National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for high clay content

  1. La052605k(250) "Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions" Table of Contents Graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 La052605k(250) "Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions" Table" #12;2 Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions Céline Martin1 , Frédéric, mechanical compression, and osmotic stress (dialysis against a polymer solution). The positional

  2. TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY MEASUREMENT AND HIGHLY PLASTIC CLAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY MEASUREMENT AND HIGHLY PLASTIC CLAYS By: J. A. Kuhn1 and J. G. Zornberg for use in highly plastic clay. The clay used for experimentation was taken locally from the Eagle Ford Ford Clay is determined. INTRODUCTION The progression of wetting and drying fronts in highly plastic

  3. Multiscale modeling of clay-water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebrahimi, Davoud

    2014-01-01

    The engineering properties of soils are highly affected by clay content and clay-water interactions. However, existing macro-scale continuum models have no length scale to describe the evolution of the clay microstructure ...

  4. The need to design and construct roadways on highly plastic clays is common in central and eastern Texas, where expansive clays are prevalent. Roadways constructed on highly plastic clay subgrades may be damaged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    The need to design and construct roadways on highly plastic clays is common in central and eastern Texas, where expansive clays are prevalent. Roadways constructed on highly plastic clay subgrades may the infiltration of water into highly plastic clays under an increased gravity field in a centrifuge. Project

  5. Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading-rich shale recovered from the Wilcox formation and saturated with 1 M NaCl solution varies from 3 Â 10À22 transport; KEYWORDS: permeability, shale, connected pore space Citation: Kwon, O., A. K. Kronenberg, A. F

  6. Preparation and Properties of Recycled HDPE/Clay Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The influence of blending method, compatibil- izers, and clay content on clay intercalation and exfoliation. RHDPE/clay hybrids containing completely exfoliated clay were obtained using a two-step blending method), high density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP) are the three largest components

  7. Diagenesis of clay minerals from early Eocene shales of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whynot, John David

    1983-01-01

    expandable layers with depth that is reflected in the K 0 content and cation exchange capac- 2 ity (CEC) of the mixed-layer clay rich fine clay (& 0. 2 )jm) fraction. Samples high in expandable layers have a low K 0 content and high CEC. Samples low... in expandable layers have a high K 0 content and low CEC, which reflect the potassium being fixed in the interlayer positions of expandable layers. Potassium for this reaction may come from the K-feldspar rich silt (2 ? . 63 um) fraction. Some samples show...

  8. Redox-driven dissolution of clay minerals by uranium under high pressure CO2 conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    online 21 June 2014 Editor: J. Fein Keywords: Carbon sequestration Iron-bearing clay minerals Uranium, indicative of potential risks associated with geologic carbon sequestration. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is a process where CO2 is captured

  9. High gradient magnetic separation of iron oxide minerals from soil clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Darrell Gene

    1977-01-01

    steel wool, placed in a strong magnetic field (1. 6 Tesla), provides the magnetic field and magnetic field gradients necessary to trap weakly magnetic, clay size particles flowing through the filter as a dilute suspension in pH 10. 5 Na C03 solution...- magnetic particles. 2. There must be magnetic field gradients across the volume of the particles for magnetic attraction and trapping to occur. A magnetic field on the order of 1-2 Tesla produced by an electro- magnet is necessary to magnetize...

  10. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with speci?c sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  11. Project Title: High Street Precinct Website Content Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Project Title: High Street Precinct Website Content Development Bachelor of Arts Internships Organisation Supervisor: Zoe Roland Academic Supervisor: Katie Pickles Project Reference Number: S112/Historic Places Trust is developing a website to commemorate the High Street Precinct. It will be designed around

  12. Methods and technologies for high-throughput and high-content small animal screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Christopher, 1979-

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput and high-content screening (HTS and HCS) of whole animals requires their immobilization for high-resolution imaging and manipulation. Here we present methods to enable HTS and HCS of the nematode Caenorhabditis ...

  13. Introduction Luminance and Chrominance High Frequency Content References Smoke Detection in Stationary Video Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knaust, Helmut

    Introduction Luminance and Chrominance High Frequency Content References Smoke Detection and Chrominance High Frequency Content References The Problem The Problem: VIDEO: #12;Introduction Luminance and Chrominance High Frequency Content References Fire/Smoke Detection Techniques Standard techniques for fire

  14. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  15. The washability of lignites for clay removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2008-07-01

    In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

  16. REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE Ahmet H-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA ABSTRACT Remediation of contaminated high water content geomaterials for selection of geotextile filters; however, they are not directly applicable to high water content

  17. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.

    1989-10-03

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]-Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4] oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm[sup [minus]1] cm[sup [minus]1]. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  18. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, Steven C. (Richland, WA); Davis, Norman C. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  19. Testing of hollow clay tile masonry prisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.D.; Butala, M.B.

    1993-10-15

    This paper presents test results of 610-mm wide (24-in.) by 1219-mm high (48-in.) by 203-or 330-mm (8- or 13-in.) thick prisms constructed of hollow clay tiles. Three prisms were extracted fro existing hollow clay title walls and 69 were constructed in laboratories at The University of Tennessee and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Modulus of Elasticity, E, and compressive strength f{prime}{sub m} were calculated from the results.

  20. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles W. Solbrig; Chad Pope; Jason Andrus

    2014-09-01

    This paper estimates the temperature of high Pu content ZPPR fuel while in storage to determine the probablilty of fuel damage during storage. The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) is an experimental reactor which has been decomissioned. It ran only at extremely low power, for testing nuclear reactor designs and was operated as a criticality facility from April 18, 1969 until decommissioned in 1990. Its fuel was manufactured in 1967 and has been in storage since the reactor was decomissioned. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible fuel damage. Any damage to the cladding would be expected to lead to the fuel hydriding and oxidizing over a long period of storage as was described in the analysis of the damage to the ZPPR uranium fuel resulting in the fuel becoming unuseable and a large potential source of contamination. (Ref. Solbrig, 1994). A series of computer runs were made to scope out the range of temperatures that can occur in the ZPPR fuel in storage. The maximum calculated conservative fuel temperature is high (292 degrees C [558 degrees F]) in spite of the fact that the fuel element heat generation rates seem quite low, between 35 and 10 W for containers (called clamshells) full of fuel. However, the ZPPR storage bins, built for safeguards, are very effective insulators. The calculated clamshells and the cavity doors temperatures are also high. No record exists of people receiving skin burns by touching the cavity doors or clamshells, which indicates the computed temperatures may be higher than actual. (Note, gloves are worn when handling hotter clamshells.) Given the high calculated temperatures, a cursory measurement program was conducted to calibrate the calculated results. The measurement of bin doors, cavity doors, and clamshell temperatures would be easy to make if it were not for regulations resulting from security and potential contamination. Due to conservative assumptions in the model like high heat transfer contact resistance between contact surfaces (such as between the fuel and the clamshell), the calculated temperatures are intended to be overestimated. The temperatures of the stored fuel in a particular clamshell are dependent, among other parameters, on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel in the clamshell (parallel or perpendicular to the door). The distribution of fuel in this analysis was selected to give higher temperatures than actual distributions might give. Due to possible contamination and security concerns, fuel temperatures could not be measured but the bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and clamshell temperatures could be and were measured. The comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are higher than the actual temperatures. This implies that the calculated fuel temperatures are higher than actual also. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions (292 degrees C, (558 degrees F)) is significantly below the no fuel failure criterion of 600 degrees C (1,112 degrees F). Some fuel failures have occurred but these results indicate that the failures are not due to high temperatures encountered in fuel storage.

  1. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookins, D.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (US). Dept. of Geology

    1993-06-01

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 {+-} 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area.

  2. High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    1 High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 1. Introduction Information about near surface soil water content the applicability of a surface geophysical method, ground penetrating radar (GPR), for use as a water content

  3. Polyaluminum chloride with high Al30 content as removal agent for arsenic-contaminated well water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Polyaluminum chloride with high Al30 content as removal agent for arsenic-contaminated well water-established coagulant in water treatment with high removal efficiency for arsenic. A high content of Al30 nanoclusters¨ berlandstrasse 133, 8600 Du¨bendorf, Switzerland c Water Research Institute (IRSA), National Research Council

  4. Wellbore instability mechanisms in clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akl, Sherif Adel

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the stability of wellbores drilled in Ko-consolidated clays using non-linear finite element method (FEM) and effective stress soil models to characterize the behavior of clay and unconsolidated ...

  5. Testing of Expansive Clays in a Centrifuge Permeameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Testing of Expansive Clays in a Centrifuge Permeameter M. D. Plaisted & J. G. Zornberg with the objective of characterizing the swelling of highly plastic clays using a centrifuge permeameter. The new. This study, conducted using a comparatively simple, non- instrumented centrifuge device complements ongo- ing

  6. Method of preparing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, T.N.; Wittmer, D.E.

    1995-10-10

    A method for producing a high solids content, low viscosity ceramic slurry composition comprises turbomilling a dispersion of a ceramic powder in a liquid to form a slurry having a viscosity less than 100 centipoise and a solids content equal to or greater than 48 volume percent.

  7. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Pope, Chad L.; Andrus, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) operated from April 18, 1969, until 1990. ZPPR operated at low power for testing nuclear reactor designs. This paper examines the temperature of Pu content ZPPR fuel while it is in storage. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible cladding damage. Damage to the cladding could lead to fuel hydriding and oxidizing. A series of computer simulations were made to determine the range of temperatures potentially occuring in the ZPPR fuel. The maximum calculated fuel temperature is 292°C (558°F). Conservative assumptions in themore »model intentionally overestimate temperatures. The stored fuel temperatures are dependent on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel. Direct fuel temperatures could not be measured but storage bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and storage canister temperatures were measured. Comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are, as expected, higher than the actual temperatures. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions is significantly below the fuel failure criterion of 600°C (1,112°F).« less

  8. Phosphate Glasses for Vitrification of Waste with High Sulfur Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Cassingham, Nathan J.

    2002-10-31

    The low solubility of sulfate in silicate-based glasses, approximately 1 mass% as SO3, limits the loading of high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) containing high concentrations of sulfur. Based on crucible melting studies, we have shown that the phosphate glasses may incorporate more than 5 mass% SO3; hence, the waste loading can be increased until another constraint is met, such as glass durability. A high-sulfate HLW glass has been formulated and tested to demonstrate the advantages of phosphate glasses. The effect of waste loading on the chemical durability of quenched and slow-cooled phosphate glasses was determined using the Product Consistency Test.

  9. Sub-population analysis based on temporal features of high content images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajapakse, Jagath

    Background: High content screening techniques are increasingly used to understand the regulation and progression of cell motility. The demand of new platforms, coupled with availability of terabytes of data has challenged ...

  10. High-Content Chemical and RNAi Screens for Suppressors of Neurotoxicity in a Huntington's Disease Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chaohong

    To identify Huntington's Disease therapeutics, we conducted high-content small molecule and RNAi suppressor screens using a Drosophila primary neural culture Huntingtin model. Drosophila primary neurons offer a sensitive ...

  11. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-29

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  12. High-content screening in oncology using fluorescence microplate cytometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    number of cells and the inability to analyze adherent cell lines in situ. CCD imagers offer very high-lead optimization screens. Acumen Explorer product configuration Acumen Explorer is unique for cell-based primary with plate handling robotics to suit all levels of automation. Data acquisition and analysis Acumen Explorer

  13. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  14. Analysis of consolidation around driven piles in overconsolidated clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niarchos, Dimitrios G

    2012-01-01

    The principal objective of this thesis is to assess the capabilities of an already established analytical framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of piles driven in highly overconsolidated clays (OCR24). ...

  15. A BIOMECHANICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ROLE OF LARGE STEM VOLUME AND HIGH WATER CONTENT IN BAOBAB TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    A BIOMECHANICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ROLE OF LARGE STEM VOLUME AND HIGH WATER CONTENT IN BAOBAB TREES storage capacity in the six Madagascar baobab species. Baobab wood has a high water content (up to 79 to that in temperate deciduous trees. Furthermore, the elastic modulus of the wood decreases with water content

  16. Lateral load test of a drilled shaft in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasch, Vernon R

    1977-01-01

    LATERAL LOAD TEST OF A DRILLED SHAFT IN CLAY A Thesis by VERNON RAY KASCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering LATERAL LOAD TEST OF A DRILLED SHAFT IN CLAY A Thesis by VERNON RAY KASCH Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle - Ch irman of Committee Charles H. Samson, Jr. Head of Department Wayne . Dunlap - Ne er Christop er C...

  17. Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high-conductivity aquifer scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high for partially-penetrating slug tests in unconfined aquifers (Malama et al., in press) provides a semi the ultimate goal of determining aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity K and specific storage Ss

  18. Reduction of FeO contents in sinter under high bed operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, K.; Hazama, K.; Hoshikuma, Y.; Tarumoto, S.; Nunomura, S.; Hirota, N.

    1996-12-31

    High-bed operation (bed height more than 700 mm) is currently being carried out at the Kure No. 1 sintering plant. Before initiating this high-bed operation, the authors conducted sinter pot tests at various bed heights to investigate the effect of bed height on sintering. The following results were obtained from these pot tests: Heightening of the sinter bed increased yield at the upper layer, but at the lower layer, the yield reached a maximum value at a certain bed height. From observation of the sinter cakes, the reduction in yield is attributed to uneven burn caused by surplus heat at the lower layers. Therefore, when high-bed operation is carried out, reduction of the burning energy (reduction of the FeO content in the sinter) is required. This high-bed operation with lower FeO content has enabled the company to reduce fuel consumption and SiO{sub 2} content, while maintaining high yield and high sinter quality.

  19. Harmonic content and time variation of electron energy distributions in high-plasma-density, low-pressure inductively coupled discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Harmonic content and time variation of electron energy distributions in high-plasma-density, low-the-fly'' OTF Monte Carlo method. The OTF method directly computes the harmonic content of the EEDs using was incorporated into a two-dimensional plasma equipment model to investigate the harmonic content of the EEDs

  20. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  1. Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays | netl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Ubiquitous clay minerals can play an important role in assessing...

  2. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  3. Detection and Quantification of Expansive Clay Minerals in Geologically-Diverse Texas Aggregate Fines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, George 1983-

    2012-11-28

    minerals identified from XRD pattern of Jones Mill clay ???... 48 4.2 Rankin clay with HIM plateau at 12 ? of ?Mg, RT? treatment ............... 48 4.3 Armor aggregate with palygorskite (10.6 ?) and sepiolite (12.2 ?) ?.. 49 4.4 Fibrous palygorskite... and sepiolite minerals in Armor clay (29000X) ?. 50 4.5 Clay mineral quantities in aggregate fines (- 2 mm starting material) ?. 54 4.6 SEM image of high-crystallinity kaolinite ?books? in Rankin fines ?? 59 4.7 SEM images of Scarmado, Tolar, and Yarrington...

  4. Muffle furnace evaluation of FGD sludge-coal-clay mixtures as potential synthetic aggregates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettit, Jesse William

    1978-01-01

    MUFFLE FURNACE EVALUATION OF FGD SLUDGE-COAL-CLAY MIXTURES AS POTENTIAL SYNTHETIC AGGREGATES A Thesis JESSE WILLIAM PETTIT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Suoject: Civil Engineering MUFFLE FURNACE EVALUATION OF FGD SLUDGE-COAL-CLAY MIXTURES AS POTENTIAL SYNTHETIC AGGREGATES A Theseus by JESSE WILLIAM PETTIT Approved as to style and content by: r n of Commi tee...

  5. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  6. Doping of GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} with high As content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levander, A.X.; Novikov, S.V.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; dos Reis, R.; Dubon, O.D.; Wu, J.; Foxon, C.T.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2011-09-22

    Recent work has shown that GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} can be grown across the entire composition range by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy with intermediate compositions being amorphous, but control of the electrical properties through doping is critical for functionalizing this material. Here we report the bipolar doping of GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} with high As content to conductivities above 4 S/cm at room temperature using Mg or Te. The carrier type was confirmed by thermopower measurements. Doping requires an increase in Ga flux during growth resulting in a mixed phase material of polycrystalline GaAs:N embedded in amorphous GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x}.

  7. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

  8. Origin of high Zn contents in Jurassic limestone of the Jura mountain range and the Burgundy: evidence from Zn speciation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Jurassic limestone of the Jura mountain range (JMR) and the Burgundy bear anomalously high zincOrigin of high Zn contents in Jurassic limestone of the Jura mountain range and the Burgundy in Jurassic limestone of the Jura mountain range (JMR) and the Burgundy (B), we investigated four loca- tions

  9. Competitive sorption of pyrene and pyridine to natural clay minerals and reference clay standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lai Man

    2001-01-01

    understood. This study followed a mechanistic approach to confirm suspected specific mineral-PAH interactions. The focus was on the sorption of pyrene to three clay sorbents, a soil clay fraction and two reference clay standards, in the presence of a...

  10. A comparison of the behavior of intact and Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (BBC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    House, Robert Donald

    2012-01-01

    Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (RBBC) has been used as an analog test material for research at MIT for decades, due to local variability and the high cost of sampling. However, a comprehensive study of the differences in ...

  11. Precipitation of aluminum nitride in a high strength maraging steel with low nitrogen content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeanmaire, G.; Dehmas, M.; Redjaïmia, A.; Puech, S.; Fribourg, G.

    2014-12-15

    In the present work, aluminum nitride (AlN) precipitation was investigated in a X23NiCoCrMoAl13-6-3 maraging steel with low nitrogen content (wt.% N = 5.5 ppm). A reliable and robust automatic method by scanning electron microscopy observations coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was developed for the quantification of AlN precipitates. The first stage was to identify the solvus temperature and to develop a heat treatment able to dissolve the AlN precipitates. The experimental determination of equilibrium conditions and solvus temperature show good agreement with ThermoCalc® simulation. Then, from this AlN-free state, the cooling rate, isothermal holding time and temperature were the subject of an intensive investigation in the austenite region of this maraging steel. In spite of the high temperatures used during heat treatments, the growth kinetic of the largest AlN precipitates (> 1 ?m) is slow. The cooling rate has a major effect on the size and the number density of AlN due to a higher driving force for nucleation at low temperatures. At last, quenching prior to isothermal annealing at high temperatures leads to fine and dense AlN precipitation, resulting from the martensite to austenite transformation. Experimental results will be discussed and compared with kinetic data obtained with the mobility database MobFe2 implemented in Dictra® software. - Highlights: • Slow dissolution kinetic of AlN precipitates due to both their large size and small chemical driving force • Significant effects of cooling rate prior isothermal heat treatment, holding time and temperature on AlN precipitation • Size of AlN precipitates can be reduced by quenching prior isothermal holding. • Fine precipitation of AlN related to the ? ? ? transformation.

  12. 2006 Minerals Yearbook ClaY and Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the clays are mainly underclays associated with coal. domestic production data for clays were developed-based products in Canada and the United S

  13. Disposition of smoked cannabis with high {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol content: A kinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunault, Claudine C., E-mail: claudine.hunault@rivm.n [National Poisons Information Center, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Eijkeren, Jan C.H. van [Expertise Center for Methodology and Information Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Mensinga, Tjeert T. [National Poisons Information Center, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Clinic for treatment of drug addiction in Northern, Vondellaan 71-73, 9721 LB, Groningen (Netherlands); Vries, Irma de [National Poisons Information Center, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leenders, Marianne E.C. [National Poisons Information Center, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Division of Perioperative and Emergency Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX (Netherlands); Meulenbelt, Jan [National Poisons Information Center, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Division Intensive Care Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-08-01

    Introduction: No model exists to describe the disposition and kinetics of inhaled cannabis containing a high THC dose. We aimed to develop a kinetic model providing estimates of the THC serum concentrations after smoking cannabis cigarettes containing high THC doses (up to 69 mg THC). Methods: Twenty-four male non-daily cannabis users smoked cannabis cigarettes containing 29.3 mg, 49.1 mg, and 69.4 mg THC. Blood samples were collected over a period of 0-8 h and serum THC concentrations were measured. A two-compartment open model was fitted on the individual observed data. Results: Large inter-individual variability was observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters. The median pharmacokinetic parameters generated by the model were C{sub max} = 175 ng/mL, T{sub max} = 14 min, and AUC{sub 0-8h} = 8150 ng x min/mL for the 69.4 mg THC dose. Median model results show an almost linear dose response relation for C{sub max}/Dose = 2.8 x 10{sup -6}/mL and AUC{sub 0-8h}/Dose = 136 x 10{sup -6} min/mL. However, for increasing dose level, there was a clear decreasing trend: C{sub max}/Dose = 3.4, 2.6 and 2.5 x 10{sup -6}/mL and AUC{sub 0-8h}/Dose = 157, 133 and 117 x 10{sup -6} min/mL for the 29.3, 49.1 and 69.4 mg dose, respectively. Within the restriction of 8 h of observation, the apparent terminal half life of THC was 150 min. Conclusion: The model offers insight into the pharmacokinetics of THC in recreational cannabis users smoking cannabis containing high doses of THC mixed with tobacco. The model is an objective method for providing serum THC concentrations up to 8 h after smoking cannabis with a high THC content (up to 23%).

  14. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Ya; Yu, Xiqian; You, Ya; Yin, Yaxia; Nam, Kyung -Wan

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. The Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  15. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmospheremore »during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.« less

  16. f your soil has a high salinity content, the plants growing there will not be as vigorous as they would

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I f your soil has a high salinity content, the plants growing there will not be as vigorous as they would be in normal soils. Seeds will germinate poorly, if at all, and the plants will grow slowly much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil's salinity levels and suggest measures

  17. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  18. Effect of composite microstructure on electrical and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl acetate) composites with carbon black and clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miriyala, Sethu M.

    2009-05-15

    black with a primary particle size of 20 nm (a) and a schematic of networked high structure carbon black (b). Clay Overview Hydrous sodium or aluminium phyllosilicates which are typically less than 2 ?m in diameter are known as clay [44, 45...

  19. Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Greg

    ) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals Erik Oerter a, , Kari Finstad a , Justin Schaefer b , Gregory R the isotope effects caused by high CEC clays in mineral­water systems, we created a series of monominerallic with quartz to determine the isotope effect of non-, or very minimally-, charged mineral surfaces. The d18 O

  20. The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

  1. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  2. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  3. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  4. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  5. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, Kathleen C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Winans, Randall E. (Downers Grove, IL); Botto, Robert E. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  6. Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11_9_06.doc | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc More Documents & Publications...

