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1

Year Average Transportation Cost of Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

delivered costs of coal, by year and primary transport mode Year Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton) Average Delivered Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton)...

2

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transportation component of coal price should also increase;investment. Coal costs and prices are functions of a numberto forecast coal demand, supply, and prices from now to

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional and clean coal technologies. This project was primarily directed toward developing concrete, mineralogical, and microstructural properties. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2 control technologies. Based on these properties, two sources of both conventional and clean coal ashes were selected

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

4

Steam Coal Import Costs - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 46.96 39.34 39.76 66.29 70.83 70.95 82.81 150.58 NA Denmark 40.78 31.65 50.27 56.29 61.84 59.15 75.20 113.34 NA Finland 40.83 37.08 39.99 58.45 62.80 67.65 72.64 134.21 NA France 45.36 42.59 42.63 64.08 75.23 72.92 84.49 135.53 NA Germany 41.46 36.80 39.00 61.22 72.48 70.12 81.49 138.84 NA Ireland3 45.25 47.88 50.08 80.90 74.91 101.78 125.15 143.08 NA Italy 44.83 41.25 42.45 63.54 73.20 69.16 86.00 143.68 NA Japan 37.95 36.95 34.93 51.48 62.73 63.33 70.92 125.42 NA Netherlands 40.09 35.81 37.27 55.09 68.86 68.57 79.12 133.50 NA

5

Coking Coal Import Costs - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Import Costs for Selected Countries Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 48.67 46.59 49.25 78.98 108.68 126.85 120.51 163.26 NA France 52.47 60.26 62.05 75.46 109.69 133.48 124.63 212.51 NA Germany 51.30 59.53 64.00 74.74 113.48 135.72 133.45 182.72 NA Italy 55.48 57.67 60.39 77.24 103.02 112.05 118.05 118.97 NA Japan 41.13 42.14 41.73 61.40 88.80 93.10 88.43 184.13 NA Netherlands 55.37 55.55 63.00 78.99 104.06 125.70 125.84 187.06 NA Spain 52.32 57.10 60.44 79.30 116.50 134.81 124.87 211.23 NA United Kingdom 53.14 56.81 57.34 77.73 116.05 128.51 120.24 187.79 NA 1To convert U.S. dollars per metric ton to U.S. dollars per short ton

6

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular type of coal, each of which is inherentlyThere are four classes of coal: bituminous, sub-bituminous,minerals Metallic ores Coal Crude petroleum Gasoline Fuel

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle ( IGCC)coal (PC) or integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC)will be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) (Same

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal for Electricity, under the Mexican scenario. Javier C. Palacios, Gustavo Alonso, Ramn Ramrez, Armando Gmez, Javier Ortiz, Luis C....

9

Coal Study Guide - High School | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High School Coal Study Guide - High School Coal Study Guide - High School More Documents & Publications Coal Study Guide - Middle School Coal Study Guide for Elementary School...

10

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

11

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute (SRI) Project Number: FE0012054 Project Description The focus of the project will be to develop, test, and optimize steam-reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, NH3, and CH4 in high-temperature and sulfur environments, increasing the ratio of hydrogen in syngas, as part of a modified, advanced gasification platform for the conversion of low-rank coals to syngas for coal-to-liquid and integrated gasification combined cycle applications. Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits Project Scope and Technology Readiness Level Accomplishments Contacts, Duration, and Cost Project Images Abstract Performer website: Southern Research Institute

12

High-Sulfur Coal for Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...amounts of coal, because...Director-Mineral Re-sources...of Gas from Coal through a...on coals of high ash-fusion temperature...per ton of high-sulfur coal burned. Absorp-tion...particulate matter as well as...capable of remov-ing up to...

James T. Dunham; Carl Rampacek; T. A. Henrie

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal March 11, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative coal-drying technology that will extract more energy from high moisture coal at less cost and simultaneously reduce potentially harmful emissions is ready for commercial use after successful testing at a Minnesota electric utility. The DryFining(TM) technology was developed with funding from the first round of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Great River Energy of Maple Grove, Minn., has selected the WorleyParsons Group to exclusively distribute licenses for the technology, which essentially uses waste heat from a power plant to reduce moisture content

15

Reclaiming lost capability in power plant coal conversions: an innovative, low-cost approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the capability lost during coal conversion can be recovered for midrange/peaking power generation through low cost, turbine cycle and economizer modifications. The additional output can be realized by shutting off adjacent high pressure feedwater heaters (as specified by turbogenerator manufacturers) and simultaneously increasing heat input to the economizer. The supplemental economizer heat input makes up for heat lost to the feedwater when extraction steam is shut off. Several options for applying this novel approach to capability recovery are described. The reclaimed capability is realized at somewhat lower efficiency but at low cost, compared to the overall cost of a coal conversion. Rather than return converted units to up to 100% oil or gas firing during periods of high system demand, the proposed method allows the continued comsumption of coal for the base-load portion of the plant's output. The development of the low NO/sub x/ Slagging Combustor will allow even the added economizer heat input to be supplied by relatively low cost coal. Following a brief review of factors affecting boiler capability in coal conversions and current approaches to coal conversion in this country and overseas, the results of a preliminary study that apply the proposed novel concept to a West Coast power plant are described.

Miliaras, E.S.; Kelleher, P.J.; Fujimura, K.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Costs and benefits of federal regulation of coal strip mining. Report E-82-08  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has attempted to assess the aggregate costs and benefits of Surface Mining Control and Reclamation ACt of 1977 (SMCRA). This has required a model of the US coal market, as well as disaggregated estimates of the costs of satisfying SMCRA's standards and the values of the environmental amenities yielded by coal-bearing land areas. Both the costs and benefits of strip mining regulation increase as policy moves from the West through the Midwest to Appalachia. SMCRA is least cost-effective in Appalachia, where stringent regulatory requirements produce a high level of environmental benefits at an even higher level of costs. SMCRA performs better relative to economic criteria of efficient resource use in the Midwest and West, although it apparently fails the overall national cost-benefit test and imposes aggregate dead-weight losses on the nation's economy in the range of $100 million per year. It does this while transferring significant amounts of income from coal consumers ($400 million per year) and surface coal producers ($980 million per year) to underground coal producers ($130 million per year) and the consumers of environmental amentities ($1.1 billion per year).

Kalt, J.P.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL GASIFICATION Final Report April 2003 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under: Contract No. DE-AM26-99FT40465 between the NETL and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Subcontract No. 990700362 between CTC and Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Task 50611 DOE Task Managers: James R. Longanbach Gary J. Stiegel Parsons Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Thomas L. Buchanan Michael G. Klett Ronald L. Schoff PARSONS Capital and Operating Cost of Hydrogen Production from Coal Gasification Page i April 2003 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page List of Tables iii List of Figures iii

18

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Southern Research Institute Project Number: FE0010231 Project Description Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, called syngas, into liquid hydrocarbons. It is a leading technology for converting syngas derived from gasification of coal and coal-biomass mixtures to hydrocarbons in coal to liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes. However, conventional FTS catalysts produce undesirable waxes (C21+) that need to be upgraded to liquids (C5-C20) by hydrotreating. This adds significantly to the cost of FTS. The objectives of this project are (i) to demonstrate potential for CBTL cost reduction by maximizing the production of C5-C20 hydrocarbon liquids using a selective FTS catalyst and (ii) to evaluate the impacts of the addition of biomass to coal on product characteristics, carbon foot print, and economics.

19

Petrochemicals from oil, natural gas, coal and biomass: Production costs in 2030–2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane, coal and biomass are being considered as alternatives to crude oil for the production of basic petrochemicals, such as light olefins. This paper is a study on the production costs of 24 process routes utilizing these primary energy sources. A wide range of projected energy prices in 2030–2050 found in the open literature is used. The basis for comparison is the production cost per t of high value chemicals (HVCs or light olefin-value equivalent). A Monte Carlo method was used to estimate the ranking of production costs of all 24 routes with 10,000 trials of varying energy prices and CO2 emissions costs (assumed to be within $0–100/t CO2; the total CO2 emissions, or cradle-to-grave CO2 emissions, were considered). High energy prices in the first three quarter of 2008 were tested separately. The main findings are:• Production costs: while the production costs of crude oil- and natural gas-based routes are within $500–900/t HVCs, those of coal- and biomass-based routes are mostly within $400–800/t HVCs. Production costs of coal- and biomass-based routes are in general quite similar while in some cases the difference is significant. Among the top seven most expensive routes, six are oil- and gas-based routes. Among the top seven least expensive routes, six are coal and biomass routes. • CO2 emissions costs: the effect of CO2 emissions costs was found to be strong on the coal-based routes and also quite significant on the biomass-based routes. However, the effect on oil- and gas-based routes is found to be small or relatively moderate. • Energy prices in 2008: most of the coal-based routes and biomass-based routes (particularly sugar cane) still have much lower production costs than the oil- and gas-based routes (even if international freight costs are included). To ensure the reduction of CO2 emissions in the long-term, we suggest that policies for the petrochemicals industry focus on stimulating the use of biomass as well as carbon capture and storage features for coal-based routes.

Tao Ren; Bert Daniëls; Martin K. Patel; Kornelis Blok

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A low emission technology -- low cost coal water mixture fired fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, low cost coal water mixture (CWM) FBC technology is described. Low cost CWM may be coal washery sludge or the mixture of water and coal crashed easily. This technology is featured by agglomerate combustion of low cost MM. Experimental results in 0.5MW FBC test rig are reported. lie effects of bed temperate excess air, staged combustion on combustion and emission performance has been studied. The comparison combustion tests by using dry coal and CWM we made ha 0.5MW FBC test rig. Also coal washery sludge of different origins are also tested in the test rig. Based on the test rig comments a demonstration AFBC boiler with capacity of 35 T/H steam for utility application (6 MW) is designed. The design features will be presented in this paper Both the operation experience of test rig and demonstration unit show the developed low cost CWM FBC technology is of high combustion efficiency and low emission. This technology is being commercialized and applied in China in top priority by Chinese government.

Jianhua Yan; Xuguang Jiang; Yong Chi [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

14 - Cost modelling of coal power plant start-up in cyclical operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: It has long been recognized that large coal plants that are exposed to cyclic operation incur more damage and have higher maintenance costs than units which operate in a base load regimen. This chapter reviews historical studies that have attempted to model the costs of cycling for these units from both bottom-up and top-down perspectives. It describes recent research at the component, unit and system level which attempts to forecast maintenance costs in the high-cycling scenarios likely to result from changes in the relative cost of fuel and the expansion of renewable energy sources.

P. Keatley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Optimal transition from coal to gas and renewable power under capacity constraints and adjustment costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal transition from coal to gas and renewable power under capacity constraints and adjustment existing coal power plants to gas and renewable power under a carbon budget. It solves a model of polluting, exhaustible resources with capacity constraints and adjustment costs (to build coal, gas, and renewable power

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

High-Sulfur Coal for Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Sulfur...FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTORS, COMBUSTION...MAY FLUE GAS DES S E...1971 ). High-sulfur...was brief. Natural gas became...overdependent on natural gas and oil to...elevated pressure with a downward...coals of high ash-fusion...

James T. Dunham; Carl Rampacek; T. A. Henrie

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

High Energy Cost Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

High Energy Cost Grants High Energy Cost Grants The High Energy Cost Grant Program provides financial assistance for the improvement of energy generation, transmission, and...

26

HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

Stefano Orsino

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cost Implications of Carbon Capture and Storage for the Coal Power Plants in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the process of extraction of carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial and energy related sources, transport to storage locations and long-term isolation from the atmosphere. It is being considered as a bridging technology, with significant carbon mitigation potential, especially for large point sources such as coal power plants. The present study looks at the technical feasibility and economic viability of any such initiative in the Indian context by means of case studies of individual power plants. The incremental cost of electricity (COE) of the plants retrofitted with CCS has been estimated using the cost data on CCS components from literature as well as using the IECM (Integrated Environmental Control Model) software. The values of incremental COE and the cost of CO2 avoidance have been estimated as INR 2.2-2.6/kWh and INR 2600-3200 per tCO2, respectively. The costs are highly sensitive to the boiler efficiency and the heat rate of the base plant. The retrofitting of the CCS units in the existing coal plants in India is expected to reduce the net power output of the already inadequate power sector and increase the electricity generation cost substantially. Thus, it would be worthwhile to investigate the necessary and sufficient conditions under which the Indian power plants could graduate to the CCS technologies.

Anand B. Rao; Piyush Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Coal-Fueled Diesel Technology Assessment Study: systems performance and cost comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the performance of diesel engines operating on coal-based fuels and compares their power generation costs with those of corresponding oil-burning prime movers. Similar performance and cost comparisons are also presented for an alternative prime mover, the direct-fired gas turbine in both a simple-cycle and a regenerative-cycle configuration. The coal-based fuels under consideration include micronized coal, coal slurries, and coal-derived gaseous fuels. The study focuses on medium-speed diesel engines for locomotive, marine, small stationary power, and industrial cogeneration applications in the 1000 to 10,000 kW size range. This report reviews the domestic industrial and transportation markets for medium-speed engines currently using oil or gas. The major problem areas involving the operation of these engines on coal-based fuels are summarized. The characteristics of available coal-based fuels are discussed and the costs of various fuels are compared. Based on performance data from the literature, as well as updated cost estimates originally developed for the Total Energy Technology Alternatives Studies program, power generation costs are determined for both oil-fueled and coal-fueled diesel engines. Similar calculations are also performed for direct-fired gas turbines. The calculations illustrate the sensitivity of the power generation cost to the associated fuel cost for these prime movers. The results also show the importance of reducing the cost of available coal-based fuels, in order to improve the economic competitiveness of coal-fueled prime movers relative to engines operating on oil or gas. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Holtz, R.E.; Krazinski, J.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

Greenhalgh, M.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the costs of coal-fired electricity in the United States between 1882 and 2006 by decomposing it in terms of the price of coal, transportation costs, energy density, thermal efficiency, plant construction cost, interest rate, and capacity factor. The dominant determinants of costs at present are the price of coal and plant construction cost. The price of coal appears to fluctuate more or less randomly while the construction cost follows long-term trends, decreasing from 1902 - 1970, increasing from 1970 - 1990, and leveling off or decreasing a little since then. This leads us to forecast that even without carbon capture and storage, and even under an optimistic scenario in which construction costs resume their previously decreasing trending behavior, the cost of coal-based electricity will drop for a while but eventually be determined by the price of coal, which varies stochastically but shows no long term decreasing trends. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of using long time series and compari...

McNerney, James; Farmer, J Doyne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Coal Gasification Systems Solicitations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Cost Coal Conversion to High Hydrogen Syngas; FE0023577 Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation; FE0023497 OTM-Enhanced...

34

Analysis of coal-firing modes shows pulverized least costly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plant owner opting to build a new coal-fired facility has several processes from which to choose. Among the most common are the spreader-stoker- and the pulverized-coal-fired boiler. Since pollution control is now an integral part of any coal-fired operation, fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is becoming increasingly popular. Reason: This process does not require auxiliary equipment to control SO/sub 2/. Comparing the operation and economics of four coal-burning processes can help make this selection a somewhat easier one. This analysis examines four types of combustion: spreader stoker, pulverized coal, bubbling fluidized bed, and circulating fluidized bed. The descriptions are for a 200,000-lb/hr unit operating under like conditions.

Lutwen, R.C.; Fitzpatrick, T.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ash limitation of physical coal beneficiation for medium–high ash coal—A geochemistry perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays the industrial coal beneficiation in China could only reduce the ash yield to about 10%, which could not meet the requirement or standard of environment protection. In this work, the possibility of reducing the ash yield was studied from the aspect of geochemistry. The channel samples were collected from two coal seams in Guizhou and Shanxi province, China and then conducted analysis by combining data from coals worldwide. The result reveals that the same coal seam or the coals deposited in the same peat swamp show a significantly positive correlation between ash yield and Al2O3 + SiO2 content, and the intercept of regression equation on the ash axis is always less than 5% (generally 2–5%). Overall, the coal from China is featured with a higher intercept compared with that in the other countries. The intercept of 2–5% on the ash axis indicates an original inorganic component in coal-forming peat. The research result also presents a theoretical limitation of coal ash by coal cleaning, because 2–5% of inorganic components in medium–high quality ash coal could hardly be separated by traditional physical coal beneficiation.

Wenfeng Wang; Weiduo Hao; Simon Xu; Fuchang Qian; Shuxun Sang; Yong Qin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Estimates of central Appalachian coal reserves by cost of production and sulfur content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides information on the quantity, quality, and production costs for all minable coal reserves in the major coal-producing counties of central Appalachia, a region that contains the large majority of low-sulfur and compliance coal reserves in the eastern US. Presently, the best source of detailed reserve information in the Appalachian region is the estimates produced by the mining and land holding companies that control the reserves. The authors have been able to obtain overall reserve estimates based on the detailed geological and engineering studies conducted by these companies. In areas where this information does not exist, the authors have relied on published estimates of reserves and modified these estimates based on known conditions on surrounding properties. This reserve information has been combined with data on coal quality and mining costs to produce cost curves for all minable coal reserves by sulfur content. Results to date indicate that most of the major coal-producing counties in central Appalachia will be able to increase production levels significantly on a sustainable basis for at least the next 20 years, without major real increases in coal prices.

Watkins, J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification Opening New Avenues for High-Efficiency, Low-Emission Coal Gasification April 10, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. A rendering of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne high pressure, dry-solids feed pump. Washington, DC - Gasification. It's a versatile technology that uses coal to produce power, chemicals, and fuels. Inherently low in air emissions, solid byproducts, and wastewater, commercial gasification plants have proven capable of exceeding the most stringent regulations for air- and solids-emissions. However, capital and operational costs have prohibited the widespread adoption of gasification, especially for power

39

Coal preparation: The essential clean coal technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter is a brief introduction to a broad topic which has many highly specialized areas. The aim is to summarize the essential elements of coal preparation and illustrate its important role in facilitating the clean use of coal. Conventional coal preparation is the essential first step in ensuring the economic and environmentally acceptable use of coal. The aim of coal preparation is to produce saleable products of consistent, specified quality which satisfy customer requirements while optimizing the utilization of the coal resource. Coal preparation covers all aspects of preparing coal for the market. It includes size reduction, blending and homogenization and, most importantly, the process of physical beneficiation or washing, which involves separation of undesirable mineral matter from the coal substance itself. Coal preparation can be performed at different levels of sophistication and cost. The degree of coal preparation required is decided by considering the quality of the raw coal, transport costs and, in particular, the coal quality specified by the consumer. However, the cost of coal beneficiation rises rapidly with the complexity of the process and some coal is lost with the waste matter because of process inefficiencies, therefore each situation requires individual study to determine the optimum coal preparation strategy. The necessary expertise is available within APEC countries such as Australia. Coals destined for iron making are almost always highly beneficiated. Physical beneficiation is mostly confined to the higher rank, hard coals, but all other aspects of coal preparation can be applied to subbituminous and lignitic coals to improve their utilization. Also, there are some interesting developments aimed specifically at reducing the water content of lower rank coals.

Cain, D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant: Conceptual design and costing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, a study was conducted to provide DOE with a reliable, documented estimate of the cost of producing coal-water fuel (CWF). The approach to the project was to specify a plant capacity and location, identify and analyze a suitable coal, and develop a conceptual design for an integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant. Using this information, a definitive costing study was then conducted, on the basis of which an economic and sensitivity analysis was performed utilizing a financial evaluation model to determine a price for CWF in 1992. The design output of the integrated plant is 200 tons of coal (dry basis) per hour. Operating at a capacity factor of 83 percent, the baseline design yields approximately 1.5 million tons per year of coal on a dry basis. This is approximately equivalent to the fuel required to continuously generate 500 MW of electric power. The CWF produced by the plant is intended as a replacement for heavy oil or gas in electric utility and large industrial boilers. The particle size distribution, particularly the top size, and the ash content of the coal in the CWF are specified at significantly lower levels than is commonly found in typical pulverized coal grinds. The particle top size is 125 microns (vs typically 300m[mu] for pulverized coal) and the coal ash content is 3.8 percent. The lower top size is intended to promote complete carbon burnout at less derating in boilers that are not designed for coal firing. The reduced mineral matter content will produce ash of very fine particle size during combustion, which leads to less impaction and reduced fouling of tubes in convective passages.

McHale, E.T.; Paul, A.D.; Bartis, J.T. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)); Korkmaz, M. (Roberts and Schaefer Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant: Conceptual design and costing. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, a study was conducted to provide DOE with a reliable, documented estimate of the cost of producing coal-water fuel (CWF). The approach to the project was to specify a plant capacity and location, identify and analyze a suitable coal, and develop a conceptual design for an integrated coal preparation and CWF processing plant. Using this information, a definitive costing study was then conducted, on the basis of which an economic and sensitivity analysis was performed utilizing a financial evaluation model to determine a price for CWF in 1992. The design output of the integrated plant is 200 tons of coal (dry basis) per hour. Operating at a capacity factor of 83 percent, the baseline design yields approximately 1.5 million tons per year of coal on a dry basis. This is approximately equivalent to the fuel required to continuously generate 500 MW of electric power. The CWF produced by the plant is intended as a replacement for heavy oil or gas in electric utility and large industrial boilers. The particle size distribution, particularly the top size, and the ash content of the coal in the CWF are specified at significantly lower levels than is commonly found in typical pulverized coal grinds. The particle top size is 125 microns (vs typically 300m{mu} for pulverized coal) and the coal ash content is 3.8 percent. The lower top size is intended to promote complete carbon burnout at less derating in boilers that are not designed for coal firing. The reduced mineral matter content will produce ash of very fine particle size during combustion, which leads to less impaction and reduced fouling of tubes in convective passages.

McHale, E.T.; Paul, A.D.; Bartis, J.T. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Korkmaz, M. [Roberts and Schaefer Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

43

Today's high coal prices: correction or crisis?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eastern spot prices for coal have risen 25% since the start of 2004, reaching their highest levels in more than 25 years. This spike represents the second time in four years that coal prices have risen to more than double their pre-2000 price levels. Years of famine (from a coal producer's point of view) have been replaced by periods of plenty, with increasing consequences for coal's customers. How long will this spike last? This article, based on studies carried out by EPRI, attempts to answer this question. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Platt, J. [EPRI (US)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Development of Cost Effective Oxy-Combustion Technology for Retrofitting Coal-Fired Boilers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost effeCtive Cost effeCtive oxy-Combustion teChnology for retrofitting Coal-fireD boilers Background Electric power generation from fossil fuels represents one of the largest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions, not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Various technologies and concepts are being investigated as means to mitigate carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. The concept of pulverized coal (PC) oxy-combustion is one potential economical solution, whereby coal is combusted in an enriched oxygen environment using pure oxygen diluted with recycled flue gas. In this manner, the flue gas is composed primarily of CO 2 and H 2 O, so that a concentrated stream of CO 2 is produced by simply condensing the water in the exhaust stream. An advantage of

45

Modified approaches for high pressure filtration of fine clean coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of moisture from fine (minus 28 mesh) clean coal to 20% or lower level is difficult using the conventional vacuum dewatering technique. High pressure filtration technique provides an avenue for obtaining low moisture in fine clean coal. This paper describes a couple of novel approaches for dewatering of fine clean coal using pressure filtration which provides much lower moisture in fine clean coal than that obtained using conventional pressure filter. The approaches involve (a) split stream dewatering and (b) addition of paper pulp to the coal slurry. For Pittsburgh No. 8 coal slurry, split stream dewatering at 400 mesh provided filter cake containing 12.9% moisture compared to 24.9% obtained on the feed material. The addition of paper pulp to the slurry provided filter cake containing about 17% moisture.

Yang, J.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K. [Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

High-Resolution Simulations of Coal Injection in A Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Resolution Simulations of Coal Injection in A Gasifier ... The shrinkage of the coal particles because of devolatilization and drying was ignored, and a single mean particle size was used. ... Simulations with three different grid resolutions were conducted (denoted by coarse, medium, and fine). ...

Tingwen Li; Aytekin Gel; Madhava Syamlal; Chris Guenther; Sreekanth Pannala

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

1992-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Economic and Environmental Costs of Regulatory Uncertainty for Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic and Environmental Costs of Regulatory Uncertainty for Coal-Fired Power Plants ... Retrofit penalty factors are very site-specific (8) and can vary over a wide range of values, exhibiting or not some economies of scale. ... While it seems sensitive to delay regulation until more about feasibility, performance, and costs of control technologies, and overall impact on the U.S. economy is known, it is important to keep in mind that waiting is not free and in fact can be costly to firms and society, and harmful to the environment. ...

Dalia Patiño-Echeverri; Paul Fischbeck; Elmar Kriegler

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

was no competitive in Mexico, at present this situation is changing, due to different factors. One of them is the high price of fossile fuel in Mexico mainly natural gas. Other...

50

High-Sulfur Coal for Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...made historically by heating bitumi-nous coal in...heart of the anthracite district only about 5 years ago...energy, wind, and geothermal steam and brines, will...15.7 Nuclear 3.1 Geothermal Negligible 1973, use...home and commercial heating, transporta-tion...

James T. Dunham; Carl Rampacek; T. A. Henrie

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

51

Applying environmental externalities to US Clean Coal Technologies for Asia. [Including external environmental costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States is well positioned to play an expanding role in meeting the energy technology demands of the Asian Pacific Basin, including Indonesia, Thailand, and the Republic of China (ROC-Taiwan). The US Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program provides a proving ground for innovative coal-related technologies that can be applied domestically and abroad. These innovative US CCTs are expected to satisfy increasingly stringent environmental requirements while substantially improving power generation efficiencies. They should also provide distinct advantages over conventional pulverized coal-fired combustors. Finally, they are expected to be competitive with other energy options currently being considered in the region. This paper presents potential technology scenarios for Indonesia, Thailand, and the ROC-Taiwan and considers an environmental cost-benefit approach employing a newly developed method of applying environmental externalities. Results suggest that the economic benefits from increased emission control can indeed be quantified and used in cost-benefit comparisons, and that US CCTs can be very cost effective in reducing emissions.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Investigation on Life-cycle Cost of Coal-based Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal-based synthetic natural gas (SNG) is considered to be a promising alternative of clean energy, especially for urban uses, to response to the insufficient supply of natural gas in China, In this paper, life cycle costing is conducted for SNG in three main urban applications: heating boiler use, residential use, and transit bus use, respectively. The results show that the SNG is competitive for residential use, while it is not as cost- effective as expected when used for heating boiler use or transit bus use. Major shortcoming of SNG is from the large environmental emissions in the production stage.

Jun Zhang; Hengchong Li; Siyu Yang; Xiuxi Li; Yu Qian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

ASSESSMENT OF LOW COST NOVEL SORBENTS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of sorbents upstream of a particulate control device is one of the most promising methods for controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired utility boilers with electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. Studies carried out at the bench-, pilot-, and full-scale have shown that a wide variety of factors may influence sorbent mercury removal effectiveness. These factors include mercury species, flue gas composition, process conditions, existing pollution control equipment design, and sorbent characteristics. The objective of the program is to obtain the necessary information to assess the viability of lower cost alternatives to commercially available activated carbon for mercury control in coal-fired utilities. Prior to injection testing, a number of sorbents were tested in a slipstream fixed-bed device both in the laboratory and at two field sites. Based upon the performance of the sorbents in a fixed-bed device and the estimated cost of mercury control using each sorbent, seventeen sorbents were chosen for screening in a slipstream injection system at a site burning a Western bituminous coal/petcoke blend, five were chosen for screening at a site burning a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, and nineteen sorbents were evaluated at a third site burning a PRB coal. Sorbents evaluated during the program were of various materials, including: activated carbons, treated carbons, other non-activated carbons, and non-carbon material. The economics and performance of the novel sorbents evaluated demonstrate that there are alternatives to the commercial standard. Smaller enterprises may have the opportunity to provide lower price mercury sorbents to power generation customers under the right set of circumstances.

Sharon Sjostrom

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

An analysis of cost effective incentives for initial commercial deployment of advanced clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis evaluates the incentives necessary to introduce commercial scale Advanced Clean Coal Technologies, specifically Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) powerplants. The incentives required to support the initial introduction of these systems are based on competitive busbar electricity costs with natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, in baseload service. A federal government price guarantee program for up to 10 Advanced Clean Coal Technology powerplants, 5 each ICGCC and PFBC systems is recommended in order to establish the commercial viability of these systems by 2010. By utilizing a decreasing incentives approach as the technologies mature (plants 1--5 of each type), and considering the additional federal government benefits of these plants versus natural gas fired combined cycle powerplants, federal government net financial exposure is minimized. Annual net incentive outlays of approximately 150 million annually over a 20 year period could be necessary. Based on increased demand for Advanced Clean Coal Technologies beyond 2010, the federal government would be revenue neutral within 10 years of the incentives program completion.

