Sample records for high capacity silicon

  1. Carbon-Silicon Core-Shell Nanowires as High Capacity Electrode for Lithium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Carbon-Silicon Core-Shell Nanowires as High Capacity Electrode for Lithium Ion Batteries Li lithium battery electrodes. Amorphous silicon was coated onto carbon nanofibers to form a core during lithium cycling and can function as a mechanical support and an efficient electron conducting

  2. Graphene Enhances Li Storage Capacity of Porous Single-crystalline Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Han, W.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrated that graphene significantly enhances the reversible capacity of porous silicon nanowires used as the anode in Li-ion batteries. We prepared our experimental nanomaterials, viz., graphene and porous single-crystalline silicon nanowires, respectively, using a liquid-phase graphite exfoliation method and an electroless HF/AgNO{sub 3} etching process. The Si porous nanowire/graphene electrode realized a charge capacity of 2470 mAh g{sup -1} that is much higher than the 1256 mAh g{sup -1} of porous Si nanowire/C-black electrode and 6.6 times the theoretical capacity of commercial graphite. This relatively high capacity could originate from the favorable charge-transportation characteristics of the combination of graphene with the porous Si 1D nanostructure.

  3. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  4. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Brzezinski, Mark A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  5. High capacity immobilized amine sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Filburn, Thomas (Granby, CT)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

  6. Capacity and Energy Cost of Information in Biological and Silicon Photoreceptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Capacity and Energy Cost of Information in Biological and Silicon Photoreceptors PAMELA ABSHIRE of infor- mation capacity (in bits per second) versus energy cost of infor- mation (in joules per bit levels of abstraction. At the functional level, we ex- amine the operational and task specification

  7. Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  8. HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Presentation for...

  9. High index contrast platform for silicon photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akiyama, Shoji, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on silicon-based high index contrast (HIC) photonics. In addition to mature fiber optics or low index contrast (LIC) platform, which is often referred to as Planar Lightwave Cirrcuit (PLC) or Silica ...

  10. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Brzezinski, Mark A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  11. High-capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes. High-capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes. Abstract: A substantial effort worldwide has been...

  12. High Q silicon carbide microdisk resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiyuan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lee, Jonathan Y. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Feng, Philip X.-L. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Lin, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.lin@rochester.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a silicon carbide (SiC) microdisk resonator with optical Q up to 5.12?×?10{sup 4}. The high optical quality, together with the diversity of whispering-gallery modes and the tunability of external coupling, renders SiC microdisk a promising platform for integrated quantum photonics applications.

  13. Highly Efficient Silicon Light Emitting Diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leminh Holleman Wallinga; P. Leminh; J. Holleman; H. Wallinga

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication, using standard silicon processing techniques, of silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap. The improved efficiency had been explained by the spatial confinement of charge carriers due to a local strain field that is formed by dislocation loop arrays. The dependence of device electroluminescent properties on the annealing conditions is carefully examined as a high temperature process has profound influence on these dislocations. Increased luminescent intensity at higher device temperature, together with pure diffusion current conduction mechanism evidently shows the influence of the dislocation loops. The electrical properties of the diode are reasonable with low leakage reverse current.

  14. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion...

  15. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil applications. During 1986 and 1987, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was responsible for maintaining the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In 1988, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA advanced technology project, and provides a bridge to the NASA exploration technology programs. The elements of CSTI high capacity power development include conversion systems - Stirling and thermoelectric, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 years lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems while minimizing the impact of day/night operation as well as attitudes and distance from the Sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the program elements will be discussed, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  16. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Schmitz, P. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Vandersande, J. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the changes for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the CSTI High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project with develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  17. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, George C. (La Crescenta, CA); Rohatgi, Naresh K. (W. Corine, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  18. Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure for High-Performance Lithium-ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaolin; Gu, Meng; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Kennard, Rhiannon; Yan, Pengfei; Chen, Xilin; Wang, Chong M.; Sailor, Michael J.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured silicon is a promising anode material for high performance lithium-ion batteries, yet scalable synthesis of such materials, and retaining good cycling stability in high loading electrode remain significant challenges. Here, we combine in-situ transmission electron microscopy and continuum media mechanical calculations to demonstrate that large (>20 micron) mesoporous silicon sponge (MSS) prepared by the scalable anodization method can eliminate the pulverization of the conventional bulk silicon and limit particle volume expansion at full lithiation to ~30% instead of ~300% as observed in bulk silicon particles. The MSS can deliver a capacity of ~750 mAh/g based on the total electrode weight with >80% capacity retention over 1000 cycles. The first-cycle irreversible capacity loss of pre-lithiated MSS based anode is only <5%. The insight obtained from MSS also provides guidance for the design of other materials that may experience large volume variation during operations.

  19. Developing High Capacity, Long Life Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    more than 1000 mAhg with poor cyleability. * The formation of Sn x Co y C z and MO composite could lead to the increase in the capacity, reduce the amount of cobalt in the...

  20. Inelastic hosts as electrodes for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries Kejie Zhao, Matt Pharr, Joost J. Vlassak, and Zhigang Suoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in commercial lithium-ion batteries for both cathodes e.g., LiCoO2 and anodes e.g., graphite . By contrastInelastic hosts as electrodes for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries Kejie Zhao, Matt Pharr, Joost for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. Upon absorbing lithium, silicon swells several times its volume

  1. High Efficiency, Low Cost Solar Cells Manufactured Using 'Silicon Ink' on Thin Crystalline Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoniadis, H.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink high efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.

  2. Silicon carbide mirrors for high power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and high energy lasers (HEL) in recent years has brought about the need for optical materials that can withstand the harsh operating conditions in such devices. SR mirrors must be ultra-high vacuum compatible, must withstand intense x-ray irradiation without surface damage, must maintain surface figure under thermal loading and must be capable of being polished to an extremely smooth surface finish. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide in combination with sintered substrate material meets these requirements and offers additional benefits as well. It is an extremely hard material and offers the possibility of being cleaned and recoated many times without degradation of the surface finish, thereby prolonging the lifetime of expensive optical components. It is an extremely strong material and offers the possibility of weight reduction over conventional mirror materials.

  3. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  4. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  5. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pujari, Vimal K. (Northboro, MA); Tracey, Dennis M. (Medfield, MA); Foley, Michael R. (Oxford, MA); Paille, Norman I. (Oxford, MA); Pelletier, Paul J. (Sutton, MA); Sales, Lenny C. (Grafton, MA); Willkens, Craig A. (Worcester, MA); Yeckley, Russell L. (Latrobe, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic body comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa.

  6. Method and apparatus for producing high purity silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.

    1983-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing high purity silicon includes forming a copper silicide alloy and positioning the alloy within an enclosure. A filament member is also placed within the enclosure opposite the alloy. The enclosure is then filled with a chemical vapor transport gas adapted for transporting silicon. Finally, both the filament member and the alloy are heated to temperatures sufficient to cause the gas to react with silicon at the alloy surface and deposit the reacted silicon on the filament member. In addition, an apparatus for carrying out this method is also disclosed.

  7. High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

  8. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the reaction is, in turn, intercalated into the negative electrode (i.e. graphite, graphene composites, intermetallics, Si-C composites, high-capacity TiO 2 (B bronze), TiO 2...

  9. Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    improve and evaluate the electrochemical properties and surface stability of composite electrode structures with a high Mn content - on going Evaluate processes for...

  10. Low cost routes to high purity silicon and derivatives thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laine, Richard M; Krug, David James; Marchal, Julien Claudius; Mccolm, Andrew Stewart

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing an agricultural waste product having amorphous silica, carbon, and impurities; extracting from the agricultural waste product an amount of the impurities; changing the ratio of carbon to silica; and reducing the silica to a high purity silicon (e.g., to photovoltaic silicon).

  11. Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions: The future of high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    ;5 Record efficiencies #12;6 Diffused-junction solar cells Diffused-junction solar cell Chemical passivation to ~650 mV #12;7 Silicon heterojunction solar cells a-Si:H provides excellent passivation of c-Si surface Heterojunction solar cell Chemical passivation Chemical passivation #12;8 Voc and silicon heterojunction solar

  12. Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation. Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation. Abstract: In this study, porous silicon...

  13. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic body is disclosed comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa. 4 figs.

  14. The freezing tendency towards 4-coordinated amorphous network causes increase in heat capacity of supercooled Stillinger-Weber silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankaj A. Apte; Nandlal Pingua; Arvind Kumar Gautam; Uday Kumar; Soohaeng Yoo Willow; Xiao Cheng Zeng; B. D. Kulkarni

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercooled liquid silicon, modeled by Stillinger-Weber potential, shows anomalous increase in heat capacity $C_p$, with a maximum $C_p$ value close to 1060 K at zero pressure. We study equilibration and relaxation of the supercooled SW Si, in the temperature range of 1060 K--1070 K at zero pressure. We find that as the relaxation of the metastable supercooled liquid phase initiates, a straight line region (SLR) is formed in cumulative potential energy distributions. The configurational temperature corresponding to the SLR is close to 1060 K, which was earlier identified as the freezing temperature of 4-coordinated amorphous network. The SLR is found to be tangential to the distribution of the metastable liquid phase and thus influences the broadness of the distribution. As the bath temperature is reduced from 1070 K to 1060 K, the effective temperature approaches the bath temperature which results in broadening of the metastable phase distribution. This, in turn, causes an increase in overall fluctuations of potential energy and hence an increase of heat capacity. We also find that during initial stages of relaxation, 4-coordinated atoms form 6-membered rings with a chair--like structure and other structural units that indicate crystallization. Simultaneously a strong correlation is established between the number of chair-shaped 6-membered rings and the number of 4-coordinated atoms in the system. This shows that all properties related to 4-coordinated particles are highly correlated as the SLR is formed in potential energy distributions and this can be interpreted as a consequence of `freezing' of amorphous network formed by 4-coordinated particles.

  15. High Capacity Li Ion Battery Anodes Using Ge Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    High Capacity Li Ion Battery Anodes Using Ge Nanowires Candace K. Chan, Xiao Feng Zhang, and Yi Cui efficiency > 99%. Structural characterization revealed that the Ge nanowires remain intact and connected nanowire anodes are promising candidates for the development of high-energy-density lithium batteries

  16. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  17. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pujari, Vimal K. (Northboro, MA); Tracey, Dennis M. (Medfield, MA); Foley, Michael R. (Oxford, MA); Paille, Norman I. (Oxford, MA); Pelletier, Paul J. (Millbury, MA); Sales, Lenny C. (Grafton, MA); Willkens, Craig A. (Sterling, MA); Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A silicon nitride ceramic comprising: a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa.

  18. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Penn Hills, PA)

    1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  19. Porous silicon ring resonator for compact, high sensitivity biosensing applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Gilberto A.; Hu, Shuren; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ring resonator is patterned on a porous silicon slab waveguide to produce a compact, high quality factor biosensor with a large internal surface area available for enhanced recognition of biological and chemical molecules. The porous nature of the ring resonator allows molecules to directly interact with the guided mode. Quality factors near 10,000 were measured for porous silicon ring resonators with a radius of 25 ?m. A bulk detection sensitivity of 380 nm/RIU was measured upon exposure to salt water solutions. Specific detection of nucleic acid molecules was demonstrated with a surface detection sensitivity of 4 pm/nM.

  20. Nanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent stability for high energy lithium batteries . Nanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent stability...

  1. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  2. High-Rate, High-Capacity Binder-Free Electrode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggsmiddlewareHigh-PressureOffice of

  3. A New Vision for High-Capacity Hybrid Li-ion/Li-O2 Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduces A New Vision for High-Capacity Hybrid Li-ionLi-O2 Batteries Diagram illustrating the CEES all-in-one vision for a high-capacity Li-ionLi-O2 cell. Illustration of CEES'...

  4. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Ajeet (Marietta, GA); Chen, Zhizhang (Duluth, GA); Doshi, Parag (Atlanta, GA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. Silicon solar cell efficiencies of 16.9% have been achieved. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO.sub.x.

  5. Highly Ordered Vertical Silicon Nanowire Array Composite Thin Films for Thermoelectric Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    Highly Ordered Vertical Silicon Nanowire Array Composite Thin Films for Thermoelectric Devices for thermoelectric devices are presented. Inter- ference lithography was used to pattern square lattice photoresist device. Key words: Silicon nanowires, thermoelectrics, cross-plane measurements, nanowire composite

  6. Optimal Capacity Conversion for Product Transitions Under High Service Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hongmin

    We consider the capacity planning problem during a product transition in which demand for a new-generation product gradually replaces that for the old product. Capacity for the new product can be acquired both by purchasing ...

  7. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

    1983-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  8. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, Ajeet (Marietta, GA); Doshi, Parag (Altanta, GA); Tate, John Keith (Lawrenceville, GA); Mejia, Jose (Atlanta, GA); Chen, Zhizhang (Duluth, GA)

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO.sub.x. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure.

  9. Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohatgi, A.; Doshi, P.; Tate, J.K.; Mejia, J.; Chen, Z.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO{sub x}. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure. 28 figs.

  10. Synthesis of high purity sinterable silicon carbide powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boecker, W.D.; Mehosky, B.L.; Rogers, R.S.C.; Storm, R.S.; Venkateswaran, V. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (USA). Structural Ceramics Div.)

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High purity, submicron silicon carbide powders were produced via gas phase synthesis using a hydrogen/argon plasma. Two test facilities were constructed, a bench-scale unit and a larger pilot scale reactor. Three candidate silicon sources were evaluated:silicon tetrachloride (SiCl{sub 4}). dimethyldichlorosilane (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(SiCl{sub 2}) and methyltrichlorosilane (CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3}). Product powders were evaluated on the basis of pressureless sinterability, surface area, agglomeration, particle size distribution, phase distribution and chemistry. Three commercial powders, Starck A10, Starck B10, and Carborundum submicron alpha silicon carbide, were also evaluated for comparison to the product powders. Powders were reproducibly synthesized at a rate of one pound per hour for standard run times of five hours. Product powders exhibited chemical and physical properties equal to or exceeding the commercial powders evaluated. In limited attempts to pressureless sinter the product powders, densities of 91% of theoretical were obtained with as-produced powder. Post-processing permitted densities in excess of 97% of theoretical. X-ray diffraction of the product indicates that the product powders are primarily beta poly-types, with traces of alpha present. Increased production rates to a target level of seven pounds per hour were not possible due to current transients produced by the pilot scale power supply. Extensive unsuccessful efforts to reduce or eliminate the transients are described. Low recovered product yields resulted from a failure of a product collection filter that was not discovered until the completion of the project.

  11. Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Arumugam (Austin, TX); Wu, Yan (Austin, TX)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

  12. Forming high efficiency silicon solar cells using density-graded anti-reflection surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method (50) is provided for processing a graded-density AR silicon surface (14) to provide effective surface passivation. The method (50) includes positioning a substrate or wafer (12) with a silicon surface (14) in a reaction or processing chamber (42). The silicon surface (14) has been processed (52) to be an AR surface with a density gradient or region of black silicon. The method (50) continues with heating (54) the chamber (42) to a high temperature for both doping and surface passivation. The method (50) includes forming (58), with a dopant-containing precursor in contact with the silicon surface (14) of the substrate (12), an emitter junction (16) proximate to the silicon surface (14) by doping the substrate (12). The method (50) further includes, while the chamber is maintained at the high or raised temperature, forming (62) a passivation layer (19) on the graded-density silicon anti-reflection surface (14).

  13. Developing A New High Capacity Anode With Long Cycle Life

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    more than 1000 mAhg with poor cyleability. * The formation of Sn x Co y C z and MO composite could lead to the increase in the capacity, reduce the amount of cobalt in the...

  14. Large Plastic Deformation in High-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries Caused by Charge and Discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Large Plastic Deformation in High-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries Caused by Charge and Discharge, Massachusetts 02138 Evidence has accumulated recently that a high-capacity elec- trode of a lithium-ion battery in the particle is high, possibly leading to fracture and cavitation. I. Introduction LITHIUM-ION batteries

  15. High Rate and High Capacity Li-Ion Electrodes for Vehicular Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A. C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant advances in both energy density and rate capability for Li-ion batteries are necessary for implementation in electric vehicles. We have employed two different methods to improve the rate capability of high capacity electrodes. For example, we previously demonstrated that thin film high volume expansion MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle electrodes ({approx}2 {micro}m thick) have a stable capacity of {approx}630 mAh/g, at C/2 (charge/dicharge in 2 hours). By fabricating thicker conventional electrodes, an improved reversible capacity of {approx}1000 mAh/g is achieved, but the rate capability decreases. To achieve high-rate capability, we applied a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition coating to enable the high volume expansion and prevent mechanical degradation. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 C. Additionally, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 {angstrom} have been shown to allow LiCoO{sub 2} to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Capacity fade at this high voltage is generally caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte or cobalt dissolution. We have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO{sub 2} and coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. In a different approach we have employed carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) to synthesize binder-free, high-rate capability electrodes, with 95 wt.% active materials. In one case, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods are employed as the active storage anode material. Recently, we have also employed this method to demonstrate improved conductivity and highly improved rate capability for a LiNi{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode material. Raman spectroscopy was employed to understand how the SWNTs function as a highly flexible conductive additive.

  16. Stress generation during lithiation of high-capacity electrode particles in lithium ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ting

    Stress generation during lithiation of high-capacity electrode particles in lithium ion batteries S in controlling stress generation in high-capacity electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Ã? 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Lithium ion battery; Lithiation

  17. High Capacity Pouch-Type Li-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Deyu; Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The pouch-type Li-air batteries operated in ambient condition are reported in this work. The battery used a heat sealable plastic membrane as package material, O2¬ diffusion membrane and moisture barrier. The large variation in internal resistance of the batteries is minimized by a modified separator which can bind the cell stack together. The cells using the modified separators show improved and repeatable discharge performances. It is also found that addition of about 20% of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) in PC:EC (1:1) based electrolyte solvent improves can improve the wetability of carbon electrode and the discharge capacities of Li-air batteries, but further increase in DME amount lead to a decreased capacity due to increase electrolyte loss during discharge process. The pouch-type Li-air batteries with the modified separator and optimized electrolyte has demonstrated a specific capacity of 2711 mAh g-1 based on carbon and a specific energy of 344 Wh kg-1 based on the complete batteries including package.

  18. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt 2014; published online 14 October 2014) Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced

  19. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  20. New Composite Silicon-Defect Graphene Anode Architecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Composite Silicon-Defect Graphene Anode Architecture for High Capacity, High-Rate Li-ion Batteries Xin Zhao, Cary Hayner, Mayfair Kung, and Harold Kung, Northwestern...

  1. Low emissivity high-temperature tantalum thin film coatings for silicon devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinnerbauer, Veronika

    The authors study the use of thin ( ? 230?nm) tantalum (Ta) layers on silicon (Si) as a low emissivity (high reflectivity) coating for high-temperature Si devices. Such coatings are critical to reduce parasitic radiation ...