  7. High Content Image Analysis Identifies Novel Regulators of Synaptogenesis in a High-Throughput RNAi Screen of Primary Neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nieland, Thomas J.

    The formation of synapses, the specialized points of chemical communication between neurons, is a highly regulated developmental process fundamental to establishing normal brain circuitry. Perturbations of synapse formation ...

  8. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:Clay Electric

  9. Improving window manipulation and content interaction on high resolution, wall-sized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruddle, Roy

    Interaction with high resolution wall-sized (Powerwall) displays can be a tedious and difficult task due%. Together, our new techniques help to make interaction more fluid on Powerwall displays. Keywords: Powerwall, interaction, precision. 1 Introduction High resolution, wall-sized displays (or Powerwalls) are becoming

  10. Model of crack propagation in a clay soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carriere, Patrick Edwidge

    1985-01-01

    of variance (ANOVA) to obtain the best selection to be included in the model. The ANOYA model was expressed by: Model = BO(H) + Bl(CL) + B2(M) + B3(H"M) + B4(H*CL) + B5(M*CL) + B6(H~M*CL) where: H = humidity effect, CL = clay content effect, M = initial.... 0280* T5 0. 7413 0. 5771 6. 16 0. 0001* T6 0. 2973 0. 2887 4. 94 0. 001* T7 0. 2065 0. 3432 2. 89 0. 0084* T8 0. 2543 0. 0767 15. 89 0. 0001* * significant at level 0. 05 30 Table 3. ANOVA results for crack de th. Source Sum of Degrees of Mean F...

  11. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  12. Characterization of Gulf of Mexico Clay Using Automated Triaxial Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murali, Madhuri

    2012-02-14

    . This thesis presents the results of SHANSEP triaxial testing performed on undisturbed samples of Gulf of Mexico clay. Background information is given about the clay, the sampling program and the laboratory testing program. The GEOTAC Truepath automated stress...

  13. The Swelling of Clays Within Portland Brownstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    the stone comes into contact with water. Water enters between the clay layers and surrounds the positive and buckling Ex.: rain #12;Example of Damage: Victoria Mansion in Portland, Maine oh my #12;2. Equipment: How 2. Water is poured on top, causes differential swelling 3. Sample warps due to the stress from

  14. Application of a Novel Clay Stabilizer to Mitigate Formation Damage due to Clay Swelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Timothy

    2014-12-09

    and drilling engineers’ responsibilities. This research focuses on the application of a cationic inorganic Al/Zr-based polymer clay stabilizer to prevent swelling of smectite particles in a sandstone matrix. Previous work has focused on mitigating fines...

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Foxon, C. T.; Yu, K. M.; Broesler, R.; Hawkridge, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Denlinger, J.; Demchenko, I.

    2009-10-06

    The authors have succeeded in growing GaN1?xAsx alloys over a large composition range (0 < x < 0.8) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The enhanced incorporation of As was achieved by growing the films with high As{sub 2} flux at low (as low as 100 C) growth temperatures, which is much below the normal GaN growth temperature range. Using x-ray and transmission electron microscopy, they found that the GaNAs alloys with high As content x > 0.17 are amorphous. Optical absorption measurements together with x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy results reveal a continuous gradual decrease in band gap from -3.4 to < 1 eV with increasing As content. The energy gap reaches its minimum of -0.8 eV at x - 0.8. The composition dependence of the band gap of the crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys follows the prediction of the band anticrossing model (BAC). However, our measured band gap of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} with 0.3 < x < 0.8 are larger than that predicted by BAC. The results seem to indicate that for this composition range the amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys have short-range ordering that resembles random crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys. They have demonstrated the possibility of the growth of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} layers with variable As content on glass substrates

  16. The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of Ni Surface Precipitates R O B E R 19717 The formation of transition-metal surface precipitates may occur during sorption to clay minerals formation are poorly understood. We monitored changes in the reversibility of Ni sorbed to a clay mineral

  17. Study of the muon content of very high-energy EAS measured with the KASCADE-Grande observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Curcio, C; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, D; Wochele, J

    2013-01-01

    The KASCADE-Grande detector is an air-shower array devoted to the study of primary cosmic rays with very high-energies (E = 10^{16} - 10^{18} eV). The instrument is composed of different particle detector systems suitable for the detailed study of the properties of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) developed by cosmic rays in the atmosphere. Among the EAS observables studied with the detector, the charged number of particles, the muon content (at different energy thresholds), and the number of electrons are found. By comparing the measurements of these air-shower parameters with the expectations from MC simulations, different hadronic interaction models can be tested at the high-energy regime with the KASCADE-Grande experiment. In this work, the results of a study on the evolution of the muon content of EAS with zenith angle, performed with the KASCADE-Grande instrument, is presented. Measurements are compared with predictions from MC simulations based on the QGSJET II, QGSJET II-04, SIBYLL 2.1 and EPOS 1.99 hadron...

  18. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, Robers; Dryer, Frederick; Ju, Yiguang

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  19. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  20. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  1. Reducing the moisture content of clean coals. Volume 2, High-G solid-bowl centrifuge: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehoe, D.

    1992-12-01

    Coal moisture content can profoundly effect the cost of burning coal in utility boilers. Because of the large effect of coal moisture, the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate advanced coal dewatering methods at its Coal Quality Development Center. This report contains the test result on the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge, the second of four devices to be tested. The high-G solid-bowl centrifuge removes water for coal by spinning the coal/water mixture rapidly in a rotating bowl. This causes the coal to cling to the sides of the bowl where it can be removed, leaving the water behind. Testing was performed at the CQDC to evaluate the effect of four operating variables (G-ratio, feed solids concentration, dry solids feed rate, and differential RPM) on the performance of the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge. Two centrifuges of different bowl diameter were tested to establish the effect of scale-up of centrifuge performance. Testing of the two centrifuges occurred from 1985 through 1987. CQDC engineers performed 32 tests on the smaller of the two centrifuges, and 47 tests on the larger. Equations that predict the performance of the two centrifuges for solids recovery, moisture content of the produced coal, and motor torque were obtained. The equations predict the observed data well. Traditional techniques of establishing the performance of centrifuge of different scale did not work well with the two centrifuges, probably because of the large range of G-ratios used in the testing. Cost of operating a commercial size bank of centrifuges is approximately $1.72 per ton of clean coal. This compares well with thermal drying, which costs $1.82 per ton of clean coal.

  2. Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Robert C. (Woodinville, WA); Edmonds, Ryan G. (Renton, WA); Williams, Joseph T. (Kirkland, WA); Baldwin, Stephen P. (Winchester, MA)

    2009-10-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  3. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  4. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness and resulted in improved TBC lifetimes. Processing based approaches of identifying optimal processing regimes deploying advanced in-situ coating property measurements and in-flight diagnostic tools were used to develop process maps for bond coats. Having established a framework for the bond coat processing using the HVOF process, effort were channeled towards fabrication of APS and VPS bond coats with the same material composition. Comparative evaluation of the three deposition processes with regard to their microstrcuture , surface profiles and TBC performance were carried out and provided valuable insights into factors that require concurrent consideration for the development of bond coats for advanced TBC systems. Over the course of this program several advancements were made on the development of durable thermal barrier coatings. Process optimization techniques were utilized to identify processing regimes for both conventional YSZ as well as other TBC compositions such as Gadolinium Zirconate and other Co-doped materials. Measurement of critical properties for these formed the initial stages of the program to identify potential challenges in their implementation as part of a TBC system. High temperature thermal conductivity measurements as well as sintering behavior of both YSZ and GDZ coatings were evaluated as part of initial efforts to undersand the influence of processing on coating properties. By effectively linking fundamental coating properties of fracture toughness and elastic modulus to the cyclic performance of coatings, a durability strategy for APS YSZ coatings was developed. In order to meet the goals of fabricating a multimaterial TBC system further research was carried out on the development of a gradient thermal conductivity model and the evaluation of sintering behavior of multimaterial coatings. Layer optimization for desired properties in the multimaterial TBC was achieved by an iterative feedback approach utilizing process maps and in-situ and ex-situ coating property sensors. Addressing the challenges pertaining to the integration of th

  5. Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Molenbroek, Edith C. (Rotterdam, NL); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO); Nelson, Brent P. (Golden, CO); Iwaniczko, Eugene (Lafayette, CO); Xu, Yueqin (Golden, CO)

    2002-01-01

    A method of fabricating device quality, thin-film a-Si:H for use as semiconductor material in photovoltaic and other devices, comprising in any order; positioning a substrate in a vacuum chamber adjacent a plurality of heatable filaments with a spacing distance L between the substrate and the filaments; heating the filaments to a temperature that is high enough to obtain complete decomposition of silicohydride molecules that impinge said filaments into Si and H atomic species; providing a flow of silicohydride gas, or a mixture of silicohydride gas containing Si and H, in said vacuum chamber while maintaining a pressure P of said gas in said chamber, which, in combination with said spacing distance L, provides a P.times.L product in a range of 10-300 mT-cm to ensure that most of the Si atomic species react with silicohydride molecules in the gas before reaching the substrate, to thereby grow a a-Si:H film at a rate of at least 50 .ANG./sec.; and maintaining the substrate at a temperature that balances out-diffusion of H from the growing a-Si:H film with time needed for radical species containing Si and H to migrate to preferred bonding sites.

  6. Muon content of ultra-high-energy air showers: Yakutsk data versus simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; I. E. Sleptsov; D. S. Gorbunov; G. I. Rubtsov; S. V. Troitsky

    2008-02-18

    We analyse a sample of 33 extensive air showers (EAS) with estimated primary energies above 2\\cdot 10^{19} eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array. We compare, event-by-event, the observed muon density to that expected from CORSIKA simulations for primary protons and iron, using SIBYLL and EPOS hadronic interaction models. The study suggests the presence of two distinct hadronic components, ``light'' and ``heavy''. Simulations with EPOS are in a good agreement with the expected composition in which the light component corresponds to protons and the heavy component to iron-like nuclei. With SYBILL, simulated muon densities for iron primaries are a factor of \\sim 1.5 less than those observed for the heavy component, for the same electromagnetic signal. Assuming two-component proton-iron composition and the EPOS model, the fraction of protons with energies E>10^{19} eV is 0.52^{+0.19}_{-0.20} at 95% confidence level.

  7. Fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Comparison with experimental clay models of oblique rifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Comparison with experimental clay models have used high-resolution scanned air photos and field measurements to analyze fracture population on the evolution of fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, SW Iceland. The peninsula is oriented

  8. Strong carrier localization and diminished quantum-confined Stark effect in ultra-thin high-indium-content InGaN quantum wells with violet light emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Suk-Min; Kwack, Ho-Sang; Park, Chunghyun; Yoo, Yang-Seok; Cho, Yong-Hoon, E-mail: yhc@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and KI for the NanoCentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and KI for the NanoCentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon-Yong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jin Kim, Hee; Yoon, Euijoon, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Si Dang, Le [Nanophysics and Semiconductors, CEA-CNRS-UJF Group, Institut Néel, CNRS Grenoble, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Nanophysics and Semiconductors, CEA-CNRS-UJF Group, Institut Néel, CNRS Grenoble, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-11-25

    Here, we report on the optical and structural characteristics of violet-light-emitting, ultra-thin, high-Indium-content (UTHI) InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), and of conventional low-In-content MQWs, which both emit at similar emission energies though having different well thicknesses and In compositions. The spatial inhomogeneity of In content, and the potential fluctuation in high-efficiency UTHI MQWs were compared to those in the conventional low-In-content MQWs. We conclude that the UTHI InGaN MQWs are a promising structure for achieving better quantum efficiency in the visible and near-ultraviolet spectral range, owing to their strong carrier localization and reduced quantum-confined Stark effect.

  9. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  10. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  11. Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Bergin

    2011-03-30

    The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

  12. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1992--May 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of iron-pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Previous work in this project showed that a catalyst prepared by adding ferric nitrate and ammonia to an acid-washed clay gave an active catalyst following sulfidation. Further testing of this catalyst with a model compound showed that its hydrocracking activity was considerably lower when used in 10% concentration rather than 50%. In contrast, the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts were still highly effective at 10% concentration and gave good conversions at one and two hour reaction times. An investigation of preparation methods demonstrated that calcination of both the iron hydroxyoxide-impregnated clay and the mixed iron/alumina pillared clays is essential for activity. High activity was obtained for these catalysts only when they were removed from the aqueous media rapidly, dried, and calcined. The use of ferric sulfate to prepare a clay-supported sulfated iron catalyst was attempted, the resulting catalyst was relatively inactive for hydrocracking. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. A zirconia-pillared clay with low pillar density was prepared and intercalated with triiron complex. The hydrocracking activity of this catalyst was somewhat lower than that of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalyst. Other new catalysts, that were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars, and finally the iron component, were also tested. The mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts was further tested at low concentration for pyrene hydrogenating and hydrocracking activities.

  13. Clay Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    arc. Three directional wells were drilled in 2001 to optimize the productivity of the geothermal field up to 15 MWe and to investigate the vertical distribution of clay...

  14. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets...

  15. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of...

  16. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide...

  17. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential members who are making efficiency upgrades to primary residence served by CEC. Rebates are available for residential...

  18. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive/thermo-chemical attack mechanisms; (iv) developing a mechanics-based analysis of the driving forces for crack growth and delamination, based on molten phase infiltration, misfit upon cooling, and loss of compliance; (v) understanding changes in TGO growth mechanisms associated with these emerging combustion product streams; and (vi) identifying degradation resistant alternative materials (including new compositions or bi-layer concepts) for use in mitigating the observed degradation modes. To address the materials stability concerns, this program integrated research thrusts aimed at: (1) Conducting tests in simulated syngas and HHC environments to evaluate materials evolution and degradation mechanisms; assessing thermally grown oxide development unique to HHC environmental exposures; carrying out high-resolution imaging and microanalysis to elucidate the evolution of surface deposits (molten phase formation and infiltration); exploring thermo-chemical instabilities; assessing thermo-mechanical drivers and thermal gradient effects on degradation; and quantitatively measuring stress evolution due to enhanced sintering and thermo-chemical instabilities induced in the coating. (2) Executing experiments to study the melting and infiltration of simulated ash deposits, and identifying reaction products and evolving phases associated with molten phase corrosion mechanisms; utilizing thermal spray techniques to fabricate test coupons with controlled microstructures to study mechanisms of instability and degradation; facilitating thermal gradient testing; and developing new materials systems for laboratory testing; (3) Correlating information on the resulting combustion environments to properly assess materials exposure conditions and guide the development of lab-scale simulations of material exposures; specification of representative syngas and high-hydrogen fuels with realistic levels of impurities and contaminants, to explore differences in heat transfer, surface degradation, and deposit formation; and facilitating combustion rig testing of materials test coupons.

  19. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    of a jurassic opalinum shale, switzerland. Clays and Clay96   1 INTRODUCTION Clay/shale has been considered asand Rupture of Heterogeneous Shale Samples by Using a Non-

  20. Naphthene upgrading with pillared synthetic clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrotreatment of methylcyclohexane was investigated to model upgrading of coal-derived naphthenes. Nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM), alumina-pillared NiSMM and Zirconia-pillared NiSMM were prepared and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of methylcyclohexane. Infrared and thermal desorption studies of the pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Total acidity and surface area increased with pillaring of NiSMM with polyoxy aluminum and polyoxy zirconium cations. Methylcyclohexane was reacted with these catalysts under a variety of conditions. Pillared clays gave higher gas yields and higher hydrocracking but lower hydroisomerization activity than nonpillared clay. The majority of the products were branched alkanes (isoparaffinic). These catalysts effectively use hydrogen as indicated by the minimal formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, coke, or other oligomeric materials. The effect of various operating conditions, i.e., reaction temperature, contact time, H{sub 2} pressure, and catalyst, on the product distribution will be described.

  1. The Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors on the Stability and Transport of Clay Particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musharova, Darya

    2012-07-16

    clays, which include the kaolinite groups of clays. Therefore, two basic damage mechanisms of clay minerals are swelling and dispersion. Both mechanisms cause pore plugging, and thus aggravate hydrocarbon ease of flow. In this thesis, the effect...

  2. Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW Department of Agronomy, Purdue University. Agric. Exp. Stn., West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. SUMMARY The swelling of clay-water systems and the thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and spectroscopic properties of water in these systems are discussed. The swelling

  3. Toxic element composition of multani mitti clay for nutritional safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    ´, Budapest, Hungary 2012 Abstract Geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common in central Pakistan of Science, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan-012-1876-x #12;In Pakistan geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common especially amongst the women

  4. Cesium Adsorption on Clay Minerals: An EXAFS Spectroscopic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    Cesium Adsorption on Clay Minerals: An EXAFS Spectroscopic Investigation B E N J A M I N C . B O, Arizona 85721-0038 Cesium adsorption on the clay minerals vermiculite and montmorilloniteisdescribedasafunctionofsurfacecoverage using extended X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Cesium (Cs) possessed

  5. Field tests and new design procedure for laterally loaded drilled shafts in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierschwale, Mark W.

    1980-01-01

    , and develop a new design procedure for drilled shafts supporting precast panel retaining walls. FIELD LOAD TESTS The prediction of the behavior of laterally loaded shafts involves the determination of the shaft-soil interaction. One approach... 4ft to l3 ft 5 -very stiff red clay(CH) below 5ft I-O zL 128 l30 P IC WA R L I QUI 0 LIMIT CONTENT /o LI Ml T ? + 7 IO 20 30 COHESIVE SHEAR STRENGTH, Cu, 0. 6 0, 8 I 0 I. 2 I, 4 I, 6 I. 8 ~ Unconfined Compression Test + Miniature Vane...

  6. CO2 Sorption to Subsingle Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Wallacher, Dirk; Hauss, Thomas; Schaef, Herbert T.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Krukowski, Elizabeth; Stack, Andrew G.; Grimm, Nico; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-15

    Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may interact with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of ??0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 Å. The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At the excess sorption maximum, increasing CO2 sorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak temperature dependence.

  7. CO2 Adsorption to Sub-Single Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Ilton, Eugene [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Hauss, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Schaef, Herbert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Qafoku, Odeta [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Felmy, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Krukowski, Elizabeth G [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Bodnar, Robert J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may react with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of 0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 . The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At low pressure increasing CO2 adsorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak or no temperature dependence. Supercritical fluids, sorption phenomena, carbon dioxide, carbon sequestration, caprock integrity

  8. Potassium Fixation and Supply by Soils with Mixed Clay Minerals. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipp, Billy W.

    1969-01-01

    potassium Fixation and Supply By Soils With Misd Clay Minerals I KUS A&M UNIVERSITY Tcrv Agricultural Experiment Station r i 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas Summary to the plants while Cameron clay supplied onl!. Studies were made... of plants for any one crop period. The plants were n , with distilled water throughout the experiment. ' Ther I Previous work by Hipp and Thomas (3) pointed out the importance of clay type in the assessment of K avail- ability in certain soils of Texas...

  9. The effect of sources of nitrogen on nitrate formation and nitrogen uptake by cotton plants growing on Miller clay loam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Zilmar Ziller

    1958-01-01

    LIB RARV A & M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE EFFECT OF SOURCES OF NITROGEN ON NITRATE FORMATION AND NITROGEN UPTAKE HX COTTON PIANTS GROWXNG ON MILLER CIAY LOAN A Thesis ZXINAR ZXLLER NARCOS AAS Submitted, to the Graduate School of the Agricultural... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ 66 APPEEDIXt ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 73 Tables l. Treatments Used in the Study. 2 Nitrate Content (ppm) of Miller Clay (0-6 ') on the 10th of July as Affected. by Rate and Source of' Nitrogen, Avexage oi' Two Repli- Nitrate Content (ppm) of Miller...

  10. TABLE OF CONTENTS Content Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Content Page Version 5.1 iii September 2012 Contents 1 INTRODUCTION 1-1 1;TABLE OF CONTENTS Content Page Version 5.1 iv September 2012 3 PLANNING AND DESIGN GUIDELINES 3-1 3 Noise 3-25 3.3.15 Optimise Light 3-25 3.3.16 Save Water 3-25 3.3.17 Minimise Waste 3-25 3.4 Green Star

  11. Sandstone Acidizing Using Chelating Agents and their Interaction with Clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Noble Thekkemelathethil 1987-

    2013-01-09

    in the application of acidizing, coreflood tests were performed on Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. Another disadvantage of mud acid has been the fast spending at clay mineral surfaces leading to depletion of acid strength, migration of fines, and formation...

  12. Immersion freezing of clay minerals and bacterial ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiranuma, Naruki

    2013-01-01

    The immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals and biological aerosols has been investigated using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber. Both monodisperse and polydisperse ...

  13. The mechanical behavior of heavily overconsolidated resedimented Boston Blue Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas Bustamante, Albalyra Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Geotechnical engineers encounter some of the most challenging problems in heavily overconsolidated soils. Clays under this condition originated in nature or man-made construction. This thesis investigates the mechanical ...

  14. Unsaturated properties for non-Darcian water flow in clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Physical chemistry of clay-water interaction, Advance inporous media. Advances in Water Resources 2, 351-362. Zou,Newtonian fluids Figure 2. A water element in a capillary

  15. Intercalation of Trichloroethene by Sediment-Associated Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthieu, Donald E.; Brusseau, Mark; Johnson, G. R.; Artiola, J. L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Curry, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the potential for intercalation of trichloroethene (TCE) by clay minerals associated with aquifer sediments. Sediment samples were collected from a field site inTucson, AZ. Two widely used Montmorillonite specimen clays were employed as controls. X-ray diffraction, conducted with a controlled-environment chamber, was used to characterize smectite interlayer dspacing for three treatments (bulk air-dry sample, sample mixed with synthetic groundwater, sample mixed with TCE-saturated synthetic groundwater). The results show that the d-spacing measured for the samples treated with TCE-saturated synthetic groundwater are larger (*26%) than those of the untreated samples for all field samples as well as the specimen clays. These results indicate that TCE was intercalated by the clay minerals, which may have contributed to the extensive elution tailing observed in prior miscible-displacement experiments conducted with this sediment.