Spencer, D.F. [SIMTECHE, Half Moon Bay, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the foreseeable future, liquid hydrocarbon fuels will play a significant role in the transportation sector of both the United States and the world. Factors favoring these fuels include convenience, high energy density, and the vast existing infrastructure for their production and use. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports from countries with developing economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be allieviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. One option is direct coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology will results in improved technical readiness that can significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically in a time frame to address the shortfall.

Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gray, D. [Mitre Corp, McLean, VA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

DOE cost comparison study industrial fluidized bed combustion vs conventional coal technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares the capital and operating costs of two different industrial boiler technologies, each producing 250,000 lbs steam/hr. These technologies are: Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) and Pulverized Coal (PC) combustion used in conjunction with a limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Three separate turnkey plant designs have been completed. Two of these plant designs incorporate FBC technology and have been designated FBA-16 and FBV-16. The first FBC design (FBA-16) contains two shop assembled, rail shippable fluid bed boilers capable of producing 125,000 lbs/hr each. The second plant design (FBV-16) utilizes a single 250,000 lbs/hr fluid bed boiler shipped by rail in large sections for field assembly. The third plant design utilizes a conventional pulverized coal (PC) boiler in conjunction with a C-E Air Quality Control System (AQCS) limestone scrubber. Capital costs were generated for the three turnkey plant designs just described. The FBA-16, FBV-16, and Conventional Unit plant designs have associated capital costs of $24.4, $22.8, and $24.7 million, respectively. Comparisons between plant capital cost estimates are valid and informative. The total operational costs, which include contingencies on new product design for the Fluid Bed Units, were found to vary between four and seven percent higher than the Conventional Unit. When contingencies are not included, the operating costs were found to be between one and three percent higher than the Conventional Unit. As can be seen, the operating costs for the bed designs are close enough to be considered similar when considering the nature of the study. The efficiency of the fluid bed plant designs can be increased and required capital equipment reduced by improvements to the plant design with time and more development. Some potential design modifications are outlined.

Myrick, D.T.

1980-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

Development of Low-Cost, High Strength Commercial Textile Precursor...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

High cost of carbon fiber CF largest cost component of high pressure storage tanks. Inadequate supply base for low cost carbon fibers Timeline Barriers * ORNL:...

58

HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modifications to the SRT-RCFR facility described in the June report were completed. As a result of these changes, the furnace hot zone was increased in length from 7 cm to 15.5 cm. The injector region of the furnace, providing entrainment and sheath flows, was unchanged, while the flow path from the exit of the furnace to the sample collection section was shortened by approximately 10 cm. The modified facility was used to resume testing of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal at 10 atm. The first goal was to confirm that the facility now provides true secondary pyrolysis test conditions. That is, the tar product should be completely converted to soot even in the absence of oxygen in the gas stream. We have now performed four tests with pure argon carrier gas, and have consistently observed voluminous soot product with little or no evidence of tar. Thus, this objective was met. The clogging problems for Pittsburgh No. 8 coal under secondary pyrolysis test conditions may preclude achieving this data point. In that case, we will make measurements under oxidizing conditions, which are expected to eliminate the clogging, and to gradually reduce the oxygen content to the point where product yields can reliably be extrapolated to the zero oxygen case.

Chris Guenther

2002-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

59

HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HPCCK project was initiated with a kickoff meeting held on June 12, 2001 in Morgantown, WV, which was attended by all project participants. SRI's existing g-RCFR reactor was reconfigured to a SRT-RCFR geometry (Task 1.1). This new design is suitable for performing the NBFZ experiments of Task 1.2. It was decided that the SRT-RCFR apparatus could be modified and used for the HPBO experiments. The purchase, assembly, and testing of required instrumentation and hardware is nearly complete (Task 1.1 and 1.2). Initial samples of PBR coal have been shipped from FWC to SRI (Task 1.1). The ECT device for coal flow measurements used at FWC will not be used in the SRI apparatus and a screw type feeder has been suggested instead (Task 5.1). NEA has completed a upgrade of an existing Fluent simulator for SRI's RCFR to a version that is suitable for interpreting results from tests in the NBFZ configuration (Task 1.3) this upgrade includes finite-rate submodels for devolatilization, secondary volatiles pyrolysis, volatiles combustion, and char oxidation. Plans for an enhanced version of CBK have been discussed and development of this enhanced version has begun (Task 2.5). A developmental framework for implementing pressure and oxygen effects on ash formation in an ash formation model (Task 3.3) has begun.

Chris Guenther; Bill Rogers

2001-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Phase I of the project, a conceptual design of a coal-fired high performance power system was developed, and small scale R&D was done in critical areas of the design. The current Phase Of the project includes development through the pilot plant stage, and design of a prototype plant that would be built in Phase 3. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team of companies in this effort: AlliedSignal Aerospace Equipment Systems, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), and Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. The following goals have been identified that relate to the efficiency,emissions, costs and general operation of the system: total station efficiency of at least 4 percent on a higher heating value basis; emissions--NOx {lt} 0.06 lb/MMBtu, SOx {lt} 0.06 lb/MMBtu, particulates {lt} 0.003 lb/MMBtu; all solid wastes must be benign with regard to disposal; over 95 percent of the total heat input is ultimately from coal, with initial systems capable of using coal for at least 65 percent of the heat input; 10 percent lower cost of electricity relative to a modern coal-fired plant conforming to NSPS. The base case arrangement of the HIPPS cycle is a combined cycle plant, and is referred to as the All Coal HIPPS because it does not require any other fuels for normal operation. An alternative HIPPS cycle uses a ceramic air heater to heat the air to temperatures above what can be achieved with alloy tubes. This arrangement is referred to as the 35 percent natural gas HIPPS. 2 refs., 11 figs. 3 tabs.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project we will study a novel process concept, i.e., the use of ceramic membrane reactors in upgrading of coal model compounds and coal derived liquids. In general terms, the USC research team is responsible for constructing and operating the membrane reactor apparatus and for testing various inorganic membranes for the upgrading of coal derived asphaltenes and coal model compounds. The USC effort will involve the principal investigator of this project and two graduate research assistants. The ALCOA team is responsible for the preparation of the inorganic membranes, for construction and testing of the ceramic membrane modules, and for measurement of their transport properties. The ALCOA research effort will involve Dr. Paul K. T. Liu, who is the project manager of the ALCOA research team, an engineer and a technician. UNOCAL's contribution will be limited to overall technical assistance in catalyst preparation and the operation of the laboratory upgrading membrane reactor and for analytical back-up and expertise in oil analysis and materials characterization. UNOCAL is a no-cost contractor but will be involved in all aspects of the project, as deemed appropriate.

Tsotsis, T.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

DOE cost comparison study: industrial fluidized bed combustion vs conventional coal technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares the capital and operating costs of two different industrial boiler technologies, each producing 250,000 lbs steam/hr: Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) and Pulverized Coal (PC) combustion used in conjunction with a limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Three separate turnkey plant designs have been completed. Two of these plant designs incorporate FBC technology and have been designated FBA-16 and FBV-16. The first FBC design (FBA-16) contains two shop assembled, rail-shippable, fluid-bed boilers capable of producing 125,000 lbs/h each. The second plant design (FBV-16) utilizes a single fluid bed boiler shipped by rail in large sections for field assembly. This single unit is capable of producing 250,000 lbs/h. The third plant design utilizes a conventional pulverized coal (PC) boiler used in conjunction with a C-E Air Quaity Control System (AQCS) limestone scrubber. The FBA-16 and FBV-16 fluid bed designs were found to be competitive with the conventional unit. Capital costs were generated for the three turnkey plant designs just described. The FBA-16, FBV-16, and Conventional Unit plant designs have associated capital costs of $24.4, $22.8, and $24.7 million, respectively. A substantial cost reduction can be realized for plant capacities less than 180,000 lbs steam/h by incorporating a single FBA-16 type boiler. The operating costs for the bed designs are close enough to be considered similar when considering the nature of the study. The efficiency of the fluid bed plant designs can be increased and required capital equipment reduced by improvements to the plant design. Some potential design modifications are outlined. Extensive design and background research was prformed to increase the validity and relevance of this report.

Myrick, D.T.

1980-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

63

A combustion/deposition entrained reactor for high?temperature/pressure studies of coal and coal minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of coal and coal?derived fuels in heat engines poses significant technical challenges in terms of establishing high combustion rates and efficiencies controlling emissions and minimizing the impact of fuel contaminants on engine components. An entrained reactor has been designed and constructed to study coal particle combustion the tendency of coal ash to form deposits on heat engine components and the effects of fuel additives on residual ash composition. The reactor is designed for high temperature/pressure conditions similar to those of a coal?fired gas turbine. Optical access ports and advanced instrumentation allow the i n s i t u measurement of gas and particle temperatures and vapor phase alkali concentrations. The reactor has been used to study the deposition potential of several coals as a function of process conditions and to determine the effects of selected additives on the deposition rate.

Rodney J. Anderson; Ronald G. Logan; Charles T. Meyer; Richard A. Dennis

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal Cleaning Costs Process Clean Coal Produced, * T/D (DryMM$ Net Operating Cost, $/T (Clean Coal Basis) Net OperatingCost, $/T (Clean Coal Bases) Case NA Hazen KVB Battelle

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Membrane reactors are today finding extensive applications for gas and vapor phase catalytic reactions (see discussion in the introduction and recent reviews by Armor [92], Hsieh [93] and Tsotsis et al. [941]). There have not been any published reports, however, of their use in high pressure and temperature liquid-phase applications. The idea to apply membrane reactor technology to coal liquid upgrading has resulted from a series of experimental investigations by our group of petroleum and coal asphaltene transport through model membranes. Coal liquids contain polycyclic aromatic compounds, which not only present potential difficulties in upgrading, storage and coprocessing, but are also bioactive. Direct coal liquefaction is perceived today as a two-stage process, which involves a first stage of thermal (or catalytic) dissolution of coal, followed by a second stage, in which the resulting products of the first stage are catalytically upgraded. Even in the presence of hydrogen, the oil products of the second stage are thought to equilibrate with the heavier (asphaltenic and preasphaltenic) components found in the feedstream. The possibility exists for this smaller molecular fraction to recondense with the unreacted heavy components and form even heavier undesirable components like char and coke. One way to diminish these regressive reactions is to selectively remove these smaller molecular weight fractions once they are formed and prior to recondensation. This can, at least in principle, be accomplished through the use of high temperature membrane reactors, using ceramic membranes which are permselective for the desired products of the coal liquid upgrading process. An additional incentive to do so is in order to eliminate the further hydrogenation and hydrocracking of liquid products to undesirable light gases.

Tsotsis, T.T. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Liu, P.K.T. (Aluminum Co. of America, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Webster, I.A. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Development of a coal reserve GIS model and estimation of the recoverability and extraction costs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The United States has the world largest coal resource and coal will serve as the major and dependable energy source in the coming 200 years… (more)

Apala, Chandrakanth, Reddy.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low energy Carbon emissions a b s t r a c t Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing of resource cost scenarios, most coal power plants would be replaced by solar, wind, gas, and/or nuclear

Kammen, Daniel M.

69

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Low Cost, High Performance, 50-year Electrode  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an extremely durable, highly active, conductive, and inexpensive electrode for flow batteries. Flow batteries offer one of the most exciting opportunities for affordable grid storage, however electrodes are costly and are the single largest cost component in a well integrated design. Grid storage can yield numerous benefits in utility and customer- owned applications:  renewable firming  peak load reduction  load shifting  capital deferral  frequency regulation By incorporating volume production practices from the chlorine, filter media, and electroplating industries, Primus Power will effectively reduce electrode costs to exceed GRIDS cost targets while providing the durability essential for widespread grid-scale adoption.

71

PENETRATION OF COAL SLAGS INTO HIGH-CHROMIA REFRACTORIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slagging coal gasifiers are used for the production of electricity and synthetic gases, as well as chemicals. High temperatures in the reaction chamber, typically between 1250ºC and 1600ºC, high pressure, generally greater than 400 psi, and corrosive slag place severe demands on the refractory materials. Slag produced during the combustion of coal flows over the refractory surface and penetrates the porous material. Slag penetration is typically followed by spalling of a brick that significantly decreases the service life of gasifier refractories. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the penetration depth of slags into high-chromia refractories as a function of time and temperature for various refractory-slag combinations.

Longanbach, Sara C.; Matyas, Josef; Sundaram, S. K.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Production of high-energy fuel with low volatile content from 3B and D coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments on the carbonization of coal show that high-energy fuel with satisfactory piece strength (?8 MPa in compression) may be produced in the nonoxidative heating of 3B and D coal, with gradual increase ...

M. V. Kulesh; S. R. Islamov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels will continue to play a significant role in the transportation sector in the future of both the world and the United States because of the their convenience, high energy density, and vast existing infrastructure. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports by developing overseas economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be alleviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology is expected to significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically at a much earlier date than previously forecast.

Srivastava, R.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gray, D.; Klunder, E.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY - Building America Top Innovation High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY -...

75

High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders - Building America Top Innovation High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders -...

76

Computer model study: An analysis of the Nephew/Spore model for determining costs of cost of coal mining in Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study determined whether the model developed to study Costs of Coal Surface Mining and Reclamation in Appalachia was capable of being responsive to the needs of the Office of Surface Mining for projecting the extraction costs of coal in support of the Small Operator Assistance Program. The study analysis validated the model and adapted the model to specific small operator needs in terms of user flexibility. Based on the analysis and model enhancements approach used by the study, three primary recommendations are made: Validate the model with live cost and performance data to determine potential viability for small operator assistance; Enhance the model to provide greater flexibility and ease of user support; and field test the model through regional offices of the Small Operator Assistance Program.

Nephew, E.A.; Spore, R.L.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI has completed the NBFZ test program, made modification to the experimental furnace for the HPBO test. The NBFZ datasets provide the information NEA needs to simulate the combustion and fuel-N conversion with detailed chemical reaction mechanisms. BU has determined a linear swell of 1.55 corresponding to a volumetric increase of a factor of 3.7 and a decrease in char density by the same factor. These results are highly significant, and indicate significantly faster burnout at elevated pressure due to the low char density and large diameter.

Chris Guenther, Ph.D.

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Annual technical progress report, October 1990--September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Prediction of oxy-coal flame stand-off using high-fidelity thermochemical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of oxy-coal flame stand-off using high-fidelity thermochemical models and the one Abstract An Eulerian one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is applied to simulate oxy-coal combustion temperature and mixing rate on oxy-coal flame is simulated and discussed where flame stand-off is used

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Advanced High Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost for Hybrid Engines Advanced High Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost for Hybrid Engines Clean, in-cylinder combustion...

82

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out under Task 2, Concept Definition and Analysis, Task 3, Preliminary R&D and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under Contract AC22-92PC91155, ``Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System`` between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and Particulates {le}25% NSPS; cost {ge}65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. A survey of currently available high temperature alloys has been completed and some of their high temperature properties are shown for comparison. Several of the most promising candidates will be selected for testing to determine corrosion resistance and high temperature strength. The corrosion resistance testing of candidate refractory coatings is continuing and some of the recent results are presented. This effort will provide important design information that will ultimately establish the operating ranges of the HITAF.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development of Low-Cost, High Strength Commercial Textile Precursor...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a project to develop develop a low-cost precursor fiber that can be converted to low-cost carbon fiber (CF) with at least 650 ksi tensile strength. Development of Low-Cost, High...

84

NETL: A Low-Cost, High-Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture From  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0007580 TDA Research, Inc is developing a low cost, high capacity CO2 adsorbent and demonstrating its technical and economic viability for post-combustion CO2 capture for existing pulverized coal-fired power plants. TDA is using an advanced physical adsorbent to selectively remove CO2 from flue gas. The sorbent exhibits a much higher affinity to adsorb CO2 than N2, H2O or O2, enabling effective CO2 separation from the flue gas. The sorbent binds CO2 more strongly than common adsorbents, providing the chemical potential needed to remove the CO2, however, because CO2 does not form a true covalent bond with the surface sites, regeneration can be carried out with only a small energy input. The heat input to regenerate the sorbent is only 4.9 kcal per mol of CO2, which is much lower than that for chemical absorbents or amine based solvents.

85

HIGH SPEED RAIL COSTS, BENEFITS, AND FINANCING RAYMOND H. ELLIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incremental Capital Cost Capital Cost Year of (Billions (Billions Completion Expenditure Section 2010$) 2010 YEAR OF EXPENDITURE CAPITAL DOLLARS CUMULATIVE YEAR OF EXPENDITURE CAPITAL COST INITIAL CONST$) of Section Capital Cost #12;CALIFORNIA HIGH SPEED RAIL PHASE 1 CAPITAL COSTS SECTION INCREMENTAL CAPITAL

Bustamante, Fabián E.

86

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Final report, September 28, 1990--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program was to study the feasibility of operating a Detroit Diesel Series 149 engine at high speeds using a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. The CWS-fueled 149 engine is proposed for the mine-haul off-highway truck and work boat marine markets. Economic analysis studies indicate that, for these markets, the use of CWS fuel could have sufficient operating cost savings, depending upon the future diesel fuel price, emission control system capital and operating costs, and maintenance and overhaul costs. A major portion of the maintenance costs is expected to be due to lower life and higher cost of the CWS injectors. Injection and combustion systems were specially designed for CWS, and were installed in one cylinder of a Detroit Diesel 8V-149TI engine for testing. The objective was to achieve engine operation for sustained periods at speeds up to 1,900 rpm with reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate. A computer simulation predicted autoignition of coal fuel at 1,900 rpm would require an average droplet size of 18 microns and 19:1 compression ratio, so the injection system, and pistons were designed accordingly. The injection system was capable of supplying the required volume of CWS/injection with a duration of approximately 25 crank angle degrees and peak pressures on the order of 100 mpa. In addition to the high compression ratio, the combustion system also utilized hot residual gases in the cylinder, warm inlet air admission and ceramic insulated engine components to enhance combustion. Autoignition of CWS fuel was achieved at 1900 rpm, at loads ranging from 20--80 percent of the rated load of diesel-fuel powered cylinders. Limited emissions data indicates coal burnout rates in excess of 99 percent. NO{sub x} levels were significantly lower, while unburned hydrocarbon levels were higher for the CWS fueled cylinder than for corresponding diesel-fuel powered cylinders.

Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.; Ryan, T.W. III; Schwalb, J.A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, R.P. Jr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Losses and Costs Associated with Coal vs. Natural Gas Firing at Hanes Dye and Finishing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Due to decreasing production and rising coal prices, the engineering and management staff at Hanes Dye and Finishing in Winston Salem, NC have been investigating… (more)

Gibides, Justin Tyler

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Analysis of the Newphew/Spore model for determining costs of coal mining in Appalachia. Computer model study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was primarily to determine whether a computer program developed to determine the costs of coal surface mining and reclamation in Appalachia was capable of being responsive to the needs of the Office of Surface Mining for projecting the extraction costs of coal in support of the Small Operator Assistance Program. The study analysis validated the model and adapted it to specific small operator needs in terms of user flexibility. It found that the model as originally programmed was subject to a number of limitations and functional constraints. Although a substantial loosening of these constraints was not feasible within the current scope of work, it did establish an approach to reprogram the model to take into account dynamically certain previously static aspects of the model. The approach was implemented in order to made the model more useful and to establish a baseline for future development.

Nephew, E.A.; Spore, R.L.

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems phase 2 and 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le}10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 2.4 Duct Heater and Gas Turbine Integration.

Unknown

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The true cost of renewables: An analytic response to the coal industry`s attack on renewable energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 1995, the Center for Energy and Economic Development (CEED), an umbrella organization of pro-coal interests, released a report entitled Energy Choices in a Competitive Era: The Role of Renewable and Traditional Energy Resources in America`s Electric Generation Mix. The report purports to show that a very modest growth in the use of renewable energy in the U.S. power sector would entail unaffordable costs for the nation`s electricity ratepayers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to review the assumptions contained in the report, which was prepared for CEED by Resource Data International, Inc. (RDI). The NREL analysis finds that the conclusions of the CEED/RDI study are based on faulty data and assumptions regarding the comparative economics of coal and renewable energy development. After correcting these errors, NREL finds that a modest growth path of renewable resource development would essentially cost the nation little more than projected electricity market costs for coal-fired generation, even before considering the environmental benefits that would accompany this development.

Swezey, B.G.; Wan, Yih-huei

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Blending high sulfer coal with refuse derived fuel to make SO{sub 2} compliant slurry fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for a better method of disposing of the international community`s garbage hardly needs emphasizing. In 1993, the United States alone generated approximately 207 million ton per year of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), with 62% landfilled, 220/6 recycled, and 16% combusted for energy recovery. Despite strenuous efforts to make these disposal methods meet present needs, the cost of disposal is rising dramatically. Concurrently, the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have severely restricted the SO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired boilers. Medium and high sulfur coals will not comply with the Phase II CAAA regulation limit of 1.2 lb SO{sub 2}/MM Btu, without advanced coal cleaning technologies or flue gas desulfurization, including the majority of the North Dakota lignite reserves. Utility power plants have attempted to burn refuse derived fuel (RDF), a heterogeneous solid fuel produced from MSW, with coal in utility scale boilers (generally referred to as co-firing). Co-firing of RDF with coal has been attempted in sixteen different boilers, five commercially. While lower SO{sub 2} emissions provided the impetus, co-firing RDF with coal suffered from several disadvantages including increased solids handling, increased excess air requirements, higher HCI, CO, NO{sub x} and chlorinated organic emissions, increased slag formation in the boiler, and higher fly ash resistivity. Currently, only two of the sixteen boilers are still regularly used to co-fire RDF. The overall objective of this research program was to assess the feasibility of blending RDF with lignite coal to form SO{sub 2} Compliant slurry fuels using EnerTech`s SlurryCarb{trademark} process. In particular, the objective was to overcome the difficulties of conventional co-firing. Blended slurry fuels were produced with the Energy & Environmental Research Center`s (EERC) bench-scale autoclave and were combusted in a pressurized fluidized-bed reactor (PFBR).

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Anderson, C. [Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Yin-An (Opelika, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary Research and Development, and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge} 65% of heat input; and all solid wastes benign. The report discusses progress in cycle analysis, chemical reactor modeling, ash deposition rate calculations for HITAF (high temperature advanced furnace) convective air heater, air heater materials, and deposit initiation and growth on ceramic substrates.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Conventional coal preparation in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processing of bituminous and anthracite coal is widely practiced in the United States and, as mentioned earlier, about 80 percent of the production of these coals is processed as clean coal in preparation plants. Subbituminous coal is not widely processed, primarily because these low rank raw coals are low in sulfur (0.5 to 1.0 percent) and relatively low in ash (8 to 15 percent). They are also relatively low in heat content due to their high inherent moisture. Lignite coals, to the best of the authors{close_quote} knowledge, are not presently being processed in Conventional Coal Preparation plants. This is due to their unstable nature and putting them in water in a coal preparation plant is likely to cause severe degradation in particle size and add to their already high inherent moisture content. The following are the benefits of clean coal processing: produces a uniform product which can be utilized more efficiently; produces a higher quality product which results in higher efficiency at the power station or the steel mill; reduces sulfur dioxide and other adverse stack emissions during coal firing which is a very important environmental consideration; reduces ash or slag handling costs by the user; reduces shipping costs; and reduces handling and storage costs. Processing any stable raw coal in a coal preparation plant will always produce a higher grade product which is a more efficient and a more environmentally acceptable fuel for use at power stations, steel mills, home heating or industrial boilers.

Beck, M.K.; Taylor, B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report studies the removal of sulfur by oxidative interaction of various cupric salts with coal and also considers the possibility of removing organic sulfur by the selective interaction of supercritical ethanol with the organic coal matrix. Either one of these methods could potentially be used to pretreat coals before burning. The primary purpose of these studies is to ascertain the nature of the chemical reactions occurring, the chemical composition of the resultant products, and information on possible reaction mechanisms. This information should allow prediction of reasonable reaction conditions for the removal of organosulfur compound from coal.

Olesik, S.V.; Pekay, L.A.; Larkins, W. Jr. [comps.

1992-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report studies the removal of sulfur by oxidative interaction of various cupric salts with coal and also considers the possibility of removing organic sulfur by the selective interaction of supercritical ethanol with the organic coal matrix. Either one of these methods could potentially be used to pretreat coals before burning. The primary purpose of these studies is to ascertain the nature of the chemical reactions occurring, the chemical composition of the resultant products, and information on possible reaction mechanisms. This information should allow prediction of reasonable reaction conditions for the removal of organosulfur compound from coal.

Olesik, S.V.; Pekay, L.A.; Larkins, W. Jr. (comps.)

1992-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Risk-Cost Tradeoff Analysis of Oil vs. Coal Fuels for Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the economic requirements and health consequences of converting an electrical power generating unit from oil to coal combustion at the West Springfield, MA Generating Station. Three alterna...

Lawrence B. Gratt; Gregory S. Kowalczyk

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE`s high performance power systems program: Development of advanced coal-fired combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal currently provides more than one third of the world`s electricity and more than one half of the US`s electricity. However, for coal to be the fuel of choice in the future, highly efficient, environmentally acceptable, and economically competitive, coal-fired power plants are needed. The US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center, under its High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) Program, has two contracts in place, one with Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and one with United Technologies Research Center, to develop advanced power generation systems. Based on an indirectly fired cycle, HIPPS uses a combined cycle for power generation at efficiencies of 47--50% (HHV) with superior environmental performance (1/10 of New Source Performance Standards) and a lower cost-of-electricity (10% reduction relative to current coal-fired plants). HIPPS, scheduled to be ready for commercialization by the year 2005, could provide a solution to the anticipated worldwide demand for clean, efficient electricity generation. In this paper, the two HIPPS designs are reviewed and on-going research is discussed.

Ruth, L.; Plasynski, S.; Shaffer, F. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Step Description Associated task 1 Define estimate's purpose Determine estimate's purpose, required level of detail, and overall scope; Determine who will receive the estimate 2 Develop estimating plan Determine the cost estimating team and develop its master schedule; Determine who will do the independent cost estimate; Outline the cost estimating approach; Develop the estimate timeline 3 Define program characteristics In a technical baseline description document, identify the program's

103

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Reaction Study: The results of the reaction of aqueous cupric chloride with Illinois {number sign}6 coal are listed on page 21. These results indicate that the oxidative desulfurization of coal with cupric chloride is more complex and less effective than previously reported. Although almost all the pyritic and sulfate sulfur are removed from the coal, the organic sulfur is actually reported to have increased. This may be due to an actual increase in the organic sulfur through a side reaction of the pyrite, or it may be caused by inaccuracy of the ASTM method when large proportions of chloro substituents are present. The amount of chlorine added to the coal (from 0 to 3.18%) is quite large and counterproductive. Most importantly, the amount of non-combustible ash has increased from 15.48 to 51.21%, most likely in the form of copper. This will dramatically decrease both the efficiency of combustion in terms of altering the heat capacity of the coal as well as decrease the amount of energy produced per ton of coal. As a result, it is quite evident that this method of desulfurization needs some modification prior to further exploitation.

Olesik, S. (comp.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Look taken at coal mining costs and trends for the 1980s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author examines the trends in US bituminous coal production and consumption over the past 40 years, and then looks at the growth rates than can be expected for the rest of the 1980s. Increases are likely to be substantial in absolute terms, although nominal when expressed as a percentage. Surface minable reserves in the eastern US are rapidly being depleted, so that underground mining will gain in importance in these regions. A significant contribution to supplying increased domestic coal consumption will eventually come from new longwall mines in the Illinois Basin and northern Appalachia.

Weir, J.P.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

New developments in coal briquetting technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Briquetting of coal has been with us for well over a century. In the earliest applications of coal briquetting, less valuable fine coal was agglomerated into briquettes using a wide variety of binders, including coal tar, pitch and asphalt. Eventually, roll briquetters came into more widespread use, permitting the process to become a continuous one. Coal briquetting went out of favor during the 1950s in most of the industrialized world. The major reason for this decline in use was the discovery that the coal gas distillates used for binders were harmful to human health. Also, the abundance of cheap petroleum made coal briquettes a less attractive alternative as an industrial or domestic fuel. The re-emergence of coal as a primary industrial fuel and also its increased prominence as a fuel for thermal electric power stations led to a large increase in the annual volume of coal being mined worldwide. Coal preparation technology steadily improved over the years with the general exception of fine coal preparation. The processes available for treating this size range were considerably more expensive per unit mass of coal treated than coarse coal processes. Also, costly dewatering equipment was required after cleaning to remove surface moisture. Even with dewatering, the high surface area per unit mass of fine coal versus coarse coal resulted in high moisture contents. Therefore, little incentive existed to improve the performance of fine coal processes since this would only increase the amount of wet coal fines which would have to be dealt with. With such an ever-increasing volume of coal fines being created each year, there emerged an interest in recovering this valuable product. Several schemes were developed to recover coal fines discarded in abandoned tailings impoundments by previous operations.