  2. A scalable silicon photonic chip-scale optical switch for high performance computing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    A scalable silicon photonic chip-scale optical switch for high performance computing systems-scale optical switch for scalable interconnect network in high performance computing systems. The proposed

  3. A Low Noise and High Dynamic Charge Sensitive Amplifier-Shaper associated with Silicon Strip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Low Noise and High Dynamic Charge Sensitive Amplifier-Shaper associated with Silicon Strip designed and fabricated in 0.35 µm CMOS process from Austria Micro System to be coupled with the Silicon a Charge Sensitive Amplifier (CSA) followed by two parallel CR-RC shapers. Slow and fast shapers, with 1

  4. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Blackfoot, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  5. Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kasei * Focused on High Capacity Manganese Rich (HCMR TM ) cathodes & Silicon-Carbon composite anodes for Lithium ion batteries * Envia's high energy Li-ion battery materials...

  6. High temperature investigations of crystalline silicon solar cell materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudelson, George David Stephen, III

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline silicon solar cells are a promising candidate to provide a sustainable, clean energy source for the future. In order to bring about widespread adoption of solar cells, much work is needed to reduce their cost. ...

  7. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low Cost, High Capacity Non-Intercalation Chemistry Automotive Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sila Nanotechnologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low cost, high capacity...

  9. Hybrid Nano Carbon Fiber/Graphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. es009jang2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Hybrid Nano Carbon FiberGraphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle...

  10. Hybrid Nano Carbon Fiber/Graphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    es009jang2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Hybrid Nano Carbon FiberGraphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries Progress of DOE...

  11. High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

  12. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    improve and evaluate the electrochemical properties and surface stability of composite electrode structures with a high Mn content - on-going Evaluate autogenic...

  13. Development of a high capacity longwall conveyor. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, C

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this program were to develop, fabricate, and demonstrate a longwall conveying system capable of transporting coal at a rate of 9000 tons/day (1000 tons/hr) and capable of accommodating a surge rate of 20 tons/min. The equipment was required to have the structural durability to perform with an operating availability of 90%. A review of available literature and discussions with longwall operators identified the problem areas of conveyor design that required attention. The conveyor under this contract was designed and fabricated with special attention given to these areas, and also to be easily maintainable. The design utilized twin 300 hp drives and twin inboard 26-mm chain at 270 ft/min; predictions of capacity and reliability based on the design indicating that it would satisfy the program requirements. Conveyor components were critically tested and the complete conveyor was surface-tested, the results verifying the design specifications. In addition, an instrumentation system was developed with analysis by computer techniques to monitor the performance of the conveyor. The conveyor was installed at a selected mine site, and it was the intention to monitor its performance over the entire longwall panel. Monitoring of the conveyor performance was conducted over approximately one-third of the longwall panel, at which point further effort was suspended. However, during the monitored period, data collected from various sources showed the conveyor to have exhibited its capability of transporting coal at the desired rate, and also to have conformed to the program requirements of reliability and availability.

  14. Dispersion engineering of high-Q silicon microresonators via thermal oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Wei C. [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Zhang, Jidong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Usechak, Nicholas G. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Lin, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.lin@rochester.edu [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and demonstrate a convenient and sensitive technique for precise engineering of group-velocity dispersion in high-Q silicon microresonators. By accurately controlling the surface-oxidation thickness of silicon microdisk resonators, we are able to precisely manage the zero-dispersion wavelength, while simultaneously further improving the high optical quality of our devices, with the optical Q close to a million. The demonstrated dispersion management allows us to achieve parametric generation with precisely engineerable emission wavelengths, which shows great potential for application in integrated silicon nonlinear and quantum photonics.

  15. Dispersion engineering of high-Q silicon microresonators via thermal oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wei C; Usechak, Nicholas G; Lin, Qiang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and demonstrate a convenient and sensitive technique for precise engineering of group-velocity dispersion in high-Q silicon microresonators. By accurately controlling the surface-oxidation thickness of silicon microdisk resonators, we are able to precisely manage the zero-dispersion wavelength while simultaneously further improving the high optical quality of our devices, with the optical Q close to a million. The demonstrated dispersion management allows us to achieve parametric generation with precisely engineerable emission wavelengths, which shows great potential for application in integrated silicon nonlinear and quantum photonics.

  16. Proton radiation damage in high-resistivity n-type silicon CCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton radiation damage in high-resistivity n-type siliconLeadon, “The effects of nuclear radiation on p-channel CCDimagers,” in 1997 IEEE Radiation Effects Data Workshop,

  17. Demonstration of high-Q mid-infrared chalcogenide glass-on-silicon resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hongtao

    We demonstrated high-index-contrast, waveguide-coupled As[subscript 2]Se[subscript 3] chalcogenide glass resonators monolithically integrated on silicon fabricated using optical lithography and a lift-off process. The ...

  18. High-speed silicon electro-optic modulator for electronic photonic integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Fuwan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of future electronic-photonic integrated circuits (EPIC) based on silicon technology critically depends on the availability of CMOS-compatible high-speed modulators that enable the interaction of electronic ...

  19. High capacity adsorption media for separating or removing constituents and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footwork by

  20. High capacity adsorption media for separating or removing constituents,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footwork byassociated

  1. For Immediate Release AUB to develop its high performance computing capacities in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    For Immediate Release AUB to develop its high performance computing capacities in the service steps to become a high performance computing center that will be able to process massive amounts thousands of servers. According to Wikipedia, supercomputers, or high performance computing, play

  2. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  3. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg (Livermore, CA); George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sooy, Walter (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  4. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs BosonAccurate knowledge ofHIGH

  5. High temperature mechanical performance of a hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Lin, C.K.J. [and others] [and others

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon nitride ceramics are an attractive material of choice for designers and manufacturers of advanced gas turbine engine components for many reasons. These materials typically have potentially high temperatures of usefulness (up to 1400{degrees}C), are chemically inert, have a relatively low specific gravity (important for inertial effects), and are good thermal conductors (i.e., resistant to thermal shock). In order for manufacturers to take advantage of these inherent properties of silicon nitride, the high-temperature mechanical performance of the material must first be characterized. The mechanical response of silicon nitride to static, dynamic, and cyclic conditions at elevated temperatures, along with reliable and representative data, is critical information that gas turbine engine designers and manufacturers require for the confident insertion of silicon nitride components into gas turbine engines. This final report describes the high-temperature mechanical characterization and analyses that were conducted on a candidate structural silicon nitride ceramic. The high-temperature strength, static fatigue (creep rupture), and dynamic and cyclic fatigue performance were characterized. The efforts put forth were part of Work Breakdown Structure Subelement 3.2.1, {open_quotes}Rotor Data Base Generation.{close_quotes} PY6 is comparable to other hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitrides currently being considered for advanced gas turbine engine applications.

  6. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA); Raley, Norman F. (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  7. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  8. Silicon Based Anodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Graff, Gordon L.; Yang, Zhenguo; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Deyu; Liu, Jun

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon is environmentally benign and ubiquitous. Because of its high specific capacity, it is considered one of the most promising candidates to replace the conventional graphite negative electrode used in today's Li ion batteries. Silicon has a theoretical specific capacity of nearly 4200 mAh/g (Li21Si5), which is 10 times larger than the specific capacity of graphite (LiC6, 372 mAh/g). However, the high capacity of silicon is associated with huge volume changes (more than 300 percent) when alloyed with lithium, which can cause severe cracking and pulverization of the electrode and lead to significant capacity loss. Significant scientific research has been conducted to circumvent the deterioration of silicon based anode materials during cycling. Various strategies, such as reduction of particle size, generation of active/inactive composites, fabrication of silicon based thin films, use of alternative binders, and the synthesis of 1-D silicon nanostructures have been implemented by a number of research groups. Fundamental mechanistic research has also been performed to better understand the electrochemical lithiation and delithiation process during cycling in terms of crystal structure, phase transitions, morphological changes, and reaction kinetics. Although efforts to date have not attained a commercially viable Si anode, further development is expected to produce anodes with three to five times the capacity of graphite. In this chapter, an overview of research on silicon based anodes used for lithium-ion battery applications will be presented. The overview covers electrochemical alloying of the silicon with lithium, mechanisms responsible for capacity fade, and methodologies adapted to overcome capacity degradation observed during cycling. The recent development of silicon nanowires and nanoparticles with significantly improved electrochemical performance will also be discussed relative to the mechanistic understanding. Finally, future directions on the development of silicon based anodes will be considered.

  9. Nanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent stability for high energy lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    for high-energy lithium battery applications. 1. Introduction Energy storage and conversion have sources.1­6 Lithium-ion batteries are considered to be the most promising energy-storage systemsNanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent stability for high energy lithium

  10. Short Channel Amorphous-Silicon TFT's on High-Temperature Clear Plastic Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short Channel Amorphous-Silicon TFT's on High-Temperature Clear Plastic Substrates K. Long, H@princeton.edu To achieve light-weight flexible AMOLED displays on plastic substrates, the substratesmust be optically clear for plastic. High-temperature plastics such as polyimide (e.g. KaptonB E) have a glass transition temperature

  11. SnO2 Filled Mesoporous Tin Phosphate High Capacity Negative Electrode for Lithium Secondary Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    SnO2 Filled Mesoporous Tin Phosphate High Capacity Negative Electrode for Lithium Secondary Battery insulators, and optics.1-6 On the other hand, their applications to electrode materials in lithium secondary batteries have received little attention because of the very limited candidates.7,8 Recently

  12. Alkali slurry ozonation to produce a high capacity nickel battery material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Penn Hills, PA)

    1984-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  13. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities Robert D of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: A Cu-carborane-based

  14. Theoretical Estimates of HVAC Duct Channel Capacity for High-Speed Internet Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    Theoretical Estimates of HVAC Duct Channel Capacity for High-Speed Internet Access Ariton E. Xhafa-conditioning (HVAC) ducts based on multi-carrier transmission that uses M-QAM mod- ulation and measured channel- flections in HVAC ducts). Our work also shows that data rates in excess of 300 Mbps are possible over

  15. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  16. FINE-GRAINED NANOCRYSTALLINE SILICON P-LAYER FOR HIGH OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE A-SI:H SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    FINE-GRAINED NANOCRYSTALLINE SILICON P-LAYER FOR HIGH OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE A-SI:H SOLAR CELLS of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA ABSTRACT Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) single- junction solar). It is found that the p-layer that leads to high Voc a-Si:H solar cells is a mixed-phase material that contains

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Silicon-based High Capacity Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the...

  18. Virus-Enabled Silicon Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X L; Gerasopoulos, K; Guo, J C; Brown, A; Wang, Chunsheng; Ghodssi, Reza; Culver, J N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel three-dimensional Tobacco mosaic virus assembled silicon anode is reported. This electrode combines genetically modified virus templates for the production of high aspect ratio nanofeatured surfaces with electroless deposition to produce an integrated nickel current collector followed by physical vapor deposition of a silicon layer to form a high capacity silicon anode. This composite silicon anode produced high capacities (3300 mAh/g), excellent charge?discharge cycling stability (0.20% loss per cycle at 1C), and consistent rate capabilities (46.4% at 4C) between 0 and 1.5 V. The biological templated nanocomposite electrode architecture displays a nearly 10-fold increase in capacity over currently available graphite anodes with remarkable cycling stability.

  19. Rice husks as a sustainable source of nanostructured silicon for high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Rice husks as a sustainable source of nanostructured silicon for high performance Li-ion battery sustainable development. However, current applications of RHs have been limited to those with low added value the RHs naturally exists in the form of nanoparticles7 . As a living plant, rice absorbs silica

  20. New Nanostructured Li2S/Silicon Rechargeable Battery with High Specific Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    -ion batteries based on LiCoO2 cathodes and graphite anodes (410 Wh kg-1 ). The nanostructured design of bothNew Nanostructured Li2S/Silicon Rechargeable Battery with High Specific Energy Yuan Yang,,§ Matthew, California 94305 ABSTRACT Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are important energy storage devices; however

  1. Capacity fade study of lithium-ion batteries cycled at high discharge rates Gang Ning, Bala Haran, Branko N. Popov*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Capacity fade study of lithium-ion batteries cycled at high discharge rates Gang Ning, Bala Haran at high discharge rates. # 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Lithium-ion batteries collectors can affect up to different degrees the capacity fade of lithium-ion batteries [1­5]. Quantifying

  2. Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudawski, N. G.; Darby, B. L.; Yates, B. R.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Volinsky, A. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa Florida 33620 (United States)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge electrodes fabricated directly on Ni current collector substrates were found to exhibit excellent specific capacities during electrochemical cycling in half-cell configuration with Li metal for a wide range of cycling rates. Structural characterization revealed that the nanostructured electrodes lose porosity during cycling but maintain excellent electrical contact with the metallic current collector substrate. These results suggest that nanostructured Ge electrodes have great promise for use as high performance Li ion battery anodes.

  3. High-efficiency and low-jitter Silicon single-photon avalanche diodes based on nanophotonic absorption enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Jian; Yu, Zongfu; Jiang, Xiao; Huo, Yijie; Zang, Kai; Zhang, Jun; Harris, James S; Jin, Ge; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) is a core device for single-photon detection in the visible and the near-infrared range, and widely used in many applications. However, due to limits of the structure design and device fabrication for current silicon SPADs, the key parameters of detection befficiency and timing jitter are often forced to compromise. Here, we propose a nanostructured silicon SPAD, which achieves high detection efficiency with excellent timing jitter simultaneously over a broad spectral range. The optical and electric simulations show significant performance enhancement compared with conventional silicon SPAD devices. This nanostructured devices can be easily fabricated and thus well suited for practical applications.

  4. High temperature Hexoloy{trademark} SX silicon carbide. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, G.V.; Lau, S.K.; Storm, R.S. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEXOLOY{reg_sign} SX-SiC, fabricated with Y and Al containing compounds as sintering aids, has been shown to possess significantly improved strength and toughness over HEXOLOY{reg_sign}SA-SiC. This study was undertaken to establish and benchmark the complete mechanical property database of a first generation material, followed by a process optimization task to further improve the properties. Mechanical characterization on the first generation material indicated that silicon-rich pools, presumably formed as a reaction product during sintering, controlled the strength from room temperature to 1,232 C. At 1,370 C in air, the material was failing due to a glass-phase formation at the surface. This glass-phase formation was attributed to the reaction of yttrium aluminates, which exist as a second phase in the material, with the ambient. This process was determined to be a time-dependent one that leads to slow crack growth. Fatigue experiments clearly indicated that the slow crack growth driven by the reaction occurred only at temperatures >1,300 C, above the melting point of the glass phase. Process optimization tasks conducted included the selection of the best SiC powder source, studies on mixing/milling conditions for SiC powder with the sintering aids, and a designed experiment involving a range of sintering and post-treatment conditions. The optimization study conducted on the densification variables indicated that lower sintering temperatures and higher post-treatment pressures reduce the Si-rich pool formation, thereby improving the room-temperature strength. In addition, it was also determined that furnacing configuration and atmosphere were critical in controlling the Si-rich formation.

  5. Towards high efficiency thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells: The roles of light trapping and non-radiative recombinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    important evaluation criterion for photovoltaic (PV) technology. Therefore, research on novel structuresTowards high efficiency thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells: The roles of light trapping February 2014; published online 3 March 2014) Thin-film solar cells based on silicon have emerged

  6. A high-speed, low-power analog-to-digital converter in fully depleted silicon-on-insulator technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundberg, Kent Howard

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis demonstrates a one-volt, high-speed, ultra-low-power, six-bit flash analog-to-digital converter fabricated in a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology. Silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology provides ...

  7. HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID M-diffused back-junction emitter. The aluminum front side grid is evaporated in an industrial-type in-thick silicon shadow masks for the in-line evaporation of the aluminum front grid. The masks are fabricated

  8. Orientation-Dependent Interfacial Mobility Governs the Anisotropic Swelling in Lithiated Silicon Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ting

    -generation lithium-ion batteries. KEYWORDS: Silicon nanowire, lithium-ion battery, anisotropic swelling, orientation-dependent interfacial mobility, diffusion, elasto-plastic deformation The demand for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries

  9. Graphdiyne as a high-capacity lithium ion battery anode material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Byungryul; Koo, Jahyun; Park, Minwoo; Kwon, Yongkyung; Lee, Hoonkyung, E-mail: hkiee3@konkuk.ac.kr [School of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hosik [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jaewook [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 300 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 300 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the first-principles calculations, we explored the feasibility of using graphdiyne, a 2D layer of sp and sp{sup 2} hybrid carbon networks, as lithium ion battery anodes. We found that the composite of the Li-intercalated multilayer ?-graphdiyne was C{sub 6}Li{sub 7.31} and that the calculated voltage was suitable for the anode. The practical specific/volumetric capacities can reach up to 2719?mAh?g{sup ?1}/2032?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, much greater than the values of ?372?mAh?g{sup ?1}/?818?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, ?1117?mAh?g{sup ?1}/?1589?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, and ?744?mAh?g{sup ?1} for graphite, graphynes, and ?-graphdiyne, respectively. Our calculations suggest that multilayer ?-graphdiyne can serve as a promising high-capacity lithium ion battery anode.

  10. Dispersion engineered high-Q silicon Nitride Ring-Resonators via Atomic Layer Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riemensberger, Johann; Herr, Tobias; Brasch, Victor; Holzwarth, Ronald; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate dispersion engineering of integrated silicon nitride based ring resonators through conformal coating with hafnium dioxide deposited on top of the structures via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Both, magnitude and bandwidth of anomalous dispersion can be significantly increased. All results are confirmed by high resolution frequency-comb-assisted-diode-laser spectroscopy and are in very good agreement with the simulated modification of the mode spectrum.

  11. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  12. Developing A New High Capacity Anode With Long Cycle Life | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E LGeothermalEnergy A New High Capacity

  13. Development of Si-based High Capacity Anodes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S HBatteries with WideNOxSi-based High Capacity

  14. Programmatic status of NASA`s CSTI high capacity power Stirling Space Power Converter Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis Research Center Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Converter Technology Development Program. This work is being conducted under NASA`s Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The goal of the CSTI High Capacity Power element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space initiatives. Efforts are focused upon increasing system thermal and electric energy conversion efficiency at least fivefold over current SP-100 technology, and on achieving systems that are compatible with space nuclear reactors. This paper will discuss the status of test activities with the Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Design deficiencies are gradually being corrected and the power converter is now outputting 11.5 kWe at a temperature ratio of 2 (design output is 12.5 kWe). Detail designs have been completed for the 1050 K Component Test Power Converter (CTPC). The success of these and future designs is dependent upon supporting research and technology efforts including heat pipes, gas bearings, superalloy joining technologies and high efficiency alternators. This paper also provides an update of progress in these technologies.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High-Voltage, High-Capacity Polyanion Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by U of Texas at Austin at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-voltage, high...

