimization for treatment of highly saline brines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The demand is rising for desalination technologies to treat highly saline brines arising from hydraulic fracturing processes and inland desalination. Interest is growing in the use of electrical desalination technologies ...

McGovern, Ronan Killian

257

Magnetic Refrigeration Technology for High Efficiency Air Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic refrigeration was investigated as an efficient, environmentally friendly, flexible alternative to conventional residential vapor compression central air conditioning systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of advanced geometry active magnetic regenerator (AMR) beds were developed to minimize bed size and thus magnet mass by optimizing geometry for fluid flow and heat transfer and other losses. Conventional and magnetocaloric material (MCM) regenerator fabrication and assembly techniques were developed and advanced geometry passive regenerators were built and tested. A subscale engineering prototype (SEP) magnetic air conditioner was designed, constructed and tested. A model of the AMR cycle, combined with knowledge from passive regenerator experiments and FEA results, was used to design the regenerator beds. A 1.5 Tesla permanent magnet assembly was designed using FEA and the bed structure and plenum design was extensively optimized using FEA. The SEP is a flexible magnetic refrigeration platform, with individually instrumented beds and high flow rate and high frequency capability, although the current advanced regenerator geometry beds do not meet performance expectations, probably due to manufacturing and assembly tolerances. A model of the AMR cycle was used to optimize the design of a 3 ton capacity magnetic air conditioner, and the system design was iterated to minimize external parasitic losses such as heat exchanger pressure drop and fan power. The manufacturing cost for the entire air conditioning system was estimated, and while the estimated SEER efficiency is high, the magnetic air conditioning system is not cost competitive as currently configured. The 3 ton study results indicate that there are other applications where magnetic refrigeration is anticipated to have cost advantages over conventional systems, especially applications where magnetic refrigeration, through the use of its aqueous heat transfer fluid, could eliminate intermediate heat exchangers or oil distribution issues found in traditional vapor compression systems.

Boeder, A; Zimm, C

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

High Impact Technology Catalyst Industry Roundtable | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many| Department of4 Energy SolutionsHigh16,

259

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

Fuller, Merrian C.

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

260

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. , and James M. Gri¢ n. 1983. Gasoline demand in the OECDof dynamic demand for gasoline. Journal of Econometrics 77(An empirical analysis of gasoline demand in Denmark using

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Tech-X Corporation has accessed the high performance computing (HPC) facilities at the Science and Technology Facilities Council's (STFC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tech-X Corporation has accessed the high performance computing (HPC) facilities at the Science high performance computing (HPC) and simulation technology. A research collaboratory in association

Zharkova, Valentina V.

265

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sterner. 1991. Analysing gasoline demand elasticities: A2011. Measuring global gasoline and diesel price and incomeMutairi. 1995. Demand for gasoline in Kuwait: An empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

Bernacki, Bruce E.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

side. Table 1. US Energy Consumption by Sector (2009 -half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential

Szmolyan, Peter

269

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Methods and technologies for high-throughput and high-content small animal screening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-throughput and high-content screening (HTS and HCS) of whole animals requires their immobilization for high-resolution imaging and manipulation. Here we present methods to enable HTS and HCS of the nematode Caenorhabditis ...

Rohde, Christopher, 1979-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Stress Management as an Enabling Technology for High-Field Superconducting Dipole Magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Pounds HD High field Dipole HGQ High Gradient Quadrupole HQ High field Quadrupole HT Heat Treatment IC Critical Current IFCC Inter-Filament Coupling Currents ITER International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor vi LARP LHC Accelerator... pressure impregnation (VPI) vessel using NbTi conductor [1, 2]. TAMU2 verified the heat treatment equipment and tested the stress management technology at low field using low Jc Nb3Sn conductor from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor...

Holik, Eddie Frank

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Life cycle assessment of buildings technologies: High-efficiency commercial lighting and residential water heaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the life cycle emissions and energy use are estimated for two types of energy technologies. The first technology evaluated is the sulfur lamp, a high-efficiency lighting system under development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Fusion Lighting, the inventor of the technology. The sulfur lamp is compared with conventional metal halide high-intensity discharge lighting systems. The second technology comparison is between standard-efficiency and high-efficiency gas and electric water heaters. In both cases the life cycle energy use and emissions are presented for the production of an equivalent level of service by each of the technologies. For both analyses, the energy use and emissions from the operation of the equipment are found to dominate the life cycle profile. The life cycle emissions for the water heating systems are much more complicated. The four systems compared include standard- and high-efficiency gas water heaters, standard electric resistance water heaters, and heat pump water heaters.

Freeman, S.L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines data center characteristics, loads, control systems, and technologies to identify demand response (DR) and automated DR (Open Auto-DR) opportunities and challenges. The study was performed in collaboration with technology experts, industrial partners, and data center facility managers and existing research on commercial and industrial DR was collected and analyzed. The results suggest that data centers, with significant and rapidly growing energy use, have significant DR potential. Because data centers are highly automated, they are excellent candidates for Open Auto-DR. 'Non-mission-critical' data centers are the most likely candidates for early adoption of DR. Data center site infrastructure DR strategies have been well studied for other commercial buildings; however, DR strategies for information technology (IT) infrastructure have not been studied extensively. The largest opportunity for DR or load reduction in data centers is in the use of virtualization to reduce IT equipment energy use, which correspondingly reduces facility cooling loads. DR strategies could also be deployed for data center lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Additional studies and demonstrations are needed to quantify benefits to data centers of participating in DR and to address concerns about DR's possible impact on data center performance or quality of service and equipment life span.

Ghatikar, Girish; Piette, Mary Ann; Fujita, Sydny; McKane, Aimee; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Radspieler, Anthony; Mares, K.C.; Shroyer, Dave

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

New Demand for Old Food: the U.S. Demand for Olive Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. consumption of olive oil has tripled over the past twenty years, but nearly all olive oil continues to be imported. Estimation of demand parameters using monthly import data reveals that demand for non-virgin oil is income inelastic, but virgin oils have income elasticities above one. Moreover, demand for oils differentiated by origin and quality is price-elastic. These olive oils are highly substitutable with each other but not with other vegetable oils. News about the health and culinary benefits of olive oil and the spread of Mediterranean diet contribute significantly to the rising demand in the United States.

Bo Xiong; William Matthews; Daniel Sumner

276

Innovation and the state : development strategies for high technology industries in a world of fragmented production : Israel, Ireland, and Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most unexpected changes of the 1990s is that firms in a number of emerging economies not previously known for their high-technology industries have leapfrogged to the forefront in new Information Technologies ...

Breznitz, Dan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

278

Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Pointer, William David [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

280

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

Heffner, Grayson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes strategies that can be used in commercial buildings to temporarily reduce electric load in response to electric grid emergencies in which supplies are limited or in response to high prices that would be incurred if these strategies were not employed. The demand response strategies discussed herein are based on the results of three years of automated demand response field tests in which 28 commercial facilities with an occupied area totaling over 11 million ft{sup 2} were tested. Although the demand response events in the field tests were initiated remotely and performed automatically, the strategies used could also be initiated by on-site building operators and performed manually, if desired. While energy efficiency measures can be used during normal building operations, demand response measures are transient; they are employed to produce a temporary reduction in demand. Demand response strategies achieve reductions in electric demand by temporarily reducing the level of service in facilities. Heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are the systems most commonly adjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The goal of demand response strategies is to meet the electric shed savings targets while minimizing any negative impacts on the occupants of the buildings or the processes that they perform. Occupant complaints were minimal in the field tests. In some cases, ''reductions'' in service level actually improved occupant comfort or productivity. In other cases, permanent improvements in efficiency were discovered through the planning and implementation of ''temporary'' demand response strategies. The DR strategies that are available to a given facility are based on factors such as the type of HVAC, lighting and energy management and control systems (EMCS) installed at the site.