Tucker, P.V. [Kilborn Inc., Ontario (Canada); Bosworth, G.B. [Kilborn Engineering Pacific Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kalb, G.W. [KKS Systems Inc., Wheeling, WV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

Mark Leavitt

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.

Amrhein, G.T.

1994-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 2: Coal to Synthetic Natural Gas and Ammonia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 2: Coal to Synthetic Natural Gas and Ammonia July 5, 2011 DOE/NETL- 2010/1402 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

109

Design study of a coal-fired thermionic (THX) topped power plant. Volume IV. Thermionic heat exchanger design and costing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume deals with the details of how thermionic conversion works, and how it is used in a coal-fired furnace to achieve power plant efficiencies of 45%, and overall costs of 36.3 mills/kWh. A review of the fundamental technical aspects of thermionic conversion is given. The overall Thermionic Heat Exchanger (THX) design, the heat pipe design, and the interaction of the heat pipes with the furnace are presented. Also, the operational characteristics of thermionic converters are described. Details on the computer program used to perform the parametric study are given. The overall program flow is reviewed along with the specifics of how the THX subroutine designed the converter to match the conditions imposed. Also, input costs and variables effecting the THX's performance are detailed. The efficiencies of the various power plants studied are given as a function of the air preheat temperature, size of the power plant, and thermionic level of performance.

Dick, R.S.; Britt, E.J.

1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Adaptive PCCI with Variable Orifice Injector for Low Cost High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Low Cost High Efficiency Clean Diesels Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit,...

111

Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

112

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO{sub 2} Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO{sub 2} removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO{sub 2} capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO{sub 2} produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

Elliott, Jeannine

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Pyrolysis behavior of coal and petroleum coke at high temperature and high pressure.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??While pyrolysis of coal is a well-studied thermal process, little is known about pressurized pyrolysis of coal and petroleum coke. This study aims to interpret… (more)

Wagner, David Ray

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Underground coal gasification field experiment in the high-dipping coal seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article the experimental conditions and process of the underground gasification in the Woniushan Mine, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province are introduced, and the experimental results are analyzed. By adopting the new method of long-channel, big-section, and two-stage underground coal gasification, the daily gas production reaches about 36,000 m{sup 3}, with the maximum output of 103,700 m{sup 3}. The daily average heating value of air gas is 5.04 MJ/m{sup 3}, with 13.57 MJ/m{sup 3} for water gas. In combustible compositions of water gas, H{sub 2} contents stand at over 50%, with both CO and CH{sub 4} contents over 6%. Experimental results show that the counter gasification can form new temperature conditions and increase the gasification efficiency of coal seams.

Yang, L.H.; Liu, S.Q.; Yu, L.; Zhang, W. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources & Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

In situ formation of coal gasification catalysts from low cost alkali metal salts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbonaceous material, such as crushed coal, is admixed or impregnated with an inexpensive alkali metal compound, such as sodium chloride, and then pretreated with a stream containing steam at a temperature of 350.degree. to 650.degree. C. to enhance the catalytic activity of the mixture in a subsequent gasification of the mixture. The treatment may result in the transformation of the alkali metal compound into another, more catalytically active, form.

Wood, Bernard J. (Santa Clara, CA); Brittain, Robert D. (Cupertino, CA); Sancier, Kenneth M. (Menlo Park, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ancillary operations in coal preparation instrumentation on-line low cost sulfur and ash analyzer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program of design, fabrication, and field testing of an on-line sulfur and ash analyzer was undertaken by The Babcock Wilcox Company. The analyzer is intended for use on coal slurry streams such as those found at coal cleaning facilities. The analyzer design consists of a sample preparation and delivery system (SPAD) and an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The program consisted of the following major tasks: Selection and screening of delivery systems; Design of the analyzer system; Fabrication of SPAD system; Field testing of the SPAD system; and Laboratory ICP testing of field collected samples. The field testing was conducted at CQ Inc., (Homer City, Pa. pilot plant). Testing was completed without taking the ICP to the field, since the analysis of coal slurry by ICP had been demonstrated during the delivery system screening tests and the field tests were aimed primarily at demonstrating the performance of the SPAD system. Although the ICP was not deployed to the field, the subsequent laboratory testing of field collected samples simulated the performance of the entire system. 16 refs., 103 figs., 38 tabs.

Malito, M.L.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems. Technical report, July - September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, AlliedSignal Aerospace Equipment Systems, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase I of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolyzation process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). It is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/airheater where steam and gas turbine air are indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and then a pilot plant with integrated pyrolyzer and char combustion systems will be tested. In this report, progress in the pyrolyzer pilot plant preparation is reported. The results of extensive laboratory and bench scale testing of representative char are also reported. Preliminary results of combustion modeling of the char combustion system are included. There are also discussions of the auxiliary systems that are planned for the char combustion system pilot plant and the status of the integrated system pilot plant.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. The detail of syngas cooler design is given in this report. The final construction work of the CFB pyrolyzer pilot plant has started during this quarter. No experimental testing was performed during this quarter. The proposed test matrix for the future CFB pyrolyzer tests is given in this report. Besides testing various fuels, bed temperature will be the primary test parameter.

York Tsuo

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R D plan to develop the concept further. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Review of China's Low-Carbon City Initiative and Developments in the Coal Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total energy consumption, energy mix and carbon emission;current coal- dominated energy mix. In conjunction with theproduct mix; low production costs; high energy conversion

Fridley, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Credit Extra Fuel Oil Coal to gasifier Na cost· Na processoiL Replace res. with coal as gasifier feed. 543 ton/day @$

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH-PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. A general arrangement drawing of the char transfer system was forwarded to SCS for their review. Structural steel drawings were used to generate a three-dimensional model of the char transfer system including all pressure vessels and major piping components. Experimental testing at the Combustion and Environmental Test Facility continued during this quarter. Performance of the char burner, as benchmarked by flame stability and low NOx, has been exceptional. The burner was operated successfully both without natural gas and supplemental pulverized coal.

Unknown

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a low cost, high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbent and demonstrate its technical and economic viability for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The specific objectives supporting our research plan were to optimize the chemical structure and physical properties of the sorbent, scale-up its production using high throughput manufacturing equipment and bulk raw materials and then evaluate its performance, first in bench-scale experiments and then in slipstream tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. One of the objectives of the laboratory-scale evaluations was to demonstrate the life and durability of the sorbent for over 10,000 cycles and to assess the impact of contaminants (such as sulfur) on its performance. In the field tests, our objective was to demonstrate the operation of the sorbent using actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams generated by air-blown and oxygen-blown commercial and pilot-scale coal gasifiers (the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in these gas streams is significantly different, which directly impacts the operating conditions hence the performance of the sorbent). To support the field demonstration work, TDA collaborated with Phillips 66 and Southern Company to carry out two separate field tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas at the Wabash River IGCC Power Plant in Terre Haute, IN and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. In collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a detailed engineering and economic analysis for the new CO{sub 2} capture system was also proposed to be carried out using Aspen PlusTM simulation software, and estimate its effect on the plant efficiency.

Alptekin, Gokhan

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

NETL: News Release - Florida Demo Tames High Sulfur Coal: Delivers Power at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 11, 2005 March 11, 2005 Florida Demo Tames High Sulfur Coal: Delivers Power at Very Low Emissions Shows that New Technology Cuts Pollutants to Fractions of Federal Clean Air Limits JACKSONVILLE, FL - Recent tests with one of the nation's mid- to high-sulfur coals have further verified that a new electric generation technology in its first large-scale utility demonstration here is one of the world's cleanest coal-based power plants. This city's municipal utility JEA logged the achievement at its Northside Generating Station using Illinois No. 6 coal in a 300 megawatt demonstration of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, which is the largest application yet of the new form in the United States. It almost triples the size of a previous demonstration and scales up the technology to the sizes preferred for adding new plants and replacing old ones, also called repowering.

125

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work completed this past quarter has centered around the further study and characterization of the selective desulfurization of coal through the oxidative interaction of aqueous copper chloride. The reaction of the CuCl{sub 2} with the particular model compounds is conducted at a series of reaction times and reaction temperatures. The reaction times studied were 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. The reaction temperatures studied were 50, 130, 210, and 295{degree}C. After the reaction, the organic compounds were extracted with methylene chloride. These products were then analyzed via GC/IRD/MS and SFC/SCD (sulfur chemiluminescence detector). Model Coal Compounds reacted include: tetrahydrothiophene, methyl p-tolyl sulfide, cyclohexyl mercaptan, and thiophenol. At 130{degree}C, in addition to these compounds reacting, reactions were also detected for phenyl sulfide and benzo(b)thiophene. 14 figs.

Olesik, S. (comp.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessment of the effect of high ash content in pulverized coal combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing literature on CFD-based coal combustion modelling is applicable mainly for coals of low ash content and the calculations are done on an ash-free basis. In Indian coals, the ash content may be significantly higher, up to 40% or more. Studies reported in the literature show that the mineral matter in the coal may have a number of effects on the combustion characteristics. In the present study, a sensitivity analysis is performed, using the CFD code CFX of AEA Technology, on the likely effect of ash content on the char reactivity, oxygen diffusion rate for char combustion and on the radiative heat transfer parameters. The results show that the effect of enhanced char reactivity is negligible whereas reduced oxygen diffusion rates due to a thicker ash layer may result in a significant reduction in char oxidation rates with a resultant decrease in the peak temperature in the furnace. The global parameters such as the peak temperature and the flue gas temperature remain relatively insensitive to the presence of high ash content. These results are consistent with the experimental observations of Kurose et al. . Kurose, M. Ikeda, H. Makino, Combustion characteristics of high ash coal in pulverized coal combustion, J. Fuel 80 (2001) 1447-1455).

Jayanti, S.; Maheswaran, K.; Saravanan, V. [Indian Institute of Technology, Madras (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

128

High-Quality, Low-Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To develop ESG into a viable bulk growth process for GaN that is more scalable to large-area wafer manufacturing and able to produce cost-effective, high-quality bulk GaN substrates.

129

Effect of bituminous coal properties on carbon dioxide and methane high pressure sorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High pressure sorption experiments with carbon dioxide and methane were carried out at a temperature of 45 °C and at pressures up to 15 MPa with three samples of methane-bearing, medium-rank coals in a moisture-equilibrated state using a manometric method. The samples were taken from selected positions of drill cores from exploration boreholes in the Bohemian part of the Upper Silesian Basin, and were characterized by a narrow range of degree of coalification and markedly different petrographic compositions, including a different mineral matter content. The total porosity of the coal samples was between 9% and 10%. A positive correlation was found between the equilibrium moisture in the coal samples and the total abundance of oxygen functional groups determined by FTIR. The excess sorption capacities ranged from 0.78 to 0.91 mmol g?1 for CO2 and from 0.45 to 0.52 mmol g?1 for CH4, and after recalculation to coal organic matter, the excess sorption capacities increased by up to 14% in the coal with the highest mineral fraction. The highest CO2/CH4 ratio was found in the sample that had the highest inertinite and liptinite content. The experimental isotherm data was fitted by modified Langmuir and Dubinin–Radushkevich sorption isotherms. The parameters obtained by these two methods were in good agreement for carbon dioxide. It was found that the sorption capacity of the organic matter in a coal sample with prevalence of inertinite (63.0 vol.%) was lower only by 14% for CO2 and by 18% for CH4 than the sorption capacity of the organic matter in a coal sample with prevalence of vitrinite (65.3 vol.%). This provided confirmation that the petrographic composition of a coal has an ambiguous effect.

Zuzana Weishauptová; Old?ich P?ibyl; Ivana Sýkorová; Vladimír Machovi?

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH-PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolyzation process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2, which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Al. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. The design of the char burner was completed during this quarter. The burner is designed for arch-firing and has a maximum capacity of 30 MMBtu/hr. This size represents a half scale version of a typical commercial burner. The burner is outfitted with nozzles for separate injection of char, coal, and limestone. Burner performance will be rated according to three criteria, carbon conversion efficiency, NOx generation, and flame stability. If initial testing in the arch configuration proves successful, further tests will be performed in the wall-fired arrangement. A complete set of process and instrumentation drawings (P/ID's) were completed for the Combustion and Environmental Test Facility (CETF) this quarter. These drawings established an ISA approved instrument tagging structure, and provided a coherent database for the development of a data acquisition system. The data acquisition system polls tag information (value, range, engineering units, etc.) from the distributed control system (DCS) highway, and provides a platform for data reduction. The quadrupole mass spectrometer, used during the pyrolyzer tests performed at the pilot plant in Livingston, N.J., has been redesigned for use at the CETF. The mass spectrometer is designed to provide on-line gas analysis by identifying all of the chemical components within the secondary air line, the flue gas recycle line, and the furnace exit ducting. The construction effort at the CETF continued this quarter with the completion of the char storage system, reheat burner, flue gas recycle piping, and the pulverized coal feed system.

NONE

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Next Generation Pressurized Oxy-Coal Combustion: High Efficiency and No Flue Gas Recirculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has developed a pressurized oxy-coal fired molten bed boiler (MBB) concept, in which coal and oxygen are fired directly into a bed of molten coal slag through burners located on the bottom of the boiler and fired upward. Circulation of heat by the molten slag eliminates the need for a flue gas recirculation loop and provides excellent heat transfer to steam tubes in the boiler walls. Advantages of the MBB technology over other boilers include higher efficiency (from eliminating flue gas recirculation), a smaller and less expensive boiler, modular design leading to direct scalability, decreased fines carryover and handling costs, smaller exhaust duct size, and smaller emissions control equipment sizes. The objective of this project was to conduct techno-economic analyses and an engineering design of the MBB project and to support this work with thermodynamic analyses and oxy-coal burner testing. Techno-economic analyses of GTI’s pressurized oxy-coal fired MBB technology found that the overall plant with compressed CO2 has an efficiency of 31.6%. This is a significant increase over calculated 29.2% efficiency of first generation oxy-coal plants. Cost of electricity (COE) for the pressurized MBB supercritical steam power plant with CO2 capture and compression was calculated to be 134% of the COE for an air-coal supercritical steam power plant with no CO2 capture. This compares positively with a calculated COE for first generation oxy-coal supercritical steam power plants with CO2 capture and compression of 164%. The COE for the MBB power plant is found to meet the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) target of 135%, before any plant optimization. The MBB power plant was also determined to be simpler than other oxy-coal power plants with a 17% lower capital cost. No other known combustion technology can produce higher efficiencies or lower COE when CO2 capture and compression are included. A thermodynamic enthalpy and exergy analysis found a number of modifications and adjustments that could provide higher efficiency and better use of available work. Conclusions from this analysis will help guide the analyses and CFD modeling in future process development. The MBB technology has the potential to be a disruptive technology that will enable coal combustion power plants to be built and operated in a cost effective way, cleanly with no carbon dioxide emissions. A large amount of work is needed to quantify and confirm the great promise of the MBB technology. A Phase 2 proposal was submitted to DOE and other sponsors to address the most critical MBB process technical gaps. The Phase 2 proposal was not accepted for current DOE support.

Rue, David

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Flexibility Retrofits for Coal and Gas-Fueled Power Plants: August 2012 - December 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High penetrations of wind and solar power plants can induce on/off cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generators. This can lead to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions for fossil-fueled generators. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) determined these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations to investigate the full impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This report studies the costs and benefits of retrofitting existing units for improved operational flexibility (i.e., capability to turndown lower, start and stop faster, and ramp faster between load set-points).

Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.; O'Connor, M.; Kumar, N.; Lefton, S.; Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Palchak, D.; Cochran, J.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

Vladimir Shiltsev

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. The char combustion tests in the arch-fired arrangement were completed this quarter. A total of twenty-one setpoints were successfully completed, firing both synthetically-made char, and char generated from the pyrolyzer tests performed at FWDC's pilot plant in Livingston, New Jersey. Construction is to begin next quarter to retrofit the CETF for additional HIPPS char combustion studies in a wall-fired configuration. Design of the char transfer system for the PSDF also progressed during this quarter. A number of arrangements have been developed to modify the existing N-Valve configuration. As an experimental test facility, the PSDF needs to maintain operating flexibility in order to test under a wide range of conditions. Although a new char transfer design is needed to support the HIPPS testing at the facility, the Second Generation PFB program will also utilize this system.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. Detailed design of the components to be used to for the circulating bed gasification tests is underway. The circulating fluidized bed will allow for easy scale-up to larger size plants. The existing pyrolyzer will be outfitted with a cyclone and a j-valve to capture and reinject char into the lower combustion zone. Additional development work has been performed to evaluate advanced cycles utilizing the HIPPS system concept.

York Tsuo

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Low cost highly reliable telemetry module for space applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we demonstrate a low cost highly reliable telemetry module design suitable for low orbit satellites based on commercial or industrial components. The proposed telemetry module configuration employs on shelf components to achieve 3 Kg weight, ... Keywords: highly reliable design, low orbit satellite, space application, telemetry module

Aladin S. Abdelaziz; Ahmed M. Mahmoud

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Property:EstimatedCostHighUSD | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EstimatedCostHighUSD EstimatedCostHighUSD Jump to: navigation, search Property Name EstimatedCostHighUSD Property Type Quantity Description the high estimate of cost in USD Use this type to express a monetary value in US Dollars. The default unit is one US Dollar. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 100 cent USD,cents USD,Cent USD,Cents USD .001 k USD,thousand USD,Thousand USD .000001 M USD,million USD,Million USD .000000001 T USD,trillion USD,Trillion USD Pages using the property "EstimatedCostHighUSD" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe Survey + 50050,000 centUSD 0.5 kUSD 5.0e-4 MUSD 5.0e-7 TUSD + A Acoustic Logs + 161,600 centUSD 0.016 kUSD 1.6e-5 MUSD 1.6e-8 TUSD + Aerial Photography + 2,360236,000 centUSD

138

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Estimating the variable cost for high-volume and long-haul transportation of densified biomass and biofuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article analyzes rail transportation costs of products that have similar physical properties as densified biomass and biofuel. The results of this cost analysis are useful to understand the relationship and quantify the impact of a number of factors on rail transportation costs of denisfied biomass and biofuel. These results will be beneficial and help evaluate the economic feasibility of high-volume and long-haul transportation of biomass and biofuel. High-volume and long-haul rail transportation of biomass is a viable transportation option for biofuel plants, and for coal plants which consider biomass co-firing. Using rail optimizes costs, and optimizes greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to transportation. Increasing bioenergy production would consequently result in lower GHG emissions due to displacing fossil fuels. To estimate rail transportation costs we use the carload waybill data, provided by Department of Transportation’s Surface Transportation Board for products such as grain and liquid type commodities for 2009 and 2011. We used regression analysis to quantify the relationship between variable transportation unit cost ($/ton) and car type, shipment size, rail movement type, commodity type, etc. The results indicate that: (a) transportation costs for liquid is $2.26/ton–$5.45/ton higher than grain type commodity; (b) transportation costs in 2011 were $1.68/ton–$5.59/ton higher than 2009; (c) transportation costs for single car shipments are $3.6/ton–$6.68/ton higher than transportation costs for multiple car shipments of grains; (d) transportation costs for multiple car shipments are $8.9/ton and $17.15/ton higher than transportation costs for unit train shipments of grains.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin Searcy; Md. S. Roni; Sandra D. Eksioglu

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Co-gasification Reactivity of Coal and Woody Biomass in High-Temperature Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(20) Although the total pressure was 0.5 MPa and lower than the usual conditions of the gasifier, it has been confirmed that the total pressure has little influence on the gasification rate of char when the partial pressure of the gasifying agent is the same and the total pressure is less than 2 MPa. ... While the pyrolysis and the char gasification were tested separately in the above experiments, raw samples of coals, cedar bark, and the mixtures were gasified with carbon dioxide at high temperature using the PDTF facility in this section, the same as the reductor in the air-blown two-stage entrained flow coal gasifier. ...

Shiro Kajitani; Yan Zhang; Satoshi Umemoto; Masami Ashizawa; Saburo Hara

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modelling of High-Chromia Refractory Spalling in Slagging Coal Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economic viability of converting coal into clean burning liquid fuels in slagging coal gasifiers is compromised by the limited service lifetime of hot-face refractories. One of the most severe refractory degradation mechanisms is spalling, which can occur by either volume expansion phenomena (compressive stresses) or by volume shrinkage phenomena (tensile stresses). A volume shrinkage model is benchmarked to high-chromia refractory material properties and performance under gasifier operating conditions. The model is found to be appropriate for first order estimates of gasifier refractory lifetime when the apparent diffusivity of volatized Cr in the refractory includes the effects of slag-filled pores and cracks.

Williford, Rick E.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Sundaram, S. K.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Coal-water-slurry autoignition in a high-speed Detroit diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Autoignition of coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel in a two-stroke engine operating at 1900 RPM has been achieved. A Pump-Line-Nozzle (PLN) injection system, delivering 400mm{sup 3} injection of CWS, was installed in one modified cylinder of a Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) 8V-149TI engine, while the other seven cylinders remained configured for diesel fuel. Coal Combustion was sustained by maintaining high gas and surface temperatures with a combination of hot residual gases, warm inlet air admission, ceramic insulated components and increased compression ratio. The coal-fueled cylinder generated 85kW indicated power (80 percent of rated power), and lower NO{sub x} levels with a combustion efficiency of 99.2 percent. 6 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W. III.; Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Task 1, Proof of principle testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

Greenhalgh, M.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coal Study Guide - Middle School | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Middle School Coal Study Guide - Middle School Coal Study Guide - Middle School More Documents & Publications Coal Study Guide for Elementary School Coal Study Guide - High School...

145

Exploration of coal-based pitch precursors for ultra-high thermal conductivity graphite fibers. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goal was to explore the utility of coal-based pitch precursors for use in ultra high thermal conductivity carbon (graphite) fibers. From graphite electrode experience, it was established that coal-based pitches tend to form more highly crystalline graphite at lower temperatures. Since the funding was limited to year 1 effort of the 3 year program, the goal was only partially achieved. The coal-base pitches can form large domain mesophase in spite of high N and O contents. The mesophase reactivity test performed on one of the variants of coal-based pitch (DO84) showed that it was not a good candidate for carbon fiber processing. Optimization of WVU`s isotropic pitch process is required to tailor the pitch for carbon fiber processing. The hetero atoms in the coal pitch need to be reduced to improve mesophase formation.

Deshpande, G.V. [Amoco Performance Products, Inc., Alpharetta, GA (United States)

1996-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

Coal keeps the home fires burning, at a price  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wild ride of 2007 thermal and coking coal and freight prices does not show any signs of abating as 2008 nears, leaving consumers coping with historic high costs, except in the US. 3 figs.

O'Connell, J.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Entrained-flow dry-bottom gasification of high-ash coals in coal-water slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It was shown that the effective use of dry ash removal during entrained-flow gasification of coal-water slurries consists in simplification of the ash storage system and utilization of coal ash, a decrease in the coal demand, a reduction in the atmospheric emissions of noxious substances and particulate matter, and abandonment of the discharge of water used for ash slurry. According to the results of gasification of coal-water slurries (5-10 {mu}m) in a pilot oxygen-blow unit at a carbon conversion of >91%, synthesis gas containing 28.5% CO, 32.5% H{sub 2}, 8.2% CO{sub 2}, 1.5% CH{sub 4}, the rest being nitrogen, was obtained. The fly ash in its chemical composition, particle size, and density meets the requirements of the European standard EN 450 as a cement additive for concrete manufacture.

E.G. Gorlov; V.G. Andrienko; K.B. Nefedov; S.V. Lutsenko; B.K. Nefedov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas. Quarterly progress report No. 3, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

1992-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

A BLOCH DECAY AND ULTRA HIGH SPEED CP/MAS 13C NMR STUDY OF THE ARGONNE PREMIUM COALS AND SELECTED OXIDISED LOW-RANK COALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the results of a Bloch decay and ultrahigh speed cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the Argonne premium coals and selected oxidized low-rank coals. A Varian Associates VXR-300 NMR spectrometer operating at 75.4 \\{MHz\\} (13C) equipped with a Doty, Scientific, Inc. high-speed cross-polarization/magic angle probe was employed. Solid-state Bloch decay 13C NMR spectra were determined using 90° carbon pulse, 74 kHz dipolar proton decoupling during acquisition, and a 200-s recycle delay with 13 kHz magic angle spinning. The probe and sample rotor exhibited a background signal amounting to ca. 20% of the total intensity of the coal spectrum, and required careful FID scaling and subtraction of the signal obtained from the empty rotor and caps. CP/MAS spectra were determined at variable contact times from 25 ?S to 25 ms, with 5 s recycle times. The chapter presents a comparison of CP/MAS and Bloch decay results for the Argonne premium coals, a standard humic acid, and for a selection of oxidized coals.

J.C. Linehan; J.A. Franz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

High-Fidelity Multi-Phase Radiation Module for Modern Coal Combustion Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Task Task Description Sample calculations LBL-PMC Future Work High-Fidelity Multi-Phase Radiation Module for Modern Coal Combustion Systems Jian Cai 1 Ricardo Marquez 1 Michael F. Modest 2 1 Postdoctoral Research Associate 2 Shaffer and George Professor of Engineering University of California Merced Merced, CA 95343, USA DE-FG26-10FE0003801 May 2012 - Pittsburgh 2/17 Introduction Task Description Sample calculations LBL-PMC Future Work Radiation Challenges in Multi-Phase Reacting Flows Radiative heat transfer in high temperature combustion systems Thermal radiation becomes very important at elevated temperatures Coal and hydrocarbon fuels C n H m → H 2 O, CO 2 , CO, NO x , soot, char, ash CO 2 , H 2 O, soot, char and ash strongly emit and absorb radiative energy (lower temperature levels) Radiative effects are conveniently ignored or treated with very crude models Neglecting

152

Environmental externalities: Applying the concept to Asian coal-based power generation. [Includes external environmental and societal costs and methods of evaluating them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the concept of environmental externality. It discusses various factors -- the atmospheric transformations, relationship of point-source emissions to ambient air quality, dose-response relationships, applicable cause-and-effect principles, and risk and valuation research -- that are considered by a number of state utilities when they apply the environmental externality concept to energy resource planning. It describes a methodology developed by Argonne National Laboratory for general use in resource planning, in combination with traditional methods that consider the cost of electricity production. Finally, it shows how the methodology can be applied in Indonesia, Thailand, and Taiwan to potential coal-fired power plant projects that will make use of clean coal technologies.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high temperature alkali corrosion kinetics of SiC have been systematically investigated from 950 to 1100[degrees]C at 0.63 vol % alkali vapor concentration. The corrosion rate in the presence of alkaliis approximately 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 5] times faster than the oxidation rate of SiC in air. The activation energy associated with the alkali corrosion is 406 kJ/mol, indicating a highly temperature-dependent reaction rate. The rate-controlling step of the overall reaction is likely to be the dissolution of silica in the sodium silicate liquid, based on the oxygen diffusivity data.

Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

1992-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

High temperature properties and reactivity of coal and coke for ironmaking.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rapid growth of the steel industry in coming years will be strongly dependent upon coal. Understanding of coal behavior in current or emerging ironmaking processes… (more)

Kim, Byong-Chul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors by the addition of pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors which can be accomplished by the addition of pulverized coal to increase the heat content and generate the proper reducing conditions. Samples from a 78%-yield sodium bisulfite pulping process employing a hardwood furnish were mixed with 10-50% pulveriized coal and burned at 950[degrees]C under reducing conditions in a box furnace. Even in these uncontrolled combustion conditions 76. 5% of the sulfur found in the soluble portion of the smelt was converted from lignousulfonates to useful sulfide ion. For the remainder of the sulfur, analyses determined it to be 19. 5% as sulfite ion, 3. 1% as thiosulfate ion, and 0.9% as sulfate ion.

Sell, N.J.; Norman, J.C. (Natural and Applied Sciences, Univ. of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Green Bay, WI (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary R and D, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal-Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of (1) > 47% thermal efficiency; (2) NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and particulates {<=}25% NSPS; (3) cost {>=}65% of heat input; (4) all solid wastes benign. In our design consideration, we have tried to render all waste streams benign and if possible convert them to a commercial product. It appears that vitrified slag has commercial values. If the flyash is reinjected through the furnace, along with the dry bottom ash, then the amount of the less valuable solid waste stream (ash) can be minimized. A limitation on this procedure arises if it results in the buildup of toxic metal concentrations in either the slag, the flyash or other APCD components. We have assembled analytical tools to describe the progress of specific toxic metals in our system. The outline of the analytical procedure is presented in the first section of this report. The strengths and corrosion resistance of five candidate refractories have been studied in this quarter. Some of the results are presented and compared for selected preparation conditions (mixing, drying time and drying temperatures). A 100 hour pilot-scale stagging combustor test of the prototype radiant panel is being planned. Several potential refractory brick materials are under review and five will be selected for the first 100 hour test. The design of the prototype panel is presented along with some of the test requirements.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

TRP0033 - PCI Coal Combustion Behavior and Residual Coal Char Carryover in the Blast Furnace of 3 American Steel Companies during Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) at High Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion behavior of pulverized coals (PC), gasification and thermal annealing of cokes were investigated under controlled environments. Physical and chemical properties of PCI, coke and carbon residues of blast furnace dust/sludge samples were characterized. The strong influence of carbon structure and minerals on PCI reactivity was demonstrated. A technique to characterize char carryover in off gas emissions was established.