  16. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 9, 1992--August 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of mixed pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported catalysts and determination of their catalytic activities were continued in this quarter. To demonstrate the reproducibility of the preparative method for high activity iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite catalysts, a new batch of the catalyst was prepared and tested for hydrocracking activity with bibenzyl. This preparation gave conversion and product distribution similar to that reported previously. The mixed iron/alumina-pillared clay was also prepared using a pillaring solution that was aged for longer period of time. To determine the importance of the type of pillaring support in hydrocracking activity, iron/zirconia-pillared montmorillonite was prepared using the same technique as that for iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite. The reaction of bibenzyl with the sulfided iron/zirconia-pillared catalyst gave a lower hydrocracking conversion than the iron/alumina-pillared catalyst. Addition of a second catalytic metal to the clay support was attempted to determine if a synergistic effect could improve liquefaction. Ferric nitrate and stannous chloride were added to the clay, but the resulting catalyst was relatively poor for hydrocracking and hydrogenation compared with ferric nitrate supported on the clay. New disposable iron catalysts with high acidity and surface area are desired for coal liquefaction. Synthetic iron aluminosilicates were prepared by methods similar to those used for the nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM) catalysts, which are very effective for hydrogenation and reforming of hydrocarbons. The iron aluminosilicate catalysts were tested for hydrocracking and hydrogenation of bibenzyl, naphthalene and pyrene. Pyrene hydrogenation was effectively catalyzed by the sulfided synthetic iron catalyst.

  17. Thermo-Hydrological-Mechanical Analysis of a Clay Barrier for Radioactive Waste Isolation: Probabilistic Calibration and Advanced Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dontha, Lakshman

    2012-07-16

    The engineered barrier system is a basic element in the design of repository to isolate high level radioactive waste (HLW). In this system, the clay barrier plays a prominent role in dispersing the heat generated from the waste, reduce the flow...

  18. Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, A.Z.

    2008-01-01

    the weighted sum of the water content in the membrane in theposition of the maximum water content and the water-contentgradient in the water content and capillary pressure,

  19. Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, A.Z.

    2008-01-01

    is the weighted sum of the water content in the membrane inResolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in aPark, PA 16802, USA. b Water-content profiles across the

  20. Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Weber, A.Z.; Hickner, M.A.

    2008-03-06

    Water-content profiles across the membrane electrode assembly of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell were measured using high-resolution neutron imaging and compared to mathematical-modeling predictions. It was found that the membrane held considerably more water than the other membrane-electrode constituents (catalyst layers, microporous layers, and macroporous gas-diffusion layers) at low temperatures, 40 and 60 C. The water content in the membrane and the assembly decreased drastically at 80 C where vapor transport and a heat-pipe effect began to dominate the water removal from the membrane-electrode assembly. In the regimes where vapor transport was significant, the through-plane water-content profile skewed towards the cathode. Similar trends were observed as the relative humidity of the inlet gases was lowered. This combined experimental and modeling approach has been beneficial in rationalizing the results of each and given insight into future directions for new experimental work and refinements to currently available models.

  1. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic eliminationof a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibanova, Daria; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Destaillats, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Clay-supported TiO2 photocatalysts can potentially improve the performance of air treatment technologies via enhanced adsorption and reactivity of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, a bench-top photocatalytic flow reactor was used to evaluate the efficiency of hectorite-TiO2 and kaolinite-TiO2, two novel composite materials synthesized in our laboratory. Toluene, a model hydrophobic VOC and a common indoor air pollutant, was introduced in the air stream at realistic concentrations, and reacted under UVA (gamma max = 365 nm) or UVC (gamma max = 254 nm) irradiation. The UVC lamp generated secondary emission at 185 nm, leading to the formation of ozone and other short-lived reactive species. Performance of clay-TiO2 composites was compared with that of pure TiO2 (Degussa P25), and with UV irradiation in the absence of photocatalyst under identical conditions. Films of clay-TiO2 composites and of P25 were prepared by a dip-coating method on the surface of Raschig rings, which were placed inside the flow reactor. An upstream toluene concentration of ~;;170 ppbv was generated by diluting a constant flow of toluene vapor from a diffusion source with dry air, or with humid air at 10, 33 and 66percent relative humidity (RH). Toluene concentrations were determined by collecting Tenax-TA (R) sorbent tubes downstream of the reactor, with subsequent thermal desorption -- GC/MS analysis. The fraction of toluene removed, percentR, and the reaction rate, Tr, were calculated for each experimental condition from the concentration changes measured with and without UV irradiation. Use of UVC light (UV/TiO2/O3) led to overall higher reactivity, which can be partially attributed to the contribution of gas phase reactions by short-lived radical species. When the reaction rate was normalized to the light irradiance, Tr/I gamma, the UV/TiO2 reaction under UVA irradiation was more efficient for samples with a higher content of TiO2 (P25 and Hecto-TiO2), but not for Kao-TiO2. In all cases, reaction rates peaked at 10percent RH, with Tr values between 10 and 50percent higher than those measured under dry air. However, a net inhibition was observed as RH increased to 33percent and 66percent, indicating that water molecules competed effectively with toluene for reactive surface sites and limited the overall photocatalytic conversion. Compared to P25, inhibition by co-adsorbed water was less significant for Kao-TiO2 samples, but was more dramatic for Hecto-TiO2 due to the high water uptake capacity of hectorite.

  2. Synthesis of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} with different sulfur content by conventional high temperature solid state solvothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, S. I., E-mail: patelishverb@yahoo.com; Patel, I. B., E-mail: patelishverb@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat-395007 (India); Shah, N. M. [Physics Department, A.N. Shah Science College, Kamrej-394185 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Bismuth sulfide (Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3}) is a binary chalcogenide compound material belonging to V-VI group of semiconductors. Because of its direct band gap of 1.3 eV and high figure of merit (ZT) value, it is widely used as a thermo electronic-cooling material based on the Peltier effect. The electrical and optical property of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} material is strongly dependent on stoichiometric composition, defect chemistry and structure. In this study, we have synthesized Bi{sub 2}S{sub x} (x = 3.15, 3.30, 3.45) compound material with different sulfur content by conventional high temperature solid state solvothermal reaction of bismuth and sulfur. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) analysis of synthesized compound materials were carried out to observe crystallinity, surface morphology and composition of elements in the compound. The optical analysis revealed that energy band gap decreases with increase of sulfur content.

  3. Midbarrel hydrocracking process employing rare earth pillared clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gortsema, F.P.; McCauley, J.R.; Miller, J.G. Rabo, J.A.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes improvement in a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbons boiling above about 700{degrees} F. to midbarrel fuel products boiling between about 300{degrees} F. and about 700{degrees} F. which includes contacting the hydrocarbons with hydrogen under effective hydrocracking conditions in the presence of a catalyst composition consisting of at least one hydrogenation component and at least one cracking component. The improvement comprises utilizing as the cracking component an expanded clay including pillars comprising at least one pillaring metal, at least one rare earth element and oxygen located between the sheets of at least one clay mineral or synthetic analogue thereof.

  4. Clay Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:Clay

  5. Soil damping constants related to common soil properties in sands and clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Gary Clive

    1968-01-01

    SOIL D'c~. 'I'IIIG COESTAlxI. S PI', IslTED TO CO!~i'iOI& SOII. PRO& ERTIES J3I SAE1)S AND CL?"S A Thesis by Gary Olive G'boon Sr b':I' te'I to tho Gra=lu. . te Col lope of Texas Afxl Univcrsi ty in pert'al fulfillsent of the requirenent... for the Je;, ree of YiASTER Ol" SCIEI!CE August ISSS II. ';or Subject: Civil I:nSin er. nb SOIL DAMPING CONSTANTS REIATED TO COMMON SOIL PROPERTIES IN SANDS AND CLAYS A Thesis by Gary Clive Gibson Approved as to style and content by: (Head...

  6. Multiscale micromechanical modeling of the thermal/mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Nuo, 1977-

    2006-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced thermal/mechanical properties at low weight fractions (We) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly ...

  7. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the ...

  8. On the relationship between water-flux and hydraulic gradient for unsaturated and saturated clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Threshold gradient for water flow in clay systems. Soil.Darcy’s law for the flow of water in soils. Soil Science 93:1970. Saturated flow of water through clay loam subsoil

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6272015 6:10:39 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary) "...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6272015 6:10:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary) "...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6272015 6:11:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary) "...

  16. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    illitization in burial diagenesis environments. Geochimicausually part of the diagenesis process of clay formation (is usually part of the diagenesis process of clay formation.

  17. Chinese character decoding: a semantic bias? Clay Williams Thomas Bever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bever, Thomas G.

    Chinese character decoding: a semantic bias? Clay Williams · Thomas Bever Published online: 6 April on Chinese character decoding were examined. Our results suggest that semantic and phonetic radicals are each response times. These results are interpreted to indicate that while educated native Chinese speakers have

  18. Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples Pierre DELAGE 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples Pierre DELAGE 1 , Trung-Tinh LE 1 , Anh-Minh TANG located at Mol (Belgium) called Boom clay, in the context of research into deep nuclear waste disposal. Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples were investigated through the characterisation

  19. Using radiative transfer models to study the atmospheric water vapor content and to eliminate telluric lines from high-resolution optical spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardini, A; Pérez, E; Quesada, J A; Funke, B

    2012-01-01

    The Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) and the retrieval algorithm, incorporated in the SCIATRAN 2.2 software package developed at the Institute of Remote Sensing/Institute of Enviromental Physics of Bremen University (Germany), allows to simulate, among other things, radiance/irradiance spectra in the 2400-24 000 {\\AA} range. In this work we present applications of RTM to two case studies. In the first case the RTM was used to simulate direct solar irradiance spectra, with different water vapor amounts, for the study of the water vapor content in the atmosphere above Sierra Nevada Observatory. Simulated spectra were compared with those measured with a spectrometer operating in the 8000-10 000 {\\AA} range. In the second case the RTM was used to generate telluric model spectra to subtract the atmospheric contribution and correct high-resolution stellar spectra from atmospheric water vapor and oxygen lines. The results of both studies are discussed.

  20. Identification of Pore Structure and Clay Content from Seismic Data within an Argillaceous Sandstone Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schelstrate, Robert

    2014-08-11

    on the depositional environment. Increasing amounts of shale become a limiting factor in reservoir quality by creating baffles to fluid flow. Seismic inversion has been used to map reservoir properties such as lithology and porosity. Previous studies have established...

  1. Clay County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:

  2. Clay County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,

  3. Evaluation of plasma melter technology for verification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes: Demonstration test No. 4 preliminary test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Gass, W.R.; Dighe, S.V.; D`Amico, N.; Swensrud, R.L.; Darr, M.F.

    1995-01-10

    This document provides a preliminary report of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. Phase I test conduct included 26 hours (24 hours steady state) of melting of simulated high-sodium low-level radioactive liquid waste. Average processing rate was 4.9 kg/min (peak rate 6.2 kg/min), producing 7330 kg glass product. Free-flowing glass pour point was 1250 C, and power input averaged 1530 kW(e), for a total energy consumption of 19,800 kJ/kg glass. Restart capability was demonstrated following a 40-min outage involving the scrubber liquor heat exchanger, and glass production was continued for another 2 hours. Some volatility losses were apparent, probably in the form of sodium borates. Roughly 275 samples were collected and forwarded for analysis. Sufficient process data were collected for heat/material balances. Recommendations for future work include lower boron contents and improved tuyere design/operation.

  4. TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE WAVELENGTH and ash. Hg, As. Ni, and Se have been detected in individualpyrite grains in Illinois#6 coal at levels up #6 coal. The same trace metals were detected in pyrite and clay grains from Pittsburgh #8 coal. Ash

  5. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-05-29

    Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

  6. No-tillage and high-residue practices reduce soil water evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    harvest and before corn seeding), we es- timated that 0.89 and 0.97 inches more waterwater content in a Panoche clay loam soil during the transition from wheat harvest

  7. Characterizing the DNA damage response by cell tracking algorithms and cell features classification using high-content time-lapse analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Georgescu, Walter; Osseiran, Alma; Rojec, Maria; Liu, Yueyong; Bombrun, Maxime; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Huen, Michael Shing-Yan

    2015-06-24

    Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF) across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were ablemore »to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when too many DSB occur at once. High doses of ionizing radiation lead to RIF merging into repair domains which in turn increases DSB proximity and misrepair. Such finding may therefore be critical to explain the supralinear dose dependence for chromosomal rearrangement and cell death measured after exposure to ionizing radiation.« less

  8. Characterizing the DNA damage response by cell tracking algorithms and cell features classification using high-content time-lapse analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgescu, Walter; Osseiran, Alma; Rojec, Maria; Liu, Yueyong; Bombrun, Maxime; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Huen, Michael Shing-Yan

    2015-06-24

    Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF) across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 µm2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when too many DSB occur at once. High doses of ionizing radiation lead to RIF merging into repair domains which in turn increases DSB proximity and misrepair. Such finding may therefore be critical to explain the supralinear dose dependence for chromosomal rearrangement and cell death measured after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  9. Uncertainty in the reactive transport model response to an alkaline perturbation in a clay formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnol, A.; Blanc, P.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    parameters (permeability, capillary pressure of concrete/Concrete Clay Van Genuchten Po (Pa) Van Genuchten m Specific Heat (J/kg K) Permeability (

  10. Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources Jump

  11. Clay County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources

  12. Clay County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: Energy

  13. Clay County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: EnergyIndiana: Energy

  14. Clay County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: EnergyIndiana:

  15. Clay County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: EnergyIndiana:Kansas:

  16. Clay County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota: Energy

  17. Clay County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota:

  18. Clay County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota:Missouri:

  19. Clay County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: Energy Resources

  20. Clay County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: Energy

  1. Clay County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: EnergyTennessee:

  2. Clay County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:

  3. Clay-Union Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,Georgia (UtilityWilliamsCentralClay-Union

  4. Investigation of two-phase flow phenomena associated with corrosion in an SF/HLW repository in Opalinus Clay, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senger, R.; Marschall, P.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-08-04

    Gas generation from corrosion of the waste canisters and gas accumulation in the backfilled emplacement tunnels is a key issue in the assessment of long-term radiological safety of the proposed repository for spent fuel and high-level waste (SF/HLW) sited in the Opalinus Clay formation of Northern Switzerland. Previous modeling studies indicated a significant pressure buildup in the backfilled emplacement tunnels for those sensitivity runs, where corrosion rates were high and the permeability of the Opalinus Clay was very low. As an extension to those studies, a refined process model of the canister corrosion phenomena has been developed, which accounts not only for the gas generation but also for the water consumption associated with the chemical reaction of corrosion of steel under anaerobic conditions. The simulations with the new process model indicate, that with increasing corrosion rates and decreasing host-rock permeability, pressure buildup increased, as expected. However, the simulations taking into account water consumption show that the pressure buildup is reduced compared to the simulation considering only gas generation. The pressure reduction is enhanced for lower permeability of the Opalinus Clay and for higher corrosion rates, which correspond to higher gas generations rates and higher water consumption rates. Moreover, the simulated two-phase flow patterns in the engineered barrier system (EBS) and surrounding Opalinus Clay show important differences at late time of the gas production phase as the generated gas continues to migrate outward into the surrounding host rock. For the case without water consumption, the water flow indicates overall downward flow due to a change in the overall density of the gas-fluid mixture from that based on the initially prescribed hydrostatic pressure gradient. For the case with water consumption, water flow converges toward the waste canister at a rate corresponding to the water consumption rate associated with the corrosion reaction. The water flow toward the canister is maintained even for very low permeabilities of the Opalinus clay, sustaining the anaerobic corrosion of the steel canister.

  5. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO?-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more »in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  6. EERE Website Content Checklist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This checklist is a tool to guide EERE content developers and editors in creating and reviewing content for websites.

  7. Change in the hydraulic properties of a Brazilian clay Ferralsol on clearing for pasture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Change in the hydraulic properties of a Brazilian clay Ferralsol on clearing for pasture L. C 80 to 300 m in size. The aim of this study was to analyze how the hydraulic properties of a clay retention properties were determined by using pressure cell equipment. We determined the saturated hydraulic

  8. A Simple Method To Improve the Clarity and Rheological Properties of Polymer/Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 ABSTRACT We present a simple method to improve. INTRODUCTION P olymer nanocomposites made by mixing thermo- plastic polymers with clay particles have been applications. The one property of polymers/plastics that is adversely impacted by the addition of clay

  9. Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation March 17 encompasses a newly developed clay-polymer aerogel composite material (developed and patented by Dr. David Aerogel ~22 > 2,500 Silica Aerogel Blanket 10 1,800 (Aspen Aerogel) Silica Aerogel / PP Evacuated Panel 50

  10. Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces R. G. Ford Metal sorption to clay minerals may lead to the formation of secondary precipitates structurally similar to the mineral takovite. Saturation with respect to this phase is promoted, in part

  11. Integrity and access control in untrusted content distribution networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kevin E. (Kevin Edward), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    A content distribution network (CDN) makes a publisher's content highly available to readers through replication on remote computers. Content stored on untrusted servers is susceptible to attack, but a reader should have ...

  12. Seawater Osmium Isotope Records from Pacific ODP and IODP Sites- Refining the Paleogene Curve and Dating Red Clay Sequences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolewicz, Zachary Louis

    2013-02-04

    exclusively of pelagic clay with little existing age control. Recent work indicates that seawater Osmium (Os) isotope analyses provide useful age control for red clay sequences due to its relatively long residence time compared to oceanic mixing. The drawback...

  13. A New Application of Potassium Nitrate as an Environmentally Friendly Clay Stabilizer in Water-Based Drilling Fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jing

    2015-04-15

    The application of potassium chloride (KCl) as a temporary clay stabilizing additive in water-based drilling fluids is problematic in chloride-sensitive formations. However, failure to utilize clay stabilization leads to additional costs to drilling...

  14. Identification and confirmation of molecular markers and orange flesh color associated with major QTL for high beta-carotene content in muskmelon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Alexandra Bamberger

    2009-05-15

    .......................................................... 26 Genetic Relationship of Beta-Carotene and Flesh Color ........................ 26 Screening RAPD Primers for Beta-Carotene Content Using BSA ......... 32 DISCUSSION.......................................................................................................... 67 x TABLE Page 26 The MseI primers used during the selective amplification phase of the AFLP process ................................................................................................ 67 27 The EcoRI primers used during...

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER BambooFiber Filled High Density Polyethylene Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    strength, bending modulus and strength were improved with the use of MAPE. The use of the clayORIGINAL PAPER Bamboo­Fiber Filled High Density Polyethylene Composites: Effect of Coupling to achieve clay exfoliation. For pure HDPE system, both dynamic and static bending moduli increased, while

  16. Laboratory Hydro-mechanical Characterisation of Boom Clay at Essen and Mol Y. F. Deng1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Laboratory Hydro-mechanical Characterisation of Boom Clay at Essen and Mol Y. F. Deng1, 2 , A. M. In the present work, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay samples from the borehole Essen-1 at a depth and hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay from Essen at 227-m, 240-m and 248-m depths are similar

  17. Visual Analysis of Weblog Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Payne, Deborah A.; McColgin, Dave; Cramer, Nick O.; Love, Douglas V.

    2007-03-26

    In recent years, one of the advances of the World Wide Web is social media and one of the fastest growing aspects of social media is the blogosphere. Blogs make content creation easy and are highly accessible through web pages and syndication. With their growing influence, a need has arisen to be able to monitor the opinions and insight revealed within their content. In this paper we describe a technical approach for analyzing the content of blog data using a visual analytic tool, IN-SPIRE, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We highlight the capabilities of this tool that are particularly useful for information gathering from blog data.

  18. Characterization of Interlayer Cs+ in Clay Samples Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Laser Sample Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Groenewold; R. Avci; C. Karahan; K. Lefebre; R. V. Fox; M. M. Cortez; A. K. Gianotto; J. Sunner; W. L. Manner

    2004-04-01

    Ultraviolet laser irradiation was used to greatly enhance the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) detection of Cs+ adsorbed to soil consisting of clay and quartz. Imaging SIMS showed that the enhancement of the Cs+ signal was spatially heterogeneous: the intensity of the Cs+ peak was increased by factors up to 100 for some particles but not at all for others. Analysis of standard clay samples exposed to Cs+ showed a variable response to laser irradiation depending on the type of clay analyzed. The Cs+ abundance was significantly enhanced when Cs+-exposed montmorillonite was irradiated and then analyzed using SIMS, which contrasted with the behavior of Cs+-exposed kaolinite, which displayed no Cs+ enhancement. Exposed illitic clays displayed modest enhancement of Cs+ upon laser irradiation, intermediate between that of kaolinite and montmorillonite. The results for Cs+ were rationalized in terms of adsorption to interlayer sites within the montmorillonite, which is an expandable phyllosilicate. In these locations, Cs+ was not initially detectable using SIMS. Upon irradiation, Cs+ was thermally redistributed, which enabled detection using SIMS. Since neither the illite nor the kaolinite is an expandable clay, adsorption to inner-layer sites does not occur, and either modest or no laser enhancement of the Cs+ signal is observed. Laser irradiation also produced unexpected enhancement of Ti+ from illite and kaolinite clays that contained small quantities of Ti, which indicates the presence of microscopic titanium oxide phases in the clay materials.

  19. Monitoring the Excavation Damaged Zone in Opalinus clay by three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    rock laboratory: Characterization, simulation and application, Engineering Geology, 117, 39-51. #12; with structural geology, Applied clay science, 33, 21-34. Nicollin, F., Gibert, D., Lesparre, N. & Nussbaum, C

  20. Dechlorination of Pentachlorophenol by ammonium amended clays: development of field applicable techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Junying

    1997-01-01

    superfund sites in both soil and groundwater. The objective of this thesis is to study mechanisms to dechlorinate PCP into less harmful derivatives. The method that we are interested in utilizes ammonium-amended clays to dechlorinate PCP. Based...

  1. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per...

  2. Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

    2010-01-01

    This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

  3. Investigating the Use of Chelating Agents for Clay Dissolution and Sandstone Acidizing Purposes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andotra, Gautam

    2014-08-06

    Mud acid, a mixture of HCl and HF, has been frequently used for stimulating sandstone reservoirs. However, using HCl in such environments can be problematic, especially at higher temperatures. Some of the most common problems are the following: clay...