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Independent Demand Models Non Linear (Chemical Industry -take or pay)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

casesshippedperweek #12;High Variability Between Forecast and Actual · Demand in relation to the forecast means almostIndependent Demand Models · Non Linear (Chemical Industry - take or pay) · Deterministic Simulation (make to stock - lumpy demand) · Mathematical Programming (family structure - near optimum) · Heuristic

Brock, David

285

Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is a demand-side management strategy to reduce electricity use during times of high peak electric loads;1 Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest

286

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

287

High Current Effects in Silicide Films for Sub-0.25 pm VLSI Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the increased use of silicided metalization schemes for low-resistivity gates, interconnections and contacts between the metal and Si. Currently, self aligned silicide (salicide) processes are widely usedHigh Current Effects in Silicide Films for Sub-0.25 pm VLSI Technologies Kaustav Banerjee

288

OVERVIEW OF SELECTED SURROGATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH-TEMPORAL RESOLUTION SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OVERVIEW OF SELECTED SURROGATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGH- TEMPORAL RESOLUTION SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT for characterizing selected properties of suspended sediments in rivers are being augmented and in some cases of quantifiably accurate data for use primarily in sediment-flux computations. Turbidity is the most common

289

Assessment of the high temperature fission chamber technology for the French fast reactor program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature fission chambers are key instruments for the control and protection of the sodium-cooled fast reactor. First, the developments of those neutron detectors, which are carried out either in France or abroad are reviewed. Second, the French realizations are assessed with the use of the technology readiness levels in order to identify tracks of improvement. (authors)

Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Geslot, B.; Domenech, T.; Normand, S. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CEA (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

EA-1867: Scale-up of High-Temperature Syngas Cleanup Technology, Polk County, Florida  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide cost-shared funding to RTI International (RTI) for its proposed project to demonstrate the precommercial scale-up of RTI’s high-temperature syngas cleanup and carbon capture and sequestration technologies.

291

Proceedings HTR2006: International Topical Meeting on High Temperature Reactor Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings HTR2006: 3rd International Topical Meeting on High Temperature Reactor Technology be effectively modeled using computational fluid dynamics. The NACOK test facility at the Julich Research Center TESTS USING COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS Marie-Anne Brudieu Department of Nuclear Engineering

292

Rare Earth Elements--Critical Resources for High Technology U.S. Department of the Interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rare Earth Elements--Critical Resources for High Technology U.S. Department of the Interior U H The rare earth elements (REE) form the largest chemically coherent group in the periodic table of hydrogen for a post-hydro- carbon economy). Some Applications of the Rare Earth Elements Many applications

293

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2013: A High-Performance PHEV Battery Pack  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by LG Chem at 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a high-performance battery pack the company is researching for plug-in electric vehicles.

294

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

Hartman, Raymond Steve

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

Majumdar, Arun

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

Majumdar, Arun

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by GMZ Energy Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanostructured high...

299

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Advanced High Strength Cast Alloys for Heavy Duty Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Caterpillar at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of advanced high...

300

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Electric Global at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about alternative high...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

APEX and ALPS, high power density technology programs in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In fiscal year (FY) 1998 two new fusion technology programs were initiated in the US, with the goal of making marked progress in the scientific understanding of technologies and materials required to withstand high plasma heat flux and neutron wall loads. APEX is exploring new and revolutionary concepts that can provide the capability to extract heat efficiently from a system with high neutron and surface heat loads while satisfying all the fusion power technology requirements and achieving maximum reliability, maintainability, safety, and environmental acceptability. ALPS program is evaluating advanced concepts including liquid surface limiters and divertors on the basis of such factors as their compatibility with fusion plasma, high power density handling capabilities, engineering feasibility, lifetime, safety and R and D requirements. The APEX and ALPS are three-year programs to specify requirements and evaluate criteria for revolutionary approaches in first wall, blanket and high heat flux component applications. Conceptual design and analysis of candidate concepts are being performed with the goal of selecting the most promising first wall, blanket and high heat flux component designs that will provide the technical basis for the initiation of a significant R and D effort beginning in FY2001. These programs are also considering opportunities for international collaborations.

Wong, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States). Fusion Group; Berk, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Fusion Energy Sciences; Abdou, M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Mattas, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Fusion Power Program

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScience and InnovationexperimentsTechnology

303

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

304

Wind Energy at NREL's National Wind Technology Center  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

It is a pure, plentiful natural resource. Right now wind is in high demand and it holds the potential to transform the way we power our homes and businesses. NREL is at the forefront of wind energy research and development. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is a world-class facility dedicated to accelerating and deploying wind technology.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Wind Energy at NREL's National Wind Technology Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is a pure, plentiful natural resource. Right now wind is in high demand and it holds the potential to transform the way we power our homes and businesses. NREL is at the forefront of wind energy research and development. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is a world-class facility dedicated to accelerating and deploying wind technology.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEST PRACTICES AND RESULTS OF DR IMPLEMENTATION . 31 Encouraging End-User Participation: The Role of Incentives 16 Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy – TechnologySummary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Look Ahead at Demand Response in New England  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the demand response programs developed and in operation in New England, and the revised designs for participation in the forward capacity market. This description will include how energy efficiency, demand-side resources, and distributed generation are eligible to participate in this new forward capacity market. The paper will also discuss various methods that can be used to configure and communicate with demand response resources and important concerns in specifying interfaces that accommodate multiple technologies and allow technology choice and evolution.

Burke, Robert B.; Henderson, Michael I.; Widergren, Steven E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Optimal Sizing of Energy Storage and Photovoltaic Power Systems for Demand Charge Mitigation (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial facility utility bills are often a strong function of demand charges -- a fee proportional to peak power demand rather than total energy consumed. In some instances, demand charges can constitute more than 50% of a commercial customer's monthly electricity cost. While installation of behind-the-meter solar power generation decreases energy costs, its variability makes it likely to leave the peak load -- and thereby demand charges -- unaffected. This then makes demand charges an even larger fraction of remaining electricity costs. Adding controllable behind-the-meter energy storage can more predictably affect building peak demand, thus reducing electricity costs. Due to the high cost of energy storage technology, the size and operation of an energy storage system providing demand charge management (DCM) service must be optimized to yield a positive return on investment (ROI). The peak demand reduction achievable with an energy storage system depends heavily on a facility's load profile, so the optimal configuration will be specific to both the customer and the amount of installed solar power capacity. We explore the sensitivity of DCM value to the power and energy levels of installed solar power and energy storage systems. An optimal peak load reduction control algorithm for energy storage systems will be introduced and applied to historic solar power data and meter load data from multiple facilities for a broad range of energy storage system configurations. For each scenario, the peak load reduction and electricity cost savings will be computed. From this, we will identify a favorable energy storage system configuration that maximizes ROI.

Neubauer, J.; Simpson, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files Data FilesFeFe-HydrogenaseDemand

311

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Customer focused collaborative demand planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many firms worldwide have adopted the process of Sales & Operations Planning (S&OP) process where internal departments within a firm collaborate with each other to generate a demand forecast. In a collaborative demand ...

Jha, Ratan (Ratan Mohan)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Demand Response: Load Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

Simon, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The critical role of manufacturing-process innovation on product development excellence in high-technology companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Few managers of high-technology companies view manufacturing-process development as primary source of competitive advantage. For the last two decades trends have shown an increasing number of high-tech industries outsourcing ...

Duarte, Carlos E. A., 1962-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

TRAVEL DEMAND AND RELIABLE FORECASTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRAVEL DEMAND AND RELIABLE FORECASTS FOR TRANSIT MARK FILIPI, AICP PTP 23rd Annual Transportation transportation projects § Develop and maintain Regional Travel Demand Model § Develop forecast socio in cooperative review during all phases of travel demand forecasting 4 #12;Cooperative Review Should Include

Minnesota, University of

316

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 Gorin Principal Authors Lynn Marshall Project Manager Kae C. Lewis Acting Manager Demand Analysis Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency and Demand Analysis Division Scott W. Matthews Acting

317

Demand Forecasting of New Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Forecasting of New Products Using Attribute Analysis Marina Kang A thesis submitted Abstract This thesis is a study into the demand forecasting of new products (also referred to as Stock upon currently employed new-SKU demand forecasting methods which involve the processing of large

Sun, Yu

318

Assessment of Demand Response Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

319

High performance computing and communications: Advancing the frontiers of information technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1997 Budget, describes the interagency High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The HPCC Program will celebrate its fifth anniversary in October 1996 with an impressive array of accomplishments to its credit. Over its five-year history, the HPCC Program has focused on developing high performance computing and communications technologies that can be applied to computation-intensive applications. Major highlights for FY 1996: (1) High performance computing systems enable practical solutions to complex problems with accuracies not possible five years ago; (2) HPCC-funded research in very large scale networking techniques has been instrumental in the evolution of the Internet, which continues exponential growth in size, speed, and availability of information; (3) The combination of hardware capability measured in gigaflop/s, networking technology measured in gigabit/s, and new computational science techniques for modeling phenomena has demonstrated that very large scale accurate scientific calculations can be executed across heterogeneous parallel processing systems located thousands of miles apart; (4) Federal investments in HPCC software R and D support researchers who pioneered the development of parallel languages and compilers, high performance mathematical, engineering, and scientific libraries, and software tools--technologies that allow scientists to use powerful parallel systems to focus on Federal agency mission applications; and (5) HPCC support for virtual environments has enabled the development of immersive technologies, where researchers can explore and manipulate multi-dimensional scientific and engineering problems. Educational programs fostered by the HPCC Program have brought into classrooms new science and engineering curricula designed to teach computational science. This document contains a small sample of the significant HPCC Program accomplishments in FY 1996.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about novel...