Veena Sahajwalla; Sushil Gupta

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Proton’s MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

Ayers, Katherine [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Dalton, Luke [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Roemer, Andy [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Carter, Blake [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Niedzwiecki, Mike [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Manco, Judith [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Anderson, Everett [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Capuano, Chris [Proton OnSite] [Proton OnSite; Wang, Chao-Yang [Penn State University] [Penn State University; Zhao, Wei [Penn State University] [Penn State University

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Coal Production of Hydrogen from Coal Project Summary Full Title: Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies Project ID: 265 Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes Brief Description: This report assesses the improvements in cost and performance of hydrogen production from domestic coal when employing emerging technologies funded by DOE. Keywords: Hydrogen production; Coal Purpose This analysis specifically evaluates replacing conventional acid gas removal (AGR) and hydrogen purification with warm gas cleanup (WGCU) and a high-temperature hydrogen membrane (HTHM) that meets DOE's 2010 and 2015 performance and cost research and development (R&D) targets. Performer Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes

162

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 4, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

NETL: News Release - Combustion Optimization Systems - Cleaner Coal Burning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Combustion Optimization System" - Cleaner Coal Burning at Lower Costs "Combustion Optimization System" - Cleaner Coal Burning at Lower Costs DOE Joins with Sunflower Electric to Outfit Kansas Coal Plant with Lower Cost System to Cut Air Emissions FINNEY COUNTY, KS - A unique combination of high-tech combustion modifications and sophisticated control systems will be tested on a Kansas coal-fired power plant as part of the federal government's efforts to show how new technology can reduce air emissions and save costs for ratepayers. - Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station - Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station will be outfitted with a combination of innovative hardware and software to further reduce air emissions. - The U.S. Department of Energy and Sunflower Electric Power Corporation have signed an agreement to use the utility's Holcomb Station power plant in

164

A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass feedstocks were utilized to identify optimized process conditions and selective HDO catalyst for high yield production of hydrocarbons from biomass. In addition to these experimental efforts, in Tasks D and E, we have developed a mathematical optimization framework to identify carbon and energy efficient biomass-to-liquid fuel process designs that integrate the use of different primary energy sources along with biomass (e.g. solar, coal or natural gas) for liquid fuel production. Using this tool, we have identified augmented biomass-to-liquid fuel configurations based on the fast-hydropyrolysis/HDO pathway, which was experimentally studied in this project. The computational approach used for screening alternative process configurations represents a unique contribution to the field of biomass processing for liquid fuel production.

Agrawal, Rakesh

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 - Development of High Volume Warm Forming of Low Cost Magnesium Sheet edm2@chrysler.com February 28, 2008 Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low- Cost Magnesium Sheet...

166

Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

167

Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of...

168

Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Magnesium...

169

Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for High Performance Relocatable Classrooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for High Element 6, Project 2.1.2: Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for High Performance Hoeschele2 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department

170

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

171

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally-acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national perspective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Effects of high pressure-dependent leakoff and high process-zone stress in coal-stimulation treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing in coals has been studied extensively over the last two decades; however, there are factors that were often ignored or incorrectly diagnosed, resulting in screenouts. Assuming that a majority of the perforations are open and there are no problems with the stimulation fluids, screenouts during coal hydraulic-fracture treatments can be attributed to either high pressure-dependent leakoff (PDL), high process-zone stress (PZS) or in some cases both. The objective of this work is to discuss, help identify, and present solutions to address these reservoir-related issues such that screenouts can be avoided in optimized refracture treatments and new well stimulations. The tools for identifying these reservoir-related parameters include a diagnostic fracture-injection test (DFIT) and a grid-oriented fully functional 3D fracture simulator with shear decoupling. An example for each respective case is presented in this paper. In the first example, in which high PZS was considered to be the dominant reason for screenout or pressure out, the well was restimulated successfully by implementing the solutions presented in this paper. In the second example, in which high PDL was considered to be the main reason for screenout, there were several wells in the same project area that exhibited the same behavior resulting in screenouts. After implementing the solutions presented in this paper to address high PDL, all new wells were stimulated successfully without any issues.

Ramurthy, M.; Lyons, B.; Hendrickson, R.B.; Barree, R.D.; Magill, D.R. [Halliburton, Denver, CO (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Profitability analysis of non-coking coal preparation for power plants in India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently coal-based power plants produce about 70% of the total electricity generated in India, where non-coking (steam) coals are utilized mostly without any preparation. A massive capacity addition of at least 140,000 MWe is required (over the 81,000 MWe of current installed capacity) during the next 15 years to meet growing energy demand. Such a rapid expansion of power generation capacity poses a serious challenge to the environment (at emission controls) and transportation infrastructure in India. Furthermore, the high ash content of indigenous coals and concentration of coal mines in central and northeastern India away from urban centers exacerbate the problem. Thus, coal preparation is envisioned to play a major role in shaping the energy future of India. Under the Indo-US Coal Preparation Program, the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is coordinating coal preparation activities for the US Agency for International Development. In this context, a detailed analysis of the washability characteristics of non-coking coals was performed using the PETC Coal Preparation Plant Simulator (CPPS) to identify coal preparation strategies for India. Based on these strategies, a profitability analysis of non-coking coal preparation has been conducted considering coal preparation and transportation costs, and coal quality impacts on power plant operations. This paper summarizes the results of this analysis and quantifies the significance of coal preparation for the Indian power sector.

Gollakota, S.V.; Rao, S.N. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Staats, G.E. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Crystallization of Coal Ash Slags at High Temperatures and Effects on the Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coal samples were ashed in a muffle furnace at 815 °C, according to the Chinese Standard GB/T1574-2007. ... Shenfu and Beisu coals are enriched in glass modifying oxides (CaO + Fe2O3 + MgO > 30%), while the contents of Al2O3 in Baodian coal ash is higher than 30%; therefore, they exhibit the crystalline slag behavior. ... compn. of coals and coal ashes from a wide variety of deposits (41) were studied by a melting test, x-ray diffractometry, light microscopy, differential-thermal, thermogravimetric and chem. ...

Haiping Yuan; Qinfeng Liang; Xin Gong

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

177

Health costs associated with the mining, transport and combustion of coal in the steam-electric industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... rarely takes into account factors other than the market value of the commodities1,2. The costs of such decisions to society in general are rarely considered. Some of these ... of such decisions to society in general are rarely considered. Some of these costs are environmental: for example, disposal of industrial waste has often been free. Others ...

L. A. Sagan

1974-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40%) with coal.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Clean coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article describes the physics-based techniques that are helping in clean coal conversion processes. The major challenge is to find a cost- effective way to remove carbon dioxide from the flue gas of power plants. One industrially proven method is to dissolve CO{sub 2} in the solvent monoethanolamine (MEA) at a temperature of 38{sup o}C and then release it from the solvent in another unit when heated to 150{sup o}C. This produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. Research is in progress with alternative solvents that require less energy. Another technique is to use enriched oxygen in place of air in the combustion process which produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. A process that is more attractive from an energy management viewpoint is to gasify coal so that it is partially oxidized, producing a fuel while consuming significantly less oxygen. Several IGCC schemes are in operation which produce syngas for use as a feedstock, in addition to electricity and hydrogen. These schemes are costly as they require an air separation unit. Novel approaches to coal gasification based on 'membrane separation' or chemical looping could reduce the costs significantly while effectively capturing carbon dioxide. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 photo.

Liang-Shih Fan; Fanxing Li [Ohio State University, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Project Profile: High-Concentration, Low-Cost Parabolic Trough...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

aperture, while incorporating additional advancements that substantially lower installed solar field costs. For example, the reflective film surfaces are being upgraded to improve...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

182

Annual prospects for world coal trade 1985: with projections to 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects US and world coal trade to 1995, and annually updates the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook. The current projections assume that world coal trade will expand between now and 1995 in response to increasing demand for steam coal. US coal exports rose rapidly between 1979 and 1981, from 66 million short tons to 113 million short tons, partly as a result of labor problems in Poland and Australia. After declining slightly to 106 million short tons in 1982, US coal exports decreased sharply to 78 million short tons in 1983 due to increased supplies of Polish coal in Western Europe and Australian coal in Asia. Moreover, the continued strength of the US dollar made US coal more expensive overseas. US coal exports rose slightly in 1984, to 81 million short tons. Exports of US coal in 1985 are projected to be approximately 71 million short tons. As a high-cost supplier of export coal, the United States has been the ''swing supplier'' because of its ability to ship large amounts of coal on short notice. The United States is likely to maintain a significant share of the world market as a reliable supplier of high-quality coal. EIA projections of US coal exports and world coal trade for 1990 and 1995 are provided in a mid-demand (or base) case as well as in two other cases, a low-demand case and a high-demand case, that reflect uncertainties in the projections. EIA estimates of import coal demand for 1990 and 1995 were developed using key energy supply and demand information for the principal coal-importing countries in Western Europe and Asia, and evaluating that information in the context of estimated trends in economic growth and energy use. 3 figs., 26 tabs.

Tukenmez, E.; Tuck, N.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Coal Science: Basic Research Opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carbon is arranged in coal becomes real. What...NMR experiments at high temperatures. This...of characterizing high-boiling coal "liquids" which...reactions. Coal mineral matter. Most U.S. coals...burned is called ash. Techniques are...

Martin L. Gorbaty; Franklin J. Wright; Richard K. Lyon; Robert B. Long; Richard H. Schlosberg; Zeinab Baset; Ronald Liotta; Bernard G. Silbernagel; Dan R. Neskora

1979-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fluidized bed combustion of a high-sulphur eastern Canadian coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-sulphur bituminous coal from Nova Scotia has been tested in a pilot scale FBC (Fluidized Bed Combustor) and an industrial FBC boiler. A comprehensive pilot plant program involved 28 tests at a nominal bed temperature of 850/sup 0/C (1560/sup 0/F) and fluidizing velocities of 1.2, 2.1 and 3 m/s (4,7 and 10 ft/sec) with and without fly ash recycle. Two different sizes of limestone were used for sulphur sorption. The industrial boiler trials involved two tests at 65% and 100% MCR (Maximum Continuous Rating). Pilot scaling results indicate that high combustion efficiencies are achievable. Sulphur capture of over 80% (meeting the SO/sub 2/ emission standard of 705 ng/J or 1.64 lbs/MBTU input) is possible with a Ca/S molar ratio <3 with fly ash recycle.

Desai, D.L.; Anthony, E.J.; Friedrich, F.D.; Razbin, V.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Investigations into coal coprocessing and coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of coal to liquid suitable as feedstock to a petroleum refinery is dependent upon several process variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, coal rank, catalyst type, nature of the feed to the reactor, type of process, etc. Western Research Institute (WRI) has initiated a research program in the area of coal liquefaction to address the impact of some of these variables upon the yield and quality of the coal-derived liquid. The principal goal of this research is to improve the efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. Two different approaches are currently being investigated. These include the coprocessing of a heavy liquid, such as crude oil, and coal using a dispersed catalyst and the direct liquefaction of coal using a supported catalyst. Another important consideration in coal liquefaction is the utilization of hydrogen, including both externally- and internally-supplied hydrogen. Because the incorporation of externally-supplied hydrogen during conversion of this very aromatic fossil fuel to, for example, transportation fuels is very expensive, improved utilization of internally-supplied hydrogen can lead to reducing processing costs. The objectives of this investigation, which is Task 3.3.4, Coal Coprocessing, of the 1991--1992 Annual Research Plan, are: (1) to evaluate coal/oil pretreatment conditions that are expected to improve the liquid yield through more efficient dispersion of an oil-soluble, iron-based catalyst, (2) to characterize the coke deposits on novel, supported catalysts after coal liquefaction experiments and to correlate the carbon skeletal structure parameters of the coke deposit with catalyst performance as measured by coal liquefaction product yield, and (3) to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction and coprocessing. Experimental results are discussed in this report.

Guffey, F.D.; Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Thomas, K.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Zhang, Tiejun; Haynes, H.W. Jr. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

OTGsim: Simulation of an Off-the-Grid Radar Network with High Sensing Energy Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OTGsim: Simulation of an Off-the-Grid Radar Network with High Sensing Energy Cost Brian C. Donovan|kurose@cs.umass.edu Abstract--Many sensor network studies assume that the energy cost for sensing is negligible compared sensors with a high energy cost such as radar. For a node utilizing radar as its primary sensor

Kurose, Jim

188

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Darlene Steward (Primary Contact), Billy Roberts, Karen Webster National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3837 Email: Darlene.Steward@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE FY 2012 Objectives Elucidate the location-dependent variability of * infrastructure costs for biomass- and coal-based central hydrogen production and delivery and the tradeoffs inherent in plant-location choices Provide modeling output and correlations for use in other * integrated analyses and tools

189

Synthesis of super plasticizer NF-30 from coal coking by product washing oil and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Super plasticizer was synthesized by using coal coking by product washing oil and industrial naphthalene....2 in exhaust (20%). Compared with NF, NF-30 have some advantages in lower cost, high water reducing rate...

Zifang Xu ???; Mingxu Zhang; Wenpei Hu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Coal Gasification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

191

Comparison of high-speed rail and maglev system costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares the two modes of transportation, and notes important similarities and differences in the technologies and in how they can be implemented to their best advantage. Problems with making fair comparisons of the costs and benefits are discussed and cost breakdowns based on data reported in the literature are presented and discussed in detail. Cost data from proposed and actual construction projects around the world are summarized and discussed. Results from the National Maglev Initiative and the recently-published Commercial Feasibility Study are included in the discussion. Finally, estimates will be given of the expected cost differences between HSR and maglev systems implemented under simple and complex terrain conditions. The extent to which the added benefits of maglev technology offset the added costs is examined.

Rote, D.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Quarterly report No. 10, December 21, 1991--March 20, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project we will study a novel process concept, i.e., the use of ceramic membrane reactors in upgrading of coal model compounds and coal derived liquids. In general terms, the USC research team is responsible for constructing and operating the membrane reactor apparatus and for testing various inorganic membranes for the upgrading of coal derived asphaltenes and coal model compounds. The USC effort will involve the principal investigator of this project and two graduate research assistants. The ALCOA team is responsible for the preparation of the inorganic membranes, for construction and testing of the ceramic membrane modules, and for measurement of their transport properties. The ALCOA research effort will involve Dr. Paul K. T. Liu, who is the project manager of the ALCOA research team, an engineer and a technician. UNOCAL`s contribution will be limited to overall technical assistance in catalyst preparation and the operation of the laboratory upgrading membrane reactor and for analytical back-up and expertise in oil analysis and materials characterization. UNOCAL is a no-cost contractor but will be involved in all aspects of the project, as deemed appropriate.

Tsotsis, T.T.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Incentives boost coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Higher energy prices are making technologies to gasify the USA's vast coal reserves attractive again. The article traces the development of coal gasification technology in the USA. IGCC and industrial gasification projects are now both eligible for a 20% investment tax credit and federal loan guarantees can cover up to 80% of construction costs. 4 photos.

Hess, G.

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

Exploratory Research on Novel Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the findings of work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22 -95PC95050, Task 3 - Flow Sheet Development. A novel direct coal liquefaction technology was investigated in a program being conducted by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates. The process concept explored consists of a first-stage coal dissolution step in which the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second stage, the products are catalytically upgraded to refinery feedstocks. Integrated first-stage and solids-separation steps were used to prepare feedstocks for second-stage catalytic upgrading. An engineering and economic evaluation was conducted concurrently with experimental work throughout the program. Parameters were established for a low-cost, low-severity first-stage reaction system. A hydride ion reagent system was used to effect high coal conversions of Black Thunder Mine Wyoming subbituminous coal. An integrated first-stage and filtration step was successfully demonstrated and used to produce product filtrates with extremely low solids contents. High filtration rates previously measured off-line in Task 2 studies were obtained in the integrated system. Resid conversions of first-stage products in the second stage were found to be consistently greater than for conventional two-stage liquefaction resids. In Task 5, elementally balanced material balance data were derived from experimental results and an integrated liquefaction system balance was completed. The economic analysis indicates that the production of refined product (gasoline) via this novel direct liquefaction technology is higher than the cost associated with conventional two-stage liquefaction technologies. However, several approaches to reduce costs for the conceptual commercial plant were recommended. These approaches will be investigated in the next task (Task 4) of the program.

Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of this project was to produce a feedstock from preparation plant fines from an Illinois (IL) coal that is ideal for a slurry fed, slagging, entrained-flow coal gasifier. The high-sulfur content and high-Btu value of IL coals are Particularly advantageous in such a gasifier; preliminary-calculations indicate that the increased cost of removing sulfur from the gas from a high-sulfur coal is more than offset b the increased revenue from the sale of the elemental sulfur; additionally the high-Btu IL coal concentrates more energy into the slurry of a given coal to water ratio. The Btu is--higher not only because of the hither Btu value of the coal but also because IL coal requires less water to produce a pumpable slurry than western coal, i.e., as little as 30--35% water may be used for IL coal as compared to approximately 45% for most western coals. During the contract extension, additional coal testing was completed confirming the fact that coal concentrates can be made from plant waste under a variety of flotation conditions 33 tests were conducted, yielding an average of 13326 Btu with 9.6% ash while recovering 86.0%-Of the energy value.

Ehrlinger, H.P. III [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Lytle, J.M.; Frost, R.R.; Lizzio, A.A.; Kohlenberger, L.B.; Brewer, K.K. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)]|[DESTEC Energy (United States)]|[Williams Technologies, Inc. (United States)]|[Illinois Coal Association (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

High-resolution 2D surface seismic reflection survey to detect abandoned old coal mine works to improve mine safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coal seismic studies in the Appalachia Coal Basin, the calculated average...seismic method in the U.K. coal mining industrya by Fairbairn et al...interpretation workstation for the coal industrya by Gochioco (Mining Engineering, 1991). a Modeling...

Lawrence M. Gochioco; Tim Miller; Fred Ruev; Jr.

197

Outside the rate-base umbrella: can IPPs play the coal game?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high cost of coal plants has generally limited their development to US utilities with large rate-base markets. Will rising natural gas prices spark coal plant development by non-rate-base energy providers? The article looks at this possibility. It reports opinions of many industry professionals. 1 photo.

Blankinship, S.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

Stephen Bergin

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Survey data. Each plant receiving CAPP or PRB coal in 2007 and 2010 were mapped and their data used to estimate costs for other cells by interpolating values based on inverse...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coal to Liquids Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the mid-1940s, natural gas and oil production had become more developed and cost-competitive with coal, and technology for production of synthetic transportation fuels was not considered economic after the Sec...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Coal to Liquids Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the mid-1940s, natural gas and oil production had become more developed and cost-competitive with coal, and technology for production of synthetic transportation fuels was not considered economic after the Sec...

Marianna Asaro; Ronald M. Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sorbents for High Temperature Removal of Arsenic from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gokhan O. Alptekin, PhD Robert Copeland, PhD Gokhan O. Alptekin, PhD Robert Copeland, PhD (Primary Contact) TDA Research, Inc TDA Research, Inc 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Email: copeland@tda.com Email: galptekin@tda.com Tel: (303) 940-2323 Tel: (303) 940-2349 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Margarita Dubovik Yevgenia Gershanovich TDA Research, Inc TDA Research, Inc 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Email: dubovik@tda.com Email: ygershan@tda.com Tel: (303) 940-2316 Tel: (303) 940-2346 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Sorbents for High Temperature Removal of Arsenic from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas

204

Refractory oxides for high?temperature coal?fired MHD air heaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a coal?burning MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) power plant the use of a regenerative air heater is one option for producing the required high plasma temperatures. However thermal mechanical and chemical stresses which the MHD environment places on materials are enormous and candidate materials must be carefully tested. We report on the results of such testing for a variety of materials studied in heater test facilities at both FluiDyne Engineering Corporation and at Montana State University. We describe the experimental program and test facilities for MHD heater development the rationale for the choice of materials and their performance (success or failure) under various envirnoments (slagging and nonslagging). Future materials needs are discussed in light of the observed effects.

Richard J. Pollina; Ronald R. Smyth

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Low-Cost High-Performance Scientific Visualization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors discuss the development of a low-cost stereoscopic visualization system using commonly available components. The system is used to improve understanding about the field-line structure and associated dynamics, confinement, and geometry of ...

Samuel T. Jones; Scott E. Parker; Charlson C. Kim

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Method for analyzing the potential feasibility of coal brokerage operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is one major prerequisite for unit train service. High volumes of coal are needed to make the operation both practical and economical. Many existing or potential coal users are too small to directly benefit from the cost savings and reliability of unit train service. If the demand for coal by a number of small users in a region could be aggregated so that the resulting volume was high enough to justify a unit train service, the users of the region could well be served through a single unit train receiving facility. Thus, coal users individually too small to receive unit train shipments could capture cost savings associated with a larger volume operation. It is the intent of this thesis to study the feasibility of such an operation, hereafter referred to as a coal brokerage. The specific purpose is to develop and present an analytical framework for evaluating the long-run economic feasibility of a coal brokerage for a region. The analysis views the brokerage operator, or broker, as a firm, and focuses on the relationships between its long-run cost function and market demand function for coal.

Wilkie, K.; Vezeris, S.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Large Field Erected and Packaged High Temperature Water (HTW) Generators for Coal Firing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and closer temperature control. The heat storage capacity of water per cubic foot is considerably greater than steam at equivalent saturation pressures, as shown in Table No. II (below). This inherent reserve or "fly wheel" effect permits closer... furnace and convection section. Coal ash fouling characteristics will have a bearing on the convection section tube spacing. Low grade coals should be reviewed for their slagging and fouling characteristics. For example, lignite and low grade coals...

Boushell, C. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hydrogen production by high-temperature steam gasification of biomass and coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature steam gasification of paper, yellow pine woodchips, and Pittsburgh bituminous coal was investigated in a batch-type flow reactor at temperatures in the range of 700 to 1,200{sup o}C at two different ratios of steam to feedstock molar ratios. Hydrogen yield of 54.7% for paper, 60.2% for woodchips, and 57.8% for coal was achieved on a dry basis, with a steam flow rate of 6.3 g/min at steam temperature of 1,200{sup o}C. Yield of both the hydrogen and carbon monoxide increased while carbon dioxide and methane decreased with the increase in gasification temperature. A 10-fold reduction in tar residue was obtained at high-temperature steam gasification, compared to low temperatures. Steam and gasification temperature affects the composition of the syngas produced. Higher steam-to-feedstock molar ratio had negligible effect on the amount of hydrogen produced in the syngas in the fixed-batch type of reactor. Gasification temperature can be used to control the amounts of hydrogen or methane produced from the gasification process. This also provides mean to control the ratio of hydrogen to CO in the syngas, which can then be processed to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel since the liquid fuel production requires an optimum ratio between hydrogen and CO. The syngas produced can be further processed to produce pure hydrogen. Biomass fuels are good source of renewable fuels to produce hydrogen or liquid fuels using controlled steam gasification.

Kriengsak, S.N.; Buczynski, R.; Gmurczyk, J.; Gupta, A.K. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Permeabilities of coal-biomass mixtures for high pressure gasifier feeds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Complete measurements of permeability on coal-biomass mixtures as a potential feedstock to gasifiers to reduce net carbon emissions were performed. Permeability is measured under anticipated… (more)

Belvalkar, Rohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

High ash non-coking coal preparation by tribo-electrostatic dry process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coal is the single largest fossil fuel used world-wide and accounts for more than 60% of the total commercial energy consumed. Between 60 to 80%… (more)

Ranjan Dwari

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effects of hydrogen donor additives on the coking properties of high-temperature coal extracts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Refcoal is a carbon precursor obtained by alkali-mediated extraction of coal with aprotic solvents such as DMF. Refcoal can be converted into a graphitic… (more)

Makgato, Matlou Hector

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Studies of the mechanism of Coal Hydrogenation by Electron Spin Resonance. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1-May 31, 1980. [For high-temperature, high pressure measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly report on the program Studies of Coal Hydrogenation by Electron Spin Resonance. This quarter has been devoted to constructing apparatus for high temperature-high pressure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, characterizing the performance of the microwave cavity, and carrying out preliminary room temperature studies on coals and coal products. At the start of this program, there were no microwave cavities available to study high pressure-high temperature reactions. A system was constructed which can be used to study coal hydrogenation, and satisfies the conditions described in the report. This cavity was constructed using funding from Rockwell International, and will be used on this program. Because of the dependence of the work to be done with this device for this program, the construction is described in detail. This report, therefore, considers the design philosophy, construction of the device, a preliminary discussion of its performance, and application of the cavity for room temperature studies on several varieties of coal.

Goldberg, Ira B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

(Fluidized bed combustion of high-ash Indian coals): Foreign trip report, January 5, 1988--March 16, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The foreign research assignment at BHEL, Trichy, was undertaken to participate in the ongoing USAID/BHEL joint program in fluidized bed combustion (FBC). As part of this program, an experimental FBC research test facility has been designed, erected and commissioned at BHEL, Trichy, to conduct experiments on the combustion of high-ash Indian coals and coal washery rejects. The data will be used to optimize the design and to select the operational parameters for large scale industrial and utility FBC boilers. ORNL has been providing technical assistance to BHEL since the initiation of the project in November 1983. The US team visited at 10 MW(e) FBC boiler fired with coal washery rejects at the Tata Iron and Steel Company (supplied by BHEL). The tour was very informative and gave the US team a good first-hand perspective of the Indian experience and concerns with FBC technology.

Krishnan, R.P.; Daw, C.S.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

coking coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

coking coal [A caking coal suitable for the production of coke for metallurgical use] ? Kokskohle f, verkokbare Kohle

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Wind versus coal: Comparing the local economic impacts of energy resource development in Appalachia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two energy development scenarios were compared for the Coal River Mountain in Raleigh County, West Virginia: (1) mountaintop mining (MTM) of coal, and (2) wind energy plus underground mining of coal. Economic impact computations over the life of each energy development scenario were made on a county basis for output of goods and services, the number of jobs created, and local earnings. Externality costs were assigned monetary values for coal mining and subtracted from earnings. Premature mortality within the general population due to additional coal mining accounted for 96% of these external cost computations. The results showed that economic output over the life of each scenario was twice as high for MTM mining as wind energy plus underground coal mining. Over the short term, employment and earnings were higher for MTM mining, but towards the end of the scenario, cumulative employment and earnings became higher under scenario (2). When local externality costs were subtracted from local earnings, MTM coal production had an overall negative net social impact on the citizens of Raleigh County. The external costs of MTM coal production provide an explanation of the existence of a “resource curse” and the conflicting results of output versus income provide insights into why coal-producing counties are underdeveloped.

Alan R. Collins; Evan Hansen; Michael Hendryx

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

High temperature ceramic membrane reactors for coal liquid upgrading. Final report, September 21, 1989--November 20, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Membrane reactors are today finding extensive applications for gas and vapor phase catalytic reactions (see discussion in the introduction and recent reviews by Armor [92], Hsieh [93] and Tsotsis et al. [941]). There have not been any published reports, however, of their use in high pressure and temperature liquid-phase applications. The idea to apply membrane reactor technology to coal liquid upgrading has resulted from a series of experimental investigations by our group of petroleum and coal asphaltene transport through model membranes. Coal liquids contain polycyclic aromatic compounds, which not only present potential difficulties in upgrading, storage and coprocessing, but are also bioactive. Direct coal liquefaction is perceived today as a two-stage process, which involves a first stage of thermal (or catalytic) dissolution of coal, followed by a second stage, in which the resulting products of the first stage are catalytically upgraded. Even in the presence of hydrogen, the oil products of the second stage are thought to equilibrate with the heavier (asphaltenic and preasphaltenic) components found in the feedstream. The possibility exists for this smaller molecular fraction to recondense with the unreacted heavy components and form even heavier undesirable components like char and coke. One way to diminish these regressive reactions is to selectively remove these smaller molecular weight fractions once they are formed and prior to recondensation. This can, at least in principle, be accomplished through the use of high temperature membrane reactors, using ceramic membranes which are permselective for the desired products of the coal liquid upgrading process. An additional incentive to do so is in order to eliminate the further hydrogenation and hydrocracking of liquid products to undesirable light gases.