  4. Radon spectroscopy of packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc cla#y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Radon spectroscopy of packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc cla#y CAIDA, SDSC techniques, specifically the Radon transform previously applied in geophysics [6] and computer tomography [7

  5. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Clay-filled Polymer Nanocomposite Thin Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Woo-Sik

    2010-01-14

    robotic dipping system, for the preparation of these thin films, was built. The robot alternately dips a substrate into aqueous mixtures with rinsing and drying in between. Thin films of sodium montmorillonite clay and cationic polymer were grown...

  6. 182 28th ANNUAL eMS Sorption and Desorption of Quaternary Amine Cations on Clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    . L. Sparks Dent of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717 The1ldsorption. (1970). Clays Clay Miner., 18,203-212. 3. Greenland, D.J. and J.P. Quirk. (1964) J. Soil ScL, 15, 178.A., P.R. Jaffe, and C.T. Chiou. (1990). Environ. Sci. Techno!., 24, 1167-1172. 6. Cadena, F. and R

  7. Retention of anhydrous ammonia as influenced by clay mineral types, cations, temperature and moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBee, George G

    1956-01-01

    samples . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 13 Ammonia retained by clays heated to various temperature levels prior to treatment with anhydrous ammonia . . . . ~ 1'9 Ammonia retained by clays treated with anhydrous ammonia prior to heating... to various temperature levels . . . . . ~ 20 5a 6. 70 Ammoni. a retained sxuressed as psr cent of cation-exchange capacity for olays treated with anhydrous ammonia prior to heating to various temperature levels . ~. . . . . . ~ ~ . 21 Ammonia retained...

  8. ContentsContents3399the normal distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents3399the normal distribution 1. The normal distribution 2. The normal approximation to the binomial distribution 3. Sums and differences of random variables Learning outcomes In a previous Workbook of a continuous random variables: the normal distribution. The probabilities of the normal distribution have

  9. ContentsContents4343Regression and correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents4343Regression and correlation 1. Regression 2. Correlation Learning outcomes You. 1 #12;Regression 43.1 Introduction Problems in engineering often involve the exploration of the relationship(s) between two or more variables. The technique of regression analysis is very useful and well

  10. ContentsContents1133integration integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents1133integration integration 1. Basic concepts of integration 2. Definite integrals 3. The area bounded by a curve 4. Integration by parts 5. Integration by substitution and using partial fractions 6. Integration of trigonometric functions Learning outcomes In this workbook you

  11. Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, A.Z.

    2008-01-01

    electrolyte-fuel-cell (PEFC) membrane electrode assembly (of a high aspect ratio PEFC with an active area of 2.1 x 7.7be considered in future PEFC modeling. The complicated GDL

  12. Sorption of cadmium and lead by clays from municipal incinerator ash-water suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The effect of Cl complexation in extracts of a flue gas-scrubber incinerator fly ash sample on the sorption of Cd and Ph by kaolinite and illite was investigated using batch-sorption methods. In the pH range of 5 to 9, Cl complexation may reduce sorption and thus increase the mobility of these metals. When an ash-water suspension was acidified to pH 6.85, the dissolution of Cl and Ca essentially eliminated Cd sorption because of complexation and cationic competition. Cadmium would be considered as either mobile or very mobile under these conditions. Lead was not soluble in the pH-6.85 suspension. At pH 12, the approximate pH of water in contact with flue gas-scrubber fly ash, Cd was essentially insoluble and Ph occurred as anionic Ph hydroxide. Anionic Ph was sorbed by the two clays, and the extent of sorption was not influenced by Cl or carbonate complexation. Sorption constants, derived from isotherms, suggested that Ph would be relatively immobile in saturated soil-water systems. The recent concern that highly alkaline, flue gas-scrubber fly ash may release environmentally significant concentrations of mobile Ph when placed in an ash-disposal site with a soil liner should be reevaluated in light of this study. 37 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Capillary suction-time tests on selected clays and shales. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    Shale stability has been an ongoing problem in the drilling of oil wells. The Capillary Suction Time test is simple and easy to use, allowing operators to conduct the test at the rigsite. However because of difficulty in reproducing results, the test should be used only qualitatively. The CST, along with the Methylene Blue, Specific Surface Area and Ensilin tests, accurately predicts shale swelling and dispersion. The tests have the added advantage of being able to be conducted relatively quickly. These tests could be carried out at the rigsite while the drilling is taking place. The experiments conducted also demonstrated the usefulness of KCL as an inhibitor of shale swelling and dispersion. From the CST data, it can be seen that KCL concentrations as low as 0.5% are effective in controlling the swelling of Phillips Ekofisk, Phillips Andrews County, Texaco Mississippi Canyon and Pierre Texaco. However a greater concentration of KCL is required to inhibit the swelling of Gold Seal Bentonite, Standard Arizona, Standard Wyoming and Standard Texas. It is recommended that more concentrations of KCL be tested of the high swelling clays to determine the minimum concentration required to inhibit swelling and dispersion.

  14. CONTENT MODEL HOW-TO

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003241MLTPL00 Content Model Guidelines  https://github.com/usgin/usginspecs/wiki/Content-Model-Guidelines 

  15. HDS and deep HDS activity of Co/Mo/S-mesostructured synthetic clays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K. A.; Song, C.; Kim, J. H.; Castagnola, N.; Fernandez-Saavedra, R.; Marshall, C. L.; Schwartz, M. M.; Penn State Univ.; ICMM-CSIC

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work is to identify more promising supports from synthetic clay materials to advance hydrotreating catalyst development. Silica sol can be used as the silicon-containing starting material when creating nanoporous layered silicate catalysts with a certain portion of unreacted sol particles incorporated into the final matrix. The resulting structure then has mesoporosity and a unique morphology. Hectorite-based clays have been prepared using different silica sols in order to ascertain the importance of sol characteristics on the final matrix. Several techniques have been applied to characterize the materials, including XRD, TGA, N2 porosimetry, and TEM. For hydrodesulfurization (HDS), the conversion of dibenzothiophene (DBT) to biphenyl was examined at 400 degrees C using CoMoS-loaded mesostructured clay supports. No hydrogenation or hydrocracking was observed with any of the clay supports. The most active clay was derived from Ludox silica sol AS-30 with an activity of 65% DBT conversion and 100% selectivity to biphenyl (BP). For comparison, a reference commercial catalyst displayed 94% BP selectivity. For deep HDS, the conversion of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene was tested at 325 and 350 degrees C. At 325 degrees C, conversions are 92% of commercial catalysts for a CoMoS-loaded mesostructured clay derived from Ludox AM-30 silica sol. A commercially available synthetic hectorite called laponite has very low activity, indicating that the unique morphology of the mesostructured clays is important. Hydrogenolysis vs. hydrogenation pathways are compared for the deep HDS reaction. HR-TEM of the most active deep HDS catalyst revealed a multilayered MoS2 morphology.

  16. Final Report - Effects of High Spinel and Chromium Oxide Crystal Contents on Simulated HLW Vitrification in DM100 Melter Tests, VSL-09R1520-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/22/09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Lutze, W.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work was to evaluate the effects of spinel and chromium oxide particles on WTP HLW melter operations and potential impacts on melter life. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, settling and rheological tests, and tests on the DM100 melter system. Crucible testing was designed to develop and identify HLW glass compositions with high waste loadings that exhibit formation of crystalline spinel and/or chromium oxide phases up to relatively high crystal contents (i.e., > 1 vol%). Characterization of crystal settling and the effects on melt rheology was performed on the HLW glass formulations. Appropriate candidate HLW glass formulations were selected, based on characterization results, to support subsequent melter tests. In the present work, crucible melts were formulated that exhibit up to about 4.4 vol% crystallization.

  17. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic elimination of a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kibanova, Daria

    2010-01-01

    of semiconductor photocatalysis Chem. Rev. 1995, 95, 69-effluents by TiO 2 photocatalysis Catalysis Today 2000, 63,clay on adsorption and photocatalysis of gaseous molecules

  18. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly in the form of sub-nanometer Cr2O3 in association with residual clay minerals as micro-aggregates. This textural association was expected to minimize the chance of Cr(III) reoxidation upon exposure to oxidants. These results are important for our understanding of how various clay minerals may be used to reductively immobilize the heavy metal contaminant Cr in the environment.

  19. The effect of cropping systems on the organic matter content and on certain physical properties of Miller clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Jim Frank

    1953-01-01

    J~~s F. %$1). s A'0'6~ ~l86 SS tie 8 8'glB Gal QQKuG'"P' t &~J 5 f jl '2 ~+mw artcc. ". t cZ P~mc~ if' t~ Xllhs Suhaitted to the Graduate Sc-'sDG1 oi the Agricultural cud 'bkehauieal College of Texas in partial fulfil~seat oi" the rendu... for their guigsaee aed bebop in sskiag this stogie passible, Thsnhs sng syyrecistion sm expressed to lCe. C. 3. Gogh', Sess, Beysrtssnt of' Genetics, for suggestions sng service in snslfsing the ksts, sr6 to Dx. E. 3. Be~lds, P'olcsso of A?. gow. @ ~ U i Xlr, & C...

  20. Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  1. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  2. Damage to HDPE geomembrane from interface shear over gravelly compacted clay liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thielmann, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Figure 2.15. As the water content and compressibility of theWater Contents Final water contents and dry unit weights areangularity), compaction water content, and magnitude of

  3. Long-Term Monitoring of a Drilled Shaft Retaining Wall in Expansive Clay: Behavior Before and During Excavation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Long-Term Monitoring of a Drilled Shaft Retaining Wall in Expansive Clay: Behavior Before are that the instrumentation survived construction and is working, residual stresses developed in the drilled shafts prior The motivation for this work is uncertainty in the design of drilled shaft retaining walls in expansive clay

  4. SCHOOLOFSCIENCE Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    SCHOOLOFSCIENCE Table of Contents Degrees Offered and Associated Departments 330 Overview Environmental Science 403 Interdisciplinary Science 407 Multidisciplinary Science 409 The Darrin Fresh Water

  5. 069 MCNITORINGTHE GROWTH OF SEODNDARYPRECIPITATES UPON METALSORPTICN CM CLAY MINERALS AND ALUMINUM OXIDES USING X-RAY ABSORPTICN FINE STRUCIURE (XAFS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    069 MCNITORINGTHE GROWTH OF SEODNDARYPRECIPITATES UPON METALSORPTICN CM CLAY MINERALS AND ALUMINUM and oxide minerals is typically fast initially, then the rates gradually diminish. In the literature on surfaces of clay minerals and aluminum oxides. #12;

  6. Formation of Replicating Saponite from a Gel in the Presence of Oxalate: Implications for the Formation of Clay Minerals in Carbonaceous Chondrites and the Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Dirk

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous ...

  7. Ultimate capacity of suction caisson in normally and lightly overconsolidated clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Partha Pratim

    2005-08-29

    is used for the numerical prediction. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models using hybrid elements. A simplified elastic perfectly plastic model with von-Mises yield criterion is used for the study. The saturated clay...

  8. Study on the hydraulic conductivity of Boom clay1 Yong-Feng Deng1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Study on the hydraulic conductivity of Boom clay1 2 Yong-Feng Deng1, 2 , Anh-Minh Tang2 , Yu Geotechnical Journal 48 (2011) 1461-1470" DOI : 10.1139/T11-048 #12;2 Abstract1 The hydraulic conductivity. Experimental results show that the hydraulic conductivity3 is mainly governed by the soil porosity

  9. Phosphonic-Based HF Acid: Interactions With Clay Minerals And Flow In Sandstone Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Lijun

    2015-05-13

    , phosphonic-based HF acid systems (HF and a phosphonic acid) have been used as an alternative to mud acid. However, very limited research has been performed to investigate the interactions of phosphonic-based acid systems with clay minerals in sandstone...

  10. Influence of an adsorbing polymer in the aging dynamics of Laponite clay suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zulian; B. Ruzicka; G. Ruocco

    2008-11-18

    Clay-polymer dispersions in aqueous solutions have attracted a great interest in recent years due to their industrial applications and intriguing physical properties. Aqueous solutions of bare Laponite particles are known to age spontaneously from an ergodic state to a non ergodic state in a time varying from hours to months depending on Laponite concentration. When a polymer species like Polyethylene Oxide (PEO) is added to the solution, it weakly adsorbs on clay particle surfaces modifying the effective interaction potential between Laponite particles. A dynamic light scattering study, varying polymer concentration at fixed polymer molecular weight (Mw=200.000 g/mol), has been performed in order to understand the effect of polymer on the aging dynamics of the system. The results obtained show that arresting phenomena between clay particles are hindered if PEO is added and consequently the aging dynamics slows down with increasing PEO concentration. This process is possibly due to the progressive coverage of the clay surface by polymers that grow with increasing PEO concentration and may lead to steric stabilization.

  11. Tunable staged release of therapeutics from layer-by-layer coatings with clay interlayer barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunable staged release of therapeutics from layer-by-layer coatings with clay interlayer barrier of coatings for medical devices and tissue engineering scaffolds, there is a need for thin coatings a self-assembled, polymer-based conformal coating, built by using a water-based layer-by-layer (Lb

  12. Evaluating the Effects of Environmentally Acceptable Clay Stabilizer on Bandera Sandstone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emecheta, Akunna C

    2013-08-26

    it possible for large areas of the formation to be effectively treated. 3.2.1.1 BENTONITE Bentonite is impure clay consisting mainly of montmorillonite. It is an absorbent aluminum phyllosilicate (Casás, L. M., M. Pozo, et al. 2013). Bentonite...

  13. On the dynamics of subaqueous clay rich gravity mass flows--the giant Storegga slide, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the dynamics of subaqueous clay rich gravity mass flows--the giant Storegga slide, Norway F, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1047 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway b Norges Geotekniske Institutt, Postboks 3930 Ulleva°l Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway c Norsk Hydro ASA, 0246 Oslo, Norway Received 10 November 2003

  14. THE LINK BETWEEN CLAY MINERAL WEATHERING AND THE FORMATION OF NI SURFACE PRECIPITATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    THE LINK BETWEEN CLAY MINERAL WEATHERING AND THE FORMATION OF NI SURFACE PRECIPITATES Andreas C minerals may proceed via formation of surface precipitates, which may lead to a significant long the formation of several mineral phases with distinct solubilities. While turbostratic a-type metal hydroxides

  15. Evaluation of Alpha-Phased Zirconium Phosphate Nanoparticles as a Clay Stabilizer and an EOR Agent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yi

    2014-12-15

    Migration. Paper presented at the Nigeria Annual International Conference and Exhibition, Lagos, Nigeria, July 30 - August 1. SPE-167503. I.A. El-Monier, H.A.Nasr-El-Din, T.L. Harper, R. Rosen. 2013. A New Environmentally Friendly Clay Stabilizer. SPE...

  16. RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    2) Institute of Mineralogy, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg, Germany #12;clays and hydrocarbons conventional resource non-conventional resource project: Nicht-konventionelle Kohlenwasserstoffe (non-conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale

  17. Application of the Modified Methylene Blue Test to Detect Clay Minerals in Coarse Aggregate Fines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitre, Brandon

    2012-12-04

    ............................................................................... 34 3.2. Plasticity Index (ASTM D 4318) ..................................................................... 41 3.3. Bar Linear Shrinkage (Tex-107-E) .................................................................. 42 3.3.1. Results... ............................................................................... 47 vi 4. CONCRETE PERFORMANCE TESTING ............................................................. 50 4.1. Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) Mixes with Pure Clays ............................... 51 4.1.1. Effect on Drying Shrinkage...

  18. Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale. Sharp exhibit features consistent with eolian sandstones that may be cemented by sulfates. As described to features observed in terrestrial eolian sandstones such as the Navajo sandstone in the southwestern U

  19. CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    THE APPLICATIONS AND VALIDITY OF BODE'S LAW CAN WE EXPLAIN BODE'S LAW USING GRAVITY? 8 Law of Gravitation 8 Centre#12;#12;CONTENTS CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION WHO, HOW AND WHEN IS THE BODE'S LAW DISCOVERED? 1 THE BODE'S LAW HOW THE BODE'S LAW SATISFIED URANUS 3 HOW THE BODE'S LAW LED TO THE DISCOVERY OF CERES

  20. The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco, Ersan Demiralp, Tahir Cagin, and William A. Goddard, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çagin, Tahir

    The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco inhibitor oil production chemical. 1. Introduction Molecular modeling studies of clay and related zeolite of water, hydrocarbons, and polar organic compounds such as oil field production chemicals on clay mineral

  1. Kinetics of Ion Exchange on Clay Minerals and Soil: I. Evaluation of Methods1 R. A. OGWADA AND D. L. SPARKS2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Ion Exchange on Clay Minerals and Soil: I. Evaluation of Methods1 R. A. OGWADA AND D. L,vermiculite. Ogwada, R.A., and D.L. Sparks. 1986. Kinetics of ion exchangeon clay minerals and soil: I. Evaluation displacement or flow techniques to investigate kinetics of ion exchange on soils and clay minerals (Sparks

  2. Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content Matthias Strahser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content Matthias Strahser Institut de Physique of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content Matthias Strahser, Institut f¨ur Geowissenschaften, Abteilung of electrical properties to water content and permeability and the high spatial resolution of seismic surveys

  3. Seismic Response of a Soft, High Plasticity, Diatomaceous Naturally Cemented Clay Deposit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera-Grunauer, Xavier F.

    2014-01-01

    Concept of overstrength in seismic design. Proceedings ofSite characterization and seismic zonation of Guayaquiland Baratau, J. (2003). Micro-seismic zonation and elastic

  4. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  5. By HENRY CLAY WEBSTER Posted: December 6, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    be quite high. Education and preparation: To enter the field, candidates can obtain a master's degree who is too extroverted might not be good at that." Suggested job searches: Counselor jobs | Clinical reserved. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our Terms and Conditions of Use and Privacy Policy

  6. Advanced Article Article Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Paul

    -reduction) WILEY ENCYCLOPEDIA OF CHEMICAL BIOLOGY 2008, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1 #12;Membrane PotentialsAdvanced Article Article Contents · Biological Background · Physical Chemistry Background of Biological Roles and of Tech- nologies for Measurement Membrane Potentials in Living Systems, Tools

  7. SCHOOLOFSCIENCE Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    SCHOOLOFSCIENCE Table of Contents Degrees Offered and Associated Departments 324 Overview The Darrin Fresh Water Institute 401 New York Center for Studies on the Origins of Life 402 New York State

  8. Effect of homogenization pressure, lipid content, and emulsifier content on the rheological properties of yogurt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaar Sansur, Patricia Mary

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of high pressure homogenization lipid hics. content, and surfactant on the rheological properties of yogurt were evaluated. NFDM, cream, and a nontoxic emulsifier (Tween 20) were combined to obtain samples with of 0% and 2% fat...

  9. Tensile strengths of problem shales and clays. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechner, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The greatest single expense faced by oil companies involved in the exploration for crude oil is that of drilling wells. The most abundant rock drilled is shale. Some of these shales cause wellbore stability problems during the drilling process. These can range from slow rate of penetration and high torque up to stuck pipe and hole abandonment. The mechanical integrity of the shale must be known when the shalers are subjected to drilling fluids to develop an effective drilling plan.

  10. SuStainability table of contentS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    SuStainability table of contentS executive Summary-Related Sustainability Options ........................................... 41 Information Technology Infrastucture #12;sustainability 2 Private Giving

  11. of Your Food Contents Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B-1400 8/11 of Your Food Content The Sodium #12;Contents Page Introduction.......................................................................................3 Sodium content of foods Beverages and fruit juices activity, and encourages Americans to consume more healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, seafood, whole

  12. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  13. Report on "Methodologies for Investigating Microbial-Mineral Interactions: A Clay Minerals Society Short Course"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia A. Maurice

    2010-02-08

    A workshop entitled, “Methods of Investigating Microbial-Mineral Interactions,” was held at the Clay Minerals Society meeting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA on June 19, 2004. The workshop was organized by Patricia A. Maurice (University of Notre Dame) and Lesley A. Warren (McMaster University, CA). Speakers included: Dr. P. Bennett, Dr. J. Fredrickson (PNNL), Dr. S. Lower (Ohio State University), Dr. P. Maurice, Dr. S. Myneni (Princeton University), Dr. E. Shock (Arizona State), Dr. M. Tien (Penn State), Dr. L. Warren, and Dr. J. Zachara (PNNL). There were approximately 75 attendees at the workshop, including more than 20 students. A workshop volume was published by the Clay Minerals Society [Methods for Study of Microbe-Mineral Interactions (2006), CMS Workshop Lectures, vol. 14?(Patricia A. Maurice and Leslie A. Warren, eds.) ISBN 978-1-881208-15-0, 166 pp.

  14. Effects of aluminosilicate minerals in clay soil fractions on pore water hydroxide ion concentrations in soil/cement matrices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Evan Russell

    1998-01-01

    between clay minerals and calcium hydroxide. Pozzolanic reactions between aluminosilicate minerals in soils and portiandite or calcium silicate hydrate, generated by cement hydration, may significantly reduce the hydroxide ion concentration in soi...

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of complex molecules at interfaces: dendritic surfactants in clay and amyloid peptides near lipid bilayers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Kunwoo

    2009-06-02

    We apply a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique to complex molecules at interfaces. Partitioning of dendritic surfactants into clay gallery and Ab protein behavior near hydrated lipids are chosen for the purpose. ...

  16. An investigation of some of the effects of anhydrous ammonia on the clay minerals montmorillonite and illite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiteley, Eli Lamar

    1959-01-01

    A survey of small, medium and large Nicaraguan producers indicated a heavy reliance on imported complete fertilizer. Analysis of soils sampled from the large-scale commercial producers found low P retention in the lowland heavy clay soils...

  17. The effects of the interphase and strain gradients on the elasticity of layer by layer (LBL) polymer/clay nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yaning

    A synergistic stiffening effect observed in the elastic mechanical properties of LBL assembled polymer/clay nanocomposites is studied via two continuum mechanics approaches. The nanostructure of the representative volume ...

  18. The aggregation of clay minerals and marine microalgal cells : physicochemical theory and implications for controlling harmful algal blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengco, Mario Rhuel

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, the use of clay minerals has emerged as one of the most promising strategies for directly controlling harmful algal blooms (HABs). Its principle is based on the mutual aggregation of algal cells and mineral ...