322

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: A Technology of Low Coal Rate and High Productivity of RHF Ironmaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economical and environment-friendly ironmaking process based on heating the chemiexecy self-sufficient green balls of iron ore and coal in a hearth furnace is being developed with financial support from AISI members and DOE. DRI, which is hot (1400 C), dense (3.2 g/cm) and of high degree of metallization (95%), has been produced in laboratory and in a pilot plant in Genoa, Italy. Products of such quality have been made from American and Brazilian ores, BOF sludge, EAF dust/BOF sludge mixtures and millscale. The removal of zinc and lead from green balls by this process is essentially complete. In comparison with typical blast furnace operation, the new technology with a melter would have a lower total coal rate by 200kg.THM. The elimination of cokemaking and high temperature agglomeration steps, and a simpler gas handling system would lead to lower capital and operating costs. In comparison with commercial RHF practice it is different in atmosphere (fully oxidized at 1600 to 1650 C), in bed height (120 mm instead of 20-25 mm) and in pellet composition (much less coal but of higher VM). The combined effect leads to three times higher furnace productivity, lower coal consumption and superior DRI quality. The risk of re-oxidation (slag formation) and dusty operation are practiexecy eliminated. The process is stable, tolerant and independent of the size, shape and movement of the hearth. However, materials handling (e.g., discharge of hot DRI) and the exact energy savings have to be established in a larger furnace, straight or rotary, and in a continuous mode of operation.

Wei-Kao Lu

2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Corporation National Institute of Standards and Technology Open Access Transmission Tariff Open Automated Demand Response Protocol Public Utility Commission Photovoltaic

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

APPLICATION OF HIGH TECHNOLOGY POLYMERS FOR THE IMMOBILIZATION AND SOLIDIFICATION OF COMPLEX LIQUID RADWASTE TYPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cold War era created a massive build-up of nuclear weapon stockpiles in the former Soviet Union and the United States. The primary objective during this period was the development of nuclear technologies for weapons, space and power with lack of attention to the impact of radioactive and hazardous waste products on the environment. Effective technologies for radioactive and hazardous waste treatment and disposal were not well investigated or promoted during the arms build-up; and consequently, environmental contamination has become a major problem. These problems in Russia and the United States are well documented. Significant amounts of liquid radwaste have existed since the 1950's. The current government of the Russian Federation is addressing the issues of land remediation and permanent storage of radwaste resulting from internal and external pressures for safe cleanup and storage. The Russian government seeks new technologies from internal sources and from the West that will provide high performance, long term stability, safe for transport and for long-term storage of liquid radwaste at a reasonable economic cost. With the great diversity of liquid chemical compositions and activity levels, it is important to note that these waste products cannot be processed with commonly used methods. Different techniques and materials can be used for this problem resolution including the use of polymer materials that are capable of forming chemically stable, solidified waste products. In 2001, the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia) and Pacific World Trade (Indianapolis, Indiana) began an extensive research and test program to determine the effectiveness and performance of high technology polymers for the immobilization and solidification of complex liquid radwaste types generated by the Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom), Russia, organization. The high tech polymers used in the tests were provided by Nochar, Inc. (Indianapolis, Indiana).

Kelley, Dennis; Brunkow, Ward; Pokhitonov, Yuri; Starchenko, Vadim

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for each day type for the demand response study - moderate8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and best practices to guide HECO demand response developmentbest practices for DR renewable integration – Technically demand responseof best practices. This is partially because demand response

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of control. Water heater demand response options are notcurrent water heater and air conditioning demand responsecustomer response Demand response water heater participation

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on Building

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In terms of demand response capability, building operatorsautomated demand response and improve building energy andand demand response features directly into building design

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Technology Development Roadmap for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor Secondary Heat Exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technology Development Roadmap (TDRM) presents the path forward for deploying large-scale molten salt secondary heat exchangers (MS-SHX) and recognizing the benefits of using molten salt as the heat transport medium for advanced high temperature reactors (AHTR). This TDRM will aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for: power production (the first anticipated process heat application), hydrogen production, steam methane reforming, methanol to gasoline production, or ammonia production. This TDRM (a) establishes the current state of molten salt SHX technology readiness, (b) defines a path forward that systematically and effectively tests this technology to overcome areas of uncertainty, (c) demonstrates the achievement of an appropriate level of maturity prior to construction and plant operation, and (d) identifies issues and prioritizes future work for maturing the state of SHX technology. This study discusses the results of a preliminary design analysis of the SHX and explains the evaluation and selection methodology. An important engineering challenge will be to prevent the molten salt from freezing during normal and off-normal operations because of its high melting temperature (390°C for KF ZrF4). The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The need for efficiency, compactness, and safety challenge the capabilities of existing heat exchanger technology. The description of potential heat exchanger configurations or designs (such as printed circuit, spiral or helical coiled, ceramic, plate and fin, and plate type) were covered in an earlier report (Sabharwall et al. 2011). Significant future work, much of which is suggested in this report, is needed before the benefits and full potential of the AHTR can be realized. The execution of this TDRM will focuses research efforts on the near-term qualification, selection, or maturation strategy as detailed in this report. Development of the integration methodology feasibility study, along with research and development (R&D) needs, are ongoing tasks that will be covered in the future reports as work progresses. Section 2 briefly presents the integration of AHTR technology with conventional chemical industrial processes., See Idaho National Laboratory (INL) TEV-1160 (2011) for further details

P. Sabharwall; M. McCllar; A. Siahpush; D. Clark; M. Patterson; J. Collins

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Pricing Data Center Demand Response Zhenhua Liu, Iris Liu, Steven Low, Adam Wierman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pricing Data Center Demand Response Zhenhua Liu, Iris Liu, Steven Low, Adam Wierman California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA, USA {zliu2,iliu,slow,adamw}@caltech.edu ABSTRACT Demand response- ularly promising industry for demand response: data centers. We use simulations to show that, not only

Wierman, Adam

346

ScopingStudyReport-AppxC-Homework-013105.doc -1 -DEMAND RESPONSE RESEARCH CENTER SCOPING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ScopingStudyReport-AppxC-Homework-013105.doc - 1 - DEMAND RESPONSE RESEARCH CENTER SCOPING STUDYStudyReport-AppxC-Homework-013105.doc - 2 - Preparing for the Roundtable Session (HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT) The PIER Demand Response that advances the near-term adoption of Demand Response technologies, policies, programs, strategies

347

Optimal Power Procurement and Demand Response with Quality-of-Usage Guarantees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimal Power Procurement and Demand Response with Quality-of-Usage Guarantees Longbo Huang, Jean the utility company to jointly perform power procurement and demand response so as to maximize the social are the inte- gration of renewable energy technologies [1] and the design of efficient user demand-response

Huang, Longbo

348

Control and Optimization Meet the Smart Power Grid: Scheduling of Power Demands for Optimal Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control and Optimization Meet the Smart Power Grid: Scheduling of Power Demands for Optimal Energy technologies to enforce sensible use of energy through effective demand load management. We envision a scenario con- sumer power demand requests with different power require- ments, durations, and deadlines

Koutsopoulos, Iordanis

349

Development of high temperature transport technology for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in pyroprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of high-temperature transport technologies for molten salt is a prerequisite and a key issue in the industrialization of pyro-reprocessing for advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The solution of a molten salt centrifugal pump was discarded because of the high corrosion power of a high temperature molten salt, so the suction pump solution was selected. An apparatus for salt transport experiments by suction was designed and tested using LiC-KCl eutectic salt. The experimental results of lab-scale molten salt transport by suction showed a 99.5% transport rate (ratio of transported salt to total salt) under a vacuum range of 100 mtorr - 10 torr at 500 Celsius degrees. The suction system has been integrated to the PRIDE (pyroprocessing integrated inactive demonstration) facility that is a demonstrator using non-irradiated materials (natural uranium and surrogate materials). The performance of the suction pump for the transport of molten salts has been confirmed.

Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Hansoo; Kim, In Tae; Kim, Jeong-Guk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daaro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

High voltage power supply systems for electron beam and plasma technologies. Its new element base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transforming technique and high voltage technique supplementing each other more and more unite in indivisible constructions of modern apparatuses and systems and applicated in modern technologies providing its high efficiency. Specially worked out, ecologically clean, inertial, inflammable perfluororganic liquid is used in elements and electronic apparatuses simultaneously as insulating and cooling media. This liquid is highly fluid, fills tiny cavities in construction elements and in the places of high concentration of losses, where maximum local overheating of active parts or apparatus constructions takes place, it transforms to boiling state with highly intensive taking off of heat energy from cooled surface point. For instance, being cooled by mentioned perfluororganic liquid, copper wire can conduct current to 50 A/mm{sup 2} density, but in ordinary conditions of transformers, reactors and busses, current density can reach only few Amperes. Possibility of considerable increasing of current density, that is reached by means of intensive cooling, provided by worked out liquid, and taking into account its incredibly high insulating features (liquid has electric strength to 50 KV/mm) allows to provide optimum heat regime of active parts of transformers. reactors, condenser, semiconductor devices, resistors, construction elements and electrotechnical apparatus in general. Particularly high effect of decreasing of weight and dimensions characteristics of elements and electrotechnical apparatus in general can be reached under working out of special constructions of each element and apparatus details, adapted to use of mentioned liquid as insulating and cooling media.

Dermengi, P.G.; Kureghan, A.S.; Pokrovsky, S.V.; Tchvanov, V.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Reduction of Edge Localized Mode Intensity on DIII-D by On-demand triggering with High Frequency Pellet Injection and Implications for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12 the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12 lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Commaux, Nicolas JC [ORNL; Jernigan, T. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Isler, Ralph C [ORNL; Unterberg, Ezekial A [ORNL; Brooks, N. H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Evans, T.E. [General Atomics, San Diego; Leonard, A. W. [General Atomics; Osborne, T. H. [General Atomics; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Snyder, P. B. [General Atomics; Strait, E. J. [General Atomics; Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Moyer, R.A. [University of California, San Diego; Loarte, A. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Huijsmans, G.T.A. [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Futantani, S. [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reduction of edge localized mode intensity on DIII-D by on-demand triggering with high frequency pellet injection and implications for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12× the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12× lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized ? operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-6169 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-6169 (United States); Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)] [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 700 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 700 East Ave, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Moyer, R. A. [University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)] [University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Futatani, S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)] [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Driving Demand | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

strategies, results achieved to date, and advice for other programs. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements. This guide, developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National...

354

Evaluation of emerging parallel optical link technology for high energy physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern particle detectors utilize optical fiber links to deliver event data to upstream trigger and data processing systems. Future detector systems can benefit from the development of dense arrangements of high speed optical links emerging from industry advancements in transceiver technology. Supporting data transfers of up to 120 Gbps in each direction, optical engines permit assembly of the optical transceivers in close proximity to ASICs and FPGAs. Test results of some of these parallel components will be presented including the development of pluggable FPGA Mezzanine Cards equipped with optical engines to provide to collaborators on the Versatile Link Common Project for the HI-LHC at CERN.

Chramowicz, J.; Kwan, S.; Prosser, A.; Winchell, M.; /Fermilab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

High-density organic light emitting diodes by nanoimprint technology Krutarth Trivedi, Caleb Nelson, Li Tao, Mathew Goeckner, Walter Hua)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-density organic light emitting diodes by nanoimprint technology Krutarth Trivedi, Caleb Nelson sources. Despite the considerable development of inorganic semiconductor based light emitting diodes of miniaturization to nanoscale. Organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology is immune to quantum confinement

Hu, Wenchuang "Walter"

356

A high-speed, low-power analog-to-digital converter in fully depleted silicon-on-insulator technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis demonstrates a one-volt, high-speed, ultra-low-power, six-bit flash analog-to-digital converter fabricated in a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology. Silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology provides ...

Lundberg, Kent Howard

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Farasis Energy, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy density Li...

358

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product estimates. Margaret Sheridan provided the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand

359

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined provided estimates for demand response program impacts and contributed to the residential forecast. Mitch

360

Identification of Market Requirements of Smart Buildings Technologies for High Rise Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices of utilizing hi-tech smart building technologies in office buildings, required additional features of smart building technologies for office buildings, challenges for integrating smart building technologies for office buildings, major benefits...

Reffat, R. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

363

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Dilution Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct-Injection (SGDI) Combustion Control Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-dilution...

364

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high efficiency...

365

Dispersed concentration of high-tech jobs in the new economy : the paradox of new information and communication technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More high-tech firms are conducting their business over long distances due to the use of new information and communication technologies (ICT). However, regional scientists articulate that geographic proximity is still ...

Kang, Myoung-Gu, 1970-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy, Long Cycle Life Lithium-ion Batteries for EV Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by The Pennsylvania State University at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy...

367

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by 3M at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced high energy Li-ion cell for PHEV...

368

Management of intermediated channels for high technology firms : achieving success in a dynamic and rapidly changing marketplace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most challenging problems for high technology firms in an increasingly global marketplace is the effective utilization of intermediated sales channels. As product development cycles shorten, there can be a ...

Gorsky, John Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Studies on High Capacity Cathodes for Advanced Lithium-ion Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about studies on high...

370

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Key technological issues in LMFBR high-temperature structural design - the US perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is: (1) to review the key technological issues in LMFBR high-temperature structural design, particularly as they relate to cost reduction; and (2) to provide an overview of activities sponsored by the US Department of Energy to resolve the issues and to establish stable, standardized, and defensible structural design methods and criteria. Specific areas of discussion include: weldments, structural validation tests, simplified design analysis procedures, design procedures for piping, validation of the methodology for notch-like geometries, improved life assessment procedures, thermal striping, extension of the methodology to new materials, and ASME high-temperature Code reform needs. The perceived problems and needs in each area are discussed, and the current status of related US activities is given.

Corum, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Characterization of high molecular weight compounds -- Implications for advanced-recovery technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oils with high pour points and undesired flow properties commonly contain a diverse assemblage of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds. The negative economic impact these compounds impose is manifested by the requisite for expensive well treatments to alleviate the impact from increased equipment failure, reduced well productivity, and lower ultimate recoveries. The failure of traditional methods to predict the precipitation of solid phases can be partially attributed to an inaccurate understanding of the molecular composition of the HMW components. This paper reports the authors progress in developing analytical techniques for direct determination of compounds up to C{sub 90} with readily available instrumentation. They believe this technology will help lead to production strategies that are more efficient and allow better estimates of production costs by more accurate forecasting of production problems.

Wavrek, D.A.; Dahdah, N.F. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

High Efficiency Low Cost CO2 Compression Using Supersonic Shock Wave Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development and testing results from a supersonic compressor are presented. The compressor achieved record pressure ratio for a fully-supersonic stage and successfully demonstrated the technology potential. Several tasks were performed in compliance with the DOE award objectives. A high-pressure ratio compressor was retrofitted to improve rotordynamics behavior and successfully tested. An outside review panel confirmed test results and design approach. A computational fluid dynamics code used to analyze the Ramgen supersonic flowpath was extensively and successfully modified to improve use on high-performance computing platforms. A comprehensive R&D implementation plan was developed and used to lay the groundwork for a future full-scale compressor demonstration. Conceptual design for a CO2 demonstration compressor was developed and reviewed.

Williams, J; Aarnio, M; Grosvenor, A; Taylor, D; Bucher, J

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design and Scalable Assembly of High Density Low Tortuosity Electrodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Massachusetts Institute of Technology at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about design...

375

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The design, construction, and operation of long-distance high-voltage electricity transmission technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on transmission lines, which operate at voltages of 115 kV and higher. Currently, the highest voltage lines comprising the North American power grid are at 765 kV. The grid is the network of transmission lines that interconnect most large power plants on the North American continent. One transmission line at this high voltage was built near Chicago as part of the interconnection for three large nuclear power plants southwest of the city. Lines at this voltage also serve markets in New York and New England, also very high demand regions. The large power transfers along the West Coast are generally at 230 or 500 kV. Just as there are practical limits to centralization of power production, there are practical limits to increasing line voltage. As voltage increases, the height of the supporting towers, the size of the insulators, the distance between conductors on a tower, and even the width of the right-of-way (ROW) required increase. These design features safely isolate the electric power, which has an increasing tendency to arc to ground as the voltage (or electrical potential) increases. In addition, very high voltages (345 kV and above) are subject to corona losses. These losses are a result of ionization of the atmosphere, and can amount to several megawatts of wasted power. Furthermore, they are a local nuisance to radio transmission and can produce a noticeable hum. Centralized power production has advantages of economies of scale and special resource availability (for instance, hydro resources), but centralized power requires long-distance transfers of power both to reach customers and to provide interconnections for reliability. Long distances are most economically served at high voltages, which require large-scale equipment and impose a substantial footprint on the corridors through which power passes. The most visible components of the transmission system are the conductors that provide paths for the power and the towers that keep these conductors at a safe distance from each other and from the ground and the natural and built environment. Common elements that are generally less visible (or at least more easily overlooked) include the maintained ROW along the path of the towers, access roads needed for maintenance, and staging areas used for initial construction that may be restored after construction is complete. Also visible but less common elements along the corridor may include switching stations or substations, where lines of similar or different voltages meet to transfer power.