Tsotsis, T.T. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Liu, P.K.T. [Aluminum Co. of America, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Webster, I.A. [Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Reducing Electricity Cost Through Virtual Machine Placement in High Performance Computing Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing Electricity Cost Through Virtual Machine Placement in High Performance Computing Clouds electricity-related costs as well as transient cooling effects. Our evaluation studies the ability) load migration enables sav- ings in many scenarios, and (3) all electricity-related costs must

219

STEO November 2012 - coal supplies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Despite drop in domestic coal production, U.S. coal exports to reach Despite drop in domestic coal production, U.S. coal exports to reach record high in 2012. While U.S. coal production is down 7 percent this year due in part to utilities switching to low-priced natural gas to generate electricity, American coal is still finding plenty of buyers in overseas markets. U.S. coal exports are expected to hit a record 125 million tons in 2012, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says in its new monthly short-term energy outlook. Coal exports are expected to decline in 2013, primarily because of continuing economic weakness in Europe, lower international coal prices, and higher coal production in Asia. However, U.S. coal exports next year are still expected to top 100 million tons for the third year in a row

220

Environmental control technology for coal cleaning wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical and mineralogical examination of coal wastes and their drainages has led us to consider three approaches to solution of the coal waste drainage problem. The first is alteration of the waste to render it non-polluting. Calcining of the waste has been shown to be an effective way of accomplishing this, but the cost of this technique is too high for it to be of any use. The second approach is codisposal of the coal waste with neutralizing and/or absorbing agents. The best way to implementing this approach is sequential slurry coating of the coal waste with lime and limestone, which is both effective and inexpensive. This is probably the best of the one-time treatments which we have evaluated when both effectiveness and cost are considered. Unfortunately this approach suffers from a lack of permanence and must be augmented with some other method of permanent diposal. The third approach to controlling coal waste effluent is to collect and treat the drainages. Perhaps the most effective way of doing this is by alkaline neutralization of the drainages. This is currently the most widely used technique for this purpose, because of its simplicity and availability. We have shown that it is effective provided that the iron is oxidized to the plus three oxidation state, and that the cost of this treatment is low. However, the need for continued treatment into the indefinite future must be considered a severe limitation.

Wagner, P.; Heaton, R.C.; Wangen, L.E.; Nyitray, A.M.; Jones, M.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scalable, Low-Cost, High Performance IPM Motor for Hybrid Vehicles 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

222

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. low rank coals contain relatively large amounts of moisture, with the moisture content of subbituminous coals typically ranging from 15 to 30 percent and that for lignites from 25 and 40 percent. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit, for it can result in fuel handling problems and it affects heat rate, stack emissions and maintenance costs. Theoretical analyses and coal test burns performed at a lignite fired power plant show that by reducing the fuel moisture, it is possible to improve boiler performance and unit heat rate, reduce emissions and reduce water consumption by the evaporative cooling tower. The economic viability of the approach and the actual impact of the drying system on water consumption, unit heat rate and stack emissions will depend critically on the design and operating conditions of the drying system. The present project evaluated the low temperature drying of high moisture coals using power plant waste heat to provide the energy required for drying. Coal drying studies were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized bed dryer to gather data and develop models on drying kinetics. In addition, analyses were carried out to determine the relative costs and performance impacts (in terms of heat rate, cooling tower water consumption and emissions) of drying along with the development of optimized drying system designs and recommended operating conditions.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Hugo Caram

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Use of high-temperature, high-torque rheometry to study the viscoelastic properties of coal during carbonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When coal is heated in the absence of oxygen it softens at approximately 400 degrees C, becomes viscoelastic, and volatiles are driven off. With further heating, the viscous mass reaches a minimum viscosity in the range of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} Pa s and then begins to resolidify. A high-torque, high-temperature, controlled-strain rheometer with parallel plates has been used to study the theology during this process. Under shear, the viscosity of the softening mass decreases with increasing shear rate. During resolidification, the viscosity increases as C-C bond formation and physical interactions gives rise to an aromatic network, but, under shear, the network breaks apart and flows. This is viewed as a yielding of the structure. The higher the shear rate, the earlier the yielding occurs, such that if the shear rate is low enough, the structure is able to build. Also, further into resolidification lower shear rates are able to break the structure. It is proposed that resolidification occurs through the formation of aromatic clusters that grow and become crosslinked by non-covalent interactions. As the clusters grow, the amount of liquid surrounding them decreases and it is thought that the non-covalent interactions between clusters and liquid could decrease and the ability of growing clusters to move past each other increases, which would explain the weakening of the structure under shear. This work is part of a program of work aimed at attaining a greater understanding of microstructural changes taking place during carbonization for different coals, in order to understand the mechanisms that give rise to good quality cokes and coke oven problems such as excessive wall pressure.

Diaz, M.C.; Duffy, J.J.; Snape, C.E.; Steel, K.M. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Coal Storage and Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal preparation, storage, and transportation are essential to coal use. Preparation plants, located near to the mine, remove some inorganic minerals associated with raw coal. Coal is transported from the mines to the point of consumption, often an electric generating plant, by rail, barge and trucks. Railroads are the predominant form of coal transportation within a country. Global coal trade, movement by large ocean-going vessels, continues to increase. At the end use site, the coal is crushed, ground, and the moisture content reduced to the proper specifications for end use. Coal is stored at various points in the supply chain. Processed coal will weather and oxidize, changing its properties; it can self-ignite, unless precautions are taken. Technology in use today is similar to that used in previous decades. Performance improvements have come from improved software and instruments that deliver real-time data. These improve management of sub-processes in the coal supply chain and reduce costs along the supply chain.

J.M. Ekmann; P.H. Le

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also be affected by higher coal prices. II "Current Factors$/year Change in Clean Coal Price, $/ton (FOB Plant) Cost ofcoal production capacities and coal prices. Coal Production

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

High opacity white plumes from coal-fired and oil-fired sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, with the installation of high efficiency particulate emission control devices on utility and industrial boilers, high-opacity white plumes have become more of a problem because formerly the emissions of primary particulate matter obscured and/or served as a condensing surface for the condensable material. The problem common to some of these installations is the violation of opacity standards due to the presence of a high-opacity persistent plume that emits from the stack. Oil fired boilers violating opacity standards typically comply with mass emission standards while coal fired boilers typically violate visual emission standards when simultaneously violating mass emission standards. The investigation reported here focuses on the atypical case when in-situ transmissometer measurements show compliance but plume opacity as measured by Reference Method 9 or LIDAR exceeds opacity standards. This case comes about due to gas phase reactions that produce fine aerosols, vapor phase condensation and physical agglomeration of sub-micron sized clusters and particles. The plume opacity control technology applicable to these aerosols which are created and/or grown in white plume is discussed in this paper.

Lee, K.T. (National Cheng Kung Univ. (TW))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Adsorption Behavior of CO2 in Coal and Coal Char  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coals of diverse characteristics have been chosen to provide a better understanding on the influence of various coal properties, such as maceral, volatile matter, and ash contents. ... In addition, char samples from two of these coals (a non-coking coal A and a coking coal B) were prepared by pyrolysis at 800 and 1000 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere and were tested for CO2 adsorption capacity. ... As stated earlier, virgin coal samples considered for the adsorption measurements include coals A, C, and D, which are of low-, high-, and medium-volatile sub-bituminous rank, respectively. ...

Shanmuganathan Ramasamy; Pavan Pramod Sripada; Md Moniruzzaman Khan; Su Tian; Japan Trivedi; Rajender Gupta

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Coal News and Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal News and Markets Coal News and Markets Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 24, 2013 "Coal News and Markets Report" summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. The report includes data on average weekly coal commodity spot prices, total monthly coal production, eastern monthly coal production, electric power sector coal stocks, and average cost of metallurgical coal at coke plants and export docks. The historical data for coal commodity spot market prices are proprietary and not available for public release. Average weekly coal commodity spot prices (dollars per short ton)

229

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 7, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) is leading a team of companies involved in this effort. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown in Figure 1.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Controlling Capital Costs in Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers Preprint Shanti Pless and Paul Torcellini To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55264 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

231

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a coal-fired, high-performance power system (HIPPS) was developed, and small-scale R and D was done in critical areas of the design. The current phase of the project includes development through the pilot plant stage and design of a prototype plant that would be built in Phase 3. The power-generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. It is a combined-cycle plant. This arrangement is referred to as the All Coal HIPPS because it does not require any other fuels for normal operation. A fluidized bed, air-blown pyrolyzer converts coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a high-temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which heats both air for a gas turbine and steam for a steam turbine. The fuel gas from the pyrolyzer goes to a topping combustor where it is used to raise the air entering the gas turbine to 1288 C. In addition to the HITAF, steam duty is achieved with a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) in the gas turbine exhaust stream and economizers in the HITAF flue gas exhaust stream. Progress during the quarter is described.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. Crossflow filtration is suitable for continuous flow operation and, when coupled with a sonic or ultrasonic field, may constitute a solution to operational problems of solids separation in coal liquefaction. However, for the efficient and trouble-free operation of crossflow filters the problems arising from dealing with highly viscous coal liquefaction resids need to be avoided. Either crossflow filters suitable for work at elevated temperatures at reduced resid viscosity should be used or the coal liquefaction process network should be modified to allow for dilution of resids using a distillate fraction, e.g., naphtha, diesel oil, etc., to reduce the viscosity of resids. As perhaps even a more practical alternative, field-assisted crossflow filtration of the reactor`s effluent stream prior to the distillation step should be considered. Such an approach will circumvent the more difficult separation of fine and ultrafine solids from highly viscous coal liquefaction resids.

Slomka, B.J. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phases 2 and 3. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1996. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: {gt} 47% efficiency (HHV); NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates {gt} 10% NSPS; coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all sold wastes benign; and cost of electricity 90% of present plant. Work reported herein is from Task 1.3 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design, Task 2,2 HITAF Air Heater, and Task 2.4 Duct Heater Design. The impact on cycle efficiency from the integration of various technology advances is presented. The criteria associated with a commercial HIPPS plant design as well as possible environmental control options are presented. The design of the HITAF air heaters, both radiative and convective, is the most critical task in the program. In this report, a summary of the effort associated with the radiative air heater designs that have been considered is provided. The primary testing of the air heater design will be carried out in the UND/EERC pilot-scale furnace; progress to date on the design and construction of the furnace is a major part of this report. The results of laboratory and bench scale activities associated with defining slag properties are presented. Correct material selection is critical for the success of the concept; the materials, both ceramic and metallic, being considered for radiant air heater are presented. The activities associated with the duct heater are also presented.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development of High-Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pressure Dry Feed Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems Background Even though coal-based power generation via Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is more efficient, cleaner, and uses less water than conventional pulverized coal burning systems, widespread IGCC deployment has not occurred because of its relatively high cost. The Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) high-pressure dry feed pump addresses IGCC cost disparity by enabling lower cost and more reliable coal feed

235

Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Status of Coal Gasification: 1977  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-pressure technology is important to coal gasification for several reasons. When the end product ... of high pressures in all types of coal gasification reduces the pressure drop throughout the equipment,...

F. C. Schora; W. G. Bair

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Discharge produces hydrocarbons from coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discharge produces hydrocarbons from coal ... Studies of the reactions of coal in electric discharges by two chemists at the U.S. Bureau of Mines' Pittsburgh Coal Research Center may lead to improved ways of producing acetylene and other useful chemicals from coal. ... Other workers have produced high yields of acetylene from coal by extremely rapid pyrolysis using energy sources such as plasma jets, laser beams, arc-image reactors, and flash heaters. ...

1968-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

High pressure water pyrolysis of coal to evaluate the role of pressure on hydrocarbon generation and source rock maturation at high maturities under geological conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the effect of water pressure on hydrocarbon generation and source rock maturation at high maturities for a perhydrous Tertiary Arctic coal, Svalbard. Using a 25 ml Hastalloy vessel, the coal was pyrolysed under low water pressure (230–300 bar) and high water pressure (500, 700 and 900 bar) conditions between 380 °C and 420 °C for 24 h. At 380 °C and 420 °C, gas yields were not affected by pressure up to 700 bar, but were reduced slightly at 900 bar. At 380 °C, the expelled oil yield was highest at 230 bar, but reduced significantly at 900 bar. At 420 °C cracking of expelled oil to gas was retarded at 700 and 900 bar. As well as direct cracking of the coal, the main source of gas generation at high pressure at both 380 °C and 420 °C is from bitumen trapped in the coal, indicating that this is a key mechanism in high pressure geological basins. Vitrinite reflectance (VR) was reduced by 0.16 %Ro at 380 °C and by 0.27 %Ro at 420 °C at 900 bar compared to the low pressure runs, indicating that source rock maturation will be more retarded at higher maturities in high pressure geological basins.

Clement N. Uguna; Andrew D. Carr; Colin E. Snape; Will Meredith

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Paying the Piper: The High Cost of Funerals in South Africa1 Princeton University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Paying the Piper: The High Cost of Funerals in South Africa1 Anne Case Princeton University Anu University of Chicago Analia Olgiati Harvard University Running Title: High Cost of Funerals in South Africa-aged adults. In one site in South Africa that has been under demographic surveillance since the early 1990s

Rowley, Clarence W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coal: the new black  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long eclipsed by oil and natural gas as a raw material for high-volume chemicals, coal is making a comeback, with oil priced at more than $100 per barrel. It is relatively cheap feedstock for chemicals such as methanol and China is building plants to convert coal to polyolefins on a large scale and interest is spreading worldwide. Over the years several companies in the US and China have made fertilizers via the gasification of coal. Eastman in Tennessee gasifies coal to make methanol which is then converted to acetic acid, acetic anhydride and acetate fiber. The future vision is to convert methanol to olefins. UOP and Lurgi are the major vendors of this technology. These companies are the respective chemical engineering arms of Honeywell and Air Liquide. The article reports developments in China, USA and India on coal-to-chemicals via coal gasification or coal liquefaction. 2 figs., 2 photo.

Tullo, A.H.; Tremblay, J.-F.

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

EIA - Future role of the United States in world coal trade  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Future role of the United States in world coal trade Future role of the United States in world coal trade International Energy Outlook 2010 Future role of the United States in world coal trade U.S. coal exports increased each year from 2002 to 2008 at an average annual rate of 12.8 percent, to 82 million tons in 2008. Some analysts have viewed the sharp increase in U.S. exports as an indication of the growing importance of the United States as a world coal supplier. There has also been speculation that China's growing demand for coal will support this trend in the future. However, U.S. coal is a relatively high-cost supply source when shipped to Asian markets, and in the long term U.S. coal will be competing in the Chinese market with lower cost suppliers, notably Australia and Indonesia among others. U.S. exports compete most strongly in European markets and then only when less expensive options are unavailable. In IEO2010, the United States remains a marginal coal supplier over the long term, responding to short-term disruptions or spikes in demand rather than significantly expanding its market share of world coal trade.

243

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at http://web.mit.edu/coal/ NETL, 2007a. “The Cost andbaseline_studies.html NETL, 2007b. “Increasing Security andRole for Coal with Biomass. DOE/NETL- 1298, National Energy

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For the high capacity, we have developed CuSnFe electro-deposition process and obtained nano-structure alloy for high loading NMC CuSnFe cell testing. 4 5132013 - 2013 DOE AMR...

245

Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

For the high capacity, we have developed CuSnFe electro-deposition process and obtained nano-structure alloy for high loading NMC CuSnFe cell testing. Technical Summary 6...

246

Mortality in Appalachian coal mining regions: the value of statistical life lost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined elevated mortality rates in Appalachian coal mining areas for 1979-2005, and estimated the corresponding value of statistical life (VSL) lost relative to the economic benefits of the coal mining industry. We compared age-adjusted mortality rates and socioeconomic conditions across four county groups: Appalachia with high levels of coal mining, Appalachia with lower mining levels, Appalachia without coal mining, and other counties in the nation. We converted mortality estimates to VSL estimates and compared the results with the economic contribution of coal mining. We also conducted a discount analysis to estimate current benefits relative to future mortality costs. The heaviest coal mining areas of Appalachia had the poorest socioeconomic conditions. Before adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual age-adjusted deaths in coal mining areas ranged from 3,975 to 10,923, depending on years studied and comparison group. Corresponding VSL estimates ranged from $18.563 billion to $84.544 billion, with a point estimate of $50.010 billion, greater than the $8.088 billion economic contribution of coal mining. After adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual deaths in mining areas ranged from 1,736 to 2,889, and VSL costs continued to exceed the benefits of mining. Discounting VSL costs into the future resulted in excess costs relative to benefits in seven of eight conditions, with a point estimate of $41.846 billion.

Hendryx, M.; Ahern, M.M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic evaluation and commercial application. During the project performance period, Alstom performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and large pilot scale combustion testing in its Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut in support of these objectives. The NOx reduction approach was to optimize near-field combustion to ensure that minimum NOx emissions are achieved with minimal impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down. Several iterations of CFD and combustion testing on a Midwest coal led to an optimized design, which was extensively combustion tested on a range of coals. The data from these tests were then used to validate system costs and benefits versus SCR. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive subbituminous coal to a moderately reactive Western bituminous coal to a much less reactive Midwest bituminous coal. Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis. Bench-scale characterization of the three test coals showed that both NOx emissions and combustion performance are a strong function of coal properties. The more reactive coals evolved more of their fuel bound nitrogen in the substoichiometric main burner zone than less reactive coal, resulting in the potential for lower NOx emissions. From a combustion point of view, the more reactive coals also showed lower carbon in ash and CO values than the less reactive coal at any given main burner zone stoichiometry. According to bench-scale results, the subbituminous coal was found to be the most amenable to both low NOx, and acceptably low combustibles in the flue gas, in an air staged low NOx system. The Midwest bituminous coal, by contrast, was predicted to be the most challenging of the three coals, with the Western bituminous coal predicted to beh

David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

250

Low Cost, High Efficiency Reversible Fuel Cell Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subsystem PV Array H2 Storage High Voltage DC Bus DC AC Power Natural Gas High Pressure H2 Water Oxygen Air--10001000 Slide 7 Approach - Cell Configuration Seal Alloy Separator Cathode Distribution Layer Electrolyte Anode Distribution layer Seal · Radial Flow · Diffusional · Small Diameter #12;May 19 , 2003 Technology Management

251

NETL: Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

use of our domestic energy resources and infrastructure. Gasification Systems | Advanced Combustion | Coal & Coal-Biomass to Liquids | Solid Oxide Fuel Cells | Turbines CO2...

252

Composition and properties of coals from the Yurty coal occurrence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coals from the Yurty coal occurrence were studied. It was found that the samples were brown non-coking coals with low sulfur contents (to 1%) and high yields of volatile substances. The high heat value of coals was 20.6-27.7 MJ/kg. The humic acid content varied from 5.45 to 77.62%. The mineral matter mainly consisted of kaolinite, a-quartz, and microcline. The concentration of toxic elements did not reach hazardous values.

N.G. Vyazova; L.N. Belonogova; V.P. Latyshev; E.A. Pisar'kova [Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk (Russia). Research Institute of Oil and Coal Chemistry and Synthesis

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

Fitzgerald, J.E.; Robinson, R.L.; Gasem, K.A.M. [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Chemical Engineering

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Low cost routes to high purity silicon and derivatives thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for providing an agricultural waste product having amorphous silica, carbon, and impurities; extracting from the agricultural waste product an amount of the impurities; changing the ratio of carbon to silica; and reducing the silica to a high purity silicon (e.g., to photovoltaic silicon).

Laine, Richard M; Krug, David James; Marchal, Julien Claudius; Mccolm, Andrew Stewart

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

256

Contributing to Lowest Life Cycle Cost of High Speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to enable constant production quality and high work safety Special developed machineries : Rail laying on rubber tyres #12;13 Repetitive construction interval of 2160 m in a 20 day cycle (single access tunnel) Production capacity 220 m linear slab track in15h Exceptional Track Quality Achieved ongoing Performance #12

Greenaway, Alan

257

A novel concept for high conversion of coal to liquids. Final report, 1 September 1988--31 August 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A batch microreactor was designed and fabricated as a means of investigating maximum yields of liquids obtainable in very short reaction times of the order of a few seconds, and the maximum ratios of liquids/hydrocarbon (HC) gases obtainable under those conditions. A Wyodak sub-bituminous coal, crushed and sieved to {minus}200 mesh particle size, was used in the experiments, with a temperature of 500{degrees}C and a pressure of 1500 psi. The fine coal particles were fed dry to the reactor and heated to reaction temperature in times of one to two seconds. At a time of 3 seconds at reaction temperature, in a single pass a liquid yield of 60% by weight of the coal was obtained, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/(HC) gases of 30/1. When the unreacted solids were recycled to the reactor, and the results combined with those of the first pass, a liquid yield of 82% by weight of the coal was achieved, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/HC gases of 30/1. This ratio represents only about 3 wt percent HC gases, much lower that is produced in current advanced technologies, and represents a large saving in hydrogen consumption. A simulated distillation technique was applied to the liquids. The liquid product contained 86% by weight (of the liquids) total distillables (boiling point below 538{degrees}C), including 70% by weight of low-boiling fractions in the gasoline, kerosene and gas oil range (boiling point up to 325{degrees}C). The liquid product exhibited a H/C ratio of 1.5, which is considerably higher than observed in current advanced technologies for the primary liquids. Several catalysts were investigated. Iron catalysts, specifically ferric chloride hexahydrate and ferric sulfate pentahydrate, each produced these high conversions and high ratios of liquids/HC gases.

Wiser, W.H.; Shabtai, J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Laboratory Study on Gasification Reactivity of Coals and Petcokes in CO2/Steam at High Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A diffusion term associated with the carbon structure may be needed for modelling the gasification behaviors of the petcoke-like materials. ... Gasification technology is used to convert feedstocks, not only coal but also petcoke and other carbonaceous materials, to fuel gas or syngas,(1, 2) which can be used to generate electricity and heat or to synthesize liquid fuel and chemicals. ... It is certain that petcoke, derived from oil refinery coke units or other cracking processes, has a much lower gasification reactivity than coal chars, especially at low temperatures. ...

Liwei Ren; Jianli Yang; Feng Gao; Jinding Yan

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.gif (4423 bytes) coal.gif (4423 bytes) The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation: Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-MO60. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

260

Cost-effectiveness of freeway median high occupancy vehicle (HOV) facility conversion to rail guideway transit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many freeways in the United States contain median high occupancy vehicle (HOV) facilities. These facilities have been envisioned by some as reserved space for future rail guideway transit. This thesis examines the cost-effectiveness of converting a...

Best, Matthew Evans

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and High Voltage Spinel Cathode | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Cathode Low Cost SiOx-Graphite and High Voltage Spinel Cathode 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

262

Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1991--September 19, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main goals for competitive coal liquefaction is to decrease gas yields to reduce hydrogen consumption. Complexing this element as methane and ethane decreases process efficiently and is less cost effective. To decrease the gas yield and increase the liquid yield, an effective preconversion process has been explored on the basis of the physically associated molecular nature of coal. Activities have been focused on two issues: (1) maximizing the dissolution of associated coal and (2) defining the different reactivity associated with a wide molecular weight distribution. Two-step soaking at 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C in a recycle oil was found to be very effective for coal solubilization. No additional chemicals, catalysts, and hydrogen are required for this preconversion process. High-volatile bituminous coals tested before liquefaction showed 80--90% conversion with 50--55% oil yields. New preconversion steps suggested are as follows: (1) dissolution of coal with two-step high-temperature soaking, (2) separation into oil and heavy fractions of dissolved coal with vacuum distillation, and (3) selective liquefaction of the separated heavy fractions under relatively mild conditions. Laboratory scale tests of the proposed procedure mode using a small autoclave showed a 30% increase in the oil yield with a 15--20% decrease in the gas yield. This batch operation projects a substantial reduction in the ultimate cost of coal liquefaction.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

NETL: Coal and Power Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Technologies Coal and Power Systems Advancing our Nation's Portfolio of Coal RD&D Technologies - Rotating Images Advancing our Nation's Portfolio of Coal RD&D Technologies - Read More! Focus of NETL RD&D RD&D efforts in coal and power systems fall into three categories: Technologies that enable existing coal power plants to cost-effectively meet environmental requirements. NETL and its research partners are developing environmental control technologies for retrofitting existing power plants, with application to new plants as well. Key areas of research include cost-effective control of mercury, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and fine particulate emissions; beneficial uses for coal utilization byproducts; and innovations to minimize the impact of

264

COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last quarter, new procedures were developed and implemented to improve reliability and repeatability of release characteristics from the temporary substrate (i.e., silicon wafer) and to minimize through-thickness defects in a 6-inch diameter film, 3 microns in thickness. With the new procedures, we have been able to consistently produce essentially stress free films, with zero or minimal defects (less than 5) across a 6-inch diameter area. (It is important to note that for those films containing pinholes, a procedure has been developed to repair the pinholes to form a gas tight seal). The films are all within the identified tolerance range for composition (i.e., 60 {+-} 0.2 % Pd). A number of these films have subsequently been shipped to IdaTech for evaluation and integration into their test module. Colorado School of Mines continued their high temperature evaluation of 6 micron thick, sputtered Pd-Cu films. Pure hydrogen permeability increased up to 400 C while the membrane was in the {beta}-phase and dropped once the temperature increased to over 450 C. Above this temperature, as confirmed by the binary phase diagram, the film transforms into either a mixed {alpha}/{beta} or pure {alpha} phase. The same trend was observed for a baseline 25 micron-thick foil (from Wilkinson) where the pure hydrogen permeability increased with temperature while the membrane was in the {beta}-phase and then decreased upon transformation to the {alpha} phase.

B. Lanning; J. Arps

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cost-Effective Method for Producing Self Supported Palladium Alloy Membranes for Use in Efficient Production of Coal Derived Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} (SwRI{reg_sign}) has utilized its expertise in large-area vacuum deposition methods to conduct research into the fabrication of dense, freestanding Pd-alloy membranes that are 3-5 microns thick and over 100 in{sup 2} in area. The membranes were deposited onto flexible and rigid supports that were subsequently removed and separated using novel techniques developed over the course of the project. Using these methods, the production of novel alloy compositions centered around the Pd-Cu system were developed with the objective of producing a thermally stable, nano-crystalline grain structure with the highest flux recorded as 242 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a 2 {micro}m thick Pd{sub 53}Cu{sub 47} at 400 C and 20 psig feed pressure which when extrapolated is over twice the 2010 Department of Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target. Several membranes were made with the same permeability, but with different thicknesses and these membranes were highly selective. Researchers at the Colorado School of Mines supported the effort with extensive testing of experimental membranes as well as design and modeling of novel alloy composite structures. IdaTech provided commercial bench testing and analysis of SwRI-manufactured membranes. The completed deliverables for the project include test data on the performance of experimental membranes fabricated by vacuum deposition and several Pd-alloy membranes that were supplied to IdaTech for testing.

K. Coulter

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fundamental understanding and development of low-cost, high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are (1) to develop rapid and low-cost processes for manufacturing that can improve yield, throughput, and performance of silicon photovoltaic devices, (2) to design and fabricate high-efficiency solar cells on promising low-cost materials, and (3) to improve the fundamental understanding of advanced photovoltaic devices. Several rapid and potentially low-cost technologies are described in this report that were developed and applied toward the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

ROHATGI,A.; NARASIMHA,S.; MOSCHER,J.; EBONG,A.; KAMRA,S.; KRYGOWSKI,T.; DOSHI,P.; RISTOW,A.; YELUNDUR,V.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

High-Temperature Air/Steam-Blown Gasification of Coal in a Pressurized Spout-Fluid Bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

7-10 However, in the MEET system a pebble bed slagging entrained-flow gasifier was used that had to be operated at very high temperatures (1350?1550 °C), which required excessive energy input to maintain such a high gasification temperature when compared with fluidized bed gasifiers, such as spout-fluid bed gasifiers which used medium temperatures (800?1100 °C) to convert coal to fuel gas. ... The typical size distribution is shown in Table 2, where is specific surface-equivalent diameter. ...

Rui Xiao; Mingyao Zhang; Baosheng Jin; Yaji Huang; Hongcang Zhou

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Coal Ranks and Geothermal Gradients in High-volatile Bituminous Coalfields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 380; Sw. No., 6. If it is assumed that no great changes in geothermal gradient have occurred since the early Pleistocene, this coal was metamorphosed at a temperature ... Silesia5. The most obvious explanation is that of a nearly two to one difference in geothermal gradient. Comparison of data from the Carboniferous coalfields of the Netherlands with analyses of ...