  16. Value Proposition for High Lifetime (p-type) and Thin Silicon Materials in Solar PV Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Hacke, P.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most silicon PV road maps forecast a continued reduction in wafer thickness, despite rapid declines in the primary incentive for doing so -- polysilicon feedstock price. Another common feature of most silicon-technology forecasts is the quest for ever-higher device performance at the lowest possible costs. The authors present data from device-performance and manufacturing- and system-installation cost models to quantitatively establish the incentives for manufacturers to pursue advanced (thin) wafer and (high efficiency) cell technologies, in an age of reduced feedstock prices. This analysis exhaustively considers the value proposition for high lifetime (p-type) silicon materials across the entire c-Si PV supply chain.

  17. Plasma polymerization of C[subscript 4]F[subscript 8] thin film on high aspect ratio silicon molds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeo, L. P.

    High aspect ratio polymeric micro-patterns are ubiquitous in many fields ranging from sensors, actuators, optics, fluidics and medical. Second generation PDMS molds are replicated against first generation silicon molds ...

  18. Towards a new high technology development in the Silicon Valley : a 21st century urban design vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Jonathan K. (Jonathan Kam)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Santa Clara Valley, perhaps better known as the Silicon Valley, is currently facing many problems and uncertainties. The explosion of the high technology industry has changed the regional scene faster than anyone could ...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Low?Cost, High?Capacity Lithium Ion Batteries through Modified Surface and Microstructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Navitas Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low?cost, high?capacity...

  20. An Insect Herbivore Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suen, Garret; Barry, Kerrie; Goodwin, Lynne; Scott, Jarrod; Aylward, Frank; Adams, Sandra; Pinto-Tomas, Adrian; Foster, Clifton; Pauly, Markus; Weimer, Paul; Bouffard, Pascal; Li, Lewyn; Osterberger, Jolene; Harkins, Timothy; Slater, Steven; Donohue, Timothy; Currie, Cameron; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Herbivores can gain indirect access to recalcitrant carbon present in plant cell walls through symbiotic associations with lignocellulolytic microbes. A paradigmatic example is the leaf-cutter ant (Tribe: Attini), which uses fresh leaves to cultivate a fungus for food in specialized gardens. Using a combination of sugar composition analyses, metagenomics, and whole-genome sequencing, we reveal that the fungus garden microbiome of leaf-cutter ants is composed of a diverse community of bacteria with high plant biomass-degrading capacity. Comparison of this microbiome?s predicted carbohydrate-degrading enzyme profile with other metagenomes shows closest similarity to the bovine rumen, indicating evolutionary convergence of plant biomass degrading potential between two important herbivorous animals. Genomic and physiological characterization of two dominant bacteria in the fungus garden microbiome provides evidence of their capacity to degrade cellulose. Given the recent interest in cellulosic biofuels, understanding how large-scale and rapid plant biomass degradation occurs in a highly evolved insect herbivore is of particular relevance for bioenergy.

  1. In-growth of an electrically active defect in high-purity silicon after proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Juul Pedersen, H.; Christian Petersen, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Privitera, V. [CNR-IMM, Institute of Microelectronics and Microsystems, Catania (Italy)] [CNR-IMM, Institute of Microelectronics and Microsystems, Catania (Italy); Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A. [IM2NP, CNRS (UMR 7334) and Université Aix-Marseille, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)] [IM2NP, CNRS (UMR 7334) and Université Aix-Marseille, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Defect-related energy levels in the lower half of the band gap of silicon have been studied with transient-capacitance techniques in high-purity, carbon and oxygen lean, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition grown, n-and p-type silicon layers after 2-MeV proton irradiations at temperatures at or just below room temperature. The in-growth of a distinct line in deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra, corresponding to a level in the band gap at E{sub V} + 0.357 eV where E{sub V} is the energy of the valence band edge, takes place for anneal temperatures at around room temperature with an activation energy of 0.95 ± 0.08 eV. The line disappears at an anneal temperature of around 450 K. The corresponding defect is demonstrated not to contain boron, carbon, oxygen, or phosphorus. Possible defect candidates are discussed.

  2. High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon Alloy Based Solar Cells and Modules; Final Technical Progress Report, 30 May 2002--31 May 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this R&D program is to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for development of high-efficiency hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon-germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) related thin-film multijunction solar cells and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. Our strategy has been to use the spectrum-splitting triple-junction structure, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, to improve solar cell and module efficiency, stability, and throughput of production. The methodology used to achieve the objectives included: (1) explore the highest stable efficiency using the triple-junction structure deposited using RF glow discharge at a low rate, (2) fabricate the devices at a high deposition rate for high throughput and low cost, and (3) develop an optimized recipe using the R&D batch large-area reactor to help the design and optimization of the roll-to-roll production machines. For short-term goals, we have worked on the improvement of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloy solar cells. a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H are the foundation of current a-Si:H based thin-film photovoltaic technology. Any improvement in cell efficiency, throughput, and cost reduction will immediately improve operation efficiency of our manufacturing plant, allowing us to further expand our production capacity.

  3. Defect Engineering, Cell Processing, and Modeling for High-Performance, Low-Cost Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonassisi, Tonio

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to close the efficiency gap between industrial multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) and monocrystalline silicon solar cells, while preserving the economic advantage of low-cost, high-volume substrates inherent to mc-Si. Over the course of this project, we made significant progress toward this goal, as evidenced by the evolution in solar-cell efficiencies. While most of the benefits of university projects are diffuse in nature, several unique contributions can be traced to this project, including the development of novel characterization methods, defect-simulation tools, and novel solar-cell processing approaches mitigate the effects of iron impurities ("Impurities to Efficiency" simulator) and dislocations. In collaboration with our industrial partners, this project contributed to the development of cell processing recipes, specialty materials, and equipment that increased cell efficiencies overall (not just multicrystalline silicon). Additionally, several students and postdocs who were either partially or fully engaged in this project (as evidenced by the publication record) are currently in the PV industry, with others to follow.

  4. High-capacity electric double-layer capacitor with high-density-activated carbon fiber electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the authors have presented a method to prepare activated carbon fiber with high bulk density (HD-ACF) without using any binders. The possibility of using the HD-ACF as an electrode for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) was examined in this paper. The capacitance of the EDLC with the HD-ACF electrode increased with the increase of bulk density of the HD-ACF, indicating that individual fibers are highly packed without losing their capacitance. The capacitance also increased in proportion to the size of the HD-ACF electrode. The initial discharge current of the EDLC showed little dependency on either the bulk density or the size of the HD-ACF electrode. These results clarified that the HD-ACF electrode is suitable for constructing a high-power EDLC. The initial discharge current was directly proportional to the conductivity of aqueous KCI used as the electrolyte, indicating that the resistance of the electrolyte is much higher than that of the HD-ACF electrode. This result showed that the efficiency of the HD-ACF was well above the efficiency of the electrolyte used in this study and that the improvement of the ionic conductivity of electrolyte is also necessary for developing a high-power EDLC.

  5. High performance continuous wave 1.3??m quantum dot lasers on silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Alan Y., E-mail: ayliu01@engineering.ucsb.edu; Norman, Justin [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Zhang, Chong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Snyder, Andrew; Lubyshev, Dmitri; Fastenau, Joel M.; Liu, Amy W. K. [IQE, Inc., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Gossard, Arthur C.; Bowers, John E. [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate record performance 1.3??m InAs quantum dot lasers grown on silicon by molecular beam epitaxy. Ridge waveguide lasers fabricated from the as-grown material achieve room temperature continuous wave thresholds as low as 16?mA, output powers exceeding 176 mW, and lasing up to 119?°C. P-modulation doping of the active region improves T{sub 0} to the range of 100–200?K while maintaining low thresholds and high output powers. Device yield is presented showing repeatable performance across different dies and wafers.

  6. Testing Hadronic Interaction Models using a Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilki, B; Schlereth, J; Xia, L; Deng, Z; Li, Y; Wang, Y; Yue, Q; Yang, Z; Eigen, G; Mikami, Y; Price, T; Watson, N K; Thomson, M A; Ward, D R; Benchekroun, D; Hoummada, A; Khoulaki, Y; Cârloganu, C; Chang, S; Khan, A; Kim, D H; Kong, D J; Oh, Y D; Blazey, G C; Dyshkant, A; Francis, K; Lima, J G R; Salcido, P; Zutshi, V; Boisvert, V; Green, B; Misiejuk, A; Salvatore, F; Kawagoe, K; Miyazaki, Y; Sudo, Y; Suehara, T; Tomita, T; Ueno, H; Yoshioka, T; Apostolakis, J; Folger, G; Ivantchenko, V; Ribon, A; Uzhinskiy, V; Cauwenbergh, S; Tytgat, M; Zaganidis, N; Hostachy, J -Y; Morin, L; Gadow, K; Göttlicher, P; Günter, C; Krüger, K; Lutz, B; Reinecke, M; Sefkow, F; Feege, N; Garutti, E; Laurien, S; Lu, S; Marchesini, I; Matysek, M; Ramilli, M; Kaplan, A; Norbeck, E; Northacker, D; Onel, Y; Kim, E J; van Doren, B; Wilson, G W; Wing, M; Bobchenko, B; Chadeeva, M; Chistov, R; Danilov, M; Drutskoy, A; Epifantsev, A; Markin, O; Mizuk, R; Novikov, E; Popov, V; Rusinov, V; Tarkovsky, E; Besson, D; Popova, E; Gabriel, M; Kiesling, C; Simon, F; Soldner, C; Szalay, M; Tesar, M; Weuste, L; Amjad, M S; Bonis, J; Callier, S; di Lorenzo, S Conforti; Cornebise, P; Doublet, Ph; Dulucq, F; Faucci-Giannelli, M; Fleury, J; Frisson, T; Kégl, B; van der Kolk, N; Li, H; Martin-Chassard, G; Richard, F; de la Taille, Ch; Pöschl, R; Raux, L; Rouëné, J; Seguin-Moreau, N; Anduze, M; Balagura, V; Becheva, E; Boudry, V; Brient, J-C; Cornat, R; Frotin, M; Gastaldi, F; Magniette, F; Matthieu, A; de Freitas, P Mora; Videau, H; Augustin, J-E; David, J; Ghislain, P; Lacour, D; Lavergne, L; Zacek, J; Cvach, J; Gallus, P; Havranek, M; Janata, M; Kvasnicka, J; Lednicky, D; Marcisovsky, M; Polak, I; Popule, J; Tomasek, L; Tomasek, M; Ruzicka, P; Sicho, P; Smolik, J; Vrba, V; Zalesak, J; Jeans, D; Götze, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of hadronic interactions is presented using data recorded with the highly granular CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter. Approximately 600,000 selected negatively changed pion events at energies between 2 and 10 GeV have been studied. The predictions of several physics models available within the GEANT4 simulation tool kit are compared to this data. Although a reasonable overall description of the data is observed, there are significant quantitative discrepancies in the longitudinal and transverse distributions of reconstructed energy.

  7. Testing Hadronic Interaction Models using a Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CALICE Collaboration; B. Bilki; J. Repond; J. Schlereth; L. Xia; Z. Deng; Y. Li; Y. Wang; Q. Yue; Z. Yang; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; T. Price; N. K. Watson; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; C. Cârloganu; S. Chang; A. Khan; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kong; Y. D. Oh; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; K. Francis; J. G. R. Lima; P. Salcido; V. Zutshi; V. Boisvert; B. Green; A. Misiejuk; F. Salvatore; K. Kawagoe; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sudo; T. Suehara; T. Tomita; H. Ueno; T. Yoshioka; J. Apostolakis; G. Folger; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; A. Ribon; V. Uzhinskiy; S. Cauwenbergh; M. Tytgat; N. Zaganidis; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; K. Krüger; B. Lutz; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; N. Feege; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; S. Lu; I. Marchesini; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; A. Kaplan; E. Norbeck; D. Northacker; Y. Onel; E. J. Kim; B. van Doren; G. W. Wilson; M. Wing; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; R. Chistov; M. Danilov; A. Drutskoy; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Popov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; D. Besson; E. Popova; M. Gabriel; C. Kiesling; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; F. Dulucq; M. Faucci-Giannelli; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; B. Kégl; N. van der Kolk; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; J. Rouëné; N. Seguin-Moreau; M. Anduze; V. Balagura; E. Becheva; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; F. Magniette; A. Matthieu; P. Mora de Freitas; H. Videau; J-E. Augustin; J. David; P. Ghislain; D. Lacour; L. Lavergne; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; D. Jeans; M. Götze

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of hadronic interactions is presented using data recorded with the highly granular CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter. Approximately 600,000 selected negatively changed pion events at energies between 2 and 10 GeV have been studied. The predictions of several physics models available within the GEANT4 simulation tool kit are compared to this data. Although a reasonable overall description of the data is observed, there are significant quantitative discrepancies in the longitudinal and transverse distributions of reconstructed energy.

  8. Effective electro-optical modulation with high extinction ratio by a graphene-silicon microring resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yunhong; Xiao, Sanshui; Hu, Hao; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Mortensen, N Asger; Yvind, Kresten

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene opens up for novel optoelectronic applications thanks to its high carrier mobility, ultra-large absorption bandwidth, and extremely fast material response. In particular, the opportunity to control optoelectronic properties through tuning of Fermi level enables electro-optical modulation, optical-optical switching, and other optoelectronics applications. However, achieving a high modulation depth remains a challenge because of the modest graphene-light interaction in the graphene-silicon devices, typically, utilizing only a monolayer or few layers of graphene. Here, we comprehensively study the interaction between graphene and a microring resonator, and its influence on the optical modulation depth. We demonstrate graphene-silicon microring devices showing a high modulation depth of 12.5 dB with a relatively low bias voltage of 8.8 V. On-off electro-optical switching with an extinction ratio of 3.8 dB is successfully demonstrated by applying a square-waveform with a 4 V peak-to-peak voltage.

  9. HIGH RESOLUTION SCANNING AUGER MICROANALYSIS OF HIGH-STRENGTH SILICON CARBIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivanek, O.L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Society HIGH RESOLUTION SCANNING AUGER MICROANALYSIS OFCalifornia. HIGH RESOLUTION SCANNING AUGER MICROANALYSIS OFhelium, by high resolution scanning Auger microanalysis and

  10. Fiber-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janke, Christopher J; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The fiber-based adsorbent includes polymer fibers with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight over known fibers to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. The polymer fibers include a circular morphology in some embodiments, having a mean diameter of less than 15 microns, optionally less than about 1 micron. In other embodiments, the polymer fibers include a non-circular morphology, optionally defining multiple gear-shaped, winged-shaped or lobe-shaped projections along the length of the polymer fibers. A method for forming the fiber-based adsorbents includes irradiating high surface area polymer fibers, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting the grafted fibers with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. High surface area fiber-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  11. Silicon Ink for High-Efficiency Solar Cells Captures a Share of the Market (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet on 2011 R&D 100 Award winner Silicon Ink. Liquid silicon has arrived, and with it comes a power boost for solar cells and dramatic cost savings for cell manufacturers.

  12. High-performance porous silicon solar cell development. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruska, P. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)] [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate use of porous silicon in new solar cell structures. Porous silicon technology has been developed at Spire for producing visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The major aspects that they have demonstrated are the following: porous silicon active layers have been made to show photovoltaic action; porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings to improve the performance of single-crystal silicon solar cells; and porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings on polycrystalline silicon solar cells. One problem with the use of porous silicon is to achieve good lateral conduction of electrons and holes through the material. This shows up in terms of poor blue response and photocurrents which increase with increasing reverse bias applied to the diode.

  13. Thin, High Lifetime Silicon Wafers with No Sawing; Re-crystallization in a Thin Film Capsule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emanuel Sachs

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The project fits within the area of renewable energy called photovoltaics (PV), or the generation of electricity directly from sunlight using semiconductor devices. PV has the greatest potential of any renewable energy technology. The vast majority of photovoltaic modules are made on crystalline silicon wafers and these wafers accounts for the largest fraction of the cost of a photovoltaic module. Thus, a method of making high quality, low cost wafers would be extremely beneficial to the PV industry The industry standard technology creates wafers by casting an ingot and then sawing wafers from the ingot. Sawing rendered half of the highly refined silicon feedstock as un-reclaimable dust. Being a brittle material, the sawing is actually a type of grinding operation which is costly both in terms of capital equipment and in terms of consumables costs. The consumables costs associated with the wire sawing technology are particularly burdensome and include the cost of the wire itself (continuously fed, one time use), the abrasive particles, and, waste disposal. The goal of this project was to make wafers directly from molten silicon with no sawing required. The fundamental concept was to create a very low cost (but low quality) wafer of the desired shape and size and then to improve the quality of the wafer by a specialized thermal treatment (called re-crystallization). Others have attempted to create silicon sheet by recrystallization with varying degrees of success. Key among the difficulties encountered by others were: a) difficulty in maintaining the physical shape of the sheet during the recrystallization process and b) difficulty in maintaining the cleanliness of the sheet during recrystallization. Our method solved both of these challenges by encapsulating the preform wafer in a protective capsule prior to recrystallization (see below). The recrystallization method developed in this work was extremely effective at maintaining the shape and the cleanliness of the wafer. In addition, it was found to be suitable for growing very large crystals. The equipment used was simple and inexpensive to operate. Reasonable solar cells were fabricated on re-crystallized material.

  14. Deposition of silicon carbide films using a high vacuum metalorganic chemical vapor deposition method with a single source precursor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boo, Jin-Hyo

    , high temperature, and high radiation environments. Conventional silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition CVD processes generally utilized multiple precursors such as silane and hydrocarbons, and required temperature alternatives to the conventional SiC CVD methods must be considered. To do this, a relatively

  15. Revealing lithium-silicide phase transformations in nano-structured silicon based lithium ion batteries via in-situ NMR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogata, K.; Salager, E.; Kerr, C. J.; Fraser, A. E.; Ducati, C.; Morris, A. J.; Hofmann, S.; Grey, C. P.

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-structured silicon anodes are attractive alternatives to graphitic carbons in rechargeable Li-ion batteries, owing to their extremely high capacities. Despite their advantages, numerous issues remain to be addressed, the most basic being...

  16. Visible Photoluminescence from Cubic (3C) Silicon Carbide Microdisks Coupled to High Quality Whispering Gallery Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Radulaski; Thomas M. Babinec; Kai Müller; Konstantinos G. Lagoudakis; Jingyuan Linda Zhang; Sonia Buckley; Yousif A. Kelaita; Kassem Alassaad; Gabriel Ferro; Jelena Vu?kovi?

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of cubic (3C) silicon carbide microdisk resonators with high quality factor modes at visible and near infrared wavelengths (600 - 950 nm). Whispering gallery modes with quality factors as high as 2,300 and corresponding mode volumes V ~ 2 ({\\lambda}/n)^3 are measured using laser scanning confocal microscopy at room temperature. We obtain excellent correspondence between transverse-magnetic (TM) and transverse-electric (TE) polarized resonances simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and those observed in experiment. These structures based on ensembles of optically active impurities in 3C-SiC resonators could play an important role in diverse applications of nonlinear and quantum photonics, including low power optical switching and quantum memories.