Molburg, J. C.; Kavicky, J. A.; Picel, K. C.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits.? Confirming these findings in intervention studies is recommended. ? Energy costs of heating/cooling unoccupied classrooms statewide are modest, but a large portion occurs in relatively few classrooms.

Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because {sup 134}Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as {sup 40}K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from {sup 134}Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)] [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

uilding modern aerospace systems is highly demanding.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) approach. Fine. But how is the consistency of the analysis results

382

Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTE’s using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTE’s and found relatively low TRL’s for each of them: • Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 • Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 • Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 • Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 • Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRL’s are low for most of these CTE’s (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRL’s are listed below: • Complete this TMP • Perform a preliminary engineering study • Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated • Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing • Melter and off-gas testing with simulants • Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses • Canister testing • Decontamination system testing • Issue a requirements document • Issue a risk management document • Complete preliminary design • Integrated pilot testing • Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4.9 2017 2 3 3 2 4 2 9.8 2018 3 3 3 3 4 3 7.9 2019 3 3 3 3 4 3 5.1 2020 3 3 3 3 4 3 14.6 2021 3 3 3 3 4 3 7.3 2022 3 3 3 3 4 3 8.8 2023 4 4 4 4 4 4 9.1 2024 5 5 5 5 5 5 6.9 2025 6 6 6 6 6 6 6.9 CCC = canister cooling and crystallization; FMP = feeding, melting, and pouring; GCF = glass ceramic formulation; MSA = mixing, sampling, and analyses. This TMP is intended to guide the development of the glass ceramics waste form and process to the point where it is ready for industrialization.

Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Full Rank Rational Demand Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a nominal income full rank QES. R EFERENCES (A.84)S. G. Donald. “Inferring the Rank of a Matrix. ” Journal of97-102. . “A Demand System Rank Theorem. ” Econometrica 57 (

LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Marketing Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand-Side Management is an organizational tool that has proven successful in various realms of the ever changing business world in the past few years. It combines the multi-faceted desires of the customers with the increasingly important...

O'Neill, M. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Community Water Demand in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions to Texas water policy and planning problems will be easier to identify once the impact of price upon community water demand is better understood. Several important questions cannot be addressed in the absence of such information...

Griffin, Ronald C.; Chang, Chan

386

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Technological assessment and evaluation of high power batteries and their commercial values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium Ion (Li-ion) battery technology has the potential to compete with the more matured Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) battery technology in the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) energy storage market as it has higher specific ...

Teo, Seh Kiat

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

From enthusiasm to practice : users, systems, and technology in high-end audio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a story about technology, users, and music. It is about an approach to the design, manipulation, and arrangement of technologies in small-scale systems to achieve particular aesthetic goals - goals that are at once ...

Downes, Kieran

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Impact of New Irrigation Technology on the Texas High Plains: 1980-2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, encourages greater use, overall. Advanced technology, however, is important to the future of crop production in the region, since it increased the level of production, and net revenue. Further, the impact of technology was proportionally greater under the low...

Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

390

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Overview of the DOE High Efficiency Engine Technologies R&D  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

393

Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors (Agreement ID:23726)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

394

Photovoltaics for demand-side management utility markets: A utility/customer partnership approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems located at customer sites can be used to meet utility needs for demand-side management (DSM) applications. PV-DSM can also represent a high-value intermediate market for PV in the utility sector. Maximum value for PV in DSM applications can be achieved by incorporating a dispatching capability to PV systems (through the addition of storage). This enables utilities to evaluate PV systems as a peak-shaving technology. To date, peak-shaving has been the higher value DSM application for US utilities. This analysis of the value of dispatchable PV-DSM systems indicates that small-scale, customer-sited systems are approaching competitive cost levels in several regions of the US that have favorable load matching and peak demand pricing characteristics. This paper presents the results for PV-DSM systems located within the service territories of five case study utilities.

Byrne, J.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C.; Wang, Y.D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power and Light Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Wallace, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Demand Response CostsSodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Low High AverageSodium Sulfur (NaS) Zinc- Air Battery Demand Response Costs

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions Combustion Technology for Manufacturing Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to develop and test a transformational combustion technology for high temperature furnaces to reduce the energy intensity and carbon footprint of U.S. manufacturing industries such as steel, aluminum, glass, metal casting, and petroleum refining. A new technology based on internal and/or external Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) along with significant enhancement in flame radiation was developed. It produces "Radiative Flameless Combustion (RFC)" and offers tremendous energy efficiency and pollutant reduction benefits over and above the now popular "flameless combustion." It will reduce the energy intensity (or fuel consumption per unit system output) by more than 50% and double the furnace productivity while significantly reducing pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions (10^3 times reduction in NOx and 10 times reduction in CO & hydrocarbons and 3 times reduction in CO2). Product quality improvements are also expected due to uniform radiation, as well as, reduction in scale/dross formation is expected because of non-oxidative atmosphere. RFC is inexpensive, easy to implement, and it was successfully tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at the University of Michigan during the course of this work. A first-ever theory with gas and particulate radiation was also developed. Numerical programs were also written to design an industrial-scale furnace. Nine papers were published (or are in the process of publication). We believe that this early stage research adequately proves the concept through laboratory experiments, modeling and computational models. All this work is presented in the published papers. Important conclusions of this work are: (1) It was proved through experimental measurements that RFC is not only feasible but a very beneficial technology. (2) Theoretical analysis of RFC was done in (a) spatially uniform strain field and (b) a planar momentum jet where the strain rate is neither prescribed nor uniform. Four important non-dimensional parameters controlling RFC in furnaces were identified. These are: (i) The Boltzmann number; (ii) The Damkohler number, (iii) The dimensionless Arrhenius number, and (iv) The equivalence ratio. Together they define the parameter space where RFC is possible. It was also found that the Damkohler number must be small for RFC to exist and that the Boltzmann number expands the RFC domain. The experimental data obtained during the course of this work agrees well with the predictions made by the theoretical analysis. Interestingly, the equivalence ratio dependence shows that it is easier to establish RFC for rich mixtures than for lean mixtures. This was also experimentally observed. Identifying the parameter space for RFC is necessary for controlling the RFC furnace operation. It is hoped that future work will enable the methodology developed here to be applied to the operation of real furnaces, with consequent improvement in efficiency and pollutant reduction. To reiterate, the new furnace combustion technology developed enables intense radiation from combustion products and has many benefits: (i) Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions; (ii) Uniform and intense radiation to substantially increase productivity; (iii) Oxygen-free atmosphere to reduce dross/scale formation; (iv) Provides multi-fuel capability; and (v) Enables carbon sequestration if pure oxygen is used for combustion.

Atreya, Arvind

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

A dynamic model of industrial energy demand in Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper analyses the effects of input price movements, technology changes, capacity utilization and dynamic mechanisms on energy demand structures in the Kenyan industry. This is done with the help of a variant of the second generation dynamic factor demand (econometric) model. This interrelated disequilibrium dynamic input demand econometric model is based on a long-term cost function representing production function possibilities and takes into account the asymmetry between variable inputs (electricity, other-fuels and Tabour) and quasi-fixed input (capital) by imposing restrictions on the adjustment process. Variations in capacity utilization and slow substitution process invoked by the relative input price movement justifies the nature of input demand disequilibrium. The model is estimated on two ISIS digit Kenyan industry time series data (1961 - 1988) using the Iterative Zellner generalized least square method. 31 refs., 8 tabs.

Haji, S.H.H. [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

see: Deciding on “Smart” Meters: The Technology Implicationslegislation/deciding_on_smart_meters. pdf) xxviii However,

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY FORECAST Volume 1 in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard. Margaret Sheridan contributed to the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand

402

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY FORECAST Volume 2 Director #12; i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid provided the projections of commercial

403

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A study of industrial equipment energy use and demand control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies. A battery storage system, capable of providing up to 5, 000 kW was installed (Hunt 1999). The batterics allow the plant's demand peaks to be lowcrcd by using energy stored in the batteries during off-peak periods to provide a portion...

Dooley, Edward Scott

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Exhausting Battery Statistics Understanding the energy demands on mobile handsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy models and resources managers designed for laptops [20] and data cen- ters [4] inapplicableExhausting Battery Statistics Understanding the energy demands on mobile handsets Narseo Vallina.surname@telekom.de ABSTRACT Despite the advances in battery technologies, mobile phones still suffer from severe energy

Cambridge, University of

407

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response A pilot program from NSTAR in Massachusetts,Massachusetts, aiming to test whether an intensive program of energy efficiency and demand response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Supply chain planning decisions under demand uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sales and operational planning that incorporates unconstrained demand forecasts has been expected to improve long term corporate profitability. Companies are considering such unconstrained demand forecasts in their decisions ...