R. P. SUGGATE; J. O. ELPHICK

1964-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

269

Recovery and utilization of waste liquids in ultra-clean coal preparation by chemical leaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal with ash lower than 1%, being called an ultra-clean coal, has many potential applications, such as a substitute for diesel fuel, production of carbon electrodes, superior activated carbon and other chemical materials. It is difficult to reduce coal ash to such a level by conventional coal preparation technology. By means of chemical leaching with the proper concentration of alkali and acid solutions, any coal can be deeply deashed to 1% ash level. However, the cost of chemical methods is higher than that of physical ones, additionally, the waste liquids would give rise to environmental pollution if used on a large scale. If the waste liquids from chemical preparation of ultra-clean coal can be recovered and utilized, so as to produce salable by-products, the cost of chemical leaching will be reduced. This processing will also solve the pollution problem of these waste liquids. This paper describes recovery and utilization methods for these liquids used in chemical leaching, including the recoveries of alkali, silica, sodium-salt and aluminium-salt. A preliminary estimate was made regarding its economic benefits. It shows that this research solves the two problems in the chemical preparation of ultra-clean coal. One is the high-cost and the other is environmental pollution. This research demonstrates good potential for the production of ultra-clean coal on an industrial scale.

Xu Zesheng; Shi Zhimin; Yang Qiaowen; Wang Xinguo [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). Beijing Graduate School

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development of High Efficacy, Low Cost Phosphorescent Oled Lightning Luminaire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this two year program, UDC together with Armstrong World Industries, Professor Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan) and Professor Mark Thompson (University of Southern California) planned to develop and deliver high efficiency OLED lighting luminaires as part of an integrated ceiling illumination system that exceed the Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 performance projections. Specifically the UDC team in 2010 delivered two prototype OLED ceiling illumination systems, each consisting of four individual OLED lighting panels on glass integrated into Armstrong's novel TechZone open architecture ceiling systems, at an overall system efficacy of 51 lm/W, a CRI = 85 and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 10,000 hours. This accomplishment represents a 50% increase in luminaire efficacy and a factor of two in lifetime over that outlined in the solicitation. In addition, the team has also delivered one 15cm x 15cm lighting panel fabricated on a flexible metal foil substrate, demonstrating the possibility using OLEDs in a range of form factors. During this program, our Team has pursued the commercialization of these OLED based ceiling luminaires, with a goal to launch commercial products within the next three years. We have proven that our team is ideally suited to develop these highly novel and efficient solid state lighting luminaires, having both the technical experience and commercial strategy to leverage work performed under this contract. Our calculations show that the success of our program could lead to energy savings of more than 0.5 quads or 8 MMTC (million metric tons of carbon) per year by 2016.

Michael Hack

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3]. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 6, October--December, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 2, October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 3, January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO{sub x}. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure. 28 figs.

Rohatgi, A.; Doshi, P.; Tate, J.K.; Mejia, J.; Chen, Z.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Coal Gasifiers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Coal Gasifiers Description Accurate temperature measurement inside a coal gasifier is essential for safe, efficient, and cost-effective operation. However, current sensors are prone to inaccurate readings and premature failure due to harsh operating conditions like high temperature (1,200-1,600 °C), high pressure (up to 500 pounds per square inch gauge [psig]),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

282

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 1, Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrated coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. Heterofunctional solvents were the most effective in swelling coals. Also solvent blends such as isopropanol/water were more effective than pure solvents alone. Impregnating slurry catalysts simultaneously during coal swelling showed that better uptake was achieved with nonswelling solvent and higher impregnation temperature. Some enhancement in initial coal conversion was seen liquefying SO{sub 2}-treated Black Thunder coal with slurry catalysts, and also when hydrogen donor liquefaction solvents were used. Noncatalytic reactions showed no benefit from SO{sub 2} treatment. Coupling coal swelling and SO{sub 2} treatment with slurry catalysts was also not beneficial, although high conversion was seen with continuous operation and long residence time, however, similar high conversion was observed with untreated coal. SO{sub 2} treatment is not economically attractive unless it provides about 17% increase in coal reactivity. In most cases, the best results were obtained when the coal was untreated and the slurry catalyst was added directly into the reactor. Foster Wheeler`s ASCOT process had better average liquid yields than either Wilsonville`s vacuum tower/ROSE combination or delayed coking process. This liquid product also had good quality.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Programmer's guide to the Argonne Coal Market Model. [USA; mathematical models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Argonne Coal Market Model was developed as part of a comprehensive DOE study of coal-related environmental, health, and safety impacts. The model includes a high degree of regional detail on both supply and demand. Coal demand is input separately for industrial and utility users in each region, and coal supply in each region is characterized by a linearly increasing function relating increments of new mine capacity to the marginal cost of extraction. Rail transportation costs and control technology costs are estimated for each supply-demand link. A quadratic programming algorithm is used to optimize flow patterns for the system. This report documents the model for programmers and users interested in technical details of the computer code.

Guziel, K.A.; Krohm, G.C.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Macal, C.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Commercialization of clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steps to commercialization are reviewed in respect of their relative costs, the roles of the government and business sectors, and the need for scientific, technological, and economic viability. The status of commercialization of selected clean coal technologies is discussed. Case studies related to a clean coal technology are reviewed and conclusions are drawn on the factors that determine commercialization.

Bharucha, N. [Dept. of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra (Australia)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Problems of Expanding Coal Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metallurgical or coking coal marketed widely here and abroad. Appalachian coal generally has a high...are characteristic of Appalachia, al-though there has also been extensive strip mining including destructive...Mid-western bituminous coal has a large market as...

John Walsh

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals. Interim final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of this project is to produce a feedstock from preparation plant fines from an Illinois coal that is ideal for a slurry fed, slagging, entrained-flow coal gasifier. The high sulfur content and high Btu value of Illinois coals are particularly advantageous in such a gasifier; preliminary calculations indicate that the increased cost of removing sulfur from the gas from a high sulfur coal is more than offset by the increased revenue from the sale of the elemental sulfur; additionally the high Btu Illinois coal concentrates more energy into the slurry of a given coal to water ratio. The Btu is higher not only because of the higher Btu value of the coal but also because Illinois coal requires less water to produce a pumpable slurry than western coal, i.e., as little as 30--35% water may be used for Illinois coal as compared to approximately 45% for most western coals. Destec Energy, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dow Chemical Company, will provide guidelines and test compatibility of the slurries developed for gasification feedstock. Williams Technologies, Inc., will provide their expertise in long distance slurry pumping, and test selected products for viscosity, pumpability, and handleability. The Illinois State Geological Survey will study methods for producing clean coal/water slurries from preparation plant wastes including the concentration of pyritic sulfur into the coal slurry to increase the revenue from elemental sulfur produced during gasification operations, and decrease the pyritic sulfur content of the waste streams. ISGS will also test the gasification reactivity of the coals.

Ehrlinger, H.P. III; Lytle, J.; Frost, R.R.; Lizzio, A.; Kohlenberger, L.; Brewer, K. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual coal preparation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal pro- vided about half of all annual electricity production for the US throughout its history... Historical Costs of Coal-Fired Electricity and Implications for the Future...

288

A centurial history of technological change and learning curves or pulverized coal-fired utility boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Japan, where higher coal prices justi?ed the higher costof the total O&M cost and the coal price remained relatively

Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

Dr. Chenn Zhou

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Determination of the effects caused by different polymers on coal fluidity during carbonization using high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of blending polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET), a flexible polyurethane (FPU), and a car shredded fluff waste (CSF) on fluidity development of a bituminous coal during carbonization have been studied by means of high-torque, small-amplitude controlled-strain rheometry and in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The most detrimental effects were caused by PET and PS, which completely destroyed the fluidity of the coal. The CSF had a deleterious effect on coal fluidity similar to that of PET, although the deleterious effect on the viscoelastic properties of the coal were less pronounced than those of PET and PS. On the contrary, the addition of 10 wt % PE caused a slight reduction in the concentration of fluid hydrogen and an increase in the minimum complex viscosity, and the addition of 10 wt % FPU reduced the concentration of fluid hydrogen without changing the viscoelastic properties of the coal. Although these results suggest that these two plastics could potentially be used as additives in coking blends without compromising coke porosity, it was found that the semicoke strengths were reduced by adding 2 wt % FPU and 5 wt % PE. Therefore, it is unlikely that more than 2 wt % of a plastic waste could be added to a coal blend without deterioration in coke quality. 35 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Miguel Castro Diaz; Lucky Edecki; Karen M. Steel; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Coal Utilization Science Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

292

Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the projects funded did not meet their original goals, the overall objectives of the CPCPC were completed as many new applications for coal-derived feedstocks have been researched. Future research in many of these areas is necessary before implementation into industry.

Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Planning the future of Botswana's coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Botswana has vast proven deposits of steam coal, which, for a long time, the government has wanted to develop but without much success. The main objectives of this study are: to forecast possible coal exports from Botswana and the land routes for these exports; to determine the competitiveness of Botswana's coal in world steam coal trade; to make recommendations on the appropriate policy for the exploitation of this coal. To accomplish these objectives, we construct a model of the global steam coal trade and apply this model to forecast the likely optimal size of mine, timing of capacity, and choice of export port for the years 2005 and 2010 from a 2000 base forecast year. The results of our regional analysis suggest that Botswana's coal exports are competitive in Asia and Western Europe. These results are shown to be least sensitive to changes in rail transportation costs and marginal supply costs but more sensitive to changes in capital costs for mine development.

Khaulani Fichani; Walter C. Labys

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The production of high surface carbons from coal using pre-swelling in solvents to disperse coking catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbons have been produced from Amaga coal using ZnCl2 as a catalyst to increase carbon yields during pyrolysis. It was found that the surface area and micropore volume could be increased by swelling the coal ...

F MONDRAGON; G QUINTERO; A JARAMILLO; J FERNANDEZ…

295

Metallic Membrane Materials Development for Hydrogen Production from Coal Derived Syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of Office of Clean Coal are: (1) Improved energy security; (2) Reduced green house gas emissions; (3) High tech job creation; and (4) Reduced energy costs. The goals of the Hydrogen from Coal Program are: (1) Prove the feasibility of a 40% efficient, near zero emissions IGCC plant that uses membrane separation technology and other advanced technologies to reduce the cost of electricity by at least 35%; and (2) Develop H{sub 2} production and processing technologies that will contribute {approx}3% in improved efficiency and 12% reduction in cost of electricity.

O.N. Dogan; B.H. Howard; D.E. Alman

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

297

Coal pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Combustion of high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes in a rotary kiln combustor with an advanced internal air distributor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluid bed combustors have received extensive testing with both high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes. Rotary kilns are effective and popular devices for waste combustion. The Angelo Rotary Furnace{trademark} has been developed to improve the operation of rotary pyrolyzer/combustor systems through enhanced air distribution, which in this process is defined as staged, swirled combustion air injection. Fourteen of these new furnaces have been installed worldwide. Two units in Thailand, designed for rice hull feed with occasional lignite feed, have been recently started up. An older unit in Pennsylvania is being upgraded with a new, more advanced air distribution system for a series of tests this fall in which inexpensive high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes will be fired with limestone. The purposes of these tests are to determine the burning characteristics of these two fuels in this system, to discover the Ca/S ratios necessary for operation of a rotary kiln combusting these fuels, and to observe the gas-borne emissions from the furnace. An extensive preliminary design study will be performed on a commercial installation for combustion of anthracite wastes. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Cobb, J.T. Jr. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA)); Ahn, Y.K. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (USA)); Angelo, J.F. (Universal Energy International, Inc., Little Rock, AR (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

Lebrun, Philippe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

3 - High temperature materials issues in the design and operation of coal-fired steam turbines and plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The basic design of steam plant is outlined, and it is emphasised how the increase in steam temperatures has required high steam pressures. High efficiency requires the use of feedheating, and reheating operation at high pressure and temperature has implications for superheaters. Critical issues are creep strength, resistance to fireside attack and oxide spallation from steam side surfaces. Coal-fired plant is increasingly required to operate in a two shift manner and to compensate for the effects of the intermittency of wind energy; the implications are summarised. Operation at steam temperatures in excess of 600 °C will require the use of even stronger austenitics. In 700 °C plants, precipitation-hardened nickel-based alloys will be required for superheaters.

F. Starr

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes.

Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Coal-oil slurry preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Insulation for High Performance Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into advanced insulation for high performance wall, roof, and foundation systems. Heat flows from hotter to colder spaces, and insulation is designed to resist this flow by keeping hot air out in the summer and in during the winter. Project Description This project seeks to develop high performing, durable, hydrofluorocarbon and hydrochlorofluorocarbons -free insulation with an R-value greater than 7.5-per-inch and a Class A fire performance. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between DOE and Dow Chemical.

304

Optimization of regimes for the feed of highly concentrated culm-anthracite coal dust for burning in a TPP-210A boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented for regime adjustment of feed systems for a TPP-210A boiler for the burning of highly concentrated culm-anthracite coal dust. As compared with nonoptimal regimes, optimal regimes of high-concentration-feed systems improve the economy of the boiler by 1.7% on average.

L.V. Golyshev; G.A. Dovgoteles [JSC 'L'vovORGRES', L'vov (Ukraine)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IISolvent Refining for Clean Coal Combustion,1I Walk, R. ,of Equipment (Percent of Clean Coal Produced) Year Type Jigs$1.50-$2.00 per ton of clean coal. In comparison, the cost

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Materials and Modules for Low Cost, High Performance Fuel Cell Humidifiers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kick-off Meeting, Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Materials and Modules for Low Cost, High Performance Fuel Cell Humidifiers Prime Contractor: W. L. Gore & Associates Elkton, MD Principal Investigator: William B. Johnson Sub-Contractor: dPoint Technologies Vancouver, BC W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. DOE Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Ahluwalia, et. al, ibid. Mirza, Z. DOE Hydrogen Program Review, June 9-13, 2008; Washington, DC Background W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. DOE Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Objective and Technical Barriers Addressed More efficient, low-cost humidifiers can increase fuel cell inlet humidity: Reduce system cost and size of balance of plant; Improve fuel cell performance; Improve fuel cell durability. OBJECTIVE: Demonstrate a durable, high performance water

307

Development of an Advanced Fine Coal Suspension Dewatering Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advancement in fine coal cleaning technology, recovery of fine coal (minus 28 mesh) has become an attractive route for the U.S. coal industry. The clean coal recovered using the advanced flotation technology i.e. column flotation, contains on average 20% solids and 80% water, with an average particle size of 35 microns. Fine coal slurry is usually dewatered using a vacuum dewatering technique, providing a material with about 25 to 30 percent moisture. The process developed in this project will improve dewatering of fine (0.6mm) coal slurry to less than 20 percent moisture. Thus, thermal drying of dewatered wet coal will be eliminated. This will provide significant energy savings for the coal industry along with some environmental benefits. A 1% increase in recovery of coal and producing a filter cake material of less than 20 % moisture will amount to energy savings of 1900 trillion Btu/yr/unit. In terms of the amount of coal it will be about 0.8% of the total coal being used in the USA for electric power generation. It is difficult to dewater the fine clean coal slurry to about 20% moisture level using the conventional dewatering techniques. The finer the particle, the larger the surface area and thus, it retains large amounts of moisture on the surface. The coal industry has shown some reluctance in using the advanced coal recovery techniques, because of unavailability of an economical dewatering technique which can provide a product containing less than 20% moisture. The U.S.DOE and Industry has identified the dewatering of coal fines as a high priority problem. The goal of the proposed program is to develop and evaluate a novel two stage dewatering process developed at the University of Kentucky, which involves utilization of two forces, namely, vacuum and pressure for dewatering of fine coal slurries. It has been observed that a fine coal filter cake formed under vacuum has a porous structure with water trapped in the capillaries. When this porous cake is subjected to pressure for a short time, the free water present is released from the filter cake. Laboratory studies have shown that depending on the coal type a filter cake containing about 15% moisture could be obtained using the two-stage filtration technique. It was also noted that applying intermittent breaks in vacuum force during cake formation, which disturbed the cake structure, helped in removing moisture from the filter cakes. In this project a novel approach of cleaning coal using column flotation was also developed. With this approach the feed capacity of the column is increased significantly, and the column was also able to recover coarser size coal which usually gets lost in the process. The outcome of the research benefits the coal industry, utility industry, and indirectly the general public. The benefits can be counted in terms of clean energy, cleaner environment, and lower cost power.

B. K. Parekh; D. P. Patil

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production of High Purity Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1432 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States (U.S.) government. Neither the U.S., nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

309

Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection; [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it will be the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. steel company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals f or such use.

Crelling, J.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Daily torpor in mice: high foraging costs trigger energy-saving hypothermia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high foraging costs trigger energy-saving hypothermia Kristin A. Schubert...the use of daily torpor as an energy-saving strategy. The finding that daily...metabolic rate over time represented energy savings which ranged from 1-8 kJ d1...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are supported through analyzing

Aamodt, Agnar

312

Design of a Low-Cost, Highly Mobile Urban Search and Rescue Robot Bradley E. Bishop*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Design of a Low-Cost, Highly Mobile Urban Search and Rescue Robot Bradley E. Bishop* Frederick L-- In this paper, we discuss the design of a novel robotic platform for Urban Search and Rescue (USAR). The system locomotive morphology. The main facets of this work involve the morphological concepts, initial design

Crabbe, Frederick

313

High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louisville, KY- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes work with Urbane Homes of Louisville, Kentucky, to build a high-performance home that cost $36 per ft2 (not counting the lot).Between 2005 and 2010, Building America research partners worked with 34 builders to construct nearly 3,000 HERS

314

Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

Kuo, Lewis J. H. (Monroeville, PA); Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, PA); Vasilow, Theodore R. (Penn Township, PA); Bratton, Raymond J. (Delmont, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

316

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COAL MARKET MODULE COAL MARKET MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Production Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Distribution Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Coal Export Component The coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. The CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply

317

Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Site clean up of coal gasification residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal gasification plant residues tested in this research consists of various particle sizes of rock, gravel, tar-sand agglomerates, fine sand and soil. Most of the soils particles were tar free. One of the fractions examined contained over 3000 ppM polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The residues were subjected to high pressure water jet washing, float and sink tests, and soil washing. Subsequent PAH analyses found less than 1 ppM PAHs in the water jet washing water. Soils washed with pure water lowered PAH concentrations to 276 ppM; the use of surfactants decreased PAHs to 47, 200, and 240 ppM for different test conditions. In the 47 ppM test, the surfactant temperature had been increased to 80 C, suggesting that surfactant washing efficiency can be greatly improved by increasing the solution temperature. The coal tar particles were not extracted by the surfactants used. Coke and tar-sand agglomerates collected from the float and sink gravimetric separation were tested for heating value. The tar exhibited a very high heating value, while the coke had a heating value close to that of bituminous coal. These processes are believed to have the potential to clean up coal gasification plant residues at a fairly low cost, pending pilot-scale testing and a feasibility study.

Wilson, J.W.; Ding, Y. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Healy Clean Coal Project: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program is to provide the energy marketplace with advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization options by conducting demonstrations of new technologies. These demonstration projects are intended to establish the commercial feasibility of promising advanced coal technologies that have been developed to a level at which they are ready for demonstration testing under commercial conditions. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP), selected under Round III of the CCT Program, and described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy, 1991). The desire to demonstrate an innovative power plant that integrates an advanced slagging combustor, a heat recovery system, and both high- and low-temperature emissions control processes prompted the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) to submit a proposal for this project. In April 1991, AIDEA entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. Other team members included Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA), host and operator; Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc., coal supplier; TRW, Inc., Space & Technology Division, combustor technology provider; Stone & Webster Engineering Corp. (S&W), engineer; Babcock & Wilcox Company (which acquired the assets of Joy Environmental Technologies, Inc.), supplier of the spray dryer absorber technology; and Steigers Corporation, provider of environmental and permitting support. Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation supplied the boiler. GVEA provided oversight of the design and provided operators during demonstration testing. The project was sited adjacent to GVEA's Healy Unit No. 1 in Healy, Alaska. The objective of this CCT project was to demonstrate the ability of the TRW Clean Coal Combustion System to operate on a blend of run-of-mine (ROM) coal and waste coal, while meeting strict environmental requirements. DOE provided $117,327,000 of the total project cost of $282,300,000, or 41.6 percent. Construction for the demonstration project was started in May 1995, and completed in November 1997. Operations were initiated in January 1998, and completed in December 1999. The evaluation contained herein is based primarily on information from the AIDEA's Final Report (Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority, 2001), as well as other references cited.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply regions (Figures 19 and 20). coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end-use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal export demands as a part of the world coal market. Coal supply is projected on a cost-minimizing basis, constrained by existing contracts. Twelve different coal types are differentiated with respect to thermal grade, sulfur content, and underground or surface mining. The domestic production and distribution of coal is forecast for 13 demand regions and 11 supply regions (Figures 19 and 20). Figure 19. Coal Market Module Demand Regions Figure 20. Coal Market Module Supply Regions

322

Chapter 3 - Coal-fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal provides around 40% of the world’s electricity, more than any other source. Most modern coal-fired power stations burn pulverized coal in a boiler to raise steam for a steam turbine. High efficiency is achieved by using supercritical boilers made of advanced alloys that produce high steam temperatures, and large, high-efficiency steam turbines. Alternative types of coal-fired power plants include fluidized bed boilers that can burn a variety of poor fuels, as well as coal gasifiers that allow coal to be turned into a combustible gas that can be burned in a gas turbine. Emissions from coal plants include sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and trace metals, all of which must be controlled. Capturing carbon dioxide from a coal plant is also under consideration. This can be achieved using post-combustion capture, a pre-combustion gasification process, or by burning coal in oxygen instead of air.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

INTERACTION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS WITH A SUBBITUMINOUS COAL BELOW PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and P. Fugassi, Phenanthrene Extraction of Bituminous Coal,Coal Science, Advances in Chemistry Series No. 55, 448 C.Mechanism of High Volatile Coal, Coal Science, Advances in

Dorighi, G.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Formation and retention of methane in coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

EIS-0146: Programmatic for Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This programmatic environmental impact statement assesses the environmental impacts of continuing the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program involving the selection, for cost-shared federal funding, of one or more clean coal projects proposed by the private sector.

326

Improvement of the Coal Ash Slagging Tendency by Coal Washing and Additive Blending with Mullite Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four typical coals and two pretreatment methods were investigated to prevent slagging by facilitating mullite formation in coal ash at a high temperature. ... Both security and economy in power plant can be improved substantially as long as ash deposition and slagging tendency alleviated. ... Pilot-projects about coal washing and coal blending economic benefit are looking forward to put into practice. ...

Zhenyu Huang; Yan Li; Dan Lu; Zhijun Zhou; Zhihua Wang; Junhu Zhou; Kefa Cen

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

Upgrading low-rank coals using the liquids from coal (LFC) process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three unmistakable trends characterize national and international coal markets today that help to explain coal`s continuing and, in some cases, increasing share of the world`s energy mix: the downward trend in coal prices is primarily influenced by an excess of increasing supply relative to increasing demand. Associated with this trend are the availability of capital to expand coal supplies when prices become firm and the role of coal exports in international trade, especially for developing nations; the global trend toward reducing the transportation cost component relative to the market, preserves or enhances the producer`s profit margins in the face of lower prices. The strong influence of transportation costs is due to the geographic relationships between coal producers and coal users. The trend toward upgrading low grade coals, including subbituminous and lignite coals, that have favorable environmental characteristics, such as low sulfur, compensates in some measure for decreasing coal prices and helps to reduce transportation costs. The upgrading of low grade coal includes a variety of precombustion clean coal technologies, such as deep coal cleaning. Also included in this grouping are the coal drying and mild pyrolysis (or mild gasification) technologies that remove most of the moisture and a substantial portion of the volatile matter, including organic sulfur, while producing two or more saleable coproducts with considerable added value. SGI International`s Liquids From Coal (LFC) process falls into this category. In the following sections, the LFC process is described and the coproducts of the mild pyrolysis are characterized. Since the process can be applied widely to low rank coals all around the world, the characteristics of coproducts from three different regions around the Pacific Rim-the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, the Beluga Field in Alaska near the Cook Inlet, and the Bukit Asam region in south Sumatra, Indonesia - are compared.

Nickell, R.E.; Hoften, S.A. van

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8: Annual HVAC Source Energy, Cost, and Savings ProjectionsStatewide HVAC Source Energy, Cost, and Savings Projections23 Table 8: Annual HVAC Source Energy, Cost, and Savings

Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Forward and reverse combustion gasification of coal with production of high-quality syngas in a simulated pilot system for in situ gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This research focused on the feasibility and stability of applying the forward and reverse combustion approach to the in situ gasification of lignite and bituminous coal with oxygen or oxygen–steam mixtures as gasification agents, especially reverse combustion gasification. A high-quality syngas (H2 and CO) could be obtained using the reverse combustion gasification technique combined with forward combustion gasification in a pilot system for in situ gasification. The gasification time was extended more than 25% using the reverse combustion approach. The controlling conditions for reverse combustion gasification were obtained by comparing and analyzing experimental data. The results show the relationship between the inject gas flow within certain limits and velocity of the gasification flame was linear during reverse combustion. The underground conditions of the coal seam and strata were simulated in a pilot-scale underground gasifier during experiments. The combustion gasification of coal was carried out experimentally for over 5 days. The average effective content (H2 and CO) of syngas was in the range of 60–70%, meeting the requirement of synthesis gas. The optimal ranges of gasifying lignite and bituminous coal were found to be 1.5–2.0 and 1.3–1.75, respectively. The product gas flow was proportional to oxygen blast. These are expected to provide useful guidance on practical underground coal gasification operations and to give experimental evidence in support of theory.

Yong Cui; Jie Liang; Zhangqing Wang; Xiaochun Zhang; Chenzi Fan; Dongyu Liang; Xuan Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Pulverised Coal as a Combustible  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , as a factor in the cost of living is very great indeed. That the price of coal, at any rate for a long time, will be maintained beyond a ... along the lines of research. Similarly, also, the reduction in the cost of our fuel bill must be sought in economy in use-that is to say, in an ...

R. A. S. REDMAYNE

1921-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and Phase III. Quarter progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is presented on the development of a coal-fired high performance power generation system by the year 2000. This report describes the design of the air heater, duct heater, system controls, slag viscosity, and design of a quench zone.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Application of wavelength-scanned wavelength-modulation spectroscopy H2O absorption measurements in an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A real-time, in situ water vapor (H2O) sensor using a tunable diode laser near 1,352 nm was developed to continuously monitor water vapor in the synthesis gas of an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier....

Kai Sun; Ritobrata Sur; Jay B. Jeffries; Ronald K. Hanson; Tommy Clark…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Economic environment of coal mining operations in Appalachia, United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Appalachia is a mountainous coal region, in the United States, where the small mining operation dominates. The large number of small coal operations makes the coal industry in that area very competitive, the industry concentration ratio being low. The vast majority of the small coal operations are contractors and nonunionized. There are various circumstances under which a large company will elect to supplement their coal production from their, usually larger, coal mines. The size of the coal mine is generally dictated by the size and location of the coal reserves. The optimum rate of coal extraction, and hence the life of the mine, is a factor of the size of the coal reserves and the contribution margin (coal price less variable cost). Large companies tend to have better safety records than smaller companies due to greater numbers of professional engineers and better management. Small mines have the advantage of closer supervision.

A.B. Szwilski

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides forecasts of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2000, DOE/EIA-M060(2000) January 2000. Key Assumptions Coal Production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the forecast. Separate supply curves are developed for each of 11 supply regions, and 12 coal types (unique combinations of thermal grade, sulfur content, and mine type). The modeling approach used to construct regional coal supply curves addresses the relationship between the minemouth price of coal and corresponding levels of coal production, labor productivity, and the cost of factor inputs (mining equipment, mine labor, and fuel requirements).

336

Cost estimate of high-level radioactive waste containers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the bottoms-up cost estimates for fabrication of high-level radioactive waste disposal containers based on the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design (SCP-CD). These estimates were acquired by Babcock and Wilcox (B&S) under sub-contract to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The estimates were obtained for two leading container candidate materials (Alloy 825 and CDA 715), and from other three vendors who were selected from a list of twenty solicited. Three types of container designs were analyzed that represent containers for spent fuel, and for vitrified high-level waste (HLW). The container internal structures were assumed to be AISI-304 stainless steel in all cases, with an annual production rate of 750 containers. Subjective techniques were used for estimating QA/QC costs based on vendor experience and the specifications derived for the LLNL-YMP Quality Assurance program. In addition, an independent QA/QC analysis is reported which was prepared by Kasier Engineering. Based on the cost estimates developed, LLNL recommends that values of $825K and $62K be used for the 1991 TSLCC for the spent fuel and HLW containers, respectively. These numbers represent the most conservative among the three vendors, and are for the high-nickel anstenitic steel (Alloy 825). 6 refs., 7 figs.