  19. The effectiveness of a foliar spray of kaolinite clay in reducing transpiration of cotton plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMichael, Bobbie Lee

    1967-01-01

    in light and to keep them from closing in darkness. Lower temperatures tended to cause the reverse. Culm (8) reported that leaf temperatures are usually higher than the surround- ing air temperatures and that transpiration accounts for a cooling effect...THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A FOLIAR SPRAY OI" KAOLINITE CLAY IN REDUCING TRANSPIRATION OF COTTON PLANTS A Thesis Bobble L. McMichael Submitted to the Graduate Col]ege cf the Texas A&I University ir, Partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  20. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  1. Organic Matter Content of Soil After Logging of Fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .) and assorted minor species. The sampling sites are in silt or clay loams of the Tish Tang or Strawberry soil

  2. Sub-THz complex dielectric constants of smectite clay thin samples with Na$^{+}$/Ca$^{++}$-ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezwanur Rahman; Douglas K. McCarty; Manika Prasad

    2015-07-28

    We implement a technique to characterize the electromagnetic properties at frequencies 100 to 165 GHz (3 cm$^{-1}$ to 4.95 cm$^{-1}$) of oriented smectite samples using an open cavity resonator connected to a sub-millimeter wave VNA (Vector Network Analyzer). We measured dielectric constants perpendicular to the bedding plane on oriented Na$^{+}$ and Ca$^{++}$-ion stabilized smectite samples deposited on a glass slide at ambient laboratory conditions (room temperature and room light). The clay layer is much thinner ($\\sim$ 30 $\\mu$m) than the glass substrate ($\\sim$ 2.18 mm). The real part of dielectric constant, $\\epsilon_{re}$, is essentially constant over this frequency range but is larger in Na$^{+}$- than in Ca$^{++}$-ion infused clay. The total electrical conductivity (associated with the imaginary part of dielectric constant, $\\epsilon_{im}$) of both samples increases monotonically at lower frequencies ($$ 110 GHz. The dispersion of the samples display a dependence on the ionic strength in the clay interlayers, i.e., $\\zeta$-potential in the Stern layers.

  3. The occurrence of clays and their bearing on evaporite mineralogy in the Salado Formation, Delaware Basin, New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harville, Donald Gene

    1985-01-01

    THE OCCURRENCE OF CLAYS AND THEIR BEARING ON EVAPORITE MINERALOGY IN THE SALADO FORMATION, DELAWARE BASIN, NEW MEXICO A Thesis by DONALD GENE HARVILLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Geology THE OCCURRENCE OF CLAYS AND THEIR BEARING ON EVAPORITE MINERALOGY IN THE SALADO FORMATION, DELAWARE BASIN, NEW MEXICO A Thesis by DONALD GENE HARVILLE Approved as to style...

  4. Authigenic clay minerals in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group: Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, Waha Field, West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walling, Suzette Denise

    1992-01-01

    AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SUZETTE DENISE WALLING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Geology AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS...

  5. A study of the effects of repeated loadings and free water on the stability of a lime stabilized clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantos, Carl Thomas

    1959-01-01

    . Sere Percent Lime (Raw Soil) Triaxial Results . 9, Twe Percent Lime Triaxial Results . 10. Four Percent Lime Triaxial Results 37 37 40 LIST OF FIGURES 1. Triaxial Compression Device and Universal Testing Nachine . 2. Harvard Nlniature Compactor... Equipment 3. Typical Test Speoimens 4. Ltterberg Limits - Brasos River Clay 5. Modified JULS80 Compaction - Brasos River Clay 6. Nohr's Circles and Rupture Envelopes 7, 0 Percent Lime (Raw Soil) Triaxial Test, 15 psi 45 47 48 Lateral Pressure 49 S...

  6. A study of the content and phytotoxicity of arsenic in two Texas soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deuel, Lloyd Elmer

    1970-01-01

    groups than vermiculites or montmorillonites, which results in a greater affinity for arsenates. Recently Johnson and Hiltbold (25) obtained values wnich represent the clays influence on the adsorption of arsenic by the soil They reported that 85...A STUDY OF TEA CONTENT AiND PHYTOTOXICITY OF ARSENIC IN TWO TEXAS SOILS A Thesis LLOYD ELvuER DEUEL JR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&X University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  7. Content-Aware Image enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schettini, Raimondo

    1 Content-Aware Image enhancement R. Schettini www.ivl.disco.unimib.it 8 Faculties, 61 Degree Recognition Content-based retrieval Quality Assessment Content-Aware Image Enhancement Presentation Outline Processing Content aware image enhancement We focus here on image based features. And show how to exploit

  8. Content-Aware Image enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schettini, Raimondo

    Content-Aware Image enhancement R. Schettini www.ivl.disco.unimib.it #12;8 Faculties, 61 Degree Recognition Content-based retrieval Quality Assessment #12;Content-Aware Image Enhancement Presentation Image Processing Content aware image enhancement We focus here on image based features. And show how

  9. ISSUE TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECTRA HOME CURRENT ISSUE TABLE OF CONTENTS TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS PRESSTIME BULLETIN ARTICLE Thomas Young's classic setup for the demonstration of interference features light from one source incident on two vertical slits because the phenomenon occurs only if the light from the slits has a well

  10. Table of Contents Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Eric Sándor

    include nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 ), nitric acid (HNO3 ), nitrous oxide (N2 O, a greenhouse gas.TheHaber-BoschprocessalsosuppliesNH3 for industrial processes. Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen are twice as large as natural terDRAFT - 1 #12;2 - DRAFT Table of Contents Introduction What is Reactive Nitrogen and Why

  11. Exploration of tektite formation processes through water and metal content measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Exploration of tektite formation processes through water and metal content measurements Nigel WATT1 continental crust, although water contents are still extremely high for rocks melted at atmospheric pressure H2O and Zn or Pb contents. Combined with water contents of other tektites in the Australasian strewn

  12. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  13. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  14. Areal distribution of clay minerals and their relationship to physical properties, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hottman, William Edward

    1975-01-01

    of Commi t e lead of De rtment Member Member December 1975 ABSTRACT Areal Distribution of Clay Minerals and their Relationship to Physical Properties, Gulf of Mexico. (December 1975) William E. Hottman, B. A. , California State University (Fullerton... 2 5 12 X 52 X 52 5 X 52 X 2 5 X 52 5 25. 2 11. 7 3. 42 25. 5 20 5 4. 5 25. 25 72. 5 8. 5 24. 0 7. 67 2 ' 77 29, 8 24. 7 4-97 34. 7 36. 24 6. 02 21. 25 6. 92 2, 63 24. o 17, 6 4. 2 21. 0 68. o 8. 8 28. 0 70. 0...

  15. Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) chargingWASHINGTON, DC - Jeffrey Clay Sell was

  16. A Content Propagation Metric for Efficient Content Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    A Content Propagation Metric for Efficient Content Distribution Ryan S. Peterson Cornell University@cs.cornell.edu ABSTRACT Efficient content distribution in large networks comprising data- centers, end hosts, and distributed in-network caches is a diffi- cult problem. Existing systems rely on mechanisms and metrics

  17. Web Content Filtering 1 User Guidelines Web content filter guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swain, Peter

    Web Content Filtering 1 User Guidelines Web content filter guidelines Introduction The basic criterion for blocking a Web page Categories of material which will be blocked Requesting the unblocking of Aberdeen applies a Web Content Filtering service to all web pages accessed from the undergraduate network

  18. Table of Contents Our Season Page 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    1 #12;2 Table of Contents 2011-2012 Our Season Page 3 People Page 8 Outreach Page 11 Curricular-Curtain 546 $3,631.16 Hell In High Water-Rand 1252 $7,102.47 Solstice-Curtain 506 $2,583.42 Urinetown - Rand-stage season this spring. Hell in High Water by Marcus Gardley The Rand Theater Nov. 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19

  19. Perceptual Experience and Its Contents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toribio, Josefa

    2002-01-01

    The contents of perceptual experience, it has been argued, often include a characteristic “non-conceptual” component (Evans, 1982). Rejecting such views, McDowell (1994) claims that such contents are conceptual in ...

  20. Personalized professional content recommendation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  1. Personalized professional content recommendation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-11-05

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  2. NESEA Newsletter Content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMoveMuncriefB NESEA Newsletter Content

  3. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  4. GEOC Martial Taillefert Tuesday, April 09, 2013 130 Realtime sorption and precipitation of nickel on clay minerals: An in situ QuickEXAFS investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of nickel on clay minerals: An in situ QuickEXAFS investigation Matthew Siebecker1, mgs@udel.edu, Wei Li1 of nickel sorption on Alrich clay minerals utilizing QuickEXAFS spectroscopy and a custom built flow cell Chemical Interactions at the MineralWater Interface (01:00 PM 05:30 PM) Location: Morial Convention Center

  5. SCHOOLOFARCHITECTURE Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    305; the Solar and Microclimate Laboratory, the School of Architecture Workshop, Field Study, independence, and a progressive outlook that makes them highly sought for architectural practice. 101SCHOOL

  6. UMIC NEWS 1/10 Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobbelt, Leif

    UMIC NEWS 1/10 Table of Contents www.umic.rwth-aachen.dewww.umic.rwth-aachen.de U M I Cltra High, along with energy, water and transportation, such that problems like address exhaustion, routing scaling

  7. A single hardening elasto-plastic model for Kaolin clay with loading-history-dependent plastic potential function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    A single hardening elasto-plastic model for Kaolin clay with loading-history- dependent plastic and failure criteria are found to be strongly dependent on the principal stress rotation angle () and plastic work. A unique plastic potential function determined solely by the current stress state

  8. WRIGHT, MELANIE CLAY. The Effects of Automation on Team Performance and Team Coordination. (Under the direction of David B. Kaber).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    ABSTRACT WRIGHT, MELANIE CLAY. The Effects of Automation on Team Performance and Team Coordination of automation in a number of work domains, including team environments. However, assessment of the effects of automation on teamwork has been primarily limited to the aviation domain (comparing early conventional

  9. An oribatid mite (Arachnida: Acari) from the Oxford Clay (Jurassic: Upper Callovian) of South Cave Station Quarry, Yorkshire, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selden, Paul A.; Baker, Anne S.; Phipps, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    in mar- ine strata: evidence from the British Jurassic, including a review of the allochthonous vertebrate assemblage from the marine Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Great Britain. 47–83. In COLECTIVO ARQUEOLO´GICO-PALEON- TOLO´GICO SALENSE...

  10. The electrorheology of suspensions consisting of Na-Fluorohectorite synthetic clay particles in silicon oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Méheust; K. P. S. Parmar; B. Schjelderupsen; J. O. Fossum

    2010-02-01

    Under application of an electric field greater than a triggering electric field $E_c \\sim 0.4$ kV/mm, suspensions obtained by dispersing particles of the synthetic clay fluoro-hectorite in a silicon oil, aggregate into chain- and/or column-like structures parallel to the applied electric field. This micro-structuring results in a transition in the suspensions' rheological behavior, from a Newtonian-like behavior to a shear-thinning rheology with a significant yield stress. This behavior is studied as a function of particle volume fraction and strength of the applied electric field, $E$. The steady shear flow curves are observed to scale onto a master curve with respect to $E$, in a manner similar to what was recently found for suspensions of laponite clay [42]. In the case of Na-fluorohectorite, the corresponding dynamic yield stress is demonstrated to scale with respect to $E$ as a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\sim 1.93$, while the static yield stress inferred from constant shear stress tests exhibits a similar behavior with $\\alpha \\sim 1.58$. The suspensions are also studied in the framework of thixotropic fluids: the bifurcation in the rheology behavior when letting the system flow and evolve under a constant applied shear stress is characterized, and a bifurcation yield stress, estimated as the applied shear stress at which viscosity bifurcation occurs, is measured to scale as $E^\\alpha$ with $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to 0.6. All measured yield stresses increase with the particle fraction $\\Phi$ of the suspension. For the static yield stress, a scaling law $\\Phi^\\beta$, with $\\beta = 0.54$, is found. The results are found to be reasonably consistent with each other. Their similarities with-, and discrepancies to- results obtained on laponite-oil suspensions are discussed.

  11. ContentsContents2424Fourier 1. The Fourier transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents2424Fourier transforms 1. The Fourier transform 2. Properties of the Fourier Transform 3. Some Special Fourier Transform Pairs Learning outcomes needs doing Time allocation You mathematical topics this time may vary considerably. 1 #12;The Fourier Transform 24.1 Introduction

  12. Predicting long-term moisture contents of earthen covers at uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, G.W.; Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-09-01

    The three methods for long-term moisture prediction covered in this report are: estimates from water retention (permanent wilting point) data, correlation with climate and soil type, and detailed model simulation. The test results have shown: soils vary greatly in residual moisture. Expected long-term moisture saturation ratios (based on generalized soil characteristics) range from 0.2 to 0.8 for soils ranging in texture from sand to clay, respectively. These values hold for noncompacted field soils. Measured radon diffusion coefficients for soils at 15-bar water contents ranged from 5.0E-2 cm/sup 2//s to 5.0E-3 cm/sup 2//s for sands and clays, respectively, at typical field densities. In contrast, fine-textured pit-run earthen materials, subjected to optimum compaction (>85% Proctor density) and dried to the 15-bar water content, ranged from 0.7 to 0.9 moisture saturation. Compacted pit-run soils at these moisture contents exhibited radon diffusion coefficients as low as 3.0E-4 cm/sup 2//s. The residual moisture saturation for cover soils is not known since no engineered barrier has been in place for more than a few years. A comparison of methods for predicting moisture saturation indicates that model simulations are useful for predicting effects of climatic changes on residual soil moisture, but that long-term moisture also can be predicted with some degree of confidence using generalized soil properties or empirical correlations based both on soils and climatic information. The optimal soil cover design will likely include more than one layer of soil. A two-layer system using a thick (1-m minimum) plant root zone of uncompacted soil placed over a moistened, tightly compacted fine-textured soil is recommended. This design concept has been tested successfully at the Grand Junction, Colorado, tailings piles.

  13. CONTENTS 2 1 Motivation 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Rudolf

    1 #12;CONTENTS 2 Contents 1 Motivation 4 2 Circuit QED and Two-Resonator Circuit-QED 6 2.1 Coupled Fabrication Parameters 94 D E-beam Sample Holder 96 E Danksagungen 103 #12;1 MOTIVATION 4 1 Motivation

  14. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENTSwitzerland|ofSessions | DepartmentT.M.008 High

  15. CRA Content and Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods PO 1COOP5 HighUNITED HomeHome

  16. Search CRA 2014 Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | ArgonnePrinceton PlasmaSea changeSearchthe

  17. Protein content of grains of different size fractions in malting barley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the variation observed in protein content was explained by the ratio of nitrogen availability to grain yield content is not due to the presence of a high proportion of thin grains, because thin grains do not always requirements, barley grain must have a specific protein level and high grain size (i.e. a high proportion

  18. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  19. Effect of Residence Time on Ni-Sorption Mechanisms on Clay and Oxide Minerals: An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Effect of Residence Time on Ni-Sorption Mechanisms on Clay and Oxide Minerals: An X-ray Absorption minerals is typically fast initially, then the rates gradually diminish. In the literature the decline

  20. Carbonation of Clay Minerals Exposed to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Ecker, L.; Gill, S.; Butcher, T. (BNL); Bour, D. (AltaRock Energy, Inc.)

    2010-11-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of carbonation of clay minerals, such as bentonite, kaolinite, and soft clay, we exposed them to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2)/water at temperatures of 200 and 250 C and pressures of 1500 and 2000 psi for 72- and 107-hours. Bentonite, comprising three crystalline phases, montmorillonite (MMT), anorthoclase-type albite, and quartz was susceptible to reactions with ionic carbonic acid yielded by the interactions between scCO2 and water, particularly MMT and anorthoclase-type albite phases. For MMT, the cation-exchangeable ions, such as Na+ and Ca2+, present in its basal interplanar space, were replaced by proton, H+, from ionic carbonic acid; thereafter, the cations leaching from MMT directly reacted with CO32- as a counter ion of H+ to form carbonate compounds. Such in-situ carbonation process in basal space caused the shrinkage and breakage of the spacing structure within MMT. In contrast, the wet carbonation of anorthoclase-type albite, categorized as rock minerals, entailed the formation of three amorphous by-products, such as carbonates, kaolinite-like compounds, and silicon dioxide. Together, these two different carbonations caused the disintegration and corruption of bentonite. Kaolinite clay containing the amorphous carbonates and silicon dioxide was inert to wet carbonation. We noted only a gain in weight due to its water uptake, suggesting that kaolinite-like by-products generated by the wet carbonation of rock minerals might remain unchanged even during extended exposure. Soft clay consisting of two crystalline phases, dolomite and silicon dioxide, also was unaltered by wet carbonation, despite the uptake of water.

  1. manipulating cytosolic PPi content can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    content and starch degradation during storage of tubers harvested from different potato varieties. Potato. et al. (1994) Possible involvement of abscisic acid, ethylene and phenolic acids in potato tuber

  2. Plants with modified lignin content and methods for production thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Qiao; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-05

    The invention provides methods for decreasing lignin content and for increasing the level of fermentable carbohydrates in plants by down-regulation of the NST transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of NST are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise reduced lignin content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops. Methods for processing plant tissue and for producing ethanol by utilizing such plants are also provided.

  3. A 5-step reduced mechanism for combustion of CO/H2/H2O/CH4/CO2 mixtures with low hydrogen/methane and high H2O content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolaou, Z. M.; Chen, J. Y.; Swaminathan, N.

    2012-10-17

    In this study a 5-step reduced chemical kinetic mechanism involving 9 species is developed for combustion of Blast Furnace Gas (BFG), a multi-component fuel containing CO/H2/CH4/CO2, typically with low hydrogen, methane and high water fractions...

  4. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yochim, April, E-mail: ayochim@regionofwaterloo.ca [Region of Waterloo Waste Management Division, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 (Canada); Zytner, Richard G., E-mail: rzytner@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); McBean, Edward A., E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Endres, Anthony L., E-mail: alendres@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  5. Structural evaluation of WIPP disposal room raised to Clay Seam G.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung Yoon (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Holland, John F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-01

    An error was discovered in the ALGEBBRA script used to calculate the disturbed rock zone around the disposal room and the shear failure zone in the anhydrite layers in the original version. To correct the error, a memorandum of correction was submitted according to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Quality Assurance program. The recommended course of action was to correct the error, to repeat the post-process, and to rewrite Section 7.4, 7.5, 8, and Appendix B in the original report. The sections and appendix revised by the post-process using the corrected ALGEBRA scripts are provided in this revision. The original report summarizes a series of structural calculations that examine effects of raising the WIPP repository horizon from the original design level upward 2.43 meters. Calculations were then repeated for grid changes appropriate for the new horizon raised to Clay Seam G. Results are presented in three main areas: (1) Disposal room porosity, (2) Disturbed rock zone characteristics, and (3) Anhydrite marker bed failure. No change to the porosity surface for the compliance re-certification application is necessary to account for raising the repository horizon, because the new porosity surface is essentially identical. The disturbed rock zone evolution and devolution are charted in terms of a stress invariant criterion over the regulatory period. This model shows that the propagation of the DRZ into the surrounding rock salt does not penetrate through MB 139 in the case of both the original horizon and the raised room. Damaged salt would be expected to heal in nominally 150 years. The shear failure does not occur in either the upper or lower anhydrite layers at the moment of excavation, but appears above and below the middle of the pillar one day after the excavation. The damaged anhydrite is not expected to heal as the salt in the DRZ is expected to.

  6. Table of Contents Deschutes Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table of Contents Deschutes Subbasin Plan Table of Contents Executive Summary 1. Purpose and Scope.1. Physical, Natural and Human Landscape ................................................2.1 2.2. Water, Table of Contents Page 1 #12;Table of Contents 7. Limiting Factors and Conditions .........

  7. Regulations and Basic Information Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Regulations and Basic Information Table of Contents Safe and Effective Use.) for Various Quantities of Water

  8. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  9. Table Of Contents Section: Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 2 SANITATION Table Of Contents Section: Page 02.A General Water......................................................... 2-1 02.D Non-Potable Water and openings. 02.C DRINKING WATER #12;EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 2-2 02.C.01 An adequate supply of potable water

  10. THINKING THESIS Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    THINKING THESIS GUIDEBOOK #12;#12;Table of Contents Part One: Getting Started 1. What the Honors aides 5. Final Turn in of the Thesis Appendix I. Sample Title Page II. Honors Mentor Declaration Form on to better things. Theodore Roosevelt #12;#12;Honors College Thesis Requirements There are several forms

  11. OUTLOOK BYLAWS Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OUTLOOK BYLAWS Table of Contents Article I - Legal Authority to Operate Article II - Scope-in-Chief and Responsible Director Article VIII - Funding of Outlook Article IX - Unused Funds Article X - Composition The publication of Outlook is authorized under a license granted to AUB by decision No. 113 issued by the Lebanese

  12. Table of Contents Executive Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Table of Contents Page Executive Summary I. Introduction 1 Neutrino Oscillation Results from Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Data 1 Tables 7 References 5 Figures 9 II. Overview of the Long Baseline Experiment 17 Magnetic Moment, Charge Radius, and Extra Z-bosons 261 VII. Cost and Schedule 265 Project schedule 267 Work

  13. Table of Contents INTRODUCTION 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    #12;1 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION 2 SECTION ONE: PRINCIPLES OF GOOD PRACTICE 4 SECTION TWO, it offers a practical guide to staff and volunteers who work with children by outlining a number of fundamental principles of good practice, highlighting the key elements of each one and discussing the issues

  14. Supplemental Material Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchta, Shawn R.

    1 Supplemental Material Table of Contents Text on the multiple individuals per population phylogeny: pg 4 Supplemental Figure 1: Phylogram of U. stansburiana populations from the complete data set that included multiple individuals per population. pg 5 Supplemental Table 1: Population locations and years

  15. Student Handbook TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Leah S.

    1 Student Handbook 2014-2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS Comprehensive Nondiscrimination Statement 3 Sex Student Handbook Comprehensive Nondiscrimination Policy The provisions of this handbook of the services, programs or activities described in this handbook. The most up-to-date handbook can be found

  16. HOUSING POLICY Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOUSING POLICY Table of Contents Housing Policy Housing Rules and Regulations Appendix I contact: policies@aub.edu.lb. Last updated on: August 14, 2014 #12;HOUSING POLICY Section 1 - Policy Section 2 - Housing Purchase Plan (HPP) Section 3 - Procedure for the Implementation of the Housing

  17. Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a crucial insight of Je Smith that external smash products can be internalized. We show that each category of generalized FSP's is isomorphic to the category of.