Huang, Yanfeng Anna

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Conventional and Alternative Fuel Response Simulatormodified to include alternative fuel demand scenarios (whichvehicle adoption and alternative fuel demand) later in the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector, the demand response potential of California buildinga demand response event prohibit a building’s participationdemand response strategies in California buildings are

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Energy prices and the adoption of energy-saving technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the link between factor prices, technology and factor demands. I estimate the effect of price-induced technology adoption on energy demand in the U.S. manufacturing sector, using plant data from the ...

Linn, Joshua

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Optimization of Ion Transport in High Energy Composite Cathodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by University of California San Diego at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

417

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by The Pennsylvania State University at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development...

418

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of High-Energy Cathode Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

419

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design and Synthesis of Advanced High-Energy Cathode Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the...

420

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Accelerating Predictive Simulation of IC Engines with High Performance Computing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about accelerating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alloy Development for High-Performance Cast Crankshafts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about applied alloy...

422

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about non...

423

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Silicon-based High Capacity Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the...

424

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of High Power Density Driveline for Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the development...

425

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about design and...

426

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOE AccidentWasteZone Modeling |Demand Response Demand

427

Integrating Demand into the U.S. Electric Power System: Technical, Economic, and Regulatory Frameworks for Responsive Load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Responsive/Adaptive Load by Jason W. Black Massachusetts Institute of Technology Submitted to the Engineering integration of demand response. Integrating demand into the US electricity system will allow the development, and market issues to determine a system structure that provides incentives for demand response. An integrated

de Weck, Olivier L.

428

Development of Brazing Technology for Use in High- Temperature Gas Separation Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of high-temperature electrochemical devices such as oxygen and hydrogen separators, fuel gas reformers, solid oxide fuel cells, and chemical sensors is part of a rapidly expanding segment of the solid state technology market. These devices employ an ionic conducting ceramic as the active membrane that establishes the electrochemical potential of the device, either under voltage (i.e. to carry out gas separation) or under chemical gradient (to develop an electrical potential and thereby generate electrical power). Because the device operates under an ionic gradient that develops across the electrolyte, hermiticity across this layer is paramount. That is, not only must this thin ceramic membrane be dense with no interconnected porosity, but it must be connected to the rest of the device, typically constructed from a heat resistant alloy, with a high-temperature, gas-tight seal. A significant engineering challenge in fabricating these devices is how to effectively join the thin electrochemically active membrane to the metallic body of the device such that the resulting seal is hermetic, rugged, and stable during continuous high temperature operation. Active metal brazing is the typical method of joining ceramic and metal engineering components. It employs a braze alloy that contains one or more reactive elements, often titanium, which will chemically reduce the ceramic faying surface and greatly improve its wetting behavior and adherence with the braze. However, recent studies of these brazes for potential use in fabricating high-temperature electrochemical devices revealed problems with interfacial oxidation and subsequent joint failure [1,2]. Specifically, it was found that the introduction of the ceramic electrolyte and/or heat resistant metal substrate dramatically affects the inherent oxidation behavior of the braze, often in a deleterious manner. These conclusions pointed to the need for an oxidation resistant, high-temperature ceramic-to-metal braze and consequently lead to the development of the novel reactive air brazing (RAB) concept. The goal in RAB is to reactively modify one or both oxide faying surfaces with an oxide compound dissolved in a molten noble metal alloy such that the newly formed surface is readily wetted by the remaining liquid filler material. In many respects, this concept is similar to active metal brazing, except that joining can be conducted in air and the final joint will be resistant to oxidation at high temperature. Potentially, there are a number of metal oxide-noble metal systems that can be considered for RAB, including Ag-CuO, Ag-V2O5, and Pt-Nb2O5. Our current interest is in determining whether the Ag-CuO system is suitable for air brazing functional ceramic-to-metal joints such as those needed in practical electrochemical devices. In a series of studies, the wetting behavior of the Ag-CuO braze was investigated with respect to a number of potential hydrogen separation, oxygen separation, and fuel cell electrolyte membrane materials and heat resistant metal systems, including: alumina, (La0.6Sr0.4)(Co0.2Fe0.8)O3, (La0.8Sr0.2)FeO3, YSZ, fecralloy, and Crofer-22APU. Selected findings from these studies as well as from our work on joint strength and durability during high-temperature exposure testing will be discussed.

Weil, K.S.; Hardy, J.S.; Kim, J.Y.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

429

1. Introduction Ad hoc networks are a hot research topic. The enabling technology for this field includes: (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1. Introduction Ad hoc networks are a hot research topic. The enabling technology for this field, with their computers turned on and connected. Ad hoc networks are a natural result of user demand meeting the enabling technology. Highly mobile devices that dynamically organize ad hoc networks, intercommunicate, pass

Yasinsac, Alec

430

Versatile Silicon Photodiode Detector Technology for Scanning Electron Microscopy with High-Efficiency Sub-5 keV Electron Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Versatile Silicon Photodiode Detector Technology for Scanning Electron Microscopy with High for Scanning Electron Microscopy, based on ultrashallow p+ n boron-layer photodiodes, features nm-thin anodes, closely-packed photodiodes and through-wafer apertures allow flexible configurations for optimal material

Technische Universiteit Delft

431

HIGH-FIELD-SIDE PELLET INJECTION TECHNOLOGY S. K. Combs, L. R. Baylor, C. R. Foust, M. J. Gouge,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH-FIELD-SIDE PELLET INJECTION TECHNOLOGY S. K. Combs, L. R. Baylor, C. R. Foust, M. J. Gouge, T of pellets, composed of frozen hydrogen isotopes and multimillimeter in size, is com- monly used for core tubes have typically been used to trans- port/deliver pellets from the acceleration device to the out

432

Technology Survey and Performance Scaling for the Design of High Power Nuclear Electric Power and Propulsion Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, use of electric primary propulsion in flight systems has been limited to low-power, solar electric thruster output power are identified. Design evolutions are presented for three thrusters that would1 Technology Survey and Performance Scaling for the Design of High Power Nuclear Electric Power

433

Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A presentation given by the University of Michigan at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a university consortium to research efficient and clean high-pressure lean burn engines.

434

Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

Demirbas, Umit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Reactor User Interface Technology Development Roadmaps for a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Outlet Temperature of 750 degrees C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the technology readiness of the interface components that are required to transfer high-temperature heat from a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) to selected industrial applications. This report assumes that the HTGR operates at a reactor outlet temperature of 750°C and provides electricity and/or process heat at 700°C to conventional process applications, including the production of hydrogen.

Ian Mckirdy

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. The focus of this document will be the overall range of DOE's structural materials research activities being conducted to support VHTR development. By far, the largest portion of material's R&D supporting VHTR development is that being performed directly as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Supplementary VHTR materials R&D being performed in the DOE program, including university and international research programs and that being performed under direct contracts with the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, will also be described. Specific areas of high-priority materials research that will be needed to deploy the NGNP and provide a basis for subsequent VHTRs are described, including the following: (1) Graphite: (a) Extensive unirradiated materials characterization and assessment of irradiation effects on properties must be performed to qualify new grades of graphite for nuclear service, including thermo-physical and mechanical properties and their changes, statistical variations from billot-to-billot and lot-to-lot, creep, and especially, irradiation creep. (b) Predictive models, as well as codification of the requirements and design methods for graphite core supports, must be developed to provide a basis for licensing. (2) Ceramics: Both fibrous and load-bearing ceramics must be qualified for environmental and radiation service as insulating materials. (3) Ceramic Composites: Carbon-carbon and SiC-SiC composites must be qualified for specialized usage in selected high-temperature components, such as core stabilizers, control rods, and insulating covers and ducting. This will require development of component-specific designs and fabrication processes, materials characterization, assessment of environmental and irradiation effects, and establishment of codes and standards for materials testing and design requirements. (4) Pressure Vessel Steels: (a) Qualification of short-term, high-temperature properties of light water rea

Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wholesale prices and looming shortages in Western power markets in 2000-01, Portland General Electric programs for large customers remain, though they are not active at current wholesale prices. Other programs demand response for the wholesale market -- by passing through real-time prices for usage above a set

438

Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% ? 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Monolithically interconnected GaAs solar cells: A new interconnection technology for high voltage solar cell output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic linear concentrator arrays can benefit from high performance solar cell technologies being developed at AstroPower. Specifically, these are the integration of thin GaAs solar cell and epitaxial lateral overgrowth technologies with the application of monolithically interconnected solar cell (MISC) techniques. This MISC array has several advantages which make it ideal for space concentrator systems. These are high system voltage, reliable low cost monolithically formed interconnections, design flexibility, costs that are independent of array voltage, and low power loss from shorts, opens, and impact damage. This concentrator solar cell will incorporate the benefits of light trapping by growing the device active layers over a low-cost, simple, PECVD deposited silicon/silicon dioxide Bragg reflector. The high voltage-low current output results in minimal 12R losses while properly designing the device allows for minimal shading and resistance losses. It is possible to obtain open circuit voltages as high as 67 volts/cm of solar cell length with existing technology. The projected power density for the high performance device is 5 kW/m for an AMO efficiency of 26% at 1 5X. Concentrator solar cell arrays are necessary to meet the power requirements of specific mission platforms and can supply high voltage power for electric propulsion systems. It is anticipated that the high efficiency, GaAs monolithically interconnected linear concentrator solar cell array will enjoy widespread application for space based solar power needs. Additional applications include remote man-portable or ultra-light unmanned air vehicle (UAV) power supplies where high power per area, high radiation hardness and a high bus voltage or low bus current are important. The monolithic approach has a number of inherent advantages, including reduced cost per interconnect and increased reliability of array connections. There is also a high potential for a large number of consumer products.