Russell, E.W.; Clarke, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Domian, H.A. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Madson, A.A. [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Too much coal, too little oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our main message is that it is optimal to use less coal and more oil once one takes account of coal being a backstop which emits much more CO2 than oil. The way of achieving this is to have a steeply rising carbon tax during the initial oil-only phase, a less-steeply rising carbon tax during the intermediate phase where oil and coal are used alongside each other and the following coal-only phase, and a flat carbon tax during the final renewables-only phase. The “laissez-faire” outcome uses coal forever or starts with oil until it is no longer cost-effective to do so and then switches to coal. We also analyze the effects on the optimal transition times and carbon tax of a carbon-free, albeit expensive backstop (solar or wind energy). Subsidizing renewables to just below the cost of coal does not affect the oil-only phase. The gain in green welfare dominates the welfare cost of the subsidy if the subsidy gap is small and the global warming challenge is acute. Without a carbon tax a prohibitive coal tax leads to less oil left in situ and substantially delays introduction of renewables, but curbs global warming substantially as coal is never used. Finally, we characterize under general conditions what the optimal sequencing oil and coal looks like.

Frederick van der Ploeg; Cees Withagen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Sensor for Individual Burner Control of Coal Firing Rate, Fuel-Air Ratio and Coal Fineness Correlation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate, cost-efficient monitoring instrumentation has long been considered essential to the operation of power plants. Nonetheless, for the monitoring of coal flow, such instrumentation has been sorely lacking and technically difficult to achieve. With more than half of the electrical power in the United States currently supplied by coal, energy generated by this resource is critical to the US economy. The demand for improvement in this area has only increased as a result of the following two situations: First, deregulation has produced a heightened demand for both reduced electrical cost and improved grid connectivity. Second, environmental concerns have simultaneously resulted in a need for both increased efficiency and reduced carbon and NOx emissions. A potential approach to addressing both these needs would be improvement in the area of combustion control. This would result in a better heat rate, reduced unburned carbon in ash, and reduced NOx emissions. However, before feedback control can be implemented, the ability to monitor coal flow to the burners in real-time must be established. While there are several ''commercially available'' products for real-time coal flow measurement, power plant personnel are highly skeptical about the accuracy and longevity of these systems in their current state of development. In fact, following several demonstration projects of in-situ coal flow measurement systems in full scale utility boilers, it became obvious that there were still many unknown influences on these instruments during field applications. Due to the operational environment of the power plant, it has been difficult if not impossible to sort out what parameters could be influencing the various probe technologies. Additionally, it has been recognized for some time that little is known regarding the performance of coal flow splitters, even where rifflers are employed. Often the coal flow distribution from these splitters remains mal-distributed. There have been mixed results in the field using variable orifices in coal pipes. Development of other coal flow control devices has been limited. An underlying difficulty that, to date, has hindered the development of an accurate instrument for coal flow measurements is the fact that coal flow is characterized by irregular temporal and spatial variation. However, despite the inherent complexity of the dynamic system, the system is in fact deterministic. Therefore, in principle, the coal flow can be deduced from the dynamics it exhibits. Nonetheless, the interactions are highly nonlinear, rendering standard signal processing approaches, which rely on techniques such as frequency decomposition, to be of little value. Foster-Miller, Inc. has developed a methodology that relates the complex variation in such systems to the information of interest. This technology will be described in detail in Section 2. A second concern regarding the current measurement systems is installation, which can be labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive. A process that does not require the pulverizer to be taken off line would be highly desirable. Most microwave and electrostatic methods require drilling up to 20 holes in the pipe, all with a high degree of precision so as to produce a proper alignment of the probes. At least one electrostatic method requires a special spool piece to be fitted into each existing coal pipe. Overall, these procedures are both difficult and very expensive. An alternative approach is pursued here, namely the development of an instrument that relies on an acoustic signal captured by way of a commercial accelerometer. The installation of this type of sensor is both simpler and less invasive than other techniques. An accelerometer installed in a pipe wall need not penetrate through the wall, which means that the system may be able to remain on line during the installation. Further, due to the fact that the Dynamical Instruments technology, unlike other systems, does not rely on uniformity of the air or coal profile, the installation location need not be on a long, straight run

R. Demler

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Comparison of high-pressure CO2 sorption isotherms on Eastern and Western US coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate estimation of carbon dioxide (CO2) sorption capacity of coal is important for planning the CO2 sequestration efforts. In this work, we investigated sorption and swelling behavior of several Eastern and Western US coal samples from the Central Appalachian Basin and from San Juan Basin. The CO2 sorption isotherms have been completed at 55°C for as received and dried samples. The role of mineral components in coal, the coal swelling, the effects of temperature and moisture, and the error propagation have been analyzed. Changes in void volume due to dewatering and other factors such as temporary caging of carbon dioxide molecules in coal matrix were identified among the main factors affecting accuracy of the carbon dioxide sorption isotherms. The (helium) void volume in the sample cells was measured before and after the sorption isotherm experiments and was used to build the volume-corrected data plots.

Romanov, V.; Hur, T.-B.; Fazio, J.; Howard, B

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Land reclamation and strip-mined coal production in appalachia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study quantifies the short-run impacts of reclamation on strip mining costs, coal prices, production, and employment in Appalachia. A process analysis model is developed and used to estimate short-run strip-mined coal supply functions under conditions of alternative reclamation requirements. Then, an econometric model is developed and used to estimate coal demand relations. Our results show that full reclamation has rather minor impacts. In 1972, full reclamation would have increased strip-mined coal production costs an average of $0.35 per ton, reduced strip-mined coal production by 10 million tons, and cost approximately 1600 jobs in Appalachia.

William Lin; Robert L Spore; Edmund A Nephew

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Russian coking coal in 2008 and 2009  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal resources and coke production in the second half of 2009 ... are considered. The unsuitability of the available coal for the production of high-strength coke is analyzed.

B. P. Kiselev

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Leaching of boron from coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Leaching of boron from coal ash ... First High-Resolution 11B Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectra of Coal Fly Ash by Satellite-Transition Magic Angle Spinning (STMAS) NMR ... First High-Resolution 11B Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectra of Coal Fly Ash by Satellite-Transition Magic Angle Spinning (STMAS) NMR ...

James A. Cox; Gary L. Lundquist; Andrzej Przyjazny; C. David Schmulbach

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports Co-PIs: Jia Wang, Miomir Vukmirovic, Kotaro Sasaki, Brookhaven National Laboratory Yang Shao-Horn Massachusetts Institute of Technology Rachel O'Malley, David Thompsett, Sarah Ball, Graham Hard Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells Radoslav Adzic Brookhaven National Laboratory DOE Projects Kickoff Meeting September 30 , 2009 2 Project Overview Project Overview 1. Objectives: Objectives: Developing high performance fuel cell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) comprising contiguous Pt monolayer Pt monolayer on stable, inexpensive metal or alloy nanorods, nanowires, nanobars and

346

Coal extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is extracted using a mixed solvent which includes a substantially aromatic component and a substantially naphthenic component, at a temperature of 400/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Although neither component is an especially good solvent for coal by itself, the use of mixed solvent gives greater flexibility to the process and offers efficiency gains.

Clarke, J.W.; Kimber, G.M.; Rantell, T.D.; Snape, C.E.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

Coal in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains Region -- Clean, compliant, and available  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region produced over 340 million short tons of coal in 1997, approximately 30 percent of the nation`s total coal production. Coals from this region are shipped to 26 states in the western, midwest, southern, and eastern US and production is projected to increase to 415 million short tons by 2015; the projected increase will be utilized primarily for production of electric power. The coals are economically attractive because they can be produced by surface mining, and do not require costly beneficiation to be compliant with emission standards. The coals are compliant because their chemical composition was influenced by tectonic settings of the coal basins and provenance of the sediments entering the basins. Tectonics during the Paleocene also influenced rates of precipitation and depositional systems. These factors, in concert, controlled the amount, distribution, and levels of sulfur, ash, and trace elements of environmental concern in the region`s coals. The emphasis of this paper is on the chemistry of these thick, high-quality coals and the geologic controls that resulted in their accumulation.

Stricker, G.D.; Ellis, M.S.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Diffusion Coatings for Corrosion-Resistant Components in Coal Gasification Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low-cost alloy may improve its resistance to such sulfidation attack, and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. The primary activity this period was preparation and presentation of the findings on this project at the Twenty-Third annual Pittsburgh Coal Conference. Dr. Malhotra attended this conference and presented a paper. A copy of his presentation constitutes this quarterly report.

Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Jordi Perez Mariano; Angel Sanjurjo

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Chemical composition and some trace element contents in coals and coal ash from Tamnava-Zapadno Polje Coal Field, Serbia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical compositions and trace element contents (Zn, Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cd, As, B, Hg, Sr, Se, Be, Ba, Mn, Th, V, U) in coal and coal ash samples from Tamnava-Zapadno Polje coal field in Serbia were studied. The coal from this field belongs to lignite. This high volatility coal has high moisture and low S contents, moderate ash yield, and high calorific value. The coal ash is abundant in alumosilicates. Many trace elements such as Ni > Cd > Cr > B > As > Cu > Co > Pb > V > Zn > Mn in the coal and Ni > Cr > As > B > Cu > Co = Pb > V > Zn > Mn in the coal ash are enriched in comparison with Clarke concentrations.

Vukasinovic-Pesic, V.; Rajakovic, L.J. [University of Montenegro, Podgorica (Montenegro)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Section 5 - Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal has the longest history of use among the fossil fuels, with use as a fuel dating to 3000 BC in China and Wales. Marco Polo’s “Description of the World” (1298) comments on many novel customs and practices of China, including the use of “stones that burn like logs” (coal). By the thirteenth century the mining of coal was widespread in England in regions such as Durham, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire, and North and South Wales. By the early seventeenth century nearly half of England’s maritime trade consisted of coal exports. Coal was the fuel that launched the Industrial Revolution in Europe and then the United States. By the late 1890s, the U.S. assumed the lead in world coal production. Britain now ranked second, after having been the world leader since the beginnings of the formal industry in the 1500s. Germany was third, an indication of its growing industrial power relative to continental rival France. Coal’s leading role in energy use peaked in the early twentieth century, after which it was supplanted by oil and natural gas. By the late twentieth century China’s rapid economic expansion, surging demand for electricity, and prodigious coal resources combined to propel it to become the world leader in production. Continuous improvements in coal mining technology have produced lower costs, improved safety, and greater labor productivity. John Buddle introduced the first air pump to ventilate coal mines (1803), followed shortly by the miner’s safety lamps that were developed independently by Sir Humphry Davy, William Clanny, and George Stephenson (1813-1816). Coal mining underwent a rapid transition in the 1880s to mechanical coal cutting in mines in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Russia. The St. Joseph Lead Company of Missouri (1900) invented the first underground mine roof bolts that became a key safety feature in underground coal mines. The first commercially successful bucket wheel excavator was used at the Luise Mine in Braunkohlemwerke, Germany (1925), followed by the first successful continuous miners in U.S. underground coal mining (1948). The first mechanized U.S. longwall mining system appeared in 1951, and was followed by the self-advancing hydraulic longwall support system that provided greater support for the roof of the mine. LeTourneau Technologies, Inc. of Texas manufactured the largest rubber tired front-end wheel loader in the world, the L-2350, which would play an important role in loading coal in Wyoming’s large surface mines (2005). Coal mining has always been a very hazardous occupation, and has produced some of history’s worst industrial disasters. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, caused the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France (1906). An explosion in a coal mine in Liaoning province in northeastern China killed more than 1,500 Chinese miners (1942), as did other major accidents in Ky?sh?, Japan (1914), Wankie, Rhodesia (1972), Wales (1913), Bihar, India (1965), and West Virginia, U.S. (1907), to name just a few. Legislation such as the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act in the U.S. (1969) improved working conditions in many nations. The Great Smog of London (1952) occurred after an exceptionally cold winter forced homes and factories to burn large quantities of coal. A temperature inversion formed, trapping pollutants above the ground. More than 4,000 people died from respiratory ailments within the following week. The use of coal has been impacted by legislation to control the environmental impacts associated with its mining and combustion. The first known environmental regulation of coal dates to 1306 when King Edward II of England prohibited burning sea coal while Parliament was in session because of its offensive smoke. Sulfur dioxide from coal combustion was tied to acid rain in the 1960s, and carbon dioxide emissions became a concern beginning in the 1980s when climate change emerged as a critical environmental issue.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the results of detailed monitoring completed under Program Element 6 of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's High Performance Commercial Building Systems (HPCBS) PIER program. The purpose of the Energy Simulations and Projected State-Wide Energy Savings project is to develop reasonable energy performance and cost models for high performance relocatable classrooms (RCs) across California climates. A key objective of the energy monitoring was to validate DOE2 simulations for comparison to initial DOE2 performance projections. The validated DOE2 model was then used to develop statewide savings projections by modeling base case and high performance RC operation in the 16 California climate zones. The primary objective of this phase of work was to utilize detailed field monitoring data to modify DOE2 inputs and generate performance projections based on a validated simulation model. Additional objectives include the following: (1) Obtain comparative performance data on base case and high performance HVAC systems to determine how they are operated, how they perform, and how the occupants respond to the advanced systems. This was accomplished by installing both HVAC systems side-by-side (i.e., one per module of a standard two module, 24 ft by 40 ft RC) on the study RCs and switching HVAC operating modes on a weekly basis. (2) Develop projected statewide energy and demand impacts based on the validated DOE2 model. (3) Develop cost effectiveness projections for the high performance HVAC system in the 16 California climate zones.

Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, Wlliam J.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reclamation of abandoned coal refuse piles and underground adit entries in the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews reclamation activities conducting during 1984-85 in the Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Under this integrated reclamation project, four sites comprising 14 acres of highly acidic abandoned coal refuse were treated and 43 abandoned adit underground mine entries were closed. The techniques used were cost-effective and could be applied in reclaiming other coal minesites in Appalachia. 9 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Muncy, J.A.; Buckner, E.R.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Exploring Cost-Effective, High Performance Residential Retrofits for Affordable Housing in the Hot Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, a Department of Energy Building America team led by the Florida Solar Energy Center began working with partners to find cost-effective paths for improving the energy performance of existing homes in the hot humid climate. A test-in energy audit and energy use modeling of the partner's proposed renovation package was performed for 41 affordable and middle income foreclosed homes in Florida and Alabama. HERS1 Indices ranged from 92 to 184 with modeled energy savings ranging from 3% to 50% (average of 26%). Analyses and recommendations were discussed with partners to encourage more efficient retrofits, highlight health and safety issues, and gather feedback on incremental cost of high performance measures. Ten completed renovations have modeled energy savings ranging from 9% to 48% (average 31%.) This paper presents the project's process including our findings thus far and highlights of the first home to meet the target HERS Index of 70.

McIlvaine, Janet; Sutherland, Karen; Schleith, Kevin; Chandra, Subrato

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal. Technical progress report No. 13, June 22, 1990--October 15, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal Reaction Study: The results of the reaction of aqueous cupric chloride with Illinois {number_sign}6 coal are listed on page 21. These results indicate that the oxidative desulfurization of coal with cupric chloride is more complex and less effective than previously reported. Although almost all the pyritic and sulfate sulfur are removed from the coal, the organic sulfur is actually reported to have increased. This may be due to an actual increase in the organic sulfur through a side reaction of the pyrite, or it may be caused by inaccuracy of the ASTM method when large proportions of chloro substituents are present. The amount of chlorine added to the coal (from 0 to 3.18%) is quite large and counterproductive. Most importantly, the amount of non-combustible ash has increased from 15.48 to 51.21%, most likely in the form of copper. This will dramatically decrease both the efficiency of combustion in terms of altering the heat capacity of the coal as well as decrease the amount of energy produced per ton of coal. As a result, it is quite evident that this method of desulfurization needs some modification prior to further exploitation.

Olesik, S. [comp.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

1983-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with solid oxide fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review was conducted for coal gasification technologies that integrate with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to achieve system efficiencies near 60% while capturing and sequestering >90% of the carbon dioxide [1-2]. The overall system efficiency can reach 60% when a) the coal gasifier produces a syngas with a methane composition of roughly 25% on a dry volume basis, b) the carbon dioxide is separated from the methane-rich synthesis gas, c) the methane-rich syngas is sent to a SOFC, and d) the off-gases from the SOFC are recycled back to coal gasifier. The thermodynamics of this process will be reviewed and compared to conventional processes in order to highlight where available work (i.e. exergy) is lost in entrained-flow, high-temperature gasification, and where exergy is lost in hydrogen oxidation within the SOFC. The main advantage of steam gasification of coal to methane and carbon dioxide is that the amount of exergy consumed in the gasifier is small compared to conventional, high temperature, oxygen-blown gasifiers. However, the goal of limiting the amount of exergy destruction in the gasifier has the effect of limiting the rates of chemical reactions. Thus, one of the main advantages of steam gasification leads to one of its main problems: slow reaction kinetics. While conventional entrained-flow, high-temperature gasifiers consume a sizable portion of the available work in the coal oxidation, the consumed exergy speeds up the rates of reactions. And while the rates of steam gasification reactions can be increased through the use of catalysts, only a few catalysts can meet cost requirements because there is often significant deactivation due to chemical reactions between the inorganic species in the coal and the catalyst. Previous research into increasing the kinetics of steam gasification will be reviewed. The goal of this paper is to highlight both the challenges and advantages of integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with SOFCs.

Siefert, N.; Shamsi, A.; Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

NETL: Gasification Systems - Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Liquid Carbon Dioxide/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low-Rank Coal to Gasifiers Project Number: DE-FE0007977 There is increased interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) for future coal-based power plants, and in a CCS integrated gasification plant, relatively pure, high pressure CO2 stream(s) will be available within the power plant. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) aims to help reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CCS by using a portion of the high purity CO2 product stream as the carrier fluid to feed low rank coal (LRC) into the gasifier. EPRI proposes to confirm the potential advantages of LRC/liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) slurries by: Conducting plant-wide technical and economic simulations.

358

Costing climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Costenergy analyses of such schemes...and tidal power at costs...consider in economic analyses of GHG abatement...pertaining to wind power in Denmark...In a cost analysis of implementing...Cutting coal combustion...large an economic burden...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quantify production, energy and cost characteristics of ironCost Total O&M Cost Energy Cost Raw Material Cost AnnualCost Total O&M Cost Energy Cost (other than Coking Coal and

Karali, Nihan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Densified Biomass Can Cost-Effectively Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Address Energy Security in Thermal Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total switchgrass production costs at the farm gate were $79.31/Mg (see SI for production cost detail). ... Replacing natural gas with biomass produces high, positive abatement costs and is not deemed to be a viable alternative. ... Zhang, Y.; McKechnie, J.; Cormier, D.; Lyng, R.; Mabee, W.; Ogino, A.; MacLean, H. L.Life cycle emissions and cost of producing electricity from coal, natural gas, and wood pellets in Ontario, Canada Environ. ...

Thomas O. Wilson; Frederick M. McNeal; Sabrina Spatari; David G. Abler; Paul R. Adler

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baseline Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity September 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1399 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring

362

Coal and Biomass to Liquids | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coal to Liquids » Coal and Coal to Liquids » Coal and Biomass to Liquids Coal and Biomass to Liquids Over the last several decades, the Office of Fossil Energy performed RD&D activities that made significant advancements in the areas of coal conversion to liquid fuels and chemicals. Technology improvements and cost reductions that were achieved led to the construction of demonstration-scale facilities. The program is now supporting work to reduce the carbon footprint of coal derived liquids by incorporating the co-feeding of biomass and carbon capture. In the area of direct coal liquefaction, which is the process of breaking down coal to maximize the correct size of molecules for liquid products, the U.S. DOE made significant investments and advancements in technology in the 1970s and 1980s. Research enabled direct coal liquefaction to produce

363

Chemical looping combustion of high-sulfur coal with NiFe2O4-combined oxygen carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) of coal has gained increasing attention as a novel combustion technology for its attractive advantage in the...2. In relative to the single metal oxide-based oxygen carrier (OC),...

Baowen Wang; Gan Xiao; Xiaoyong Song…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Sixth quarterly report, 1 January 1994--31 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal twelth quarterly report for the period 1 July 1995--30 September 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench- scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY FROM COAL WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification, quench cooled and shifted to (pri- marily) H2 and CO2 via sulfur-tolerant water-gas shift (WGS with sulfur-bearing waste gases, H2S and SO2. I. INTRODUCTION Carbon-free energy carriers, H2 and electricity relative abundance, high carbon intensity, and low cost. Coal-to-H2 plants based on gasification have been

367

Confined-Unconfined Changes above Longwall Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was about 2 m from coal extraction about...and space by the mining and subsidence rates...In studies in Appalachia, Moebs and Barton...high-extraction coal mining. The rapid change...effects of longwall coal mining on overlying aquifers...

COLIN J BOOTH

368

High Energy Density Utracapacitors: Low-Cost, High Energy and Power Density, Nanotube-Enhanced Ultracapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FastCAP is improving the performance of an ultracapacitor—a battery-like electronic device that can complement, and possibly even replace, an HEV or EV battery pack. Ultracapacitors have many advantages over conventional batteries, including long lifespans (over 1 million cycles, as compared to 10,000 for conventional batteries) and better durability. Ultracapacitors also charge more quickly than conventional batteries, and they release energy more quickly. However, ultracapacitors have fallen short of batteries in one key metric: energy density—high energy density means more energy storage. FastCAP is redesigning the ultracapacitor’s internal structure to increase its energy density. Ultracapacitors traditionally use electrodes made of irregularly shaped, porous carbon. FastCAP’s ultracapacitors are made of tiny, aligned carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide a regular path for ions moving in and out of the ultracapacitor’s electrode, increasing the overall efficiency and energy density of the device.

None

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

High pressure/high temperature vapor liquid equilibrium study of light gases in hydrogen-coal liquid model compound systems using perturbation chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perturbation chromatography or gas-liquid partition chromatography (GLPC) provides a powerful tool for making physicochemical measurements. In this investigation GLPC was applied to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium behavior of light gases in nonvolatile coal liquid model compound solvents at high temperatures and high pressures. Improvements made in existing GLPC techniques include: the use of a high pressure tandem proportioning pump to give precise control of the carrier gas flow rate and low pressure drops; a high pressure ionization chamber to detect the injection of very dilute radioactive sample gases; and the use of a microcomputer to provide instantaneous integration and very precise retention times of the chromatographic peaks. Infinite dilution K-values for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide in hydrogen-dibenzofuran systems were obtained at 100 and 125 C and up to 800 psia. Infinite dilution K-values for the same light gases in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene systems were obtained at 100, 125, 150, 175, and 200 C and up to 3000 psia. Henry's constants were determined for the light gases in 9-methylanthracene. Second cross virial coefficients and vapor phase infinite dilution fugacity coefficients were calculated for methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane in hydrogen. These results were combined with the experimental K-value measurements to obtain Henry's constants in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene mixtures of fixed liquid compositions. Infinite dilution heats of solution of the solute gases in the mixtures were calculated.

Kragas, T.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The mechanism of coking pressure generation II: Effect of high volatile matter coking coal, semi-anthracite and coke breeze on coking pressure and contraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the most important aspects of the cokemaking process is to control and limit the coking pressure since excessive coking pressure can lead to operational problems and oven wall damage. Following on from a previous paper on plastic layer permeability we have studied the effect of contraction of semi-coke on coking pressure and the effect of organic additives on contraction. A link between contraction (or simulated contraction) outside the plastic layer and coking pressure was demonstrated. The interaction between this contraction, local bulk density around the plastic layer and the dependence of the permeability of the plastic layer on bulk density was discussed as possible mechanisms for the generation of coking pressure. The effect of blending either a high volatile matter coal or one of two semi-anthracites with low volatile matter, high coking pressure coals on the coking pressure of the binary blends has been explained using this mechanism.

Merrick Mahoney; Seiji Nomura; Koichi Fukuda; Kenji Kato; Anthony Le Bas; David R. Jenkins; Sid McGuire

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America research showing how some energy-efficiency measure cost increases can balance again measures that reduce up-front costs: Advanced framing cuts lumber costs, right sizing can mean downsizing the HVAC, moving HVAC into conditioned space cuts installation costs, designing on a 2-foot grid reduces materials waste, etc.

372

Analysis of liquified coal for nitrogenous bases; separation by high performance liquid chromatography and identification by probe microdistillation/mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF LIQUIFIED COAL FOR NITROGENOUS BASES; SEPARATION BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY AND IDENTIFICATION BY PROBE MICRODISTILLATION/MASS SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by LEONARD ROYCE SCHRONK Submitted to the Graduate College... AND IDENTIFICATION BY PROBE MICRODISTILLATION/MASS SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by LEONARD ROYCE SCHRONK Approved as to style and content by: Co-Charrman o Commlxtte ) (Co-Chazrman o Committee Me er Hea of Department December 1978 ABSTRACT Analysis of Liquified...

Schronk, Leonard Royce

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Â… High-Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs Production Builders  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

projects with production builders have demonstrated projects with production builders have demonstrated that high-performance homes experience significant cost trade-offs that offset other cost increases. This proved transformational, gaining builder traction with related market-based programs like ENERGY STAR for Homes and DOE Challenge Home. "Break points" or cost trade-offs that are identified during the engineering analysis of the residential construction process can yield two types of business savings: 1) reductions in costs of warranty and call-back service; and 2) offsets or "credits" attributed to reductions in other construction costs. The tables below show examples of cost and savings trade-offs experienced by Building America projects in hot-dry and cold climates. Energy-Efficiency

374

LEP3: a low-cost, high-luminosity Higgs factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of a relatively light Higgs opens up the possibility of circular e+e- Higgs factories. LEP3 is such a machine with emphasis on low cost, since it re-uses most of the LHC infrastructure, including the tunnel, cryogenics, and the two general-purpose LHC experiments Atlas and CMS, with some modifications. The energy reach of LEP3 is 240GeV in the centre of mass, close to the ZH production maximum. Alternative tunnel diameters and locations are possible, including a Higgs factory housed in the UNK tunnel, UNK-L, and a machine located in a new 80 km tunnel in the Geneva region, TLEP, than can further house a very high energy pp collider. The design merits further consideration and a detailed study should be performed, so that LEP3 can be one more option available to the community for the next step in High Energy Physics.

M. Koratzinos

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The sample bank consists of eight coals, including lignite, subbituminous coal, high volatile, medium by a variety of techniques. Five-gallon carboys hold about 80% of the batch in reserve for filling more

Maranas, Costas

376

Matrix Shrinkage and Swelling Effects on Economics of Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production and CO2 Sequestration in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increases in CO2 levels in the atmosphere and their contributions to global climate change have been a major concern. It has been shown that CO2 injection can enhance the methane recovery from coal. Accordingly, sequestration costs can be partially offset by the value added product. Indeed, coal seam sequestration may be profitable, particularly with the introduction of incentives for CO2 sequestration. Hence, carbon dioxide sequestration in unmineable coals is a very attractive option, not only for environmental reasons, but also for possible economic benefits. Darcy flow through cleats is an important transport mechanism in coal. Cleat compression and permeability changes due to gas sorption desorption, changes of effective stress, and matrix swelling and shrinkage introduce a high level of complexity into the feasibility of a coal sequestration project. The economic effects of carbon dioxide-induced swelling on permeabilities and injectivities has received little (if any) detailed attention. Carbon dioxide and methane have different swelling effects on coal. In this work, the Palmer-Mansoori model for coal shrinkage and permeability increases during primary methane production was re-written to also account for coal swelling caused by carbon dioxide sorption. The generalized model was added to PSU-COALCOMP, a dual porosity reservoir simulator for primary and enhanced coalbed methane production. A standard five-spot of vertical wells and representative coal properties for Appalachian coals were used.[1] Simulations and sensitivity analyses were performed with the modified simulator for nine different parameters, including coal seam and operational parameters and economic criteria. The coal properties and operating parameters that were varied included Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, the cleat porosity, and the injection pressure. The economic variables included CH4 price, CO2 cost, CO2 credit, water disposal cost, and interest rate. Net present value analyses of the simulation results included profits due to methane production, and potential incentives for CO2 sequestered. This work shows that for some coal-property values, the compressibility and cleat porosity of coal may be more important than more purely economic criteria.

Gorucu, F.B.; Jikich, S.A.; Bromhal, G.S.; Sams, W.N.; Ertekin, T.; Smith, D.H.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Coal ban could heat up electricity prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal ban could heat up electricity prices ... The U.S. EPA’s new report on the economic impact of the bill suggests it would cost households $100?140 per year by 2030. ...