  17. R&D for a highly granular silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pöschl, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on first experience with the technological prototype of a highly- granular silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter as envisaged for the detectors at a future lepton collider. In the focus of the analysis is the performance of a highly integrated Application Specific Integrated Circuit designed to meet the requirements in terms of dynamic range, compactness and power consumption. The beam test results show that the circuit will allow a future detector with a signal over noise ratio of at least 10:1. To minimise the power dissipation the ASIC will be operated in a power pulsed mode. So far no conceptual problem was revealed but the studies show the way for further work. The prototype is read out by a DAQ system conceived to meet the needs of a trigger less system with a huge number of readout cells.

  18. Investigations of segregation phenomena in highly strained Mn-doped Ge wetting layers and Ge quantum dots embedded in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prestat, E., E-mail: eric.prestat@gmail.com; Porret, C.; Favre-Nicolin, V.; Tainoff, D.; Boukhari, M.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.; Jamet, M.; Barski, A., E-mail: andre.barski@cea.com [INAC, SP2M, CEA and Université Joseph Fourier, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we investigate manganese diffusion and the formation of Mn precipitates in highly strained, few monolayer thick, Mn-doped Ge wetting layers and nanometric size Ge quantum dot heterostructures embedded in silicon. We show that in this Ge(Mn)/Si system manganese always precipitates and that the size and the position of Mn clusters (precipitates) depend on the growth temperature. At high growth temperature, manganese strongly diffuses from germanium to silicon, whereas decreasing the growth temperature reduces the manganese diffusion. In the germanium quantum dots layers, Mn precipitates are detected, not only in partially relaxed quantum dots but also in fully strained germanium wetting layers between the dots.

  19. A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a low cost, high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbent and demonstrate its technical and economic viability for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The specific objectives supporting our research plan were to optimize the chemical structure and physical properties of the sorbent, scale-up its production using high throughput manufacturing equipment and bulk raw materials and then evaluate its performance, first in bench-scale experiments and then in slipstream tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. One of the objectives of the laboratory-scale evaluations was to demonstrate the life and durability of the sorbent for over 10,000 cycles and to assess the impact of contaminants (such as sulfur) on its performance. In the field tests, our objective was to demonstrate the operation of the sorbent using actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams generated by air-blown and oxygen-blown commercial and pilot-scale coal gasifiers (the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in these gas streams is significantly different, which directly impacts the operating conditions hence the performance of the sorbent). To support the field demonstration work, TDA collaborated with Phillips 66 and Southern Company to carry out two separate field tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas at the Wabash River IGCC Power Plant in Terre Haute, IN and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. In collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a detailed engineering and economic analysis for the new CO{sub 2} capture system was also proposed to be carried out using Aspen PlusTM simulation software, and estimate its effect on the plant efficiency.

  20. Conductive Rigid Skeleton Supported Silicon as High-Performance Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xilin; Li, Xiaolin; Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Cao, Yuliang; Meduri, Praveen; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A cost effective and scalable method is developed to prepare a core-shell structured Si/B4C composite with graphite coating with high efficiency, exceptional rate performance and long-term stability. In this material, conductive B4C with high Mohs hardness serves not only as micro-/nano- millers in the ball-milling process to break down micron-sized Si but also as the conductive rigid skeleton to support the in-situ formed sub-10 nm Si particles to alleviate the volume expansion during charge/discharge. The Si/B4C composite is coated with a few graphitic layers to further improve the conductivity and stability of the composite. The Si/B4C/graphite (SBG) composite anode shows excellent cyclability with a specific capacity of ~822 mAh?g-1 (based on the weight of the entire electrode, including binder and conductive carbon) and ~94% capacity retention over 100 cycles at 0.8C rate. This new structure has the potential to provide adequate storage capacity and stability for practical applications, and good opportunity for large scale manufacturing using commercially available materials and technologies.

  1. Increased Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Yaun-Min (Langhorne, PA); Bennett, Murray S. (Langhorne, PA); Yang, Liyou (Plainsboro, NJ)

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

  2. Increasing Stabilized Performance Of Amorphous Silicon Based Devices Produced By Highly Hydrogen Diluted Lower Temperature Plasma Deposition.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Yaun-Min (Langhorne, PA); Bennett, Murray S. (Langhorne, PA); Yang, Liyou (Plainsboro, NJ)

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality, stable photovoltaic and electronic amorphous silicon devices which effectively resist light-induced degradation and current-induced degradation, are produced by a special plasma deposition process. Powerful, efficient single and multi-junction solar cells with high open circuit voltages and fill factors and with wider bandgaps, can be economically fabricated by the special plasma deposition process. The preferred process includes relatively low temperature, high pressure, glow discharge of silane in the presence of a high concentration of hydrogen gas.

  3. Dynamic modelling of generation capacity investment in electricity markets with high wind penetration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eager, Daniel

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of liberalised electricity markets to trigger investment in the generation capacity required to maintain an acceptable level of security of supply risk has been - and will continue to be - a topic of much ...

  4. Mn3O4-Graphene Hybrid as a High-Capacity Anode Material for Lithium Ion Hailiang Wang,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Mn3O4-Graphene Hybrid as a High-Capacity Anode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries Hailiang Wang hybrid materials of Mn3O4 nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets for lithium ion battery stability, owing to the intimate interactions between the graphene substrates and the Mn3O4 nanoparticles

  5. High-Capacity Micrometer-Sized Li2S Particles as Cathode Materials for Advanced Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Lithium-Ion Batteries Yuan Yang, Guangyuan Zheng, Sumohan Misra,§ Johanna Nelson,§ Michael F. Toney for lithium metal-free rechargeable batteries. It has a theoretical capacity of 1166 mAh/g, which is nearly 1 as the cathode material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries with high specific energy. INTRODUCTION

  6. Cyclic plasticity and shakedown in high-capacity electrodes of lithium-ion batteries Laurence Brassart, Kejie Zhao, Zhigang Suo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Cyclic plasticity and shakedown in high-capacity electrodes of lithium-ion batteries Laurence for lithium-ion batteries. Upon absorbing a large amount of lithium, the electrode swells greatly rights reserved. 1. Introduction Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are energy-storage systems of choice

  7. Maximum Li storage in Si nanowires for the high capacity three-dimensional Li-ion battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    , such as fuel cells and secondary batteries. Here we report a coin-type Si nanowire NW half-cell Li-ion battery is the central research subject in various energy conversion systems, such as solar cells, fuel cells must be optimally coordinated.7 In this respect, Si nanowire NW arrays can serve as the high capacity

  8. Mechanically and chemically robust ZIF-8 monoliths with high volumetric adsorption capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Tian; Velazquez-Garcia, Jose; Bennett, Thomas D.; Fairen-Jimenez, David

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    of the monolith and therefore a reduction in the adsorption capacity. Lohe et al. have previously prepared monolithic aerogels using the precursors from MIL-100, but the obtained materials resulted in very low densities, low volumetric capacities... relatively flat surface. The different morphologies at the macro- and micro-scale resemble those previously observed for xerogels and aerogels,16,27 not only for amorphous MOF-like materials14 but also for carbon and silica aerogels28. Primary particle...

  9. High-performance hybrid organic-inorganic solar cell based on planar n-type silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi, Dan [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qi, Boyuan; Wang, Jizheng [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qu, Shengchun, E-mail: qsc@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Zhanguo [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells were fabricated by spin coating the hole transporting conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) film on n-type crystalline silicon (n-Si). By incorporating different additives into the PEDOT:PSS, the conductivity and wettability of PEDOT:PSS film are markedly improved, and the device performance is greatly enhanced accordingly. To further optimize the device performance, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) layer was inserted between the n-Si and PEDOT:PSS layer. The P3HT layer blocks electrons from diffusing to the PEDOT:PSS, and hence reduces recombination at the anode side. The device eventually exhibits a high power conversion efficiency of 11.52%.

  10. Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delahoy, A.E.; Tonon, T.; Macneil, J. (Chronar Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this subcontract is to develop the technology for same bandgap, amorphous silicon tandem junction photovoltaic modules having an area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} with the goal of achieving an aperture area efficiency of 9%. A further objective is to demonstrate modules that retain 95% of their under standard light soaking conditions. Our approach to the attainment of these objective is based on the following distinctive technologies: (a) in-house deposition of SiO{sub 2}/SnO{sub 2}:F onto soda lime glass by APCVD to provide a textured, transparent electrode, (b) single chamber r.f. flow discharge deposition of the a-Si:H layers onto vertical substrates contained with high package density in a box carrier'' to which the discharge is confined (c) sputter deposition of highly reflecting, ZnO-based back contacts, and (d) laser scribing of the a-Si:H and electrodes with real-time scribe tracking to minimize area loss. Continued development of single junction amorphous silicon was aggressively pursued as proving ground for various optical enhancement schemes, new p-layers, and i-layers quality. We have rigorously demonstrated that the introduction of a transitional i-layer does not impair stability and that the initial gain in performance is retained. We have demonstrated a small improvement in cell stability through a post-fabrication treatment consisting of multiple, intense light flashes followed by sufficient annealing. Finally, several experiments have indicated that long term stability can be improved by overcoating the SnO{sub 2} with ZnO. 25 refs., 17 figs.

  11. Purified silicon production system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  12. LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -344-3957, vmf5@columbia.edu 2 Center for Life Cycle Analysis, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA 3 SunLIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE Vasilis Fthenakis1,2 , Rick Betita2 , Mark Shields3 , Rob

  13. ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR to those measured on reference cells passivated by an aluminum-annealed thermal SiO2, while those of the Al of aluminum ox- ide (Al2O3) grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) pro- vide an excellent level of sur

  14. Oxidation resistant high temperature thermal cycling resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates and process for the production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, V.K.

    1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxidation resistant, high temperature thermal cycling resistant coated ceramic article for ceramic heat engine applications is disclosed. The substrate is a silicon-based material, i.e. a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based monolithic or composite material. The coating is a graded coating of at least two layers: an intermediate AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and an aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. The composition of the coating changes gradually from that of the substrate to that of the AlN or Al[sub x]N[sub y]O[sub z] layer and further to the composition of the aluminum oxide or zirconium oxide outer layer. Other layers may be deposited over the aluminum oxide layer. A CVD process for depositing the graded coating on the substrate is also disclosed.

  15. Advanced Detector Research - Fabrication and Testing of 3D Active-Edge Silicon Sensors: High Speed, High Yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Sherwood I

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of 3D silicon radiation sensors employing electrodes fabricated perpendicular to the sensor surfaces to improve fabrication yields and increasing pulse speeds.

  16. High-capacity Li2Sgraphene oxide composite cathodes with stable cycling performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    oxide onto the surface of Li2S through favorable lithium­oxygen interactions helps to minimize and grid energy storage applica- tions.1­6 Although rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are widely used-mentioned applications.1­6 The major limiting factor in lithium-ion batteries today is the low theoretical capacity

  17. High-Responsivity Graphene-Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D; Efetov, Dimitri; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H L; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cut-off at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron-phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photorespo...

  18. Silicon detectors for the next generation of high energy physics experiments: expected degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Lazanu; S. Lazanu

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists an enormous interest for the study of very high energy domain in particle physics, both theoretically and experimentally, in the aim to construct a general theory of the fundamental constituents of matter and of their interactions. Until now, semiconductor detectors have widely been used in modern high energy physics experiments. They are elements of the high resolution vertex and tracking system, as well as of calorimeters. The main motivation of this work is to discuss how to prepare some possible detectors - only silicon option being considered, for the new era of HEP challenges because the bulk displacement damage in the detector, consequence of irradiation, produces effects at the device level that limit their long time utilisation, increasing the leakage current and the depletion voltage, eventually up to breakdown, and thus affecting the lifetime of detector systems. In this paper, physical phenomena that conduce to the degradation of the detector are discussed and effects are analysed at the device level (leakage current and effective carrier concentration) in the radiation environments expected in the next generation of hadron colliders after LHC, at the next lepton and gamma-gamma colliders, as well as in astroparticle experiments, in conditions of long time continuum irradiations, for different technological options. The predicted results permit a better decision to obtain devices with harder parameters to radiation.

  19. Fluorescent porous silicon biological probes with high quantum efficiency and stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lih Y.

    stable Si-C linked functionalized monolayers on the silicon (100) surface," Langmuir 14(7), 1759, and M. J. Sailor, "Biodegradable luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles for in vivo applications," Nat. Mater. 8(4), 331­336 (2009). 13. Z. F. Li and E. Ruckenstein, "Water-soluble poly(acrylic acid) grafted

  20. HIGH EFFICIENCY AMORPHOUS SILICON GERMANIUM SOLAR CELLS X. Liao, W. Du, X. Yang, H. Povolny, X. Xiang and X. Deng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    HIGH EFFICIENCY AMORPHOUS SILICON GERMANIUM SOLAR CELLS X. Liao, W. Du, X. Yang, H. Povolny, X ABSTRACT We report high-efficiency single-junction a-SiGe n-i-p solar cells deposited using rf PECVD-area efficiencies have been improved to 12.5-13.0% and 10.4%, respectively, for 0.25 cm 2 a-SiGe cells

  1. Yttrium-dispersed C{sub 60} fullerenes as high-capacity hydrogen storage medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Zi-Ya; Dong, Shun-Le, E-mail: dongshunle2013@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)] [Department of Physics, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction between hydrogen molecules and functionalized C{sub 60} is investigated using density functional theory method. Unlike transition metal atoms that tend to cluster on the surface, C{sub 60} decorated with 12 Yttrium atoms on each of its 12 pentagons is extremely stable and remarkably enhances the hydrogen adsorption capacity. Four H{sub 2} molecules can be chemisorbed on a single Y atom through well-known Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson interaction. The nature of bonding is a weak physisorption for the fifth adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule. Consequently, the C{sub 60}Y{sub 12} complex with 60 hydrogen molecules has been demonstrated to lead to a hydrogen storage capacity of ?6.30 wt. %.

  2. High-capacity nanostructured germanium-containing materials and lithium alloys thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graetz, Jason A. (Upton, NY); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Ahn, Channing (Pasadena, CA); Yazami, Rachid (Los Angeles, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodes comprising an alkali metal, for example, lithium, alloyed with nanostructured materials of formula Si.sub.zGe.sub.(z-1), where 0capacities, cycle lives, and/or cycling rates compared with similar electrodes made from graphite. These electrodes are useful as anodes for secondary electrochemical cells, for example, batteries and electrochemical supercapacitors.

  3. CASTOR cask with high loading capacity for transport and storage of VVER 440 spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diersch, R.; Methling, D.; Milde, G. [Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Behaelter mbH Essen (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    GNB has developed a CASTOR transport and storage cask with a capacity of 84 spent fuel assemblies from reactors of the type VVER 440. The safety analyses are performed with the help of modern, benchmarked calculation programs. The results show that the cask design is able to fulfill both the Type B test conditions on basis of IAEA Regulations-1985 edition and the requirements for interim storage sites in Germany.

  4. Inks for Ink Jet Printed Contacts for High Performance Silicon Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-06-199

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work under the proposed CRADA will be a joint effort by BP Solar and NREL to develop new types of high performance inks for high quality contacts to silicon solar cells. NREL will develop inks that have electronic properties that will allow the formation of high quality ohmic contacts to n- and p-type crystalline silicon, and BP Solar will evaluate these contacts in test contact structures.

  5. Sacrificial high-temperature phosphorus diffusion gettering for lifetime improvement of multicrystalline silicon wafers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Stephanie Morgan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron is among the most deleterious lifetime-limiting impurities in crystalline silicon solar cells. In as-grown material, iron is present in precipitates and in point defects. To achieve conversion efficiencies in excess ...

  6. High-speed optical sampling using a silicon-chip temporal magnifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipson, Michal

    of nonequilibrium electronic processes in metals," Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1680-1683 (1987). 3.M. Tonouchi, "Cutting-edge a silicon-chip time lens. We demonstrate the largest reported temporal magnification factor yet achieved

  7. Fabrication of high aspect ratio silicon nanostructure arrays by metal-assisted etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to explore and understand the mechanisms involved in the fabrication of silicon nanostructures using metal-assisted etching. We developed a method utilizing metal-assisted etching in conjunction ...

  8. Measurement of radioactive contamination in the high-resistivity silicon CCDs of the DAMIC experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Bertou, X; Bole, D; Butner, M; Cancelo, G; Vázquez, A Castañeda; Chavarria, A E; Neto, J R T de Mello; Dixon, S; D'Olivo, J C; Estrada, J; Moroni, G Fernandez; Torres, K P Hernández; Izraelevitch, F; Kavner, A; Kilminster, B; Lawson, I; Liao, J; López, M; Molina, J; Moreno-Granados, G; Pena, J; Privitera, P; Sarkis, Y; Scarpine, V; Schwarz, T; Haro, M Sofo; Tiffenberg, J; Machado, D Torres; Trillaud, F; You, X; Zhou, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of radioactive contamination in the high-resistivity silicon charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used by the DAMIC experiment to search for dark matter particles. Novel analysis methods, which exploit the unique spatial resolution of CCDs, were developed to identify $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ particles. Uranium and thorium contamination in the CCD bulk was measured through $\\alpha$ spectroscopy, with an upper limit on the $^{238}$U ($^{232}$Th) decay rate of 5 (15) kg$^{-1}$ d$^{-1}$ at 95% CL. We also searched for pairs of spatially correlated electron tracks separated in time by up to tens of days, as expected from $^{32}$Si-$^{32}$P or $^{210}$Pb-$^{210}$Bi sequences of $\\beta$ decays. The decay rate of $^{32}$Si was found to be $80^{+110}_{-65}$ kg$^{-1}$ d$^{-1}$ (95% CI). An upper limit of $\\sim$35 kg$^{-1}$ d$^{-1}$ (95% CL) on the $^{210}$Pb decay rate was obtained independently by $\\alpha$ spectroscopy and the $\\beta$ decay sequence search. These levels of radioactive contamination are su...

  9. Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area amorphous silicon based modules -- Task B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, K.W.; Willet, D.R. (Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress in developing a stable, high- efficiency, four-terminal hybrid tandem module. The module consists of a semi-transparent, thin-film silicon:hydrogen alloy (TFS) top circuit and a copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) bottom circuit. Film deposition and patterning processes were successfully extended to 0.4-m{sup 2} substrates. A 33.2-W (8.4% efficient) module with a 3970-cm{sup 2} aperture area and a white back reflector was demonstrated; without the back reflector, the module produced 30.2 W (7.6% efficient). Placing a laminated, 31.6-W, 8.1%-efficient CuInSe{sub 2} module underneath this TFS module, with an air gap between the two, produces 11.2 W (2.9% efficient) over a 3883-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Therefore, the four-terminal tandem power output is 41.4 W, translating to a 10.5% aperture-area efficiency. Subsequently, a 37.8-W (9.7% aperture-area efficiency) CuInSe{sub 2} module was demonstrated with a 3905-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Future performances of single-junction and tandem modules of this size were modeled, and predicted power outputs exceed 50 W (13% efficient) for CuInSe{sub 2} and 65 W (17% efficient) for TFS/CuInSe{sub 2} tandem modules.