  18. Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling the invasion and spread of contagious diseases in heterogeneous populations; Wayne M. Getz, James O. Lloyd-Smith, Paul C. Cross, Shirli Bar-

  19. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chapter 3.0 - CRITICAL, SPECIAL, & ENGINEERED LIFTS March 21, 2013 Rev 1 Page 4 6. Two mobile cranes are lifting the load and the load share equals more than 70% of one or both...

  20. Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentrating Department of Energy'sContango in Cushing?Program

  1. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 8 GE4,

  2. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 8 GE4, Volume 2,

  3. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 8 GE4, Volume 2,

  4. CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 8 GE4, Volume 2,8.0 -

  5. Contents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. Geographic Available for® ALOHA A R E A L L

  6. Contents

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeep Vadose Zone - Applied

  7. contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative7 Boundarycontainers | National

  8. Recycle of Wastes of Clay Brick Industry for Producing Eco-cement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, A. M

    2010-01-01

    factors as type, degree of crystallinty, and fineness of the used pozzolana in addition to the ESL-IC-10-10-09 Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Kuwait, October 26-28, 2010 curing conditions (4... for Enhanced Building Operations, Kuwait, October 26-28, 2010 strength of the hardened specimens decreases with increasing waste material content in the mix. The continuous growth of the compressive strength is mainly due to the formation and accumulation...

  9. Robust Content-Based MPEG-4 XMT Scene Structure Authentication and Multimedia Content Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottawa, University of

    18 Robust Content-Based MPEG-4 XMT Scene Structure Authentication and Multimedia Content Location-based MPEG-4 XMT standard. XMT allows content authors to exchange their content with other authors, tools-4 XMT structure and its media content. Unlike images or videos, watermarking an XMT structure

  10. Correlation between physical and acoustic properties in surficial sediments of the Northwest Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Daniel A

    2000-01-01

    A high-resolution analysis of the properties of bulk density, grain density, P-wave velocity, impedance, porosity, water content, and sand/ silt/clay content was performed on 126 short cores (<120cm) associated with LATEX hydrography stations...

  11. Reducing the moisture content of clean coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehoe, D. )

    1992-12-01

    Coal moisture content can profoundly effect the cost of burning coal in utility boilers. Because of the large effect of coal moisture, the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate advanced coal dewatering methods at its Coal Quality Development Center. This report contains the test result on the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge, the second of four devices to be tested. The high-G solid-bowl centrifuge removes water for coal by spinning the coal/water mixture rapidly in a rotating bowl. This causes the coal to cling to the sides of the bowl where it can be removed, leaving the water behind. Testing was performed at the CQDC to evaluate the effect of four operating variables (G-ratio, feed solids concentration, dry solids feed rate, and differential RPM) on the performance of the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge. Two centrifuges of different bowl diameter were tested to establish the effect of scale-up of centrifuge performance. Testing of the two centrifuges occurred from 1985 through 1987. CQDC engineers performed 32 tests on the smaller of the two centrifuges, and 47 tests on the larger. Equations that predict the performance of the two centrifuges for solids recovery, moisture content of the produced coal, and motor torque were obtained. The equations predict the observed data well. Traditional techniques of establishing the performance of centrifuge of different scale did not work well with the two centrifuges, probably because of the large range of G-ratios used in the testing. Cost of operating a commercial size bank of centrifuges is approximately $1.72 per ton of clean coal. This compares well with thermal drying, which costs $1.82 per ton of clean coal.

  12. Near Surface Water Content Estimation using GPR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    waves can be used to estimate soil water content · Short pulses of High frequency EM energy · Variations) Improved irrigation management; 3) Improved understanding of ecosystem responses and terroir; 4) May assist, evapotranspiration, and groundwater storage From Or and Rubin, 1990 ** Accurate Spatial and Temporal Variations

  13. Original article Changes in foliar nutrient content and resorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Changes in foliar nutrient content and resorption in Fraxinus excelsior L., Ulmus in the flooded forest, causes high fluctuations of water level and increases bioavailability of cer- tain the variability of the test species response (nutrient con- tent and resorption) to the soil and flood water

  14. An Extension of the TalbotOgden Hydrology Model to an Affine Multi-dimensional Moisture Content Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Craig C.

    ;2 t = - K + z( )( ), (1) where is water content, t is time, K is hydraulic conductivity, is capillary [3] [4] since both K and are highly nonlinear functions of water content or the pressure head term1 An Extension of the Talbot­Ogden Hydrology Model to an Affine Multi-dimensional Moisture Content

  15. Biocompatible polymer microarrays for cellular high-content screening 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pernagallo, Salvatore

    2010-11-25

    The global aim of this thesis was to study the use of microarray technology for the screening and identification of biocompatible polymers, to understand physiological phenomena, and the design of biomaterials, implant ...

  16. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitzman, Jerry; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These results provide evidence that the leading points model can provide useful predictions of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of operating conditions and flow geometries.

  17. Polymer microarrays for microbial high-content screening 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mei

    2012-11-28

    Research on the interactions between microbes and polymeric materials constitutes an important part in antimicrobial identification and provides an insight into microbial response on the polymer surfaces. Herein, a ...

  18. Modeling the strangeness content of hadronic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Toledo Sanchez; J. Piekarewicz

    2001-09-06

    The strangeness content of hadronic matter is studied in a string-flip model that reproduces various aspects of the QCD-inspired phenomenology, such as quark clustering at low density and color deconfinement at high density, while avoiding long range van der Waals forces. Hadronic matter is modeled in terms of its quark constituents by taking into account its internal flavor (u,d,s) and color (red, blue, green) degrees of freedom. Variational Monte-Carlo simulations in three spatial dimensions are performed for the ground-state energy of the system. The onset of the transition to strange matter is found to be influenced by weak, yet not negligible, clustering correlations. The phase diagram of the system displays an interesting structure containing both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions. Strange matter is found to be absolutely stable in the model.

  19. Alexandria Digital Library Project Content Access Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    Alexandria Digital Library Project Content Access Characterization in Digital Libraries Greg Janée · James Frew · David Valentine University of California, Santa Barbara #12;Alexandria Digital Library environments e.g., GIS #12;Alexandria Digital Library Project Janée, Frew, Valentine · Content Access

  20. Energy.gov Content Management System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy.gov Content Management SystemEERE's websites are hosted in Energy.gov's Drupal content management system (CMS), which is maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's Public Affairs Office.

  1. CP content of D->h+h-pi0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Libby

    2015-09-14

    Quantum-correlated psi(3770)->DDbar decays collected by the CLEO-c experiment are used to perform measurements of F+, the fractional CP-even content of the self-conjugate decays D->pi+pi-pi0 and D->K+K-pi0. Values of 0.973+/-0.017 and 0.732+/-0.055 are obtained for pi+pi-pi0 and K+K-pi0, respectively. The high CP-even content of D->pi+pi-pi0, in particular, makes this a promising mode for improving the precision on gamma and for measurements of CP violation in D decay.

  2. TABLE OF CONTENTS: Building Executive Definition.......................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS: Building Executive Definition.......................................................................3 Building Executives Areas of Responsibilities ...................................................................................5 Building Safety and Security Issues

  3. 7, 40654083, 2007 Liquid water content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 4065­4083, 2007 Liquid water content and effective number density Y. Hu et al. Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global statistics of liquid water content and effective number density: Y. Hu (yongxiang.hu-1@nasa.gov) 4065 #12;ACPD 7, 4065­4083, 2007 Liquid water content and effective

  4. Optimal Rate Allocation in Overlay Content Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Optimal Rate Allocation in Overlay Content Distribution Chuan Wu and Baochun Li Department. This paper addresses the optimal rate allocation problem in overlay content distribution for efficient, these scenarios reflect the contrast between elastic and streaming content distribution, with either per

  5. Content of system design descriptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    A System Design Description (SDD) describes the requirements and features of a system. This standard provides guidance on the expected technical content of SDDs. The need for such a standard was recognized during efforts to develop SDDs for safety systems at DOE Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facilities. Existing guidance related to the corresponding documents in other industries is generally not suitable to meet the needs of DOE nuclear facilities. Across the DOE complex, different contractors have guidance documents, but they vary widely from site to site. While such guidance documents are valuable, no single guidance document has all the attributes that DOE considers important, including a reasonable degree of consistency or standardization. This standard is a consolidation of the best of the existing guidance. This standard has been developed with a technical content and level of detail intended to be most applicable to safety systems at DOE Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facilities. Notwithstanding that primary intent, this standard is recommended for other systems at such facilities, especially those that are important to achieving the programmatic mission of the facility. In addition, application of this standard should be considered for systems at other facilities, including non-nuclear facilities, on the basis that SDDs may be beneficial and cost-effective.

  6. Damage to HDPE geomembrane from interface shear over gravelly compacted clay liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thielmann, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    high-density polyethylene leachate collection and removalthe following requirements: leachate collection and removalLCRS) limiting the head of leachate on the liner system to

  7. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Carapella, Jeffrey C. (Evergreen, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH.sub.4) over a high temperature, 2000.degree. C., tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400.degree. C., substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20-30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content.

  8. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

    1995-03-14

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

  9. Effect of water washing on oxalic acid content of various fodders and its determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of water washing on oxalic acid content of various fodders and its determination A Kumar CS that high oxalic acid content, producing oxalate toxicity and interfering with the calcium metabolism, reduces milk yield. If these fodders are washed with water, soluble oxalates are released up to a safe

  10. Capillary geochemistry in non-saturated zone of soils. Water content and geochemical signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Capillary geochemistry in non-saturated zone of soils. Water content and geochemical signatures change. The volumetric capillary water content of the soil at high suction can be calculated corresponds to a decreasing internal pressure of the water, which modifies its thermodynamic properties

  11. Future Generation Computer Systems 25 (2009) 599616 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    2009-01-01

    Future Generation Computer Systems 25 (2009) 599­616 Contents lists available at Science that computing will one day be the 5th utility (after water, electricity, gas, and telephony). This computing of harnessing `Storage Clouds' for high performance content delivery. Finally, we conclude with the need

  12. Can Next-Generation Reactors Power a Safe Nuclear Futur By Clay Dillow Posted 03.17.2011 at 12:18 pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Can Next-Generation Reactors Power a Safe Nuclear Futur By Clay Dillow Posted 03.17.2011 at 12 of nuclear reactors are designed to prevent exactly what we old Fukushima Daiichi plant. Which is good the world rush to reconsider their nuclear plans, nuclear experts look toward a future of smaller, safer

  13. Study of the Effects of Environmental Variables and Supercritical Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    difficult to extract from soils containing high levels of both organic matter and clay. Atrazine was extracted more easily than diuron. High organic matter and high clay content led to strong binding the world's need for abundant, safe, affordable food and fiber. Knowledge of environmental fate in soil

  14. Designing Flat Mail --Contents Publication 63, May 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Designing Flat Mail -- Contents Publication 63, May 1995 CONTENTS 1. OVERVIEW 2. UNDERSTANDING FLAT ­ POSTAL BUSINESS CENTERS #12;Publication 63, Designing Flat Mail (May 1995) Contents 1-- Overview

  15. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory A content inventory and analysis will help...

  16. Evalutaion of Multi-Stage Sandstone Acidizing Uging an Organic Mud Acid and a Clay Stabalizer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakipour, Armin

    2013-05-29

    of the reactions involved in this process. These reactions result in potentially damaging precipitation and cause formation damage. The problem is more severe when dealing with Bandera sandstone formations that contain a high concentration of carbonate minerals...

  17. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 26 (2011) 45264531 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics 26 (2011) 4526­4531 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Biosensors and Bioelectronics journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bios A method for high throughput

  18. INSTRUMENTATION OF VIDEO GAME SOFTWARE TO SUPPORT AUTOMATED CONTENT ANALYSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katchabaw, Michael James

    INSTRUMENTATION OF VIDEO GAME SOFTWARE TO SUPPORT AUTOMATED CONTENT ANALYSES T. Bullen and M, automated content analysis, software instrumentation, Unreal Engine. ABSTRACT Content analysis of video content analyses for video games through the use of software instrumentation. By properly instrumenting

  19. STRATEGIC RESEARCH PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    SFU STRATEGIC RESEARCH PLAN 2010-2015 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction........................................................................................ 2 Major Objectives of the Strategic Research Plan (SRP.................................................................................................27 Impact of the Strategic Research Plan

  20. GIS DEVELOPMENT GUIDE Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghelli, Giorgio

    GIS DEVELOPMENT GUIDE Volume II Table of Contents SURVEY OF AVAILABLE DATA Introduction ...................................................................................13 EVALUATING GIS HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE Introduction ...................................................................................14 Sources of Information About GIS......................................................14 GIS

  1. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  2. Energy.gov Content Management System Webforms

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, Energy.gov's content management system (CMS) has the ability to create webforms.

  3. 2011 Annual Report Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ...................12 Smart Grid Cyber Security.....................................................13 ICT Supply ChainComputer Security Division 2011 Annual Report #12;Table of Contents Welcome ................................................................. 1 Division Organization .................................................2 The Computer Security

  4. Catalog of Studies Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    2014-15 GRADUATE Catalog of Studies TM #12;Table of Contents Welcome to the University of Arkansas ............................. 26 Arkansas Water Resources Center ................................................ 26 Bessie Boehm

  5. Catalog of Studies Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    2015-16 GRADUATE Catalog of Studies TM #12;Table of Contents Welcome to the University of Arkansas ............................. 26 Arkansas Water Resources Center ................................................ 26 Bessie Boehm

  6. Training Program Content, 4/10/95

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for establishing the content of training programs.  The process to be evaluated includes (1)...

  7. Review: Prof Slipchenko's class, Fall 2013 Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-10

    REVIEW. Yingwei Wang. October 10, 2013. Review: Prof Slipchenko's class, Fall 2013. Contents. 1 Hartree energy. 2. 2 Many-body system. 2.

  8. PROPERTIES OF HDPE/CLAY/WOOD NANOCOMPOSITES , C. M. Clemons 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as biodegradable reinforcing materials alternative for the use of glass or carbon fiber and inorganic fillers/natural fibers composites, especially wood plastic composites (WPC) which have successfully proven their high materials. Natural organic fibers from renewable natural resources offer the potential to act

  9. Black Bear Prep plant replaces high-frequency screens with fine wire sieves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, C.J.; Nottingham, J.

    2007-12-15

    At the Black Bear prep plant (near Wharncliffe, WV, USA) the clean coal from the spirals traditionally reported to high-frequency screens, which removed high-ash clay fines. Screens have inherent inefficiencies that allow clean coal to report to the screen underflow. The goal of this project was to capture the maximum amount of spiral clean coal while still removing the high-ash clay material found in the spiral product. The reduction of the circulating load and plant downtime for unscheduled maintenance were projected as additional benefits. After the plant upgrade, the maintenance related to the high frequency screens was eliminated and an additional 2.27 tons per hour (tph) of fine coal was recovered, which resulted in a payback period of less than one year. The article was adapted from a paper presented at Coal Prep 2007 in April 2007, Lexington, KY, USA. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. From Image Analysis to Content Extraction: Are We There Yet?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    From Image Analysis to Content Extraction: Are We There Yet? From Image Analysis to Content~2008 #12;Signal vs. ContentSignal vs. Content #12;Tsuhan Chen [Baker and Kanade] What is "content"?What is "content"? populationworldhistoryhuman36524606030 ××××××>> Number of all possible 16×12 images 81216 2

  11. The Sodium Content of Your Food. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1982-01-01

    ............................ ............................. Pear nectar Pineapple juice .......................... Prune juice .............................. ................ Mineral Water. imported Tea ............................. Hot brewed .............................. Hot instant... .................................... Condiments, fats and oils 2t ........ Sodium Content of Selected Non-prescription Drugs 2t The Sodium Content of Your Food Extension food and nutrition specialists, The Texas A&M University System. Introduction Sodium is a mineral element necessary...

  12. This article was downloaded by:[EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution] [EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, May

    This article was downloaded by:[EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution] [EBSCOHost EJS Content Distribution] On: 24 April 2007 Access Details: [subscription number 768320842] Publisher: Taylor & Francis://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713599799 A framework to enhance semantic flexibility for analysis of distributed phenomena J. Mc

  13. Thermal and mechanical properties of palm oil-based polyurethane acrylate/clay nanocomposites prepared by in-situ intercalative method and electron beam radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salih, A. M.; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan

    2014-02-12

    Palm oil based-polyurethane acrylate (POBUA)/clay nanocomposites were prepared via in-situ intercalative polymerization using epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) and 4,4' methylene diphenyl diisocyante (MDI). Organically modified Montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was incorporated in EPOLA (1, 3 and 5%wt), and then subjected to polycondensation reaction with MDI. Nanocomposites solid films were obtained successfully by electron beam radiation induced free radical polymerization (curing). FTIR results reveal that the prepolymer was obtained successfully, with nanoclay dispersed in the matrix. The intercalation of the clay in the polymer matrix was investigated by XRD and the interlayer spacing of clay was found to be increased up to 37 Å, while the structure morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by TEM and SEM. The nanocomposites were found to be a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated morphologies. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites was significantly increased by incorporation of nanoclay into the polymer matrix. DSC results reveal that the Tg was shifted to higher values, gradually with increasing the amount of filler in the nanocomposites. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites showed remarkable improvement compared to the neat POBUA.

  14. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  15. Section 4. Inventory Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Section 4. Inventory Table of Contents 4.1 Existing Legal Protections Protections Level Name Clean Water Act Endangered Species Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act National Environmental State Instream Water Rights ­ Oregon Water Resources Department Morrow County Zoning Ordinance ­ Morrow

  16. Volume III, Chapter 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 4 Eulachon #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 4.0 EULACHON (Thaleichthys pacificus..................................................................................................................... 4-4 4.1.5 Movements in Fresh Water ........................................................... 4-8 4.4.1 Water Development

  17. Milk dispenser for variable fat content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henion, Julie E

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a new milk dispenser product that is designed to dispense milk with varying levels of milk fat content. The product contains two tanks of milk, one containing skim and one containing ...

  18. Hierarchical Classification Web Content Susan Dumais

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hao

    organizations. Since th century, librarians classification systems Dewey and Library Congress subject headings classification methods to supplement human effort in creating structured knowledge hierarchies. A wide rangeHierarchical Classification Web Content Susan Dumais Microsoft Research One Microsoft Way Redmond

  19. TABLE OF CONTENTS Hand and Power Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 30 Nov 14 13-i Section 13 TABLE OF CONTENTS Hand and Power Tools Section: Page 13.A-4 13.D Pneumatic Power Tools ................................................................................. 13-5 13.E Explosive-Actuated Tools

  20. Content modeling for social media text

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sauper, Christina (Christina Joan)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on machine learning methods for extracting information from user-generated content. Instances of this data such as product and restaurant reviews have become increasingly valuable and influential in ...

  1. Laboratory Safety Manual Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Laboratory Safety Manual Table of Contents I. Emergency Procedures a. Laboratory Contact Information b. Location of Laboratory Emergency Equipment c. Laboratory Hazard and Evacuation Maps d. University Emergency Procedures II. University Policies and Procedures a. Rice University Laboratory Safety

  2. Stomach contents ofjuvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    374 Stomach contents ofjuvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum, from the northern Gulf of Mexico James from the northern Gulf of Mexico. Methods The cobia, Rachycentron canadum, is a monotypic member ofthe Mexico (Migdalski and Fichter, 1983), ranging from Key

  3. BSc (Hons) Building Surveying Course content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    BSc (Hons) Building Surveying Course content Year One Year One modules Professional, Academic and openings o Upper floor construction o Internal walls and partitions o Roofs, roof coverings and rain water

  4. Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow-Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore Tsotsis

    2010-01-08

    Arsenic (As) and Selenium (Se) are found in water in the form of oxyanions. Relatively high concentrations of As and Se have been reported both in power plant discharges, as well as, in fresh water supplies. The International Agency for Research on Cancer currently classifies As as a group 1 chemical, that is considered to be carcinogenic to humans. In Phase I of this project we studied the adsorption of As and Se by uncalcined and calcined layered double hydroxide (LDH). The focus of the present work is a systematic study of the adsorption of As and Se by conditioned LDH adsorbents. Conditioning the adsorbent significantly reduced the Mg and Al dissolution observed with uncalcined and calcined LDH. The adsorption rates and isotherms have been investigated in batch experiments using particles of four different particle size ranges. As(V) adsorption is shown to follow a Sips-type adsorption isotherm. The As(V) adsorption rate on conditioned LDH increases with decreasing adsorbent particle size; the adsorption capacity, on the other hand, is independent of the particle size. A homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) and a bi-disperse pore model (BPM) - the latter viewing the LDH particles as assemblages of microparticles and taking into account bulk diffusion in the intraparticle pore space, and surface diffusion within the microparticles themselves - were used to fit the experimental kinetic data. The HSDM estimated diffusivity values dependent on the particle size, whereas the BPM predicted an intracrystalline diffusivity, which is fairly invariant with particle size. The removal of As(V) on conditioned LDH adsorbents was also investigated in flow columns, where the impact of important solution and operational parameters such as influent As concentration, pH, sorbent particle size and flow rate were studied. An early breakthrough and saturation was observed at higher flow rates and at higher influent concentrations, whereas a decrease in the sorbent particle size and a decrease in influent pH resulted in an increase in the bed volumes treated at breakthrough. Both the HSDM and BPM were shown capable of predicting the column behavior.

  5. Z .Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 31 1998 315335 Rapid fluid content measurement method for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with potential for controlling the huge costs and extended times required to clean up these sites. However contents in rapidly changing flow fields. High intensity X-rays were used at the Cornell High Z .Energy it aids in the understanding of hydrologic control which is an essential component of cost-effective in

  6. Method of determining a content of a nuclear waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernardi, Richard T. (Prospect Heights, IL); Entwistle, David (Buffalo Grove, IL)

    2003-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for identifying contents of a nuclear waste container. The method includes the steps of forming an image of the contents of the container using digital radiography, visually comparing contents of the image with expected contents of the container and performing computer tomography on the container when the visual inspection reveals an inconsistency between the contents of the image and the expected contents of the container.

  7. On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2013-01-01

    To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

  8. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel...