Dinetta, L.C.; Hannon, M.H.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

High temperature turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II - Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems encountered during this Phase II annual reporting period are presented. Progress on design, fabrication and checkout of test facilities and test rigs is described. LP turbine cascade tests were concluded. 350 hours of testing were conducted on the LP rig engine first with clean distillate fuel and then with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream. Design and fabrication of the turbine spool technology rig components are described. TSTR 60/sup 0/ sector combustor rig fabrication and testing are reviewed. Progress in the design and fabrication of TSTR cascade rig components for operation on both distillate fuel and low Btu gas is described. The new coal-derived gaseous fuel synthesizing facility is reviewed. Results and future plans for the supporting metallurgical programs are discussed.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing by solid evidence from three utility case studies. BACKGROUND Demand Response: demand response (DR

Perez, Richard R.

445

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid provided the projections

446

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid provided the projections

447

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work Sheridan provided the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid

448

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy for demand response program impacts and contributed to the residential forecast. Mitch Tian prepared

449

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work provided estimates for demand response program impacts and contributed to the residential forecast. Mitch

450

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

451

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

452

BPA seeks research partners to advance technology solutions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transmission technologies, data intelligence, next-generation energy efficiency and demand response technologies, generation asset management. A copy of each roadmap is...

453

Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services by Simon Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services by Simon Christopher Parkinson B highly-distributed sustainable demand- side infrastructure, in the form of heat pumps, electric vehicles

Victoria, University of

454

(2013) 128 Data Center Demand Response: Avoiding the Coincident Peak via  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(2013) 1­28 Data Center Demand Response: Avoiding the Coincident Peak via Workload Shifting.chen@hp.com Abstract Demand response is a crucial aspect of the future smart grid. It has the potential to provide centers' participation in demand response is becoming increasingly important given their high

Wierman, Adam

455

Control and Optimization Meet the Smart Power Grid - Scheduling of Power Demands for Optimal Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The smart power grid aims at harnessing information and communication technologies to enhance reliability and enforce sensible use of energy. Its realization is geared by the fundamental goal of effective management of demand load. In this work, we envision a scenario with real-time communication between the operator and consumers. The grid operator controller receives requests for power demands from consumers, with different power requirement, duration, and a deadline by which it is to be completed. The objective is to devise a power demand task scheduling policy that minimizes the grid operational cost over a time horizon. The operational cost is a convex function of instantaneous power consumption and reflects the fact that each additional unit of power needed to serve demands is more expensive as demand load increases.First, we study the off-line demand scheduling problem, where parameters are fixed and known. Next, we devise a stochastic model for the case when demands are generated continually and sched...

Koutsopoulos, Iordanis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines 2012 FOA 648 Topic 3a  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

457

THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation & Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation & Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same technology have proven to be difficult. Through the RKC, DOE-EM funded an evaluation of adaptable commercial technologies that could assist with the removal of the tank heels. This paper will discuss the efforts and results of developing the RKC to improve communications and discussion of tank waste retrieval through a series of meetings designed to identify technical gaps in retrieval technologies at the DOE Hanford and Savannah River Sites. This paper will also describe the results of an evaluation of commercially available technologies for low level mixing as they might apply to HLW tank heel retrievals.

Fellinger, A.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

458

Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Physics is the liberal arts of high tech Physics and Technology for Future Presidents? Yes, that is a serious title. Energy, global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preface Physics is the liberal arts of high tech Physics and Technology for Future Presidents? Yes studied physics, and do not understand science and technology. Even my school, the University of California at Berkeley, doesn't require physics. Physics and Technology for Future Presidents, PTff

Landweber, Laura

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Overview oi the DOE High Efficiency Engine Technologies R&D  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Class 8 Trucks (SuperTruck) and Advanced Technology Powertrains For Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) *Baseline is state-of-the-art port-fuel injected gasoline engine Vehicle...

462

A Paired-Vehicle Recourse Strategy for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Stochastic Demands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Paired-Vehicle Recourse Strategy for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Stochastic Demands Aykagan Institute of Technology Abstract This paper presents a paired-vehicle recourse strategy for the vehicle vehicles is dispatched from a terminal to serve single-period customer demands which are known

Erera, Alan

463

Demand Response Design based on a Stackelberg Game in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Design based on a Stackelberg Game in Smart Grid Sung-Guk Yoon, Young-June Choi and communications technology (ICT), that is, smart grid. With help of a two-way communication infrastructure, a real- time demand response can be applied. A smart grid network consisting of one retailer and many customers

Bahk, Saewoong

464

Global energy demand to 2060  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projection of global energy demand to the year 2060 is of particular interest because of its relevance to the current greenhouse concerns. The long-term growth of global energy demand in the time scale of climatic change has received relatively little attention in the public discussion of national policy alternatives. The sociological, political, and economic issues have rarely been mentioned in this context. This study emphasizes that the two major driving forces are global population growth and economic growth (gross national product per capita), as would be expected. The modest annual increases assumed in this study result in a year 2060 annual energy use of >4 times the total global current use (year 1986) if present trends continue, and >2 times with extreme efficiency improvements in energy use. Even assuming a zero per capita growth for energy and economics, the population increase by the year 2060 results in a 1.5 times increase in total annual energy use.

Starr, C. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Quantifying stock-price response to demand fluctuations Vasiliki Plerou,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying stock-price response to demand fluctuations Vasiliki Plerou,1 Parameswaran Gopikrishnan, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 2 Department of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 Received 2 July 2001; revised manuscript received 13 May 2002

Stanley, H. Eugene

466

Coordinating Inventory Control and Pricing Strategies with Random Demand and Fixed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinating Inventory Control and Pricing Strategies with Random Demand and Fixed Ordering Cost, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 1. Introduction Traditional inventory strategies to manage their inventory effectively. For example, techniques such as revenue management have

Chen, Xin

467

Incorporating endogenous demand dynamics into long-term capacity expansion power system models for Developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research develops a novel approach to long-term power system capacity expansion planning for developing countries by incorporating endogenous demand dynamics resulting from social processes of technology adoption. ...

Jordan, Rhonda LeNai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing Jin Xiao, Jae--In this paper, we present demand-side energy manage- ment under real-time demand-response pricing as a task, demand-response, energy management I. INTRODUCTION The growing awareness of global climate change has

Boutaba, Raouf

469

Development of Designer Diamond Technology for High Pressure High Temperature Experiments in Support of Stockpile Stewardship Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of nitrogen in the fabrication of designer diamond was systematically investigated by adding controlled amount of nitrogen in hydrogen/methane/oxygen plasma. This has led to a successful recipe for reproducible fabrication of designer diamond anvils for high-pressure high-temperature research in support of stockpile stewardship program. In the three-year support period, several designer diamonds fabricated with this new growth chemistry were utilized in high-pressure experiments at UAB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The designer diamond anvils were utilized in high-pressure studies on heavy rare earth metals, high pressure melting studies on metals, and electrical resistance measurements on iron-based layered superconductors under high pressures. The growth chemistry developed under NNSA support can be adapted for commercial production of designer diamonds.

Vohra, Yogesh, K.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

470

Supersonic Technology for CO2 Capture: A High Efficiency Inertial CO2 Extraction System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: Researchers at ATK and ACENT Laboratories are developing a device that relies on aerospace wind-tunnel technologies to turn CO2 into a condensed solid for collection and capture. ATK’s design incorporates a special nozzle that converges and diverges to expand flue gas, thereby cooling it off and turning the CO2 into solid particles which are removed from the system by a cyclonic separator. This technology is mechanically simple, contains no moving parts and generates no chemical waste, making it inexpensive to construct and operate, readily scalable, and easily integrated into existing facilities. The increase in the cost to coal-fired power plants associated with introduction of this system would be 50% less than current technologies.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Technology Assessment: NREL Provides Know-How for Highly Energy-Efficient Data Centers (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL leads the effort to change how energy is used worldwide by helping identify and eliminate barriers to energy efficiency and clean energy technology deployment. The laboratory takes a portfolio approach that explores the full range of technology options for developing and implementing innovative energy performance solutions. The Research Support Facility (RSF) data center is a prime example of NREL's capabilities and expertise in energy efficiency. But, more important, its features can be replicated. NREL provides custom technical assistance and training for improved data center performance to help our customers realize cost savings.