  10. Tritium trapping in silicon carbide in contact with solid breeder under high flux isotope reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Katsui; Y. Katoh; A. Hasegawa; M. Shimada; Y. Hatano; T. Hinoki; S. Nogami; T. Tanaka; S. Nagata; T. Shikama

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The trapping of tritium in silicon carbide (SiC) injected from ceramic breeding materials was examined via tritium measurements using imaging plate (IP) techniques. Monolithic SiC in contact with ternary lithium oxide (lithium titanate and lithium aluminate) as a ceramic breeder was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The distribution of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) of tritium in SiC was successfully obtained, which separated the contribution of 14C ß-rays to the PSL. The tritium incident from ceramic breeders was retained in the vicinity of the SiC surface even after irradiation at 1073 K over the duration of ~3000 h, while trapping of tritium was not observed in the bulk region. The PSL intensity near the SiC surface in contact with lithium titanate was higher than that obtained with lithium aluminate. The amount of the incident tritium and/or the formation of a Li2SiO3 phase on SiC due to the reaction with lithium aluminate under irradiation likely were responsible for this observation.

  11. Enhancement of specific heat capacity of high-temperature silica-nanofluids synthesized in alkali chloride salt eutectics for solar thermal-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    Enhancement of specific heat capacity of high-temperature silica-nanofluids synthesized in alkali nanoparticles at 1% mass concentration. The specific heat capacity of the nanofluid was enhanced by 14 of nanoparticles at min- ute concentrations are termed as ``nanofluids'' [1­3]. Nanoparticles are defined

  12. Strain induced lithium functionalized graphane as a high capacity hydrogen storage material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Tanveer; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain effects on the stability, electronic structure, and hydrogen storage capacity of lithium-doped graphane (CHLi) have been investigated by stateof-the art first principle density functional theory (DFT). Molecular dynamics MD) simulations have confirmed the stability of Li on graphane sheet when it is subject to 10% of tensile strain. Under biaxial asymmetric strain, the binding energy of Li of graphane (CH) sheet increases by 52% with respect to its bulk's cohesive energy. With 25% doping concentration of Li on CH sheet,the gravimetric density of hydrogen storage is found to reach up to 12.12wt%. The adsorption energies of H2 are found to be within the range of practical H2 storage applications.

  13. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, T [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Engineering-Nuclear Engineering

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (< 10ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 {micro}s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  14. The effects of concentrated ultraviolet light on high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of stability in the performance of solar cells is clearly recognized as fundamental. Some of the highest efficiency silicon solar cells demonstrated to date, such as the Point Contact solar cell and the Passivated Emitter solar cell, rely upon the passivation of cell surfaces in order to minimize recombination, which reduces cell power output. Recently, it has been shown that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light of wavelengths present in the terrestrial solar spectrum can damage a passivating silicon-oxide interface and increase recombination. In this study, we compared the performance of Point Contact and Passivated Emitter solar cells after exposure to UV light. We also examined the effect of UV exposure on oxide-passivated silicon wafers. We found that current Passivated Emitter designs are stable at both one-sun and under concentrated sunlight. The evolution of Point Contact concentrator cell performance shows a clear trend towards more stable cells. 15 refs., 18 figs.

  15. Liquid-phase plasma synthesis of silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix for lithium battery anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Ying [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Yu, Hang; Li, Haitao; Ming, Hai; Pan, Keming; Huang, Hui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) were fabricated. • SiQDs/C exhibits excellent battery performance as anode materials with high specific capacity. • The good performance was attributed to the marriage of small sized SiQDs and carbon. - Abstract: Silicon quantum dots embedded in carbon matrix (SiQDs/C) nanocomposites were prepared by a novel liquid-phase plasma assisted synthetic process. The SiQDs/C nanocomposites were demonstrated to show high specific capacity, good cycling life and high coulmbic efficiency as anode materials for lithium-ion battery.

  16. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  17. High-speed digitization readout of silicon photomultipliers for time of flight positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Ramberg, E.; /Fermilab; Kim, H.; Chen, C.; Kao, C.; /Chicago U.; Niessen, K.; /SUNY, Buffalo; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez; Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; /SGS Thomson, Catania

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on work to develop a system with about 100 picoseconds (ps) time resolution for time of flight positron emission tomography [TOF-PET]. The chosen photo detectors for the study were Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM's). This study was based on extensive experience in studying timing properties of SiPM's. The readout of these devices used the commercial high speed digitizer DRS4. We applied different algorithms to get the best time resolution of 155 ps Guassian (sigma) for a LYSO crystal coupled to a SiPM. We consider the work as a first step in building a prototype TOF-PET module. The field of positron-emission-tomography (PET) has been rapidly developing. But there are significant limitations in how well current PET scanners can reconstruct images, related to how fast data can be acquired, how much volume they can image, and the spatial and temporal resolution of the generated photons. Typical modern scanners now include multiple rings of detectors, which can image a large volume of the patient. In this type of scanner, one can treat each ring as a separate detector and require coincidences only within the ring, or treat the entire region viewed by the scanner as a single 3 dimensional volume. This 3d technique has significantly better sensitivity since more photon pair trajectories are accepted. However, the scattering of photons within the volume of the patient, and the effect of random coincidences limits the technique. The advent of sub-nanosecond timing resolution detectors means that there is potentially much better rejection of scattered photon events and random coincidence events in the 3D technique. In addition, if the timing is good enough, then the origin of photons pairs can be determined better, resulting in improved spatial resolution - so called 'Time-of-Flight' PET, or TOF-PET. Currently a lot of activity has occurred in applications of SiPMs for TOF-PET. This is due to the devices very good time resolution, low profile, lack of high voltage needed, and their non-sensitivity to magnetic fields. While investigations into this technique have begun elsewhere, we feel that the extensive SiPM characterization and data acquisition expertise of Fermilab, and the historical in-depth research of PET imaging at University of Chicago will combine to make significant strides in this field. We also benefit by a working relationship with the SiPM producer STMicroelectronics (STM).

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Metal-Based High Capacity Li-Ion Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Binghamton University-SUNY at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about metal-based high...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Capacity Polyanion Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by The University of Texas at Austin at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  20. Multiple-part-type systems in high volume manufacturing : long-term capacity planning & time-based production control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Xia, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines a production station that faces fluctuating demand with seasonal pattern. The cumulative capacity exceeds the cumulative demand in a one year period; however, its weekly capacity is not able to meet ...

  1. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  2. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  3. Silicon dioxide and hafnium dioxide evaporation characteristics from a high-frequency sweep e-beam system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Tsujimoto, N. [MDC Vacuum Products Corporation, Hayward, California 94545 (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive oxygen evaporation characteristics were determined as a function of the front-panel control parameters provided by a programmable, high-frequency sweep e-beam system. An experimental design strategy used deposition rate, beam speed, pattern, azimuthal rotation speed, and dwell time as the variables. The optimal settings for obtaining a broad thickness distribution, efficient silicon dioxide boule consumption, and minimal hafnium dioxide defect density were generated. The experimental design analysis showed the compromises involved with evaporating these oxides. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  4. Design and Synthesis of Novel Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) Toward High Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, Eddaoudi [USF; Zaworotko, Michael [USF; Space, Brian [USF; Eckert, Juergen [USF

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Statement of Objectives: 1. Synthesize viable porous MOFs for high H2 storage at ambient conditions to be assessed by measuring H2 uptake. 2. Develop a better understanding of the operative interactions of the sorbed H2 with the organic and inorganic constituents of the sorbent MOF by means of inelastic neutron scattering (INS, to characterize the H2-MOF interactions) and computational studies (to interpret the data and predict novel materials suitable for high H2 uptake at moderate temperatures and relatively low pressures). 3. Synergistically combine the outcomes of objectives 1 and 2 to construct a made-to-order inexpensive MOF that is suitable for super H2 storage and meets the DOE targets - 6% H2 per weight (2kWh/kg) by 2010 and 9% H2 per weight (3kWh/kg) by 2015. The ongoing research is a collaborative experimental and computational effort focused on assessing H2 storage and interactions with pre-selected metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolite-like MOFs (ZMOFs), with the eventual goal of synthesizing made-to-order high H2 storage materials to achieve the DOE targets for mobile applications. We proposed in this funded research to increase the amount of H2 uptake, as well as tune the interactions (i.e. isosteric heats of adsorption), by targeting readily tunable MOFs:

  5. A bipolar monolithic preamplifier for high-capacitance SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) silicon calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton, C.L. Jr. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Kennedy, E.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Bugg, W.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a preamplifier designed and fabricated specifically to address the requirements of silicon calorimetry for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The topology and its features are discussed in addition to the design methodology employed. The simulated and measured results for noise, power consumption, and speed are presented. Simulated an measured data for radiation damage effects as well as data for post-damage annealing are also presented. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Developing a new high capacity anode with long life | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E LGeothermalEnergy Aa new high

  7. METHOD OF FABRICATING ELECTRODES INCLUDING HIGH-CAPACITY, BINDER-FREE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, In this3,Office

  8. Impedance Analysis of Silicon Nanowire Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Riccardo Ruffo,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Impedance Analysis of Silicon Nanowire Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Riccardo Ruffo, Seung Sae Hong as a high-capacity anode in a lithium ion battery. The ac response was measured by using impedance for higher specific energy lithium ion batteries for applications such as electric vehicles, next generation

  9. Research on stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon multijunction modules. Annual subcontract report, 1 November 1992--31 May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, M.; Kampas, F.; Xi, J. [Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress made in the first half of Phase II of a three-phase program to develop high-efficiency, same-band-gap, amorphous-silicon, tandem-junction modules. Results for both 1-cm- {sup 2} devices and 0.3-m (0.09-m{sup 2}) modules are given. considerable effort was devoted to finding a device structure and layer conditions that reconcile the conflicting requirements of a good ``tunnel junction`` contact between the two stacks and a high-efficiency device. High-band-gap p{sub 2}layers, which enable good voltage and current from the second stack, were found to result in poor tunnel junctions. The best results were obtained by using a thin (1-nm-thick) p{sup +} layer (no carbon) between the n{sub 1} and p{sub 2} layers of the device.

  10. Mechanism for high hydrogen storage capacity on metal-coated carbon nanotubes: A first principle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jinlian; Xiao, Hong [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China); Cao, Juexian, E-mail: jxcao@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute for nanophysics and Rare-earth Luminescence, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan Province 411105 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogen adsorption and binding mechanism on metals (Ca, Sc, Ti and V) decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated using first principle calculations. Our results show that those metals coated on SWCNTs can uptake over 8 wt% hydrogen molecules with binding energy range -0.2--0.6 eV, promising potential high density hydrogen storage material. The binding mechanism is originated from the electrostatic Coulomb attraction, which is induced by the electric field due to the charge transfer from metal 4s to 3d. Moreover, we found that the interaction between the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} further lowers the binding energy. - Graphical abstract: Five hydrogen molecules bound to individual Ca decorated (8, 0) SWCNT : a potential hydrogen-storage material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each transition metal atom can adsorb more than four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interation between metal and hydrogen molecule is electrostatic coulomb attraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electric field is induced by the charge transfer from metal 4s to metal 3d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbed hydrogen molecules which form supermolecule can further lower the binding energy.

  11. Single crystal silicon as a macro-world structural material : application to compact, lightweight high pressure vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Tanya Cruz

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystal silicon has promising inherent structural properties which are attractive for weight sensitive applications. Single crystal silicon, however, is a brittle material which makes the usable strength that can ...

  12. Black Conductive Titanium Oxide High-Capacity Materials for Battery Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, W.

    2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is one of the most widely studied transitionmetal oxides because of its many potential applications in photoelectrochemical systems, such as dye-sensitized TiO{sub 2} electrodes for photovoltaic solar cells, and water-splitting catalysts for hydrogen generation, and in environmental purification for creating or degrading specific compounds. However, TiO{sub 2} has a wide bandgap and high electrical resistivity, which limits its use as an electrode. A set of non-stoichiometric titanium oxides called the Magneli phases, having a general formula of Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n-1} with n between 4 and 10, exhibits lower bandgaps and resistivities, with the highest electrical conductivities reported for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}. These phases have been formulated under different conditions, but in all reported cases the resulting oxides have minimum grain sizes on the order of micrometers, regardless of the size of the starting titanium compounds. In this method, nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2} or hydrogen titanates are first coated with carbon using either wet or dry chemistry methods. During this process the size and shape of the nanoparticles are 'locked in.' Subsequently the carbon-coated nanoparticles are heated. This results in the transformation of the original TiO{sub 2} or hydrogen titanates to Magneli phases without coarsening, so that the original size and shape of the nanoparticles are maintained to a precise degree. People who work on batteries, fuel cells, ultracapacitors, electrosynthesis cells, electro-chemical devices, and soil remediation have applications that could benefit from using nanoscale Magneli phases of titanium oxide. Application of these electrode materials may not be limited to substitution for TiO{sub 2} electrodes. Combining the robustness and photosensitivity of TiO{sub 2} with higher electrical conductivity may result in a general electrode material.

  13. Silicon sponge improves lithium-ion battery performance | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sponge improves lithium-ion battery performance Silicon sponge improves lithium-ion battery performance Increasing battery's storage capacity could allow devices to run...

  14. Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 609 2000 Materials Research Society Preparation of Microcrystalline Silicon Based Solar Cells at High i-layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    of Microcrystalline Silicon Based Solar Cells at High i-layer Deposition Rates Using a Gas Jet Technique S.J. Jones-layers for nip single-junction solar cells. The high deposition rates allow for fabrication of the required plays in determining the device performance. INTRODUCTION µc-Si-based solar cells are an intriguing

  15. Advanced Materials . 2012, 24, 25922597 High-Rate Capability Silicon Decorated Vertically AlignedCarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a leading technology for medical and electronic devices as well as electric vehicles. The increasing demand.[1] Then, as nanotechnology develops, various Si-nanostructures have emerged as an appropriate anode material. Specific charge storage capacity about 2000 mAh g-1 is available and stable after one

  16. FeO0.7F1.3/C Nanocomposite as a High-Capacity Cathode Material for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yong-Ning [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Uptown, NY (United States); Sina, Masha [Rutgers Univ., Materials and Engineering, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Pereira, Nathalie [Rutgers Univ., Energy Storage Research Group (ESRG), Piscataway, NJ (United States); Yu, Xiquian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Uptown, NY (United States); Amatucci, Glenn G. [Rutgers Univ., Energy Storage Research Group (ESRG), Piscataway, NJ (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Uptown, NY (United States); Cosandey, Frederic [Rutgers Univ., Materials and Engineering, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Nam, Kyung-Wan [Dongguk University-Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Searching high capacity cathode materials is one of the most important fields of the research and development of sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). Here, we report a FeO0.7F1.3/C nanocomposite synthesized via a solution process as a new cathode material for SIBs. This material exhibits a high initial discharge capacity of 496 mAh g-1 in a sodium cell at 50 °C. From the 3rd to 50th cycle, the capacity fading is only 0.14% per cycle (from 388 mAh g-1 at 3rd the cycle to 360 mAh g-1 at the 50th cycle), demonstrating superior cyclability. A high energy density of 650 Wh kg-1 is obtained at the material level. The reaction mechanism studies of FeO0.7F1.3/C with sodium show a hybridized mechanism of both intercalation and conversion reaction.

  17. Highly efficient photoinduced desorption of N{sub 2}O and CO from porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toker, Gil; Sagi, Roey; Bar-Nachum, Shay; Asscher, Micha [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoinduced desorption (PID) of N{sub 2}O and CO from porous silicon (PSi) samples is reported. Both adsorbates exhibit unusually large cross sections for PID at 193 nm, up to 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the literature values for similar processes on flat Si. Under this UV irradiation, N{sub 2}O molecules undergo photodissociation (a competing process leading to surface oxidation) with a cross section that is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than photodesorption. In the case of CO desorption is the exclusive photodepletion mechanism. PID efficiency decreases with increasing CO coverage suggesting PID hindrance by interactions among the desorbing CO molecules leading to re-adsorption at higher coverage. The wavelength and fluence dependence measurements exclude the possibility of laser induced thermal desorption for both adsorbates. The proposed mechanism for this phenomenon is desorption induced by hot electron transfer from the substrate to the adsorbate. Enhanced lifetime of transient negative adsorbate due to stabilization by localized holes on PSi nanotips can explain the observed abnormally large PID efficiency on top of porous silicon.

  18. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  19. Reliability of GaN high electron mobility transistors on silicon substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirtas, Sefa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors are promising devices for high power and high frequency applications such as cellular base stations, radar and wireless network systems, due to the high bandgap and high breakdown ...

  20. Development of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calderini, G; Bomben, M; Boscardin, M; Bosisio, L; Chauveau, J; Giacomini, G; La Rosa, A; Marchiori, G; Zorzi, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In view of the LHC upgrade for the high luminosity phase (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment is planning to replace the inner detector with an all-silicon system. The n-in-p bulk technology represents a valid solution for the modules of most of the layers, given the significant radiation hardness of this option and the reduced cost. The large area necessary to instrument the outer layers will demand to tile the sensors, a solution for which the inefficient region at the border of each sensor needs to be reduced to the minimum size. This paper reports on a joint R&D project by the ATLAS LPNHE Paris group and FBK Trento on a novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel design, based on the deep-trench process available at FBK.

  1. Technology Development for High-Efficiency Solar Cells and Modules Using Thin (<80 um) Single-Crystal Silicon Wafers Produced by Epitaxy: June 11, 2011 - April 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravi, T. S.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final technical progress report of Crystal Solar subcontract NEU-31-40054-01. The objective of this 18-month program was to demonstrate the viability of high-efficiency thin (less than 80 um) monocrystalline silicon (Si) solar cells and modules with a low-cost epitaxial growth process.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Wiring Up Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Stanford University at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about wiring up silicon...

  3. THE EFFECT OF SILICON ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL CRACKING BEHAVIOR OF A HIGH STRENGTH STEEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cedeno, M.H.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-Alloy, High-Strength Steel, Advanced Research ProjectsTests of High Strength Steels, BISRA Report September 1971.Cracking in High Strength Steels and in Titanium and

  4. Aluminium doped ceria–zirconia supported palladium-alumina catalyst with high oxygen storage capacity and CO oxidation activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu, E-mail: shuyin@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Guo, Chongshen; Wu, Xiaoyong; Kimura, Takeshi; Sato, Tsugio

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} possessed high OSC and CO oxidation activity at low temperature. - Highlights: • A new OSC material of Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is prepared via a mechanochemical method. • Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed high OSC even after calcination at 1000 °C for 20 h. • Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited the highest CO oxidation activity at low temperature correlates with enhanced OSC. - Abstract: The Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst prepared by a mechanochemical route and calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h in air atmosphere to evaluate the thermal stability. The prepared Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was characterized for the oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and CO oxidation activity in automotive catalysis. For the characterization, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique were employed. The OSC values of all samples were measured at 600 °C using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 41 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 583 ?mol-O g{sup ?1} and good OSC performance stability. The same synthesis route was employed for the preparation of the CeO{sub 2}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.5}O{sub 2}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for comparison.