Janet Pelley

2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

378

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Ninth quarterly report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report covers the activities of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal during the Period October 1 - December 31, 1994, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE Contract Period was from December 8, 1992 to December 7, 1994 and has been extended to September 30, 1995. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Johnson, E.S.; Lee, L.K. [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Distribution of arsenic, selenium, and other trace elements in high pyrite Appalachian coals: Evidence for multiple episodes of pyrite formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pennsylvanian coals in the Appalachian Basin host pyrite that is locally enriched in potentially toxic trace elements such as As, Se, Hg, Pb, and Ni. A comparison of pyrite-rich coals from northwestern Alabama, eastern Kentucky, and West Virginia reveals differences in concentrations and mode of occurrence of trace elements in pyrite. Pyrite occurs as framboids, dendrites, or in massive crystalline form in cell lumens or crosscutting veins. Metal concentrations in pyrite vary over all scales, from microscopic to mine to regional, because trace elements are inhomogeneously distributed in the different morphological forms of pyrite, and in the multiple generations of sulfide mineral precipitates. Early diagenetic framboidal pyrite is usually depleted in As, Se, and Hg, and enriched in Pb and Ni, compared to other pyrite forms. In dendritic pyrite, maps of As distribution show a chemical gradient from As-rich centers to As-poor distal branches, whereas Se concentrations are highest at the distal edges of the branches. Massive crystalline pyrite that fills veins is composed of several generations of sulfide minerals. Pyrite in late-stage veins commonly exhibits As-rich growth zones, indicating a probable epigenetic hydrothermal origin. Selenium is concentrated at the distal edges of veins. A positive correlation of As and Se in pyrite veins from Kentucky coals, and of As and Hg in pyrite-filled veins from Alabama coals, suggests coprecipitation of these elements from the same fluid. In the Kentucky coal samples (n = 18), As and Se contents in pyrite-filled veins average 4200 ppm and 200 ppm, respectively. In Alabama coal samples, As in pyrite-filled veins averages 2700 ppm (n = 34), whereas As in pyrite-filled cellular structures averages 6470 ppm (n = 35). In these same Alabama samples, Se averages 80 ppm in pyrite-filled veins, but was below the detection limit in cell structures. In samples of West Virginia massive pyrite, As averages 1700 ppm, and Se averages 270 ppm (n = 24). The highest concentration of Hg (? 102 ppm) is in Alabama pyrite veins. Improved detailed descriptions of sulfide morphology, sulfide mineral paragenesis, and trace-element concentration and distribution allow more informed predictions of: (1) the relative rate of release of trace elements during weathering of pyrite in coals, and (2) the relative effectiveness of various coal-cleaning procedures of removing pyrite. For example, trace element-rich pyrite has been shown to be more soluble than stoichiometric pyrite, and fragile fine-grained pyrite forms such as dendrites and framboids are more susceptible to dissolution and disaggregation but less amenable to removal during coal cleaning.

S.F. Diehl; M.B. Goldhaber; A.E. Koenig; H.A. Lowers; L.F. Ruppert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Definition: Bituminous coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bituminous coal Bituminous coal Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Bituminous coal A dense coal, usually black, sometimes dark brown, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, used primarily as fuel in steam-electric power generation, with substantial quantities also used for heat and power applications in manufacturing and to make coke; contains 45-86% carbon.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Bituminous coal or black coal is a relatively soft coal containing a tarlike substance called bitumen. It is of higher quality than lignite coal but of poorer quality than anthracite. Formation is usually the result of high pressure being exerted on lignite. Its composition can be black and sometimes dark brown; often there are well-defined bands of bright and dull

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Integrated coal cleaning, liquefaction, and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal is finely ground and cleaned so as to preferentially remove denser ash-containing particles along with some coal. The resulting cleaned coal portion having reduced ash content is then fed to a coal hydrogenation system for the production of desirable hydrocarbon gases and liquid products. The remaining ash-enriched coal portion is gasified to produce a synthesis gas, the ash is removed from the gasifier usually as slag, and the synthesis gas is shift converted with steam and purified to produce the high purity hydrogen needed in the coal hydrogenation system. This overall process increases the utilization of as-mined coal, reduces the problems associated with ash in the liquefaction-hydrogenation system, and permits a desirable simplification of a liquids-solids separation step otherwise required in the coal hydrogenation system.

Chervenak, Michael C. (Pennington, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their suitability. Seven foam generators were evaluated: two were packed columns of honeycomb, two were static mixers with different mixing media, one was a tube containing a concentric fritted air pipe, and two were low- and high-pressure venturi mi xers.... The air and solution have a common inlet to the packed column and static mixer type foamers. The air for the venturi foamers is added to the turbulent solution after the venturi throat. The mixing in the tube foamer is achieved by blowing air through...

Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

383

The reduced environmental liability of clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the authors will discuss the waste stream minimization that future commercially operated clean coal technologies can effect. They will explore the ability of these now-beginning-to-mature technologies to reduce those aspects of the emission streams that have greatest potential for what the authors term as environmental liability. Environmental liability is manifested in a variety of forms. There are both current liabilities and future liabilities. In addition, uncertainties may reside in future anticipated regulatory compliance and the costs of such compliance. Exposure to liability translates into perceived risk which creates an air of uncertainty to the power industry and its lenders who provide the capital to build new power plants. In the context of electric power generation, newer, high efficiency power generation technologies developed in the course of the Clean Coal Technology Program of the US Department of Energy result in reduced waste stream emissions when compared against more aging conventional combustion technologies. This paper will discuss how the introduction of new clean coal technologies will help balance the conflict between adverse environmental impact and the global demand for increased energy. The authors will discuss how clean coal technologies will facilitate compliance with future air standards that may otherwise expose power producers to modification and cleanup costs, noncompliance penalties, or premature shut down.

Leslie, A.C.D. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); McMillen, M. [Energetics, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Heavy media coal hydro-transport in Malinau, Indonesia: a process study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Indonesia, coal transportation has traditionally been handled by trucks and by other mechanical means. With the expansion plan of coal production and increasing truck costs, Kayan Putra Utama Coal believes that alternative modes of transportation must be considered. For long distance transport of export size coal, one of the most viable options is to use coal slurry pipeline. This paper compares the technical issues involved in all coal pipeline options. Economic analysis compares the cost of transporting coal from the mines to ports by the best option of coal slurry pipeline or truck. On the basis of these comparisons, recommendations are made on how coal slurry pipeline can help in achieving proposed increased production targets and decreasing the operation's export coal transportation costs.

Antony Lesmana; Michael Hitch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing. During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.

Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

METC ceramic corrosion/erosion studies: turbine-material screening tests in high-temperature, low-Btu, coal-derived-gas combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center, through its Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies, has participated in the United States Department of Energy's High-Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Ceramic Technology Readiness. The program's overall objective is to advance the turbine firing temperature to a range of 2600/sup 0/ to 3000/sup 0/F (1700 to 1922K) with a reasonable service life using coal or coal-derived fuel. The Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies' major objective was to conduct a screening test for several ceramic materials to assess their probability of survival in turbine applications. The materials were exposed to combustion products from low heating value coal-derived gas and air at several high temperatures and velocities. The combustion product composition and temperatures simulated actual environment that may be found in stationary power generating gas turbines except for the pressure levels. The results of approximately 1000 hours of accumulative exposure time of material at the specific test conditions are presented in this report.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Waltermire, D.M.; Hawkins, L.W.; Jarrett, T.L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Low-Cost, High-Performance Hybrid Membranes for Redox Flow Batteries - Hongxing Hu, Amsen Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DESIGN © 2008 DESIGN © 2008 www.PosterPresentations.com Low-Cost, High-Performance Hybrid Membranes for Redox Flow Batteries Hongxing Hu, Amsen Technologies LLC DOE SBIR Project, Program Manager at DOE: Dr. Imre Gyuk Objectives and Technical Approach Objectives: This SBIR project aims to develop low-cost, high performance hybrid polymeric PEMs for redox flow batteries (RFBs). Such membranes shall have high chemical stability in RFB electrolytes, high proton conductivity, low permeability of vanadium ions, along with high dimensional stability, high mechanical strength and durability, and lower cost than Nafion membranes. Approach: * Hybrid membranes of sulfonated polymers * Balance between different types of polymers for proton conductivity and chemical stability

388

Development of catalyst free carbon nanotubes from coal and waste plastics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DC-Arc technique has been used to synthesize carbon nanotubes from super clean coal, chemically cleaned coal, original coal and waste plastics instead of using high purity graphite in the presence of metal catalysts. The results obtained are compared in terms of yield, purity and type of carbon nanotubes produced from different types of raw material used. In the present study different types of raw materials have been prepared i.e. chemically cleaned coal and super clean coal, and the carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by DC Arc discharge method. Taking in account the present need of utilizing coal as a cheaper raw material for bulk production of carbon nanotubes and utilization of waste plastics (which itself is a potential environmental threat) for production of such an advance material the present work was undertaken. Since the process does not involve presence of any kind of metal catalyst, it avoids the cost intensive process of removal of these metal particles. The residual coal obtained after refining has major fuel potential and can be utilized for various purposes.

Dosodia, A.; Lal, C.; Singh, B.P.; Mathur, R.B.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (India). Centre of Energy Studies

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles ... The process uses a heavy liquid to separate marketable high-ash coal from nonburnable waste rock. ... Nearly 500 mountains of coal refuse, waste material from coal cleaning operations, are burning uncontrollably in 15 states in the U.S., according to a Bureau of Mines survey. ...

1965-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

390

Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Coal-Biomass to Liquids News Gasifipedia Coal-Biomass Feed Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications...

391

Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Low Cost, High Performance and Long Life Flow Battery Electrodes - Tom Stepien, Primus Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

With ARPA-E we optimized With ARPA-E we optimized * Adhesion * Current density * Duration * Catalytic coatings * Voltaic performance Goals * Cost-effectiveness * High-efficiency * Uniformity EnergyPod Low Cost, High Performance and Long Life Flow Battery Electrodes TM A Breakthrough In Distributed, Grid Scale Energy Storage ARPA-E has enabled Primus Power to create an innovative and technically advanced electrode Electrode Zinc Plating This, combined with our other advances has enabled us to create a unique flow battery system with ...  Low cost electrodes  Long life  High efficiency  Flexibility For...  Ubiquitous  Dispatchable  Cost effective ... grid-scale electrical energy storage to: * Accelerate renewable

393

Pyrolysis of coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for mild gasification of crushed coal in a single vertical elongated reaction vessel providing a fluidized bed reaction zone, a freeboard reaction zone, and an entrained reaction zone within the single vessel. Feed coal and gas may be fed separately to each of these reaction zones to provide different reaction temperatures and conditions in each reaction zone. The reactor and process of this invention provides for the complete utilization of a coal supply for gasification including utilization of caking and non-caking or agglomerating feeds in the same reactor. The products may be adjusted to provide significantly greater product economic value, especially with respect to desired production of char having high surface area.

Babu, Suresh P. (Willow Springs, IL); Bair, Wilford G. (Morton Grove, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

High-Pressure Gasification of Coal Water Ethanol Slurry in an Entrained Flow Gasifier for Bioethanol Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In comparison to CWS gasification, gasification with CWES showed a higher performance, such as composition of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, carbon conversion, cold gas efficiency, and total flow rate of syngas. ... As for the preparation of CWS and CWES, viscosity of 2000 cP or under was maintained while maintaining the maximum coal content, so that the coal particles could be atomized when the slurry was injected into the burner. ... The gasifier was preheated to approximately 1100 °C using a LPG burner, and after feeding CWS or CWES into the gasifier, syngas starts to be produced, whereby pressurization proceeds. ...

Jong-Soo Bae; Dong-Wook Lee; Se-Joon Park; Young-Joo Lee; Jai-Chang Hong; Ho Won Ra; Choon Han; Young-Chan Choi

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development of high energy density fuels from mild gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the program is the determination of the minimal processing requirements to produce High Energy Density Fuels (HEDF), meeting a minimal energy density of 130,000 Btu/gal (conventional jet fuels have energy densities in the vicinity of 115,000--120,000 Btu/gal) and having acceptable advanced fuel specifications in accordance with the three defined categories of HEDF. The program encompasses assessing current technology capability; selecting acceptable processing and refining schemes; and generating samples of advanced test fuels. A task breakdown structure was developed containing eight key tasks. This report summarizes the work that Amoco Oil Company (AOC), as key subcontractor, performed in the execution of Task 4, Proposed Upgrading Schemes for Advanced Fuel. The intent of the Task 4 study was to represent all the candidate processing options, that were either studied in the experimental efforts of Task 3 or were available from the prior art in the open literature, in a linear program (LP) model. The LP model would allow scaling of the bench-scale Task 3 results to commercial scale and would perform economic evaluations on any combination of the processes which might be used to make HEDF. Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the process and economic bases used. Sections 3.0 and 4.0 details the economics and processing sensitivities for HEDF production. 1 ref., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Daily torpor in mice: high foraging costs trigger energy-saving hypothermia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strategies to save energy. Facultative daily...between environmental quality, foraging behaviour...environmental quality|foraging costs|energy balance| 1. Introduction...foraging costs in poor quality habitat. As an...strategy to maintain energy balance, natural...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Scale Up of Novel, Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The goal of this scale-up is to produce low cost CF from novel PO polymer precursors in higher yield and at lower cost than the incumbent CF made from specialty-grade PAN fiber.

398

NETL: Coal & Power Systems - Contacts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Power Systems & Power Systems RD&D Clean Coal Program Vision An energy-secure United States that can tap the full potential of all its energy resources, including coal. Mission Ensure the availability of ultra-clean (near-zero emissions), abundant, low cost domestic energy from coal to fuel economic prosperity, strengthen energy security, and enhance environmental quality. NETL manages an RD&D portfolio that is designed to remove environmental concerns over the future use of coal by developing revolutionary, near-zero-emissions coal technology. In partnership with the private sector, technology developments are focused on maximizing efficiency and environmental performance while driving down the cost for these new technologies. RD&D efforts focus on near-term developments to enhance the capabilities of

399

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Low Cost, Manufacturable High Voltage Power Module for ESS - Brandon Passmore, APEI  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

W. Research Center Blvd. * Fayetteville, AR 72701 * (479) 443-5759 W. Research Center Blvd. * Fayetteville, AR 72701 * (479) 443-5759 Design and Development of a Low Cost, Manufacturable High Voltage Power Module for Energy Storage Systems Phase I SBIR September 27, 2012 Brandon Passmore, PhD Sr. Electronics Packaging Research Engineer Email: bpassmo@apei.net Acknowledgements * I would like to thank Dr. Imre Gyuk of the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program and Dr. Stan Atcitty for technical support * I would also like to thank 2 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

400

Philips Lumileds Develops a Low-Cost, High-Power, Warm-White LED Package  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With the help of DOE funding, Philips Lumileds has developed a low-cost, high-power, warm-white LED package for general illumination. During the course of the two-year project, this package was used to commercialize a series of products with correlated color temperatures (CCTs) ranging from 2700 to 5700 K, under the product name LUXEON M. A record efficacy of nearly 125 lm/W was demonstrated at a flux of 1023 lumens, a CCT of 3435 K, and a color rendering index (CRI) of more than 80 at room temperature in the productized package. In an R&D package, a record efficacy of more than 133 lm/W at a flux of 1015 lumens, a CCT of 3475 K, and a CRI greater than 80 at room temperature were demonstrated.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high coal cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Issue #4: Are High Efficiency Hot Water Heating Systems Worth the Cost?  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

What are realistic energy savings associated with the latest advanced and forthcoming water heating technologies and are they cost effective?

402

Clean Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Projects This interactive map shows the extent of FE's clean coal projects across the United States and Canada. Read more AVESTAR Training FE and local colleges signed an agreement recently to train power plant field operators. Read more FutureGen 2.0 DOE recently announced the beginning of Phase II development for this innovative carbon capture and storage project in Illinois. Read more DOE's clean coal R&D is focused on developing and demonstrating advanced power generation and carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies for existing facilities and new fossil-fueled power plants by increasing overall system efficiencies and reducing capital costs. In the near-term, advanced technologies that increase the power generation

403

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation’s energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation’s most abundant energy resource—coal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

None

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Clean coal technology programs: program update 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2006 is to provide an updated status of the DOE commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCTs). These demonstrations are performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2006 provides 1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation's energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation's most abundant energy resource - coal; 2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and 3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, with fact sheets for demonstration projects that are active, recently completed, withdrawn or ended, including status as of June 30 2006. 4 apps.

NONE

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach To Auxiliary Electric Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger; Kanchan Angal; Steve Brewer; Steve Kraihanzel; Lenny Schrank; Jason Wolf

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach to Auxilliary Electric Motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

Roy Kessinger Jr.; Keith Seymour; Kanchan Angal; Jason Wolf; Steve Brewer; Leonard Schrank

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

Low cost, single crystal-like substrates for practical, high efficiency solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well established that high efficiency (20%) solar cells can be routinely fabricated using single crystal photovoltaic (PV) materials with low defect densities. Polycrystalline materials with small grain sizes and no crystallographic texture typically result in reduced efficiences. This has been ascribed primarily to the presence of grain boundaries and their effect on recombination processes. Furthermore, lack of crystallographic texture can result in a large variation in dopant concentrations which critically control the electronic properties of the material. Hence in order to reproducibly fabricate high efficiency solar cells a method which results in near single crystal material is desirable. Bulk single crystal growth of PV materials is cumbersome, expensive and difficult to scale up. We present here a possible route to achieve this if epitaxial growth of photovoltaic materials on rolling-assisted-biaxially textured-substrates (RABiTS) can be achieved. The RABiTS process uses well-established, industrially scaleable, thermomechanical processing to produce a biaxially textured or single-crystal-like metal substrate with large grains (50-100 {mu}m). This is followed by epitaxial growth of suitable buffer layers to yield chemically and structurally compatible surfaces for epitaxial growth of device materials. Using the RABiTS process it should be possible to economically fabricate single-crystal-like substrates of desired sizes. Epitaxial growth of photovoltaic devices on such substrates presents a possible route to obtaining low-cost, high performance solar cells.

Goyal, A.; Specht, E.D.; List, F.A. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Evaluating coking resources. 2. State standard GOST 25543-88 as a coding system for coal and coal mixtures in evaluating their technological properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The codification of coal in State Standard 25543-88 is compared with the international codification of coal of medium and high rank. The ranking of coking coal on the basis of State Standard GOST...

Yu. A. Zolotukhin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Water-inrush Assessment Using a GIS-based Bayesian Network for the 12-2 Coal Seam of the Kailuan Donghuantuo Coal Mine in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Donghuantuo coal mine is geologically unusual, with 60 normal ... 18 reverse faults, and 1 syncline. The coal seam floor is highly fractured and the ... Ordina limestone aquifer into the no. 12 coal seam. Fro...

Dong Donglin; Sun Wenjie; Xi Sha

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Novel Steel/Concrete Composite Vessel for Stationary Storage of High-Pressure Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel, low-cost, high-pressure, steel/concrete composite vessel (SCCV) technology for stationary storage of compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH2) is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored by DOE s Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program. The SCCV technology uses commodity materials including structural steels and concretes for achieving cost, durability and safety requirements. In particular, the hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength low-alloy steels, a major safety and durability issue for current industry-standard pressure vessel technology, is mitigated through the use of a unique layered steel shell structure. This report presents the cost analysis results of the novel SCCV technology. A high-fidelity cost analysis tool is developed, based on a detailed, bottom-up approach which takes into account the material and labor costs involved in each of the vessel manufacturing steps. A thorough cost study is performed to understand the SCCV cost as a function of the key vessel design parameters, including hydrogen pressure, vessel dimensions, and load-carrying ratio. The major conclusions include: The SCCV technology can meet the technical/cost targets set forth by DOE s FCT Program for FY2015 and FY2020 for all three pressure levels (i.e., 160, 430 and 860 bar) relevant to the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. Further vessel cost reduction can benefit from the development of advanced vessel fabrication technologies such as the highly automated friction stir welding (FSW). The ORNL-patented multi-layer, multi-pass FSW can not only reduce the amount of labor needed for assembling and welding the layered steel vessel, but also make it possible to use even higher strength steels for further cost reductions and improvement of vessel structural integrity. It is noted the cost analysis results demonstrate the significant cost advantage attainable by the SCCV technology for different pressure levels when compared to the industry-standard pressure vessel technology. The real-world performance data of SCCV under actual operating conditions is imperative for this new technology to be adopted by the hydrogen industry for stationary storage of CGH2. Therefore, the key technology development effort in FY13 and subsequent years will be focused on the fabrication and testing of SCCV mock-ups. The static loading and fatigue data will be generated in rigorous testing of these mock-ups. Successful tests are crucial to enabling the near-term impact of the developed storage technology on the CGH2 storage market, a critical component of the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. In particular, the SCCV has high potential for widespread deployment in hydrogen fueling stations.

Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Candidate alloys for cost-effective, high-efficiency, high-temperature compact/foil heat-exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems operate at high temperatures (up to 1000 C and 650 C, respectively), which makes them especially attractive sources for combined heat and power (CHP) cogeneration. However, improvements in the efficiency of heat exchange in these fuel cells require both development and careful processing of advanced cost-effective alloys for use in such high-temperature service conditions. The high-temperature properties of both sheet and foil forms of several alloys being considered for use in compact heat-exchangers (recuperators) have been characterized. Mechanical and creep-rupture testing, oxidation studies, and microstructural studies have been performed on commercially available sheet and foil forms of alloy 347, alloys 625, HR230, HR120, and the new AL20-25+Nb. These studies have led to a mechanistic understanding of the responses of these alloys to anticipated service conditions, and suggest that these alloys developed for gas- and micro-turbine recuperator applications are also suitable for use in fuel cell heat-exchangers. Additional work is still required to achieve foil forms with creep life comparable to thicker-section wrought product forms of the same alloys.

Evans, Neal D [ORNL; Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Water and Associated Costs in the Production of Cotton and Grain Sorghum, Texas High Plains, 1955.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a very low price for his labor. Water constitutes one of the largest items of expense in preharvest costs, but substantial re- ductions in water cost seem unlikely. One pro- spect is to reduce fuel costs by a shift to natural gas. Natural gas... lines cost about $1,000 per well; consequently, the shift is advisable only if the annual fuel requirements are large. For large wells, a shift to natural gas would reduce annual costs of fuel substantially, and the savings would be sufficient...

Magee, A. C.; Hughes, William F.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Shenhua coal direct liquefaction plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon Technologies (HTI) has been working on a feasibility study for the construction of a Direct Coal Liquefaction Plant in Shenhua coalfield of China. HTI's direct coal liquefaction process, consisting primarily of two backmixed reactor stages plus a fixed-bed inline hydrotreater, operates at a pressure of 17 \\{MPa\\} and reactor temperatures in the range of 400–460°C. A dispersed superfine iron catalyst, GelCat®, is used in the process. Phase I of the study was successfully completed. Two coal sample from a coal mine in Shenhua coalfield were tested on HTI's continuous flow unit (CFU). Results were very encouraging. Though Shenhua coals are high in inert materials, HTI's coal liquefaction process has been able to achieve coal conversion of higher than 91 wt.% (on moisture and ash free, maf, coal) under all test conditions. Under the best conditions tested, distillate product yields from Shenhua coals are between 63–68 wt.% (maf coal). Liquid products are very low in sulfur and nitrogen, thus, very clean. Phase II is now underway. An additional test was conducted on a coal from another coal mine in Shenhua coalfield, which showed similar performance on liquefaction. Preliminary economic assessment is also discussed.

Alfred G. Comolli; Theo L.K. Lee; Gabriel A. Popper; Peizheng Zhou

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Coal Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Coal Market Module Figure 19. Coal Market Module Demand Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 20. Coal Market Module Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 21. Coal Market Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Coal Market Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end–use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal

417

Comparative Study of Gasification Performance between Bituminous Coal and Petroleum Coke in the Industrial Opposed Multiburner Entrained Flow Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SUMMARY : Co-gasification performance of coal and petroleum coke (petcoke) blends in a pilot-scale pressurized entrained-flow gasifier was studied exptl. ... Two different coals, including a subbituminous coal (Coal A) and a bituminous coal (Coal B), individually blended with a petcoke in the gasifier were considered. ... results suggested that, when the petcoke was mixed with Coal A over 70%, the slagging problem, which could shorten the operational period due to high ash content in the coal, was improved. ...

Zhonghua Sun; Zhenghua Dai; Zhijie Zhou; Jianliang Xu; Guangsuo Yu

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

418

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of recovering a very fine fraction of fly ash, that is 5 microns in diameter or less and examining the characteristics of these materials in new or at least less traditional applications. These applications included as a polymer filler or as a 'super' pozzolanic concrete additive. As part of the effort the ash from 6 power plants was investigated and characterized. This work included collection from ESP Hoppers and ponds. The ash was thoroughly characterized chemically and physically. Froth flotation was used to reduce the carbon and testing showed that flotation could effectively reduce carbon to acceptable levels (i.e. 0.5% LOI) for most of the substrates tested. in order to enable eventual use as fillers. Hydraulic classification was used in the separation of the fine ash from the coarse ash. Hydraulic classification requires the ash to be dispersed to be effective and a range of dispersants were tested for adsorption as well as sedimentation rate. A wide range of dosages were required (0.3 to 10 g/kg). In general the ponded ash required less dispersant. A model was developed for hydraulic classification. A pilot-scale hydraulic classifier was also designed and operated for the project. Product yields of up to 21% of feed solids were achieved with recoveries of <5 {micro}m particles as high as 64%. Mean particle sizes (D{sub 50}) of the ultra fine ash (UFA) products varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. A patent was filed on the classifier design. A conceptual design of a Process Demonstration Unit (PDU) with a feed rate of 2 tons of raw ash feed per hour was also completed. Pozzolanic activity was determined for the UFA ashes in mortars. In general the overall strength index was excellent with values of 90% achieved in 3 days and {approx}100% in 7 days. Three types of thermoplastic polymers were evaluated with the UFA as a filler: high density polyethylene, thermoplastic elastomer and polyethylene terphthalate filled polymers were prepared and subjected to SEM analysis to verify that the UFA was well dispersed. The addition of fillers increased the modulus of the HDPE composite, but decreased both the offset yield stress and offset yield strain, showing that the fillers essentially made the composite stiffer but the transition to plastic deformation occurred earlier in filled HDPE as stress was applied. Similar results were obtained with TPE, however, the decrease in either stress or strain at offset yield were not as significant. Dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) were also completed and showed that although there were some alterations in the properties of the HDPE and TPE, the alterations are small, and more importantly, transition temperatures are not altered. The UFA materials were also tested in expanded urethanes, were improvements were made in the composites strength and stiffness, particularly for lighter weight materials. The results of limited flammability and fire safety testing were encouraging. A flowsheet was developed to produce an Ultra-Fine Ash (UFA) product from reclaimed coal-fired utility pond ash. The flowsheet is for an entry level product development scenario and additional production can be accommodated by increasing operating hours and/or installing replicate circuits. Unit process design was based on experimental results obtained throughout the project and cost estimates were derived from single vendor quotes. The installation cost of this plant is estimated to be $2.1M.

T. L. Robl; J. G. Groppo; R. Rathbone; B. Marrs; R. Jewell

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

419

Syngas Production from Coal through Microwave Plasma Gasification: Influence of Oxygen, Steam, and Coal Particle Size  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas Production from Coal through Microwave Plasma Gasification: Influence of Oxygen, Steam, and Coal Particle Size ... Plasma gasification is widely applied because of its clean syngas production performance and high chemical reactivity accelerated by the free radicals produced by plasma. ... The syngas composition produced from plasma gasification at same conditions is affected by the physicochemical properties of coals. ...

Sang Jun Yoon; Jae Goo Lee

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

420

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 8, April--June, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion conditions, resulting in unburned carbon as well as slagging. A second phase of the project involved advanced analysis of the baseline coal along with an Australian coal fired at the plant. These analysis results were used in equilibrium thermodynamic modeling along with a coal quality model developed by the EERC to assess slagging, fouling, and opacity for the coals. Bench-scale carbon conversion testing was performed in a drop-tube furnace to assess the reactivity of the coals. The Australian coal had a higher mineral content with significantly more clay minerals present than the baseline coal. The presence of these clay minerals, which tend to melt at relatively low temperatures, indicated a higher potential for problematic slagging than the baseline coal. However, the pyritic minerals, comprising over 25% of the baseline mineral content, may form sticky iron sulfides, leading to severe slagging in the burner region if local areas with reducing conditions exist. Modeling results indicated that neither would present significant fouling problems. The Australian coal was expected to show slagging behavior much more severe than the baseline coal except at very high furnace temperatures. However, the baseline coal was predicted to exhibit opacity problems, as well as have a higher potential for problematic calcium sulfate-based low-temperature fouling. The baseline coal had a somewhat higher reactivity than the Australian coal, which was consistent with both the lower average activation energy for the baseline coal and the greater carbon conversion at a given temperature and residence time. The activation energy of the baseline coal showed some effect of oxygen on the activation energy, with E{sub a} increasing at the lower oxygen concentration, but may be due to the scatter in the baseline coal kinetic values at the higher oxygen level tested.

Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

Kennth Marken

2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

423

High Speed, Low Cost Fabrication of Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Membrane Electrode Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) depends on creating inks or pastes of catalyst and binder, and applying this suspension to either the membrane (catalyst coated membrane) or gas diffusion media (gas diffusion electrode) and respectively laminating either gas diffusion media or gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) to the membrane. One barrier to cost effecti