  9. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2007-07-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

  10. Disseminated `jigsaw piece' dolomite in Upper Jurassic shelf sandstones, Central North Sea: an example of cement growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Disseminated `jigsaw piece' dolomite in Upper Jurassic shelf sandstones, Central North Sea authigenesis in highly bioturbated marine sandstones. The dolomite is present throughout the Franklin Sandstone throughout the sandstones, irrespective of detrital grain size or clay content. Dolomite authigenesis

  11. AVLIS documentation overview and tables of contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    Three documents constitute the executive summary series in Data Package III: this document (Documentation Overview and Tables of Contents (E001)) plus the AVLIS Production Plant Executive Summary (E010) and the AVLIS Production Plant Overall Design Report (E020). They provide progressively greater detail on the key information and conclusions contained within the data package. The Executive Summary and Overall Design Report present summaries of each Data Package III document. They are intended to provide a global overview of AVLIS Production Plant deployment including program planning, project management, schedules, engineering design, production, operations, capital cost, and operating cost. The purpose of Overview and Tables of Contents is threefold: to briefly review AVLIS goals for Data Package III documentation, to present an overview of the contents of the data package, and to provide a useful guide to information contained in the numerous documents comprising the package.

  12. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01

    and Patna1k (1 ) partially support th1s explanation. They found that lime at ths rate of one percent of the weight of the so11 increased mineralisat1on of nitrogen, but most of the n1trogen in their tests accumulated as ammonia rather than nitrate under...RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural...

  13. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Course contentCourse content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    - firedPulverised coal- fired power plantpower plant #12;HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-upPulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up #12;HELSINKIHELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 ·· Course contentCourse content ·· Flue gases and fuel

  14. Local content of bipartite qubit correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branciard, Cyril; Gisin, Nicolas [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Scarani, Valerio [Centre for Quantum Technologies and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117543 Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-02-15

    One of the last open problems concerning two qubits in a pure state is to find the exact local content of their correlation, in the sense of Elitzur, Popescu, and Rohrlich (EPR2) [A. C. Elitzur, S. Popescu, and D. Rohrlich, Phys. Lett. A162, 25 (1992)]. We propose an EPR2 decomposition that allows us to prove, for a wide range of states |{psi}({theta})>=cos{theta}|00>+sin{theta}|11>, that their local content is p{sub L}({theta})=cos2{theta}. We also share reflections on how to possibly extend this result to all two-qubit pure states.

  15. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2006-12-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

  16. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-16

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  17. PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THF WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Herbert Wo Graham, Fishery Biologist, John Mo of T richodesmium floating on the surface over water of very low phosphorus content. #12;CONTENTS Page Methods

  18. FUNDAMENTALSTUDY FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ESTIMATION ACCURACY CHLORIDE CONTENT USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    by the electromagnetic wave radar that chloride contents and water contents, and temperature affected the electricalFUNDAMENTALSTUDY FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ESTIMATION ACCURACY CHLORIDE CONTENT USING ELECTROMAGNETIC, Tokyo, Japan mami.uchida.4k@stu.hosei.ac.jp ABSTRACT Chloride contents estimation using electromagnetic

  19. Acclimatizing Taxonomic Semantics for Hierarchical Content Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Huan

    Acclimatizing Taxonomic Semantics for Hierarchical Content Classification Lei Tang Dept. of Comp in con- tent classification. However, we observe through empirical study that the performance semantics-based hierarchy does not work well in con- tent classification, and how it could be improved

  20. Volume III, Chapter 7 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 7 Walleye #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 7.0 Walleye (Stizostedium vitreum................................................................................................... 7-7 7.4.3 Water Development only in fresh water, as illustrated by the map in Figure 7-1 (Scott and Crossman 1998).Walleye also

  1. TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction INTRO -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Sheet IV - 31 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Laboratory V: Magnetic Fields and Forces V - 1 Problem #1: Permanent of Permanent Magnets V - 8 Problem #4: Measuring the Magnetic Field of One Coil V - 11 Problem #5: Determining Difference VI - 9 Problem #5: The Generator VI - 12 Problem #6: Time-Varying Magnetic Fields VI - 15 Check

  2. Table of Contents Dean Search 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to the January Robert G. Gootee/ODS Health Endowed Lectureship in Leadership and Professionalism. The speaker-year dental student Shannon Woods after the Robert G. Gootee/ODS Health Endowed Lectureship in LeadershipTable of Contents Gootee 1 Dean Search 1 Historical Feature 2 Patient Visits Rise 4 Dentistry One

  3. TABLE OF CONTENTS Welding and Cutting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 30 Nov 14 10-i Section 10 TABLE OF CONTENTS Welding and Cutting Section: Page 10.A ............................................................................................... 10-5 10.E Oxyfuel Gas Welding and Cutting .................................................................. 10-7 10.F Arc Welding and Cutting

  4. Hierarchical Classification of Web Content Susan Dumais

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianping

    classification methods to supplement human effort in creating structured knowledge hierarchies. A wide rangeHierarchical Classification of Web Content Susan Dumais Microsoft Research One Microsoft Way Redmond, WA 99802 USA sdumais@microsoft.com Hao Chen Computer Science Division University of California

  5. The Technical Specification for the Security Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. economy and public welfare by providing technical leadership for the nation`s measurement and standards include the development of technical, physical, administrative, and management standards and guidelinesThe Technical Specification for the Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP): SCAP Version 1

  6. WWW-2005 Tutorial Web Content Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wen-Chen

    of surface Web and deep Web. Surface Web: pages that can be browsed using a browser. Deep Web: databasesWWW-2005 Tutorial Web Content Mining Bing Liu Department of Computer Science University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) liub@cs.uic.edu http://www.cs.uic.edu/~liub The 14th International World Wide Web Conference

  7. OSGeo Journal Volume 8 Volume 8 Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalak, Anna M.

    #12;#12;OSGeo Journal Volume 8 Volume 8 Contents Editorial 2 From the Editor From the Editor OSGeo has just past its 5th birthday, along with this 8th volume of the OSGeo Journal- nificantly, several top papers from the FOSS4G 2009 con- ference event held in Sydney, Australia. The Journal

  8. CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY Table Of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 12 CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY Table Of Contents Section: Page 12.A General.................. .............................................. ... .12-1 12.B Hazardous Energy.......................................................12-6 #12;EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 12-1 SECTION 12 CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL 12.A.01 When

  9. Table of Contents Division Organization 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security and Forensics 33 NIST Cloud Computing Project 34 Policy Machine 35 Security for Grid#12;2002 Table of Contents Welcome 1 Division Organization 2 The Computer Security Division Implements the 3 Federal Information Security Management Act of Security Management and Assurance Group 4

  10. Music Retrieval2 Content Based Music Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veltkamp, Remco

    Music Retrieval2 Content Based Music Retrieval Remco C. Veltkamp, Frans Wiering, Rainer Typke Department of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University, Netherlands Two main groups of Music audio data and systems for searching notated music. There are also hybrid systems that first transcribe

  11. USING ACTIVE CONTENT AND MOBILE CODE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    convenience to the users who download files and electronic documents from the Internet. The Web pages of electronic documents with active content are Web pages with digitally encoded multimedia information the Internet. The Web pages that they retrieve are used as electronic counterparts to paper documents. However

  12. A Content Dissemination Framework for Vehicular Networking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascolo, Cecilia

    mobile networks in which vehicles are equipped with radio interfaces and are, therefore, able to communicate with fixed infrastructure (if available) or other vehicles. Content dissemination has a potential- based that is aiming to proactively deliver information to a group of vehicles based on their interests

  13. TABLE OF CONTENTS Tree Maintenance and Removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    protection should be worn for all tree maintenance and removal operations. b. Training shall be providedEM 385-1-1 30 Nov 14 31-i Section 31 TABLE OF CONTENTS Tree Maintenance and Removal Section: Page ....................................................................... 31-10 31.E Other Operations and Equipment

  14. Table of Contents 3 Officers and Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    #12;Table of Contents 3 Officers and Administration 7 The Field and the School 15 Educational Agencies 176 SSA Calendar 178 Index #12;School of Social Service Administration 3 Officers and Administration Officers of the University Andrew M. Alper, Chairman of the Board of Trustees Robert J. Zimmer

  15. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES Table of Contents Section 1 - Introduction Section 2 - The Emergency Response Team (ERT) Section 3 - Purpose of the Emergency Response Plan (ERP) Section 4 - The Incident Setup Section 7 - Emergency Response Critique Section 8 - Coordination with Other Agencies (Large

  16. HOUSING DEPARTMENT MANUAL Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOUSING DEPARTMENT MANUAL Table of Contents Section 1 ­ Introduction Section 2 ­ Mission Statement Section 3 ­ Vision Section 4 ­ The Housing Department Location Section 5 ­ The Housing Department Team@aub.edu.lb. Last updated on: May 8, 2014 #12;Housing Department Manual Page 2 Section 1 - Introduction The Housing

  17. Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index A (1) City & State Atlas A (2) Astronomy Atlas A (3) U.S. Atlas A (4) Water Atlas A (5) South America & Central America A (6) Africa, Asia, &, Antarctica A (7) Mexico) SAN ANTONIO QUICK FINDER MAPS F 1373 .B46 F4 1990 33. A (1) SURFACE WATER RESOURCES OF TEXAS MAPS G

  18. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  19. Table of Contents White Coat 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Table of Contents White Coat 1 Staff Profiles 2/3/4 Recent Photos 5 New SOD'ers 6 State of School 7 on page six) Dental Bites October 2014 Class of 2017 Receives White Coats The Class of 2017 was recognized of patients. Seventy-five second-year dental students received their personalized white lab coats in a formal

  20. Were Moving to Phoenix Core Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Bruce

    WeÕre Moving to Phoenix Core Content 2.2 Life Science Diversity and Adaptations of Organisms good friend just told you that his family is moving to Phoenix, Arizona from Kentucky. Your friend. You need to find out if the same is true of Phoenix, Arizona. Preassessment 1. What kinds of plant

  1. AWtemplate Examples, 1 Content Conversion and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdun, Uwe

    place, interactive, Web-based applications represent their services using HTML pages. An HTTP server transfers HTML pages with the HTTP protocol. A Web user agent, such as a browser, communicates with a Web to be decorated with HTML markup. On the first glance, content creation on the Web seems to be a simple effort

  2. The effect of initial gas content and distribution on the residual gas content of cores after waterflooding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James Kelly

    1953-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF INITIAL GAS CONTENT AND DISTRIBUTION ON THE RESIDUAL GAS CONTENT OF CORES AFTER WATERF LOODING A Thesis By JAMES KELLY ELLIOTT Approved as to style and content by: hairman of Committ e THE EFFECT OF INITIAL GAS CONTENT... AND DISTRIBUTION ON THE RESIDUAL GAS CONTENT OF CORES AFTER WATERFLOODING By JAMES KELLY ELLIOTT A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  3. Determining the Gluonic Content of Isoscalar Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    1996-12-13

    The gluonic widths of four leading glueball candidates are determined from their production in radiative quarkonium decays, allowing quantitative estimation of their glue content. Lattice predictions for the scalar and tensor channels seem to be in reasonable agareement with present data (allowing for mixing with $q \\bar{q}$ states). However there is a glueball-like-state in the pseudoscalar spectrum whose mass is considerably lower than expected from lattice estimates.

  4. BETO Quiz - Interactive Content | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO Quiz - Interactive Content BETO Quiz -

  5. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 26 (2010) 12971301 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    2010-01-01

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics 26 (2010) 1297­1301 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Biosensors and Bioelectronics journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bios Carbon nanotubes-free chemiresistive/field-effect tran- sistor biosensors as they provide label-free and high sensitivity detection

  6. Neural Networks 24 (2011) 950960 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    2011-01-01

    Neural Networks 24 (2011) 950­960 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Neural of a spiking neural network model of the basal ganglia circuitry using general purpose computing on graphics neural networks Real-time simulation GPGPUs Basal ganglia High-performance computing a b s t r a c t Real

  7. Microsoft Word - Permit Table of Contents 2-2014 (2).docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Table of Contents February 2014 WIPP Permit - Table of Contents PART 1 - GENERAL PERMIT CONDITIONS ... 1...

  8. Introduction Final Cooling Channel -High Frequency RF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Outline Introduction Final Cooling Channel - High Frequency RF Muon Collider Final Cooling Hisham Sayed February 27, 2014 1 / 10 #12;Outline Introduction Final Cooling Channel - High Frequency RF Table of Contents 1 Introduction 2 Final Cooling Channel - High Frequency RF 2 / 10 #12;Outline Introduction Final

  9. A Review of the Intrinsic Heavy Quark Content of the Nucleon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brodsky, S. J.; Kusina, A.; Lyonnet, F.; Schienbein, I.; Spiesberger, H.; Vogt, R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a review of the state of the art of our understanding of the intrinsic charm and bottom content of the nucleon. We discuss theoretical calculations, constraints from global analyses, and collider observables sensitive to the intrinsic heavy quark distributions. A particular emphasis is put on the potential of a high energy and high luminosity fixed target experiment using the LHC beams (AFTER@LHC) to search for intrinsic charm.

  10. A review of the intrinsic heavy quark content of the nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, S J; Lyonnet, F; Schienbein, I; Spiesberger, H; Vogt, R

    2015-01-01

    We present a review of the state-of-the-art of our understanding of the intrinsic charm and bottom content of the nucleon. We discuss theoretical calculations, constraints from global analyses, and collider observables sensitive to the intrinsic heavy quark distributions. A particular emphasis is put on the potential of a high-energy and high-luminosity fixed target experiment using the LHC beams (AFTER@LHC) to search for intrinsic charm.

  11. High carbon fly ash finds uses in highway construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, H.; Patton, R.

    2008-07-01

    The beneficial use of high carbon fly ash in a highway construction project is discussed. The fly ash also had a relatively high content of mercury and some other heavy metals. 1 fig., 4 photos.

  12. Cloud Monitoring for Large Cosmic Ray Sites R.W. Clay, B.R. Dawson, R.T. Pace, D.S. Riordan, A.G.K. Smith, N.R. Wild

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OG 4.5.23 Cloud Monitoring for Large Cosmic Ray Sites R.W. Clay, B.R. Dawson, R.T. Pace, D monitoring of the cloud distribution in the night sky within the experimental fiducial volume. We have developed infra-red detectors which are capa- ble of responding to cloud in daytime or night-time. We

  13. A Network Contention Model for the Extreme-scale Simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) is a performance investigation toolkit for high-performance computing (HPC) hardware/software co-design. It permits running a HPC application with millions of concurrent execution threads, while observing its performance in a simulated extreme-scale system. This paper details a newly developed network modeling feature for xSim, eliminating the shortcomings of the existing network modeling capabilities. The approach takes a different path for implementing network contention and bandwidth capacity modeling using a less synchronous and accurate enough model design. With the new network modeling feature, xSim is able to simulate on-chip and on-node networks with reasonable accuracy and overheads.

  14. Original article Biomass, litterfall and nutrient content in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Biomass, litterfall and nutrient content in Castanea sativa coppice stands November 1995) Summary - Aboveground biomass and nutrient content, litterfall and nutrient return) and Catania (Italy). Best regression equations for the aboveground biomass were obtained by applying the allo

  15. Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual January 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual January 2014 Table of Contents........................................................................5 Table F-1 Small Water Heater Test Methods ..................................................................................6 Table F-2 Large Water Heater Test Methods

  16. THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II REGIONS. VII. W3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE STELLAR CONTENT OF OBSCURED GALACTIC GIANT H II...

  17. Branch content of metallocene polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Branch content of metallocene polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran, Gregory Beaucage* and Amit catalyzed polyethylene (PE). A novel scaling approach is applied to determine the mole fraction branch solutions of metallocene polyethylene samples, to quantify the LCB content in polymers previously studied

  18. Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    LBNL- Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel withSwinhoe. “Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent FuelS. Tobin, “Measurement of Plutonium in Spent Nuclear Fuel by

  19. Exploiting User Generated Content for Mountain Peak Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tagliasacchi, Marco

    Exploiting User Generated Content for Mountain Peak Detection Roman Fedorov Politecnico di Milano.g. snow water availability maps based on mountain peaks states extracted from photographs hosting services). User Generated Content(UGC); collective intelligence; passive crowdsourcing; environmental models

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF ELECTROMAGNETIC TECHNIQUES FOR HYDROGEN CONTENT ASSESSMENT IN COATED LINEPIPE STEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasseigne-Jackson, A. N.; Anton, J.; Jackson, J. E.; Olson, D. L.; Mishra, B.

    2008-02-28

    With the introduction of new higher strength steels operating at higher pressure, the need for characterization of hydrogen content in high strength steel pipelines is timely for the pipeline industry. The higher-strength steel pipelines have higher susceptibility to hydrogen damage. Through the use of low-frequency induced current impedance measurements, a new non-contact sensor has been developed for real-time determination of diffusible hydrogen content in coated pipeline steel. A measurement scheme to separate variables associated with pipelines is discussed. This electromagnetic technique allows for a rapid, non-destructive assessment of hydrogen accumulation in coated steel line pipe and thus an evaluation of the pipeline integrity.

  1. Adaptive Personalization for Mobile Content Delivery Daniel Billsus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pazzani, Michael J.

    . Downloaded content can then be browsed at any time during the day without any additional wireless charges

  2. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A content inventory and analysis will help identify content that needs to be updated, edited, added, or removed for maintenance. They're also recommended prior to starting a website redesign. This content template and sample inventory were created in Excel. The sample lists URLs, page names, navigation, navigation hierarchy, and section placement for each page on the website. It also includes a notes field, which can be used for a Web content analysis.

  3. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome Pageper ThousandTABLE OF CONTENTS

  4. DERIVING PROGNOSTIC EQUATIONS FOR CLOUD FRACTION AND LIQUID WATER CONTENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DERIVING PROGNOSTIC EQUATIONS FOR CLOUD FRACTION AND LIQUID WATER CONTENT Vincent E. Larson1 1 that accounts for how liquid water varies with both total water content and temperature. The variable s has- ter content, ql , and cloud fraction, C. This provides in- formation about partial cloudiness. Tiedtke

  5. NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN CALIFORNIA VINEYARDS S (sshubbard@lbl.gov) Detailed estimates of water content are necessary for variety of hydrogeological inves to obtain sufficient information about the spatial variation of water content within the root zone using

  6. VARIATIONS IN THE DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTENT OF INTRAGRAVEL WATER IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ^402: VARIATIONS IN THE DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTENT OF INTRAGRAVEL WATER IN FOUR SPAWNING STREAMS IN THE DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTENT OF INTRAGRAVEL WATER IN FOUR SPAWNING STREAMS OF SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA by William J Introduction 1 Sampling intragravel water for dissolved oxygen content 2 Obtaining water samples from

  7. Aircraft Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Content using the Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Aircraft Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Content using the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe Water Content? Basic Cloud Parameter (MPACE) Icing Studies (WISP04, Sikorsky) Comparison with Remote Sensing Measurements (THORpex, IOP1) #12;Liquid Water Content Calculation The amount of liquid water

  8. Classifying Web content for a corporate digital library Ian Thurlow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Classifying Web content for a corporate digital library Ian Thurlow BT Abstract: The integration of relevant Web content into corporate digital libraries is expected to be of significant benefit when tools. The integration of Web content into a digital library, however, raises some concerns with regard

  9. Hackathon Project (HC-04): Ontology Summit 2013 Content Hack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baclawski, Kenneth B.

    Hackathon Project (HC-04): Ontology Summit 2013 Content Hack Leveraging Semantics on OntologPSMW Ken Baclawski Marcela Vegetti (co-champions) #12;Ontology Summit 2013 Content Hack 2 Background;Ontology Summit 2013 Content Hack 3 Intersection Common basis for the projects is the Ontology Summit

  10. Fast Browsing of Archived Web Contents Sangchul Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JaJa, Joseph F.

    and deep contents, web contents involve a wide variety of objects such as html pages, documents, multimediaFast Browsing of Archived Web Contents Sangchul Song Department of Electrical and Computer The web is becoming the preferred medium for communicating and storing information pertaining to almost

  11. Original article Estimation of leaf water content and specific leaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Estimation of leaf water content and specific leaf weight from reflectance and transmittance spectra measured over the 1 300-2 400-nm domain and the corresponding water content (g.cm-2) for pure water. We then investigated the possibility of estimating leaf water content and specific weight

  12. Privacy in encrypted content distribution using private broadcast encryption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, Brent

    @cs.stanford.edu Dan Boneh dabo@cs.stanford.edu Brent Waters bwaters@cs.stanford.edu Abstract In many contentPrivacy in encrypted content distribution using private broadcast encryption Adam Barth abarth distribution systems it is important to both restrict access of content to au- thorized users and to protect

  13. Near-Optimal Content Replication for Interactive Multiview Video Streaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Shueng-Han Gary

    Near-Optimal Content Replication for Interactive Multiview Video Streaming Huan Huang S.-H. Gary Chan Dept. of Comp. Sci. & Eng. The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Clear Water Bay services, a content provider often deploys distributed content servers with heterogeneous storage

  14. Original article Tau-fluvalinate content of Apistan® strips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Tau-fluvalinate content of Apistan® strips Mark F. Feldlaufer USDA (Received1 July 1998; accepted12 November 1998) Abstract - The tau-fluvalinate content of13 lot numbers in certain areas of the US is due to the tau-fluvalinate content of Apistan® strips. © Inra

  15. De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar growing seasons and quantified their LFMC, relative water content (RWC) and dry matter chemistry. LFMC a stronger control on seasonal LFMC dynamics than actual changes in water content, and they challenge

  16. Impact of the hydrogen content on the photoluminescence efficiency of amorphous silicon alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kistner, J.; Schubert, M. B. [Institute for Photovoltaics and Research Center SCoPE, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-12-07

    This paper analyzes the impact of hydrogen on the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of the three wide gap silicon alloys: silicon carbide (a-SiC{sub x}), silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}): silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}). All three materials behave similarly. The progression of the PL efficiency over the Si content splits into two regions. With decreasing Si content, the PL efficiency increases until a maximum is reached. With a further decrease of the Si content, the PL efficiency declines again. A comprehensive analysis of the sample structure reveals that the PL efficiency depends on the degree of passivation of Si and Y atoms (Y?=?C, N, O) with hydrogen. For samples with a high Si content, an effective passivation of incorporated Y atoms gives rise to an increasing PL efficiency. The PL efficiency of samples with a low Si content is limited due to a rising amount of unpassivated Si defect states. We find that a minimum amount of 0.2?H atoms per Si atom is required to maintain effective luminescence.