  5. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  6. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Phoenix, AZ)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  7. Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure for High-Performance Lithium-ion Battery Anodes. Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure for...

  8. Six Thousand Electrochemical Cycles of Double-Walled Silicon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite remarkable progress, lithium ion batteries still need higher energy density and better cycle life for consumer electronics, electric drive vehicles and large-scale renewable energy storage applications. Silicon has recently been explored as a promising anode material for high energy batteries; however, attaining long cycle life remains a significant challenge due to materials pulverization during cycling and an unstable solid-electrolyte interphase. Here, we report double-walled silicon nanotube electrodes that can cycle over 6000 times while retaining more than 85% of the initial capacity. This excellent performance is due to the unique double-walled structure in which the outer silicon oxide wall confines the inner silicon wall to expand only inward during lithiation, resulting in a stable solid-electrolyte interphase. This structural concept is general and could be extended to other battery materials that undergo large volume changes.

  9. High-G testing of MEMS mechanical non-volatile memory and silicon re-entry switch.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Michael Sean; Pohl, Kenneth Roy

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different Sandia MEMS devices have been tested in a high-g environment to determine their performance and survivability. The first test was performed using a drop-table to produce a peak acceleration load of 1792 g's over a period of 1.5 ms. For the second test the MEMS devices were assembled in a gun-fired penetrator and shot into a cement target at the Army Waterways Experiment Station in Vicksburg Mississippi. This test resulted in a peak acceleration of 7191 g's for a duration of 5.5 ms. The MEMS devices were instrumented using the MEMS Diagnostic Extraction System (MDES), which is capable of driving the devices and recording the device output data during the high-g event, providing in-flight data to assess the device performance. A total of six devices were monitored during the experiments, four mechanical non-volatile memory devices (MNVM) and two Silicon Reentry Switches (SiRES). All six devices functioned properly before, during, and after each high-g test without a single failure. This is the first known test under flight conditions of an active, powered MEMS device at Sandia.

  10. High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon and Nanocrystalline Silicon-Based Solar Cells and Modules: Final Technical Progress Report, 30 January 2006 - 29 January 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    United Solar Ovonic successfully used its spectrum-splitting a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H triple-junction structure in their manufacturing plants, achieving a manufacturing capacity of 118 MW in 2007, and set up a very aggressive expansion plan to achieve grid parity.

  11. Evaluation of a robust, diimide-based, porous organic polymer (POP) as a high-capacity sorbent for representative chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -acid forming substances, while octane is used to assess physical adsorption capacity. Experiments were carried to their well-defined crystalline structure. However, many MOFs lack the chemical stability required is characterized by pores ranging in width from 3.5to8 angstroms and a total surface area of ca. 950 m2 / g (i

  12. Properties of nanostructured diamond-silicon carbide composites sintered by high pressure infiltration technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    peak profiles using Fourier coefficients of ab initio theoretical size and strain profiles Materials Research Society 2703 #12;electric power dissipated in the apparatus. Obtained power­ temperature and load­pressure plots were used as the calibration curves for subsequent high-pressure, high- temperature

  13. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raj, Rishi (Ithaca, NY); Baik, Sunggi (Ithaca, NY)

    1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  14. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  15. Millimeter-wave GaN high electron mobility transistors and their integration with silicon electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jinwook W. (Jinwook Will)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of the great progress in performance achieved during the last few years, GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) still have several important issues to be solved for millimeter-wave (30 ~ 300 GHz) applications. ...

  16. High-temperature defect engineering for silicon solar cells : predictive process simulation and synchrotron-based microcharacterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenning, David P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency is a major lever for cost reduction in crystalline silicon solar cells, which dominate the photovoltaics market but cannot yet compete subsidy-free in most areas. Iron impurities are a key performance-limiting ...

  17. A Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter and Top Quark Production at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouëné, J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis deals with two aspects of the International Linear Collider (ILC) which is a project of a linear electron-positron collider of up to at least 500 GeV center of mass energy. The first aspect is the development of a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter (SiW-ECAL) for one of the detectors of the ILC. The concept of this detector is driven by the ILC beam specifications and by the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). This requires highly granular calorimeter and very compact one with integrated electronics. To prove the capability of the SiW- ECAL a technological prototype has been built and tested in test beam at DESY. The results are presented here, and show, after the calibration procedure a signal over noise ratio of 10, even in the power pulsing mode. The second aspect is the study of one of the important physics channels of the ILC, the top anti-top quark pairs production. The main goal of this study is to determine the precision that we can expect at the ILC on the top coupling with the W bos...

  18. Evolution of Nickel-Manganese-Silicon Dominated Phases in Highly Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter B Wells; Yuan Wu; Tim Milot; G. Robert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto; Brandon Miller; James Cole

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of a high density of Ni-Mn-Si nm-scale precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels, both with and without Cu, could lead to severe embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement regulations, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Ni-Mn- Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni were carried out at ˜ 295±5°C to high and very high neutron fluences of ˜ 1.3x1020 and 1.1x1021 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) shows that significant mole fractions of these precipitates form in the Cu bearing steels at ˜ 1.3x1020 n/cm2, while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1x1021 n/cm2 at all Cu levels. The precipitates diffract, and in one case are compositionally and structurally consistent with the Mn6Ni16Si7 G-phase. At the highest fluence, the large precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the steel Ni content, rather than Cu, and lead to enormous strength increases up to about 700 MPa. The implications of these results to light water reactor life extension are discussed briefly.

  19. High temperature 4H-silicon carbide thyristors and power MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmour, J.W.; Allen, S.T.; Singh, R.; Lipkin, L.A.; Waltz, D.G. [Cree Research, Inc., 2810 Meridian Parkway, Durham, North Carolina 27713 (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of high temperature power switches, MOSFETs and thyristors, have been demonstrated in 4H-SiC. Vertical UMOS power MOSFETs have been demonstrated to block voltages as high as 260 V with a specific on-resistance of 18 m{Omega}-cm{sup 2}. Larger area, 175 V MOSFETs had a rated current of 2 Amps (200 A/cm{sup 2}) at {ital V}{sub {ital d}}=2.65 V. Previous 4H-SiC UMOS MOSFETs were measured to operate up to 573 K. 4H-SiC npnp thyristors have been successfully operated up to 773 K, and have achieved blocking voltages of 600 V and an on-current of 1.8 A. Larger area, 200 V thyristors had a rated current of 10 Amps (620 A/cm{sup 2}) with a voltage drop of 3.6 V. Current densities as high as 1000 A/cm{sup 2} at {minus}4.0 V has also been achieved. The thyristors have also shown very fast turn-off times, ranging from 360{endash}640 nsec. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  1. Low Cost, High Efficiency Tandem Silicon Solar Cells and LEDs - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking5investsLouisPrepared:

  2. High Performance Silicon Monoxide (SiO) Electrode for Next Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartmentInnovationHigh Flux IsotopetheLithium Ion

  3. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  4. Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huckabee, M.L.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

    1991-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength are disclosed. The powder mixture includes (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12m[sup 2]g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder. No Drawings

  5. Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base & articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huckabee, Marvin L. (Marlboro, MA); Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav (Acton, MA); Neil, Jeffrey T. (Acton, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The powder mixture includes 9a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon mitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12m.sup.2 g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified articel an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder.

  6. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  7. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Mendez, Victor P. (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  8. Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Molenbroek, Edith C. (Rotterdam, NL); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO); Nelson, Brent P. (Golden, CO); Iwaniczko, Eugene (Lafayette, CO); Xu, Yueqin (Golden, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating device quality, thin-film a-Si:H for use as semiconductor material in photovoltaic and other devices, comprising in any order; positioning a substrate in a vacuum chamber adjacent a plurality of heatable filaments with a spacing distance L between the substrate and the filaments; heating the filaments to a temperature that is high enough to obtain complete decomposition of silicohydride molecules that impinge said filaments into Si and H atomic species; providing a flow of silicohydride gas, or a mixture of silicohydride gas containing Si and H, in said vacuum chamber while maintaining a pressure P of said gas in said chamber, which, in combination with said spacing distance L, provides a P.times.L product in a range of 10-300 mT-cm to ensure that most of the Si atomic species react with silicohydride molecules in the gas before reaching the substrate, to thereby grow a a-Si:H film at a rate of at least 50 .ANG./sec.; and maintaining the substrate at a temperature that balances out-diffusion of H from the growing a-Si:H film with time needed for radical species containing Si and H to migrate to preferred bonding sites.

  9. High efficiency low cost thin film silicon solar cell design and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor device having a substrate, a conductive intermediate layer deposited onto said substrate, wherein the intermediate layer serves as a back electrode, an optical reflector, and an interface for impurity gettering, and a semiconductor layer deposited onto said intermediate layer, wherein the semiconductor layer has a grain size at least as large as the layer thickness, and preferably about ten times the layer thickness. The device is formed by depositing a metal layer on a substrate, depositing a semiconductive material on the metal-coated substrate to produce a composite structure, and then optically processing the composite structure by illuminating it with infrared electromagnetic radiation according to a unique time-energy profile that first produces pits in the backside surface of the semiconductor material, then produces a thin, highly reflective, low resistivity alloy layer over the entire area of the interface between the semiconductor material and the metal layer, and finally produces a grain-enhanced semiconductor layer. The time-energy profile includes increasing the energy to a first energy level to initiate pit formation and create the desired pit size and density, then ramping up to a second energy level in which the entire device is heated to produce an interfacial melt, and finally reducing the energy to a third energy level and holding for a period of time to allow enhancement in the grain size of the semiconductor layer.

  10. High efficiency low cost thin film silicon solar cell design and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor device is described having a substrate, a conductive intermediate layer deposited onto said substrate, wherein the intermediate layer serves as a back electrode, an optical reflector, and an interface for impurity gettering, and a semiconductor layer deposited onto said intermediate layer, wherein the semiconductor layer has a grain size at least as large as the layer thickness, and preferably about ten times the layer thickness. The device is formed by depositing a metal layer on a substrate, depositing a semiconductive material on the metal-coated substrate to produce a composite structure, and then optically processing the composite structure by illuminating it with infrared electromagnetic radiation according to a unique time-energy profile that first produces pits in the backside surface of the semiconductor material, then produces a thin, highly reflective, low resistivity alloy layer over the entire area of the interface between the semiconductor material and the metal layer, and finally produces a grain-enhanced semiconductor layer. The time-energy profile includes increasing the energy to a first energy level to initiate pit formation and create the desired pit size and density, then ramping up to a second energy level in which the entire device is heated to produce an interfacial melt, and finally reducing the energy to a third energy level and holding for a period of time to allow enhancement in the grain size of the semiconductor layer. 9 figs.

  11. High efficiency, low cost, thin film silicon solar cell design and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor device having a substrate, a conductive intermediate layer deposited onto said substrate, wherein the intermediate layer serves as a back electrode, an optical reflector, and an interface for impurity gettering, and a semiconductor layer deposited onto said intermediate layer, wherein the semiconductor layer has a grain size at least as large as the layer thickness, and preferably about ten times the layer thickness. The device is formed by depositing a metal layer on a substrate, depositing a semiconductive material on the metal-coated substrate to produce a composite structure, and then optically processing the composite structure by illuminating it with infrared electromagnetic radiation according to a unique time-energy profile that first produces pits in the backside surface of the semiconductor material, then produces a thin, highly reflective, low resistivity alloy layer over the entire area of the interface between the semiconductor material and the metal layer, and finally produces a grain-enhanced semiconductor layer. The time-energy profile includes increasing the energy to a first energy level to initiate pit formation and create the desired pit size and density, then ramping up to a second energy level in which the entire device is heated to produce an interfacial melt, and finally reducing the energy to a third energy level and holding for a period of time to allow enhancement in the grain size of the semiconductor layer.

  12. High-Velocity Features of Calcium and Silicon in the Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marion, G H; Wheeler, J Craig; Barna, Barnabas; Szalai, Tamas; Mulligan, Brian; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "High-velocity features" (HVFs) are spectral features in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have minima indicating significantly higher (by greater than about 6000 km/s) velocities than typical "photospheric-velocity features" (PVFs). The PVFs are absorption features with minima indicating typical photospheric (i.e., bulk ejecta) velocities (usually ~9000-15,000 km/s near B-band maximum brightness). In this work we undertake the most in-depth study of HVFs ever performed. The dataset used herein consists of 445 low-resolution optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectra (at epochs up to 5 d past maximum brightness) of 210 low-redshift SNe Ia that follow the "Phillips relation." A series of Gaussian functions is fit to the data in order to characterise possible HVFs of Ca II H&K, Si II {\\lambda}6355, and the Ca II NIR triplet. The temporal evolution of the velocities and strengths of the PVFs and HVFs of these three spectral features is investigated, as are possible correlations with other SN Ia observables. We f...

  13. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding ember adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  14. System and method for liquid silicon containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding member adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

  15. A 2-terminal perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell enabled by a silicon tunnel junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailoa, Jonathan P.

    With the advent of efficient high-bandgap metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics, an opportunity exists to make perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. We fabricate a monolithic tandem by developing a silicon-based interband ...

  16. Floating Silicon Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  17. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on HOPG as precursor of new carbon-based anode for high-capacity lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelucci, Marco; Frau, Eleonora; Betti, Maria Grazia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I - 00185 Roma (Italy); Mura, Francesco [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences for Engineering, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 14/16, I - 00161 Roma (Italy); Panero, Stefania [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I - 00185 Roma (Italy); Mariani, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, CNISM, CNIS, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I - 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron Oxides nanostructures are very promising systems for new generation of anode material for Lithium-Ion batteries because of their high capacity associated to their surface area. A core-level photoemission study of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires deposited on highly-oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) under Li exposure is presented. The Fe-2p, Fe-3p, and Li-1s core-level lineshape evolution upon Li exposure in ultra-high-vacuum conditions clearly brings to light the Fe ion reduction from fully trivalent to prevalently divalent at saturation. Furthermore, the graphite substrate allows allocation of a large amount of Li ions surrounding the iron-oxide nanowires, opening a new scenario towards the use of graphene for improving the ionic charge exchange.

  18. Amorphous Silicon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has a proven track record of funding successes in amorphous silicon (a-Si)research. A list of current projects, summary of the benefits, and discussion on the production and manufacturing of...

  19. First-principles Approaches to Simulate Lithiation in Silicon Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qianfan; Wang, Enge

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon is viewed as an excellent electrode material for lithium batteries due to its high lithium storage capacity. Various Si nano-structures, such as Si nanowires, have performed well as lithium battery anodes and have opened up exciting opportunities for the use of Si in energy storage devices. The mechanism of lithium insertion and the interaction between Li and the Si electrode must be understood at the atomic level; this understanding can be achieved by first-principles simulation. Here, first-principles computations of lithiation in silicon electrodes are reviewed. The review focuses on three aspects: the various properties of bulk Li-Si compounds with different Li concentrations, the electronic structure of Si nanowires and Li insertion behavior in Si nanowires, and the dynamic lithiation process at the Li/Si interface. Potential study directions in this research field and difficulties that the field still faces are discussed at the end.

  20. Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery N. G. Rudawski, B. L. Darby, B. R. Yates, K. S. Jones, R. G. Elliman et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes N. G. Rudawski, B photoelectrochemical cells Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 084104 (2012) Synthesis and characterization of Nd4+xFe72Co5Ga2B17-x://apl.aip.org/authors #12;Nanostructured ion beam-modified Ge films for high capacity Li ion battery anodes N. G. Rudawski,1

  1. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Studies on High Capacity Cathodes for Advanced Lithium-ion Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about studies on high...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Studies on High Capacity Cathodes for Advanced Lithium-ion Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about studies on high...

  4. Neural substrates of cognitive capacity limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschman, Tim

    Cognition has a severely limited capacity: Adult humans can retain only about four items “in mind”. This limitation is fundamental to human brain function: Individual capacity is highly correlated with intelligence measures ...

  5. Polarization manipulation in silicon photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Zhan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon photonics is moving fast toward industrialization. It satisfies the increasing demand for higher speed, larger bandwidth communication. Thus it has a wide range of applications including high-performance computing, ...

  6. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of an iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100{degrees}C.

  7. Phase Transfer-Catalyzed Fast CO2 Absorption by MgO-Based Absorbents with High Cycling Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Weizhen; Rohatgi, Aashish; Duan, Yuhua; Singh, Prabhakar; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 capture from pre-combustion syngas in the temperature range of 250-400°C is highly desirable from an energy efficiency perspective. Thermodynamically, MgO is a promising material for CO2 capture, but the gas-solid reaction to produce MgCO3 is kinetically slow due to high lattice energy. We report here fast CO2 absorption over a solid MgO-molten nitrate/nitrite aggregate through phase transfer catalysis, in which the molten phase serves as both a catalyst and reaction medium. Reaction with CO2 at the gas-solid-liquid triple phase boundary results in formation of MgCO3 with significant reaction rate and a high conversion of MgO. This methodology is also applicable to other alkaline earth oxides, inspiring the design of absorbents which require activation of the bulk material.

  8. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamza, Alex V. (Livermore, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Moalem, Mehran (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C.sub.60 precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C.sub.60 with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C.sub.60 on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K.

  9. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamza, A.V.; Balooch, M.; Moalem, M.

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C{sub 60} precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C{sub 60} with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C{sub 60} on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K. 5 figs.

  10. amorphous-nanocrystalline silicon thin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    THE POROUS SILICON PROCESS APPLYING CONVECTION for the first time to monocrystalline Si thin-film solar cells from the porous silicon (PSI) layer transfer for manufacturing high...

  11. Arrays of Sealed Silicon Nanotubes As Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Arrays of Sealed Silicon Nanotubes As Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries Taeseup Song, Jianliang Xia ABSTRACT Silicon is a promising candidate for electrodes in lithium ion batteries due to its large reversible capacity and long-term cycle stability. KEYWORDS Lithium ion battery, silicon, nanotubes

  12. Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

  13. 2008 Nature Publishing Group High-performance lithium battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    © 2008 Nature Publishing Group High-performance lithium battery anodes using silicon nanowires in lithium batteries have shown capacity fading and short battery lifetime due to pulverization and loss December 2007; doi:10.1038/nnano.2007.411 There is great interest in developing rechargeable lithium

  14. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

  15. Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

  16. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam. [For access denial

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mead, J.W.; Montoya, O.J.; Rand, P.B.; Willan, V.O.

    1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO/sub 2/ in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  17. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  18. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  19. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruby, D.S.; Basore, P.A.; Schubert, W.K.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon. 9 figs.

  20. Method for fabricating silicon cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruby, Douglas S. (Albuquerque, NM); Basore, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon.

  1. aspect ratio silicon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    silicon-nitride hard-mask for high aspect-ratio silicon fins V. Jovanovi, S, Zagreb, Croatia Abstract - A method for using hard-masks to achieve sub- 100 nm patterning of...