Not Available

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fuse Control for Demand Side Management: A Stochastic Pricing Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a service contract for load curtailment. Index Terms--Demand side management, aggregated demand response

Oren, Shmuel S.

473

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Buildings & Community Systems, Demand-Side Management,Demand-Side Management Implementing Agreement (www.ieadsm.org) ECBCS Energy Conservation in BuildingsBuilding Technologies Program, Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Demand Side Management

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silain Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silasuccessfully in the wholesale non- spinning ancillary

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand responsepilot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a research project to develop and test Automated Demand Response hardware and software technology in large facilities. We describe the overall project and some of the commissioning and system design problems that took place. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability purposes, manage electricity costs, and ensure that customers receive signals that encourage load reduction during times when the electric grid is near its capacity. There were a number of specific commissioning challenges in conducting this test including software compatibility, incorrect time zones, IT and EMCS failures, and hardware issues. The knowledge needed for this type of system commissioning combines knowledge of building controls with network management and knowledge of emerging information technologies.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

476

Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

477

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

widely differing control technologies, notification options,Electric  Reliability   Technology,  LBNL,  Joseph  Eto  E. Availability F. Technology Proposed Residential Large

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

drivingdemandsocialmedia010611.pdf More Documents & Publications Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 Social Media for Natural...

479

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature-based demand response in buildings that havedemand response advantages of global zone temperature setup in buildings

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table x provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high demand technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

Larson, D.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Towards a systematic characterization of the potential of demand side management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With an increasing share of electric energy produced from non-dispatchable renewable sources both energy storage and demand side management might gain tremendously in importance. While there has been significant progress in general properties and technologies of energy storage, the systematic characterization of features particular to demand side management such as its intermittent, time-dependent potential seems to be lagging behind. As a consequence, the development of efficient and sustainable strategies for demand side management and its integration into large-scale energy system models are impeded. This work introduces a novel framework for a systematic time-resolved characterization of the potential for demand side management. It is based on the specification of individual devices both with respect to their scheduled demand and their potential of load shifting. On larger scales sector-specific profiles can straightforwardly be taken into account. The potential for demand side management is then specifie...

Kleinhans, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Peterbilt at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the technology and system level...

484

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: The Application of High Energy Ignition and Boosting/Mixing Technology to Increase Fuel Economy in Spark Ignition Gasoline Engines by Increasing EGR Dilution Capability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the application of high...

485

Low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells utilizing GaAs-on-Si technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to develop technology to deposit GaAs on Si using a nucleation layer of atomic-layer-epitaxy-grown GaAs or AlAs on Si. This ensures two-dimensional nucleation and should lead to fewer defects in the final GaAs layer. As an alternative, we also developed technology for depositing GaAs on sawtooth-patterned Si. Preliminary studies showed that this material can have a very low defect density, [approximately] 1 [times] 10[sup 5] cm[sup [minus]5], as opposed to our conventionally grown GaAs on SL which has a typical defect density of over 1 [times]10[sup 7] cm[sup [minus]2]. Using these two now methods of GaAs-on-Si material growth, we made solar cells that are expected to show higher efficiencies than those of previous cells.

Vernon, S.M. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

High-Efficiency Solid State Cooling Technologies: Non-Equilibrium Asymmetic Thermoelectrics (NEAT) Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: Sheetak is developing a thermoelectric-based solid state cooling system to replace typical air conditioners that use vapor compression to cool air. With noisy mechanical components, vapor compression systems use a liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the external environment. With no noisy moving parts or polluting refrigerants, thermoelectric systems rely on an electrical current being passed through the junction of the two different conducting materials to change temperature. Using advanced semiconductor technology, Sheetak is improving solid state cooling systems by using proprietary thermoelectric materials along with other innovations to achieve significant energy efficiency. Sheetak’s new design displaces compressor-based technology; improves reliability; and decreases energy usage. Sheetak’s use of semiconductor manufacturing methods leads to less material use—facilitating cheaper production.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes log demand in 1995. The composites board mills operating in Korea took advantage of flexibility environment changes on the production mix, some economic indications, statistics of demand and supply of wood

488

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 http with the mill consuming 450 000 m3 , amounting to 30% of total plywood log demand in 1995. The composites board, statistics of demand and supply of wood, costs and competitiveness were analysed. The reactions

489

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand prepared the peak demand forecast. Ravinderpal Vaid provided the projections of commercial floor space

490

FINAL STAFF FORECAST OF 2008 PEAK DEMAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION FINAL STAFF FORECAST OF 2008 PEAK DEMAND STAFFREPORT June 2007 CEC-200 of the information in this paper. #12;Abstract This document describes staff's final forecast of 2008 peak demand demand forecasts for the respective territories of the state's three investor-owned utilities (IOUs

491

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

492

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

493

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

494

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

495

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators are new actors in the energy scenario: they gather a group of energy consumers and implement a demand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

496

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05 as a source of energy. Global supply and demand trends will have a profound impact on the ability to use our) Transportation energy demand in the U.S. has increased because of the greater use of less fuel efficient vehicles

Saldin, Dilano

497

SUPERCONDUCTIVITY PROGRAM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) is a technology with the potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;SUPERCONDUCTIVITY PROGRAM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS-of-way. The Department of Energy's efforts to advance High Temperature Superconductivity combine major national strengths: the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), the 2nd Generation Wire Initiative

498

THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOW TEMPERATURE TECHNOLOGY AT STANFORD AND ITS RELEVANCE TO HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and High Energy Physics Laboratory I. INTRODUCTION In the history of nuclear and high energy physics ENERGY PHYSICS" H. Alan Schwettmant Stanford University Stanford, California Department of Physics there have been a few pioneer- The High Energy Physics Laboratory (HEPL) at Stanford ing laboratories which

Ohta, Shigemi

499

US/China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC) international business development and technology transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since January 1997, the US/China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC) in Beijing has been jointly operated by Tulane University and Tsinghua University. EETC is established to encourage the adoption of technologies for energy production with improved environmental performance which are essential for supporting economic growth and managing the Global Warming and Climate Change issues. International cooperation is critical to insure the environmental and energy security on a global basis. For example, the US has acquired a great deal of useful experience in clean coal technology which has been demonstrated with major utilities in commercial operations. The adaption of, and the installation of, clean coal technology should be given high priority. Worldwide, the continuous exchange of information and technology between developed and developing nations relating to the current and future clean coal technologies is of great importance. Developed nations which possess environmental responsive technologies and financial resources should work closely with developing nations to facilitate technology transfer and trade of technologies. International cooperation will lower the cost of deploying clean coal technologies directed toward the clean production of energy. This paper presents the updated activities of EETC on facilitating technology transfer and promoting the clean use of coal to satisfy growing energy demand in China.

Hsieh, S.T. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). US/China Inst.; Atwood, T. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Qiu Daxiong [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Zhang Guocheng [State Science and Technology Commission, Beijing (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

500

Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano-engineered Silica Aerogels a Proven Method for Water Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid deployment and the use of objective force aggressively reduce logistic footprints and replenishment demands. Maneuver Sustainment requires that Future Combat Systems be equipped with water systems that are lightweight, have small footprints, and are highly adaptable to a variety of environments. Technologies employed in these settings must be able to meet these demands. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed and previously field tested nano-engineered materials for the treatment of water. These materials have been either based on silica aerogel materials or consist of composites of these aerogels with granular activated carbon (GAC). Recent tests have proven successful for the removal of contaminants including uranium, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Silica aerogels were evaluated for their ability to purify water that had been spiked with the nerve agent VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate). These results demonstrated that silica aerogels were able to remove the VX from the supply water and were nearly 30 times more adsorbent than GAC. This performance could result in REDUCING CHANGEOUT FREQUENCY BY A FACTOR OF 30 or DECREASING the VOLUME of adsorbent BY A FACTOR OF 30; thereby significantly reducing logistic footprints and replenishment demands. The use of the nano-engineered Silica Aerogel/GAC composites would provide a water purification technology that meets the needs of Future Combat Systems.

Daily, W; Coleman, S; Love, A; Reynolds, J; O'Brien, K; Gammon, S

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z