  17. Nighttime enhancements in total electron content near Arecibo and their association with VHF scintillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kersley, L.; Aarons, J.; Klobuchar, J.A.

    1980-08-01

    From the analysis of 16 months of transionospheric propagation data taken near Arecibo it has been found that there are associations between nighttime enhancements and quasi-periodic fluctuations in total electron content and the occurrence of amplitude scintillations. A postmidnight peak is found in the occurrence of electron content increases, maximum wave activity, and largest scintillation index, with some evidence to suggest a second premidnight peak in winter and reduced probability of the features being found at equinox. An analysis of the large-scale variations of the total content data for three stations has shown that the postsunset minimum in electron content propagates at high speed toward the northeast, while the premidnight minimum advances toward the south with the main postmidnight maximum having northward component of motion. The results are discussed in terms of the known dynamical features of the ionosphere at Arecibo and in particular the effects of the neutral wind on the bottpmside ionosphere. It appears that conditions conducive to the production of nighttime enhancements in total electron content may also allow the penetration of medium scale gravity waves through the lower thermosphere with an unstable breakdown process giving rise to the development of scintillation-producing irregularities.

  18. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the initial phase of experiments. Compared to dry O{sub 2}, the addition of 10% water vapor decreased the lifetime of MCrAlY by {approx}30% for the conventional CMSX4 substrates. Higher average lifetimes were observed with Hf in the bond coating, but a similar decrease in lifetime was observed when water vapor was added. The addition of Y and La to the superalloy substrate did not change the YSZ lifetime with 10% water vapor. However, increasing water vapor content from 10 to 50% did not further decrease the lifetime of either bond coating with the doped superalloy substrate. Thus, these results suggest that higher water vapor contents cannot explain the derating of syngas-fired turbines, and other factors such as sulfur and ash from imperfect syngas cleanup (or upset conditions) need to be explored. Researchers continue to study effects of water vapor on thermally grown alumina scale adhesion and growth rate, and are looking for bond coating compositions more resistant to oxidation in the presence of water vapor.

  19. Determining the Gluonic Content of Isoscalar Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank E. Close; Glennys R. Farrar; Zhenping Li

    1996-10-08

    We develop tools to determine the gluonic content of a resonance of known mass, width and $J^{PC}$ from its branching fraction in radiative quarkonium decays and production cross section in $\\gamma \\gamma$ collisions. We test the procedures by applying them to known $q\\bar{q}$ mesons, then analyze four leading glueball candidates. We identify inconsistencies in data for $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma f_0(1500)$ and $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma f_J(1710)$ whose resolution can quantify their glueball status.When $\\Gamma(f_0(1500) \\to \\gamma \\gamma )$ and $\\Gamma(f_J(1710) \\to \\gamma \\gamma)$ are known, the $n\\bar{n}, s\\bar{s},gg$ mixing angles can be determined. The enigmatic situation in 1400-1500 MeV region of the isosinglet $0^{-+}$ sector is discussed.

  20. Fragmentation of colliding planetesimals with water content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maindl, Thomas I; Schäfer, Christoph; Speith, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the outcome of collisions of Ceres-sized planetesimals composed of a rocky core and a shell of water ice. These collisions are not only relevant for explaining the formation of planetary embryos in early planetary systems, but also provide insight into the formation of asteroid families and possible water transport via colliding small bodies. Earlier studies show characteristic collision velocities exceeding the bodies' mutual escape velocity which - along with the distribution of the impact angles - cover the collision outcome regimes 'partial accretion', 'erosion', and 'hit-and-run' leading to different expected fragmentation scenarios. Existing collision simulations use bodies composed of strengthless material; we study the distribution of fragments and their water contents considering the full elasto-plastic continuum mechanics equations also including brittle failure and fragmentation.

  1. Ionic content of Antarctic ice samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    1965-01-01

    0 0 0 004 001 0 10 4 0 0 0 40 400 1000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ND ND 0 0 0 0 ND ND 2 0 ND 6 0 ND 1 7-15 ND 230 1543 200 ND = Not determined. *B2 *B3 TGI TGM 2 Nov. 61 3 Nov. 61 2 Dec. 61 2 Dec. 61 Content (ppm) 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50... ND 0 0 38 ND ND ND 0 4 0-4 0 0 0 0 ND ND ND 009 0 0 0 0 ~ 1 0 ND 200 2200 ND WPI 8 Jan. 62 0 0 12 0 ND...

  2. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, K.

    2010-01-01

    wave method for soil water content measurement: Hydrologicalfor estimating soil water content during irrigation andvariations of the soil water content in an agro-ecosystem

  3. The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements of wood chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    of a Permanent Magnet for Water Content Measurements of Wooda device that measures the water content of wood chips, pulpsystem. The results of water content measurements in wood

  4. High performance computing and numerical Volker Springel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    High performance computing and numerical modelling Volker Springel Lecture Notes 43rd Saas-mail: volker.springel@h-its.org 1 arXiv:1412.5187v1[astro-ph.GA]16Dec2014 #12;#12;Contents High performance computing and numerical modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Volker Springel 1 Preamble

  5. Expanded Content Envelope For The Model 9977 Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G. A.; Loftin, B. M.; Nathan, S. J.; Bellamy, J. S.

    2013-07-30

    An Addendum was written to the Model 9977 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging adding a new content consisting of DOE-STD-3013 stabilized plutonium dioxide materials to the authorized Model 9977 contents. The new Plutonium Oxide Content (PuO{sub 2}) Envelope will support the Department of Energy shipment of materials between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Savannah River Site facilities. The new content extended the current content envelope boundaries for radioactive material mass and for decay heat load and required a revision to the 9977 Certificate of Compliance prior to shipment. The Addendum documented how the new contents/configurations do not compromise the safety basis presented in the 9977 SARP Revision 2. The changes from the certified package baseline and the changes to the package required to safely transport this material is discussed.

  6. Constraints on the hadronic content of gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yacobi, Lee; Guetta, Dafne; Behar, Ehud [Department of Physics, Technion (Israel)

    2014-09-20

    The IceCube High-energy Neutrino Telescope has been collecting data since 2006. Conversely, hundreds of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected by the GRB Monitor on board Fermi since its launch in 2008. So far no neutrino event has been associated with a GRB, despite many models predicting the generation of high-energy neutrinos through GRB photon interaction with PeV protons in the GRB jet. We use the non-detection of neutrinos to constrain the hadronic content of GRB jets independent of jet model parameters. Assuming a generic particle spectrum of E {sup –?} with ? = 2, we find that the ratio of the energy carried by pions to that in electrons has to be small f {sub ?}/f{sub e} ? 0.24 at 95% confidence level. A distribution of spectral slopes can lower f {sub ?}/f{sub e} by orders of magnitude. Another limit, independent of neutrinos, is obtained if one ascribes the measured Fermi/Large Area Telescope GeV gamma-ray emission to pair-photon cascades of high-energy photons resulting from (the same photon-hadronic interactions and subsequent) neutral pion decays. Based on the generally observed MeV-to-GeV GRB fluence ratio of ?10, we show that f {sub ?}/f{sub e} ? 0.3. In some bursts, this ratio is as low as unity, f {sub ?}/f{sub e} ? 0.03. These findings add to mounting doubts regarding the presence of PeV protons in GRB jets.

  7. Content Development Policy: Electrical & Electronic Engineering 1 The University of Manchester Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    Content Development Policy: Electrical & Electronic Engineering 1 The University of Manchester Library Content Development Policy Electrical & Electronic Engineering Monday, 30 April 2012 Contents-books).......................................................... 20 #12;2 Content Development Policy: School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering Introduction

  8. Content Development Policy: Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science 1 The University of Manchester Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    Content Development Policy: Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science 1 The University of Manchester Library Content Development Policy Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science Monday, 30 April 2012 Contents Content Development Policy Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science

  9. A guide to web content for Heriot-Watt University websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howie, Jim

    1 A guide to web content for Heriot-Watt University websites #12;2 Contents A guide to web content..........................................................................................................................3 Why is writing for the web different?..........................................................................................3 Planning your web content

  10. Table of contents 1 What is software architecture? ......................................................................... 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    Table of contents 1 What is software architecture? ......................................................................... 1 1.1 Software architecture as abstraction ............................................................ 2 1.2 Software architecture as blueprint

  11. Adding Links in Energy.gov Content Management System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, to add a link in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system (CMS), follow these steps.

  12. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants Craig Turchi, Parthiv Kurup, Sertac Akar, and Francisco Flores Technical Report NRELTP-5500-64429 August...

  13. Heat content asymptotics with transmittal and transmission boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Gilkey; Klaus Kirsten

    2002-06-14

    We study the heat content asymptotics on a Riemannian manifold with smoooth boundary defined by Dirichlet, Neumann, transmittal and transmission boundary conditions.

  14. Recent content in Market Research Reports | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Recent content in Market Research Reports Home Name Post date sort icon Type Global Energy Efficient IT Equipment Industry 2015 Market Research Report Gosreports 30 Jun 2015 -...

  15. Energy.gov Content Management System Block Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, learn about the variety of block types available in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system (CMS).

  16. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  17. CONTENT ADAPTIVE WATERMARKING BASED ON A STOCHASTIC MULTIRESOLUTION IMAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genève, Université de

    CONTENT ADAPTIVE WATERMARKING BASED ON A STOCHASTIC MULTIRESOLUTION IMAGE MODELING Sviatoslav to provide wa­ termark invisibility. Thirdly, a new principle of water­ mark spatial allocation, based

  18. Environmental Health and Safety -Safety Manual Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    1 Environmental Health and Safety - Safety Manual Table of Contents I. Assignment of Responsibility Management Program..................................81 XIX. Water Vessel Safety Program

  19. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  20. Energy.gov Data Tables in Content Management System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, follow these guidelines for creating Section 508-compliant data tables in the Energy.gov content management system.

  1. Determining the gluonic content of isoscalar mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, F.E. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (England)] [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (England); Farrar, G.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States); Li, Z. [Physics Department, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, Peoples Republic of (China)] [Physics Department, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, Peoples Republic of (China)

    1997-05-01

    We develop tools to determine the gluonic content of a resonance of known mass, width, and J{sup PC} from its branching fraction in radiative quarkonium decays and production cross section in {gamma}{gamma} collisions. We test the procedures by applying them to known q{bar q} mesons, then analyze four leading glueball candidates. We identify inconsistencies in data for J/{psi}{r_arrow}{gamma}f{sub 0}(1500) and J/{psi}{r_arrow}{gamma}f{sub J}(1710) whose resolution can quantify their glueball status. When {Gamma}(f{sub 0}(1500){r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma}) and {Gamma}(f{sub J}(1710){r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma}) are known, the n{bar n},s{bar s},gg mixing angles can be determined. The enigmatic situation in the 1400-1500 MeV region of the isosinglet 0{sup {minus}+} sector is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. The mineral content of water as a variable in the quality control of reconstituted non-fat dry milk products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapsalis, John G.

    1959-01-01

    Expansive clay mineral contamination of road aggregate materials in Texas is a persistent problem. Hydrous layer silicate minerals - particularly smectites - in concretes are associated with decreased strength and durability in Portland cement...

  3. TABLE OF CONTENTS COMMUNITY HEALTH SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    , or property. The hospitals, operations, and businesses are owned and operated, and management services INTRODUCTION 4 THE ROLE OF MANAGEMENT 4 THE ROLE OF THE INDIVIDUAL 6 Grievance Resolution 6 CODE OF CONDUCT recognize the value of each employee in providing high quality, personalized care to our patients. We

  4. TABLE OF CONTENTS Control of Hazardous Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ), pneumatic, hydraulic, electrical, chemical, nuclear, and thermal (e.g., high or low temperature) energies are on a site that is controlled by a contractor and are affected by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA be initiated until these procedures have been reviewed by a person knowledgeable in HEC and accepted by the GDA

  5. Table of Contents John Murray enjoys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    out how much it will cost to build these hydropower plants. "The high-value opportunities . . . . . . . . . . .8 SCIENCE Energy development at U.S. dams could power more than 4 million homes In a study 4 million homes. ORNL and Idaho National Laboratory researchers conducting a hydropower resource

  6. Table of Contents Dental Month 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    in children between 1 month and 1 year of age. About one in three adults in the United States has high blood development. Dr. Balkowiec and her team discovered that the nerve cells controlling heart rate and blood. The finding could someday play a significant role in the prevention of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS

  7. Bounds On Contention Management Algorithms Johannes Schneider1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bounds On Contention Management Algorithms Johannes Schneider1 , Roger Wattenhofer1 Computer algorithms for contention management in transactional memory, the deterministic algorithm CommitRounds and the randomized algo- rithm RandomizedRounds. Our randomized algorithm is efficient: in some noto- rious problem

  8. Stomach contents of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Scottish waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Graham

    Stomach contents of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Scottish waters M.B. Santos*P , G, Stratherrick Road, Inverness, IV24JZ. P E-mail: m.b.santos@abdn.ac.uk Data on stomach contents of ten information exists on the feeding habits of the species in Scottish waters. Cod (Gadus morhua), saithe

  9. Original article Irrigation, faecal water content and development rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Irrigation, faecal water content and development rate of free-living stages- ent faecal water contents (FWC) simulating a submersion (7 or 16 h) or an alternance of spraying, T vitrinus in summer, but higher rates were observed in autumn. The action of water had more effect

  10. Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual June 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual June 2014 Table of Contents 13.........................................................7 13.8 NRCA-MCH-09-A: Supply Water Temperature Reset Controls Acceptance ....................7 13: Condenser Water Supply Temperature Reset Controls Acceptance 8 13.17 NRCA-MCH-18-A: Energy Management

  11. Table of Contents Preparing for and Responding to Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 Table of Contents Preparing for and Responding to Drought WHEN EVERY DROP COuNtsProtecting Public, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency, and American Water Works Association. 2010. When every drop counts P r o f e s s i o n A l s #12;#12;Table of Contents Acknowledgments

  12. CONTENTS 3 1 Strategy and education policy 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Université

    Year Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.3 Fourth year1 #12;2 #12;CONTENTS 3 Contents 1 Strategy and education policy 5 2 Courses listed per year 8 2.1 Core curriculum: first and second year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.2 Third

  13. Landscape Automata for Search Based Procedural Content Generation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashlock, Dan

    Landscape Automata for Search Based Procedural Content Generation. Daniel Ashlock and Cameron Mc be used for terrain generation or other procedural content generation. Landscape automata are evolvable idealized landforms and to generate a heightmap with controllable connectivity for agents using the height

  14. Table of Contents i Export Administration Regulations October 1, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    Table of Contents i Export Administration Regulations October 1, 2001 Table of Contents Index 730.2 Statutory authority 730.3 Dual-use exports 730.4 Other control agencies and departments 730.5 Coverage of more than exports 730.6 Control purposes 730.7 License requirements and exceptions 730.8 How

  15. The Web Changes Everything: Understanding the Dynamics of Web Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Robert F.

    The Web Changes Everything: Understanding the Dynamics of Web Content Eytan Adar University, USA jelsas@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT The Web is a dynamic, ever changing collection of information. This paper explores changes in Web content by analyzing a crawl of 55,000 Web pages, selected to represent

  16. Original article Belowground biomass and nutrient content in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    useful when using estimates of the aerial biomass of a stand to calculate the carbon storage content of the belowground compartment. Douglas-fir / root system / C sequestration / nutrient content carbone dans le compartiment souterrain, connaissant la biomasse aérienne d'un peuplement. Pour ce qui

  17. Characterizing Web Spam Using Content and HTTP Session Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caverlee, James

    ­ a collection of about 350,000 web spam pages. Our content analysis results are consistent with the hypothesis that web spam pages are different from normal web pages, showing far more duplication of physical content analysis may contribute a great deal towards future efforts to automatically distinguish web spam pages

  18. REGIONAL BLACKOUTS: PROTECTION OF BROADCAST CONTENT ON 3G NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    REGIONAL BLACKOUTS: PROTECTION OF BROADCAST CONTENT ON 3G NETWORKS Alexander W. Dent, Allan- gional blackouts. Broadcasters are often required to res- trict broadcasts of certain content to specific of reception is outside the blackout region. What is now required is proof that the end user is outside

  19. CONSTRUCTING SECURE CONTENT-DEPENDENT WATERMARKING SCHEME USING HOMOMORPHIC ENCRYPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qibin

    CONSTRUCTING SECURE CONTENT-DEPENDENT WATERMARKING SCHEME USING HOMOMORPHIC ENCRYPTION Zhi Li.a-star.edu.sg ABSTRACT Content-dependent watermarking (CDWM) has been pro- posed as a solution to overcome the potential and cryptography. 1. INTRODUCTION Consider a simplified model of Spread-Spectrum (SS) water- marking. Let x

  20. Chemical composition, mineral content and cholesterol levels of some regular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Note Chemical composition, mineral content and cholesterol levels of some regular and reduced from cow's milk, were analyzed for basic nutrients (water, protein, fat, ash and lactose), cholesterol and selected minerals (Na, Ca, K, Mg, P and Zn). The moisture contents of Labneh (78.6 g·100 g-1 ) and Double

  1. A Stochastic Approach to Content Adaptive Digital Image Watermarking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genève, Université de

    A Stochastic Approach to Content Adaptive Digital Image Watermarking Sviatoslav Voloshynovskiy y z and strength for the water­ mark embedding stage. We examine two such NVFs, based on either a non of the watermark estimation is equivalent to image denoising and derive content adaptive criteria. Re­ sults show

  2. A Stochastic Approach to Content Adaptive Digital Image Watermarking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genève, Université de

    A Stochastic Approach to Content Adaptive Digital Image Watermarking Sviatoslav Voloshynovskiyyz function, that allows us to determine the optimal watermark locations and strength for the water- mark to image denoising and derive content adaptive criteria. Re- sults show that watermark visibility

  3. Automated Content Metadata Extraction Services based on MPEG Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    Metadata Extraction 3 flows from producers to consumers via two paths. The first one is focused on specific to infer the perceived value of a piece of content and provide input for content filtering of automated production workflows and service oriented architectures, the stage has been set for rapid

  4. Content-aware Caching and Traffic Management in Content Distribution Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amble, Meghana Mukund

    2012-02-14

    is Nd. A. Request Arrivals at Front-end Nodes Under the switch abstraction of the CDN, we have request queues of size qcs[k] at source s for content c at (discrete) time k: We denote the vector of all such queues (the system state) by ~Q[k...]: The number of requests that arrive at time k is denoted acs[k]. Arrivals are Bayesian, with nite mean c s and second moment c s: We assume that for any A 0, there exists a A > 0, such that P(acs[k] A) > 1 A 8c; s; k: In other words, the maximum...

  5. Building America Webinar: Put New Tools and Content on the Building America Solution Center To Work for You!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building America Solution Center is known for its easy-to-follow, illustrated, step-by-step guides for installing the measures that make up high-performance homes. This webinar on July 22, 2015, described a number of updates that offer exciting new tools and content that builders and industry professionals can put to work immediately.

  6. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Donna

    in a highly unequal distribution of air pollution between towns and cities, and across the country. This paper protected from industrial air pollution View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal pollution B Dobbie1 and D Green2 1 Climate Change Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW

  7. Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L.

    2009-07-01

    Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

  8. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry R. (Palos Heights, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  9. The Particle Content of Extragalactic Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David S. De Young

    2006-05-31

    Recent x-ray and radio data from radio sources in galaxy clusters are used to show that the pdV work required to inflate the radio lobes exceeds all other energy estimates deduced from the radio emission. If the required jet energy density has an isotropic pressure, then in almost all cases the jet cannot be confined by an external medium. This problem can be resolved with jets dominated by cold protons, but even here the accompanying energy density in relativistic electons can cause decollimation. Electron-positron jets cannot solve this problem unless they are highly beamed with unusual energy distributions. Poynting flux jets may be a viable alternative.

  10. Effect of FeO-content and potentials for quality improvements of iron ore pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortmann, H.A.; Mertins, E.; Ritz, V.J. [Studiengesellschaft fuer Eisenerzaufbereitung, Liebenburg-Othfresen (Germany)

    1995-12-01

    The FeO-content strongly influences the physical and metallurgical properties of iron ore pellets. A wide range of FeO-contents within the pellet deliveries to the Germany market is evaluated. Investigations include the effect of pellet size. The paper concludes potentials for quality improvement of iron ore pellets. Most of the German blast furnaces are operated with high injection rates either of oil or of coal resulting in a decrease of coke consumption down to a level of about 300 kg/t hot metal. As the retention time of the burden increases, blast furnace operators demand higher quality burden material, basically with respect to strength before and during reduction.

  11. Accuracy of the Water Vapour Content Measurements in the Atmosphere Using Optical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galkin, V D; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Pakhomov, V P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the accuracy and the errors of water vapour content measurements in the atmosphere using optical methods, especially starphotometer. After the general explanations of the used expressions for the star-magnitude observations of the water vapour absorption in section 3 the absorption model for the water vapour band will be discussed. Sections 4 and 5 give an overview on the technique to determine the model parameters both from spectroscopic laboratory and radiosonde observation data. Finally, the sections 6 and 7 are dealing with the details of the errors; that means errors of observable magnitude, of instrumental extraterrestrial magnitude, of atmospheric extinction determination and of water vapour content determination by radiosonde humidity measurements. The main conclusion is: Because of the high precision of the results the optical methods for water vapour observation are suited to validate and calibrate alternative methods (GPS, LIDAR, MICROWAVE) which are making constant progress wo...

  12. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong Tam Nguyen; Jozsef Zsigrai

    2005-08-25

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  13. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, C T

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  14. High PRF high current switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Stuart L. (Fredericksburg, VA); Hutcherson, R. Kenneth (College Park, MD)

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossum, Eric R.

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Frédo

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  17. A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  18. 1TABLE OF CONTENTS 2014 ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;1TABLE OF CONTENTS 2014 ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES STRATEGIC PLAN Executive Summary Director Facilities Strategic Planning and Research Community Involvement New Opportunities Science Priorities and Upgraded Capabilities Enabling Technologies Sources Executing the Plan Strategic Timeline Appendices

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    OF THE BUILDING. 6. Walk, do not run. Shut all doors behind you and proceed along corridors and down stairwaysTABLE OF CONTENTS INSTRUCTIONS IN CASE OF EMERGENCY AN EMERGENCY EVACUATION.............................................................................27 APPENDIX