  2. Iron-oxide catalyzed silicon photoanode for water splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Kimin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an integrated study of high efficiency photoanodes for water splitting using silicon and iron-oxide. The fundamental limitations of silicon to water splitting applications were overcome by an ultrathin ...

  3. Toward High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells: Bringing Conjugated Polymers and Inorganic Nanocrystals in Close

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    , China ABSTRACT: Organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells composed of conjugated polymers (CPs) and inorganicToward High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells: Bringing Conjugated Polymers to traditional silicon solar cells due to the capacity of producing high- efficiency solar energy in a cost

  4. HIGH-CAPACITY POLYANION CATHODES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    nanostructured phosphate and silicate cathodes as well as their nanocomposites with graphene to overcome the limitations of poor ionic and electronic conductivity - To develop a...

  5. Growth of high-quality GaAs on Ge/Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} on nanostructured silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanamu, G.; Datye, A.K.; Dawson, R.; Zaidi, Saleem H. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States) and Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Center for High Technology Materials, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Gratings, Inc., 2700 B Broadbent Parkway, NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 (United States)

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Heteroepitaxial growth of GaAs/Ge/SiGe films on submicrostructured Si substrates is reported. One-dimensional, nanometer-linewidth, submicrometer period features were fabricated in Si substrates using interferometric lithography, reactive ion etching, and wet-chemical etching techniques. The quality of the GaAs layers grown on these structures was investigated using high-resolution x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, photoluminescence, and etch pit density measurements. The defect density of GaAs epilayers grown on submicrostructured Si at {approx}6x10{sup 5} cm{sup -2} was two orders of magnitude lower compared with that grown on planar silicon. The optical quality of the GaAs/Ge/SiGe on submicrostructured Si was comparable to that of single crystal GaAs.

  6. Purification and deposition of silicon by an iodide disproportionation reaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Tihu (Littleton, CO); Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  7. Device integration for silicon microphotonic platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Desmond Rodney

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon ULSI compatible, high index contrast waveguides and devices provide high density integration for optical networking and on-chip optical interconnects. Four such waveguide systems were fabricated and analyzed: ...

  8. Electrochemical characteristics of plasma-etched black silicon as anodes for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Gibaek; Wehrspohn, Ralf B., E-mail: ralf.b.wehrspohn@iwmh.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM, Halle (Saale) 06120, Germany and Department of Physics, Martin-Luther University, Halle (Saale) 06099 (Germany); Schweizer, Stefan L. [Department of Physics, Martin-Luther University, Halle (Saale) 06099 (Germany)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured silicon as an anode material for Li-ion batteries is produced for the first time by inductively coupled plasma–plasma etching of Si wafers in the black silicon regime. The microscopic structure strongly resembles other types of nanostructured silicon, with a well-arranged nanostructure possessing a sufficient porosity for accommodating large volume expansion. Despite these features, however, a high first-cycle irreversible capacity loss and a poor cycle life are observed. The main reason for these poor features is the formation of a thick solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer related to the surface condition of the pristine nanostructured black silicon (b-Si) electrode. Therefore, the cycle life of the b-Si electrode is heavily influenced by the constant reformation of the SEI layer depending upon the surface composition in spite of the presence of nanostructured Si. In the fast lithiation experiments, the nanostructure region of the b-Si electrode is detached from the Si substrate owing to the kinetics difference between the lithium ion diffusion and the electron injection and phase transformation in the nanostructured Si region. This means that more Si substrate is involved in lithiation at high current rates. It is therefore important to maintain balance in the chemical kinetics during the lithiation of nanostructured Si electrodes with a Si substrate.

  9. Heterogeneous lithium niobate photonics on silicon substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fathpour, Sasan

    Heterogeneous lithium niobate photonics on silicon substrates Payam Rabiei,1,* Jichi Ma,1 Saeed-confined lithium niobate photonic devices and circuits on silicon substrates is reported based on wafer bonding high- performance lithium niobate microring optical resonators and Mach- Zehnder optical modulators

  10. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Lindemer, Terrence B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  11. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  12. Improving high-capacity Li1.2Ni0.15Mn0.55Co0.1O2-based lithium-ion cells by modifiying the positive electrode with alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spila, Timothy P.

    and EVs), they must meet a range of stringent criteria: for instance, energy densities high enoughImproving high-capacity Li1.2Ni0.15Mn0.55Co0.1O2-based lithium-ion cells by modifiying the positive-ion Atomic layer deposition Al2O3 Coating Secondary ion mass spectrometry Layered oxide a b s t r a c

  13. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  14. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  15. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raj, Rishi (Ithaca, NY); Baik, Sunggi (Ithaca, NY)

    1985-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  16. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Yang; Piper, Daniela M.; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J.; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X.; Zhang, Jiguang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface modification of silicon nanoparticle via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism as how this thin layer of coating function is not known, which is even complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in-situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation, and therefore low coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD coated particles show extremely fast, thorough and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li+/e- conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer and therefore mitigates side reaction and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the coulombic efficiency and preserve capacity and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrated that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance as the coating layer itself.

  17. Ultraviolet selective silicon photodiode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chintapalli, Koteswara Rao

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (' silicon surfa&(& that n&ost of t h&) phologeneraied hole-el( & tron pairs are k&st by surface rccornbinai ion before being nolle&. trxl hy a pr). jun?i, ion. The major cause of surl'a&. e re?omhination is probably due Io lifetim(. shortening ol' Lhe... drpth corresponded to a high& r shor4wav? length rcsponsiv- ity tlirough liis ( xperimcnial diodes with junction dcpl ha ol'0. -'I to 2 0 pm. I indmayer and Allison [4I] I'abri&. ated n+-p solar cells with junction &lcpths of approximately 0. 1, 0. 15...

  18. Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Timothy D.; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon (Si) has a very high lithium storage capacity and is being explored as a negative electrode material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Si nanowires can exhibit relatively stable performance for many cycles of charging; however, conductive carbon must often be added to the electrode layer to improve the rate capability due to the relatively low electrical conductivity of Si. The added carbon lowers the capacity of the electrode. Here, we show that the rate capability of Si in LIBs can be substantially enhanced by incorporating tin (Sn) into Si nanowires. The solubility of Sn in Si is very low (0.015 at%); yet, Sn used as a seed for supercritical fluid–liquid–solid (SFLS) growth can be trapped in Si nanowires with relatively high concentration (10 at%). Such Sn-containing Si nanowires and no added conductive carbon in the electrode layer, could be cycled in LIBs with high capacity (*1000 mA h g*1 over 100 cycles) at a current density of 2.8 A g*1 (1 C). Capacities exceeding that of graphite could still be reached at cycle rates as high as 2 C. Real-time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that lithiation occurs five times faster in Si nanowires with significant amounts of Sn than in the Si nanowires without Sn, and twice as fast as in nanowires that were coated with carbon.

  19. Thin film microcalorimeter for heat capacity measurements from 1.5 to 800 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellman, Frances

    Thin film microcalorimeter for heat capacity measurements from 1.5 to 800 K , D. W. Denlinger, E. N for publication 13 January 1994) A new microcalorimeter for measuring heat capacity of thin films in the range 1 silicon nitride membrane as the sample substrate, a Pt thin film resistor for temperatures greater than 40

  20. Design of Low-Noise Output Amplifiers for P-channel Charge-Coupled Devices Fabricated on High-Resistivity Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haque, S.; Frost, F. Dion R.; Groulx, R.; Holland, S.E.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.F.; Roe, N. A.; Wang, G.; Yu, Y.

    2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the design and optimization of low-noise, single-stage output amplifiers for p-channel charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used for scientific applications in astronomy and other fields. The CCDs are fabricated on high-resistivity, 4000–5000 -cm, n-type silicon substrates. Single-stage amplifiers with different output structure designs and technologies have been characterized. The standard output amplifier is designed with an n{sup +} polysilicon gate that has a metal connection to the sense node. In an effort to lower the output amplifier readout noise by minimizing the capacitance seen at the sense node, buried-contact technology has been investigated. In this case, the output transistor has a p{sup +} polysilicon gate that connects directly to the p{sup +} sense node. Output structures with buried-contact areas as small as 2 ?m × 2 ?m are characterized. In addition, the geometry of the source-follower transistor was varied, and we report test results on the conversion gain and noise of the various amplifier structures. By use of buried-contact technology, better amplifier geometry, optimization of the amplifier biases and improvements in the test electronics design, we obtain a 45% reduction in noise, corresponding to 1.7 e{sup ?} rms at 70 kpixels/sec.

  1. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki [Dept. of Electron. Sci. Eng., Kyoto Univ. Kyotodaigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Dept. of Electron. Information Eng., Chubu Univ., 1200, Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze-Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto 601-8502 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  2. Capacity Markets for Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

  3. ORISE: Capacity Building

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute...

  4. Texturization of multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Dai-Yin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant efficiency gain for crystalline silicon solar cells can be achieved by surface texturization. This research was directed at developing a low-cost, high-throughput and reliable texturing method that can create ...

  5. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  6. Combustion Synthesis of Silicon Carbide 389 Combustion Synthesis of Silicon Carbide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    Combustion Synthesis of Silicon Carbide 389 X Combustion Synthesis of Silicon Carbide Alexander S. Mukasyan University of Notre Dame USA 1. Introduction Combustion synthesis (CS) is an effective technique by which combustion synthesis can occur: self - propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) and volume

  7. Lithium-Reactive Co3,,PO4...2 Nanoparticle Coating on High-Capacity LiNi0.8Co0.16Al0.04O2 Cathode Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    Lithium-Reactive Co3,,PO4...2 Nanoparticle Coating on High-Capacity LiNi0.8Co0.16Al0.04O2 Cathode 2 nanoparticle coating. As opposed to conventional coating methods, in which the coating material did not react with LiOH and Li2CO3 impurities dissolved from the cathode, the Co3 PO4 2 coating

  8. Passivated Tunneling Contacts to N-Type Wafer Silicon and Their Implementation into High Performance Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradins, P.; Essig, S.; Nemeth, W.; Lee, B. G.; Young, D.; Norman, A.; Liu, Y.; Luo, J.-W.; Warren, E.; Dameron, A.; LaSalvia, V.; Page, M.; Rohatgi, A.; Upadhyaya, A.; Rounsaville, B.; Ok, Y.-W.; Glunz, S.; Benick, J.; Feldmann, F.; Hermle, M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a case that passivated contacts based on a thin tunneling oxide layer, combined with a transport layer with properly selected work function and band offsets, can lead to high efficiency c-Si solar cells. Passivated contacts contribute to cell efficiency as well as design flexibility, process robustness, and a simplified process flow. Material choices for the transport layer are examined, including transparent n-type oxides and n+-doped poly-Si. SiO2/n+-poly-Si full-area, induced-junction back surface field contacts to n-FZ and n-Cz Si are incorporated into high efficiency cells with deep, passivated boron emitters.

  9. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  10. The Influence of High-Energy Lithium Ion Irradiation on Electrical Characteristics of Silicon and GaAs Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jayashree; Ramani; M. C. Radhakrishna; Anil Agrawal; Saif Ahmad Khan; A. Meulenberg

    2006-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-grade Si and GaAs solar cells were irradiated with 15 & 40 MeV Li ions. Illuminated (AM0 condition) and unilluminated I-V curves reveal that the effect of high-energy Li ion irradiation has produced similar effects to that of proton irradiation. However, an additional, and different, defect mechanism is suggested to dominate in the heavier-ion results. Comparison is made with proton-irradiated solar-cell work and with non-ionizing energy-loss (NIEL) radiation-damage models.

  11. Knudsen heat capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babac, Gulru, E-mail: babac@itu.edu.tr [Institute of Energy, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey)] [Institute of Energy, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Reese, Jason M. [School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a “Knudsen heat capacity” as a more appropriate and useful fluid property in micro/nanoscale gas systems than the constant pressure heat capacity. At these scales, different fluid processes come to the fore that are not normally observed at the macroscale. For thermodynamic analyses that include these Knudsen processes, using the Knudsen heat capacity can be more effective and physical. We calculate this heat capacity theoretically for non-ideal monatomic and diatomic gases, in particular, helium, nitrogen, and hydrogen. The quantum modification for para and ortho hydrogen is also considered. We numerically model the Knudsen heat capacity using molecular dynamics simulations for the considered gases, and compare these results with the theoretical ones.

  12. Large-Scale Fabrication, 3D Tomography, and Lithium-Ion Battery Application of Porous Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Large-Scale Fabrication, 3D Tomography, and Lithium-Ion Battery Application of Porous Silicon, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Recently, silicon-based lithium-ion battery anodes have for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries with enhanced capacity and energy density. KEYWORDS: Cost

  13. Silicon nanowire boost for rechargeable batteries Online Shop Contact us Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    that of graphite and close to the theoretical maximum. The nanowire battery also maintained its capacity over 10Silicon nanowire boost for rechargeable batteries Online Shop Contact us Advanced search Chemistry batteries 17 December 2007 Scientists in the US have devised an easy way of using silicon nanowires

  14. California: Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 10:17am Addthis Working with Nextval, Inc., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a Conducting Polymer Binder for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. With a...

  15. High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 1 September 2001--6 March 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives for the University of Toledo are to: (1) establish a transferable knowledge and technology base for fabricating high-efficiency triple-junction a-Si-based solar cells, and (2) develop high-rate deposition techniques for the growing a-Si-based and related alloys, including poly-Si, c-Si, a-SiGe, and a-Si films and photovoltaic devices with these materials.

  16. Holey Silicon as an Efficient Thermoelectric Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Jinyao; Wang, Hung-Ta; Hyun Lee, Dong; Fardy, Melissa; Huo, Ziyang; Russell, Thomas P.; Yang, Peidong

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigated the thermoelectric properties of thin silicon membranes that have been decorated with high density of nanoscopic holes. These ?holey silicon? (HS) structures were fabricated by either nanosphere or block-copolymer lithography, both of which are scalable for practical device application. By reducing the pitch of the hexagonal holey pattern down to 55 nm with 35percent porosity, the thermal conductivity of HS is consistently reduced by 2 orders of magnitude and approaches the amorphous limit. With a ZT value of 0.4 at room temperature, the thermoelectric performance of HS is comparable with the best value recorded in silicon nanowire system.

  17. Method of forming crystalline silicon devices on glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for fabricating single-crystal silicon microelectronic components on a silicon substrate and transferring same to a glass substrate. This is achieved by utilizing conventional silicon processing techniques for fabricating components of electronic circuits and devices on bulk silicon, wherein a bulk silicon surface is prepared with epitaxial layers prior to the conventional processing. The silicon substrate is bonded to a glass substrate and the bulk silicon is removed leaving the components intact on the glass substrate surface. Subsequent standard processing completes the device and circuit manufacturing. This invention is useful in applications requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, particularly for display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard electronics, and high temperature electronics. 7 figures.

  18. Method of forming crystalline silicon devices on glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating single-crystal silicon microelectronic components on a silicon substrate and transferring same to a glass substrate. This is achieved by utilizing conventional silicon processing techniques for fabricating components of electronic circuits and devices on bulk silicon, wherein a bulk silicon surface is prepared with epitaxial layers prior to the conventional processing. The silicon substrate is bonded to a glass substrate and the bulk silicon is removed leaving the components intact on the glass substrate surface. Subsequent standard processing completes the device and circuit manufacturing. This invention is useful in applications requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, particularly for display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard electronics, and high temperature electronics.

  19. Glass-silicon column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  20. Powerful, Efficient Electric Vehicle Chargers: Low-Cost, Highly-Integrated Silicon Carbide (SiC) Multichip Power Modules (MCPMs) for Plug-In Hybrid Electric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: Currently, charging the battery of an electric vehicle (EV) is a time-consuming process because chargers can only draw about as much power from the grid as a hair dryer. APEI is developing an EV charger that can draw as much power as a clothes dryer, which would drastically speed up charging time. APEI's charger uses silicon carbide (SiC)-based power transistors. These transistors control the electrical energy flowing through the charger's circuits more effectively and efficiently than traditional transistors made of straight silicon. The SiC-based transistors also require less cooling, enabling APEI to create EV chargers that are 10 times smaller than existing chargers.

  1. Black Silicon Enhanced Thin Film Silicon Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin U. Pralle; James E. Carey

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SiOnyx has developed an enhanced thin film silicon photovoltaic device with improved efficiency. Thin film silicon solar cells suffer from low material absorption characteristics resulting in poor cell efficiencies. SiOnyx’s approach leverages Black Silicon, an advanced material fabricated using ultrafast lasers. The laser treated films show dramatic enhancement in optical absorption with measured values in excess of 90% in the visible spectrum and well over 50% in the near infrared spectrum. Thin film Black Silicon solar cells demonstrate 25% higher current generation with almost no impact on open circuit voltage as compared with representative control samples. The initial prototypes demonstrated an improvement of nearly 2 percentage points in the suns Voc efficiency measurement. In addition we validated the capability to scale this processing technology to the throughputs (< 5 min/m2) required for volume production using state of the art commercially available high power industrial lasers. With these results we clearly demonstrate feasibility for the enhancement of thin film solar cells with this laser processing technique.

  2. Revitalize the US silicon/ferrosilicon industry through energy-efficient technology. Part 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, H.R.; Welborn, J.H.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is concluded that silicon metal and ferrosilicon can be very effectively produced in a DC submerged arc furnace. Specific energy consumption factors measured were favorable to the technology. Significant energy savings over conventional AC practice are likely. Hollow electrode feeding of the furnace does not appear feasible. Electrode consumption was 0.144 lbs/lb so silicon while making metal, much of which occurred above the burden pile. Silicon loss to fume averaged 19.5% of the silicon charge. In this furnace, 50% FeSi was more difficult to produce than silicon metal, and the furnace could not be run with full burden; it was operated successfully about 3/4 full. In the silicon metal portion, the furnace was operated in a fully submerged mode for several 3-day test campaigns. The industry must seriously consider the identified benefits of DC plasma arc technology for retrofit or new added silicon capacity.

  3. Refinery Capacity Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    by State as of January 1, 2006 PDF 5 Refiners' Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2006 PDF 6 Operable Crude Oil and Downstream Charge...

  4. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Capacity Report June 2014 With Data as of January 1, 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by...

  5. Forward capacity market CONEfusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, James F.

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

  6. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  7. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  8. Silicon rich nitride for silicon based laser devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Jae Hyung

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon based light sources, especially laser devices, are the key components required to achieve a complete integrated silicon photonics system. However, the fundamental physical limitation of the silicon material as light ...

  9. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal Immobilization, and Catalytic Applications. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal...

  10. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Robert A. (Albuquerque, NM); Seager, Carleton H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  11. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  12. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, R.W.

    1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

  13. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Robert W. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  14. Quantum Channel Capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graeme Smith

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum communication channel can be put to many uses: it can transmit classical information, private classical information, or quantum information. It can be used alone, with shared entanglement, or together with other channels. For each of these settings there is a capacity that quantifies a channel's potential for communication. In this short review, I summarize what is known about the various capacities of a quantum channel, including a discussion of the relevant additivity questions. I also give some indication of potentially interesting directions for future research.

  15. Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates with increased stability using the hot wire filament technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Molenbroek, Edith C. (Utrecht, NL); Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

    2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method or producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate, comprising the steps of: positioning the substrate in a deposition chamber at a distance of about 0.5 to 3.0 cm from a heatable filament in the deposition chamber; maintaining a pressure in said deposition chamber in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr and pressure times substrate-filament spacing in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr-cm, heating the filament to a temperature in the range of about 1,500 to 2,000.degree. C., and heating the substrate to a surface temperature in the range of about 280 to 475.degree. C.; and flowing silicohydride gas into the deposition chamber with said heated filament, decomposing said silicohydride gas into silicon and hydrogen atomic species and allowing products of gas reactions between said atomic species and the silicohydride gas to migrate to and deposit on said substrate while adjusting and maintaining said pressure times substrate-filament spacing in said deposition chamber at a value in said 10 to 100 millitorr range to produce statistically about 3 to 50 atomic collisions between the silicon and hydrogen atomic species migrating to said substrate and undecomposed molecules of the silane or other silicohydride gas in the deposition chamber.

  16. Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiang (Los Alamos, NM); Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  17. Method for forming silicon on a glass substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method by which single-crystal silicon microelectronics may be fabricated on glass substrates at unconventionally low temperatures. This is achieved by fabricating a thin film of silicon on glass and subsequently forming the doped components by a short wavelength (excimer) laser doping procedure and conventional patterning techniques. This method may include introducing a heavily boron doped etch stop layer on a silicon wafer using an excimer laser, which permits good control of the etch stop layer removal process. This method additionally includes dramatically reducing the remaining surface roughness of the silicon thin films after etching in the fabrication of silicon on insulator wafers by scanning an excimer laser across the surface of the silicon thin film causing surface melting, whereby the surface tension of the melt causes smoothing of the surface during recrystallization. Applications for this method include those requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, such as display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard and high temperature electronics.

  18. Structures And Magnetization Of Defect-Associated Sites In Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, L.; Gonzalez-Pons, J. C.; Barco, E. del [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Vanfleet, R. [Department of Physics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Misiuk, A. [Institute of Electron Technology (ITE), al. Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw 02-668 Poland (Poland); Barcz, A. [Institute of Electron Technology (ITE), al. Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw 02-668 Poland (Poland); Polish Academy of Science, Institute of Physics, al Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw 02-668 Poland (Poland); Choi, E. S. [NHMFL, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310-3706 (United States); Chai, G. [Apollo Technologies, Inc. 205 Waymont Court, Suite 111, Lake Mary, FL 32746 (United States)

    2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand the mechanism of the reported 'quasi-ferromagnetism' observed in Si ions self-implanted or irradiated silicon, we carry out high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), magnetization measurements using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements of the magnetic interaction of the defect-associated sites in silicon damaged by silicon self-implantation or energetic particle beams. The SQUID measurements showed that the silicon self-implanted sample has paramagnetic ordering. FMR measurements indicated the He{sup ++} irradiated sample has a ferromagnetic interaction and yields a Lande g-factor of 2.35.

  19. amorphous silicon carbide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The high power densities expected for the MIT microengine (silicon MEMS-based micro-gas turbine generator) require the turbine and compressor spool to rotate at a very high...

  20. ablating silicon carbide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The high power densities expected for the MIT microengine (silicon MEMS-based micro-gas turbine generator) require the turbine and compressor spool to rotate at a very high...

  1. advanced silicon carbide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The high power densities expected for the MIT microengine (silicon MEMS-based micro-gas turbine generator) require the turbine and compressor spool to rotate at a very high...

  2. advanced silicon processing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The high power densities expected for the MIT microengine (silicon MEMS-based micro-gas turbine generator) require the turbine and compressor spool to rotate at a very high...

  3. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kova?evi?, Goran, E-mail: gkova@irb.hr; Pivac, Branko [Department of Materials Physics, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijeni?ka 56, P.O.B. 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

  4. AMORPHOUS SILICON-BASED MINIMODULES WITH SILICONE ELASTOMER ENCAPSULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    -based polymers (silicones) may not show this effect. Although silicones were used to encapsulate solar cells improved, which may make them suitable for encapsulating solar cells once again. We have recentlyAMORPHOUS SILICON-BASED MINIMODULES WITH SILICONE ELASTOMER ENCAPSULATION Aarohi Vijh 1

  5. Amorphous silicon passivated contacts for diffused junction silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, J., E-mail: james.bullock@anu.edu.au; Yan, D.; Wan, Y.; Cuevas, A. [Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Demaurex, B.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; De Wolf, S. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of micro engineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronic Laboratory, Maladière 71, CH-200 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Carrier recombination at the metal contacts is a major obstacle in the development of high-performance crystalline silicon homojunction solar cells. To address this issue, we insert thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon [a-Si:H(i)] passivating films between the dopant-diffused silicon surface and aluminum contacts. We find that with increasing a-Si:H(i) interlayer thickness (from 0 to 16?nm) the recombination loss at metal-contacted phosphorus (n{sup +}) and boron (p{sup +}) diffused surfaces decreases by factors of ?25 and ?10, respectively. Conversely, the contact resistivity increases in both cases before saturating to still acceptable values of ? 50 m? cm{sup 2} for n{sup +} and ?100 m? cm{sup 2} for p{sup +} surfaces. Carrier transport towards the contacts likely occurs by a combination of carrier tunneling and aluminum spiking through the a-Si:H(i) layer, as supported by scanning transmission electron microscopy–energy dispersive x-ray maps. We explain the superior contact selectivity obtained on n{sup +} surfaces by more favorable band offsets and capture cross section ratios of recombination centers at the c-Si/a-Si:H(i) interface.

  6. Silicon optical nanocrystal memory R. J. Walters,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    Silicon optical nanocrystal memory R. J. Walters,a) P. G. Kik, J. D. Casperson, and H. A. Atwater (Received 19 January 2004; accepted 22 July 2004) We describe the operation of a silicon optical nanocrystal memory device. The programmed logic state of the device is read optically by the detection of high or low

  7. Method for improving the stability of amorphous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard M.

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a metastable degradation resistant amorphous hydrogenated silicon film is provided, which comprises the steps of growing a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, the film having an exposed surface, illuminating the surface using an essentially blue or ultraviolet light to form high densities of a light induced defect near the surface, and etching the surface to remove the defect.

  8. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide: Introduction to structured graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide: Introduction to structured graphene Ming Ruan 1 , Yike Hu 1, France Abstract We present an introduction to the rapidly growing field of epitaxial graphene on silicon present, highly evolved state. The potential of epitaxial graphene as a new electronic material is now

  9. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as an electrode in field emission applications. In this project, the formation of a CoSi2, conducting layer on porous silicon by high dose ion implantation while preserving the pore structure and field emission properties of the underlying porous silicon...

  10. Microchannel Systems in Titanium and Silicon for Structural and Mechanical Studies of Aligned Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    Microchannel Systems in Titanium and Silicon for Structural and Mechanical Studies of Aligned, such as F-actin bundles and microtubules, in a surface-modified titanium or silicon microfluidic device-modified devices produced via a high aspect ratio etch process in titanium and silicon can be used to confine

  11. GHZ ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON SILICON DIOXIDE MICRO BRIDGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, William C

    1 GHZ ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON SILICON DIOXIDE MICRO BRIDGES SHENG F. YEN1 of an approach to reduce the high-frequency capacitive feedthrough and dielectric leakages of carbon nanotubes grown on silicon dioxide micro bridges suspended over silicon substrates. The microwave reflection

  12. Transition metal co-precipitation mechanisms in silicon T. Buonassisi a,*, M. Heuer a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Argonne, IL 60439, USA Received 14 March 2007; received in revised form 9 July 2007; accepted 11 July 2007­silicon droplets may form within the silicon matrix, possibly with the potential to getter additional metal atoms is key to achieving high per- formance silicon-based devices, e.g., integrated circuits and solar cells

  13. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  14. Device Architecture Simplification of Laser Pattering in High-Volume Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication using Intensive Computation for Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grupp Mueller, Guenther [SolarWorld; Herfurth, Hans [Fraunhofer CLT; Dunham, Scott [University of Washington; Xu, Baomin [PARC

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prices of Si based solar modules have been continuously declining in recent years. Goodrich is pointing out that a significant portion of these cost reductions have come about due to ?economies of scale? benefits, but there is a point of diminishing returns when trying to lower cost by simply expanding production capacity [1]. Developing innovative high volume production technologies resulting in an increase of conversion efficiency without adding significant production cost will be necessary to continue the projected cost reductions. The Foundational Program to Advance Cell Efficiency (F-PACE) is seeking to achieve this by closing the PV efficiency gap between theoretical achievable maximum conversion efficiency - 29% for c-Si - and the current typical production - 18.5% for a typical full area back contact c-Si Solar cell ? while targeting a module cost of $0.50/Watt . The research conducted by SolarWorldUSA and it?s partners within the FPACE framework focused on the development of a Hybrid metal-wrap-through (MWT) and laser-ablated PERC solar cell design employing a extrusion metallization scheme to achieve >20% efficient devices. The project team was able to simulate, develop and demonstrate the technologies necessary to build p-type MWT PERC cells with extruded front contacts. Conversion efficiencies approaching 20% were demonstrated and a path for further efficiency improvements identified. A detailed cost of ownership calculation for such a device was based on a NREL cost model and is predicting a $/Watt cost below 85 cents on a 180 micron substrate. Several completed or planned publications by SolarWorldUSA and our partners are based on the research conducted within this project and are adding to a better understanding of the involved technologies and materials. Several aspects and technologies of the proposed device have been assessed in regards to technical effectiveness and economic feasibility. It has been shown in a pilot demonstration with wafer thicknesses down to 120 micron that further wafer thickness reduction is only economically viable if handling and contact formation limitations are addressed simultaneously. Furthermore the project partners assessed and demonstrated the feasibility of processing wafers with vias connecting front and back sides through a PERC cell process and aligning and connecting those vias with a non-contact metallization. A close cooperation between industry and institutes of higher education in the Pacific Northwest as shown in this project is of direct benefit to the public and is contributing to the education of the next generation of PV engineers and scientist.

  15. Efficient power coupling to waveguides in high index contrast systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Victor T. (Victor Trinh)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future integrated optical circuits will hold, on a single chip, several optical components that communicate via high index contrast waveguides. Silicon nitride (SixNy) and silicon oxynitride (SixOyNz) waveguides with silicon ...

  16. Impact of surface roughness on the electrical parameters of industrial high efficiency NaOH-NaOCl textured multicrystalline silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, P.K. [Department of Physics, Echelon Institute of Technology, Faridabad 121002, Haryana (India); Pujahari, R.M. [Department of Physics, Echelon Institute of Technology, Faridabad 121002, Haryana (India); Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Kaur, Harpreet [Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Department of Physics, Advanced Institute of Technology and Management, Palwal 121105, Haryana (India); Singh, Devi [Department of Physics, Manav Rachna International University, Faridabad 121001, Haryana (India); Varandani, D.; Mehta, B.R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution (1:1 ratio by volume) based texturization process at 80-82 C is an easy, low cost and comparatively new and convenient option for fabrication of any multicrystalline silicon (mC-Si) solar cell. In the present study atomic force microscope is used to observe the intragrain surface in a miniscule area (3 {mu}m x 3 {mu}m) of NaOH-NaOCl textured surface by two and three dimensional analysis, roughness analysis and section analysis. The r.m.s value of the surface parameter of 7.0 nm ascertains the smoothness of the textured surface and further the surface reflectivity is minimized to 4-6% in the 500-1000 nm wavelength range by a proper silicon nitride anti-reflection coating. Comparing with the standard HF-HNO{sub 3}-CH{sub 3}COOH acid textured cell, the NaOH-NaOCl textured cell shows a comparatively lower value of series resistance of 7.17 m{omega}, higher value of shunt resistance of 18.4 {omega} to yield a fill factor of 0.766 leading to more than 15% cell efficiency in the industrial cell processing line. This AFM study yields different surface roughness parameters for the NaOH-NaOCl textured wafers which can be used as a reference standard for optimized texturing. (author)

  17. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity Report

  18. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity Report5

  19. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity

  20. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity Operable

  1. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity

  2. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity onThousand(Dollars2009Rail

  3. Refinery Capacity Report Historical

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity onThousand(Dollars2009Rail

  4. ORISE: Capacity Building

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project *1980-1981 U.S.CapabilitiesCapacity Building

  5. Light Ions Response of Silicon Carbide Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. De Napoli; G. Raciti; E. Rapisarda; C. Sfienti

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide (SiC) Schottky diodes 21 mum thick with small surfaces and high N-dopant concentration have been used to detect alpha particles and low energy light ions. In particular 12C and 16O beams at incident energies between 5 and 18 MeV were used. The diode active-region depletion-thickness, the linearity of the response, energy resolution and signal rise-time were measured for different values of the applied reverse bias. Moreover the radiation damage on SiC diodes irradiated with 53 MeV 16O beam has been explored. The data show that SiC material is radiation harder than silicon but at least one order of magnitude less hard than epitaxial silicon diodes. An inversion in the signal was found at a fluence of 10^15 ions/cm^2.

  6. Optical properties of nanostructured silicon-rich silicon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolfi, Michael Anthony

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a study of the optical properties of sputtered silicon-rich silicon dioxide (SRO) thin films with specific application for the fabrication of erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers and lasers, polarization ...

  7. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  8. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, George C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  9. Safety profile, efficacy, and biodistribution of a bicistronic high-capacity adenovirus vector encoding a combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy as a prelude to a phase I clinical trial for glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puntel, Mariana [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Ghulam, Muhammad A.K.M. [Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Farrokhi, Catherine [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); VanderVeen, Nathan; Paran, Christopher; Appelhans, Ashley [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Kroeger, Kurt M.; Salem, Alireza [Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Lacayo, Liliana [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Pechnick, Robert N. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kelson, Kyle R.; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Kennedy, Sean [Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip [Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); and others

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their high transduction efficiency; however, their clinical usefulness has been hampered by their immunogenicity and the presence of anti-Ad immunity in humans. We reported the efficacy of a gene therapy approach for glioma consisting of intratumoral injection of Ads encoding conditionally cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase (Ad-TK) and the immunostimulatory cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand 3 (Ad-Flt3L). Herein, we report the biodistribution, efficacy, and neurological and systemic effects of a bicistronic high-capacity Ad, i.e., HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L. HC-Ads elicit sustained transgene expression, even in the presence of anti-Ad immunity, and can encode large therapeutic cassettes, including regulatory elements to enable turning gene expression “on” or “off” according to clinical need. The inclusion of two therapeutic transgenes within a single vector enables a reduction of the total vector load without adversely impacting efficacy. Because clinically the vectors will be delivered into the surgical cavity, normal regions of the brain parenchyma are likely to be transduced. Thus, we assessed any potential toxicities elicited by escalating doses of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L (1 × 10{sup 8}, 1 × 10{sup 9}, or 1 × 10{sup 10} viral particles [vp]) delivered into the rat brain parenchyma. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points. The results indicate that doses up to 1 × 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered into the normal rat brain and underpin further developments for its implementation in a phase I clinical trial for glioma. - Highlights: ? High capacity Ad vectors elicit sustained therapeutic gene expression in the brain. ? HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L encodes two therapeutic genes and a transcriptional switch. ? We performed a dose escalation study at acute and chronic time points. ? Doses up to 1 × 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered in the brain. ? Efficacy and safety of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L merits its use in a GBM Phase I trial.

  10. aluminum silicon titanium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 7 HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID Renewable Energy Websites Summary:...

  11. Simulation of iron impurity gettering in crystalline silicon solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Douglas M. (Douglas Michael)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work discusses the Impurity-to-Efficiency (12E) simulation tool and applet. The 12E simulator models the physics of iron impurity gettering in silicon solar cells during high temperature processing. The tool also ...

  12. Rapid Wolff–Kishner reductions in a silicon carbide microreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wolff–Kishner reductions are performed in a novel silicon carbide microreactor. Greatly reduced reaction times and safer operation are achieved, giving high yields without requiring a large excess of hydrazine. The corrosion ...

  13. Reactor physics assessment of thick silicon carbide clad PWR fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloore, David A. (David Allan)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity make silicon carbide (SiC) a potential fuel cladding material that may improve the economics and safety of light water reactors (LWRs). "Thick" SiC ...

  14. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  15. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Silvan

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization ...

  16. Developing High Capacity, Long Life Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2000 25000 30000 35000 40000 1578 G Intensity Raman Shift cm -1 1340 D Two Raman scattering peaks at 1578 and 1340 cm -1 are assigned as G and D band, respectively. ...

  17. Developing High Capacity, Long Life Anodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    interactions with DOE's User Facilities and personnel. - on going. * X-ray absorption studies on BATT materials at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS) and HR-TEM at...

  20. On the Capacity of Hybrid Wireless Networks Benyuan Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    On the Capacity of Hybrid Wireless Networks Benyuan Liu , Zhen Liu + , Don Towsley Department 704 Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 Abstract-- We study the throughput capacity of hybrid wireless networks stations are assumed to be connected by a high-bandwidth wired network and act as relays for wireless nodes

  1. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medernach, John W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  2. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  3. Silicon on insulator achieved using electrochemical etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk crystalline silicon wafers are transferred after the completion of circuit fabrication to form thin films of crystalline circuitry on almost any support, such as metal, semiconductor, plastic, polymer, glass, wood, and paper. In particular, this technique is suitable to form silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers, whereby the devices and circuits formed exhibit superior performance after transfer due to the removal of the silicon substrate. The added cost of the transfer process to conventional silicon fabrication is insignificant. No epitaxial, lift-off, release or buried oxide layers are needed to perform the transfer of single or multiple wafers onto support members. The transfer process may be performed at temperatures of 50.degree. C. or less, permits transparency around the circuits and does not require post-transfer patterning. Consequently, the technique opens up new avenues for the use of integrated circuit devices in high-brightness, high-resolution video-speed color displays, reduced-thickness increased-flexibility intelligent cards, flexible electronics on ultrathin support members, adhesive electronics, touch screen electronics, items requiring low weight materials, smart cards, intelligent keys for encryption systems, toys, large area circuits, flexible supports, and other applications. The added process flexibility also permits a cheap technique for increasing circuit speed of market driven technologies such as microprocessors at little added expense.

  4. European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Frankfurt, Germany, 24-28 September 2012, 2AO.2.4 HIGH EFFICIENCY BACK-CONTACT BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELLS WITH CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    27th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Frankfurt, Germany, 24-28 September 2012, 2AO.2 cost of energy in photovoltaics can be achieved by increasing the conversion efficiency as well into the surface of a thick silicon wafer. After sintering at 1100 °C in hydrogen atmosphere silicon is grown

  5. Fabrication of porous silicon membranes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue, Wing Kong

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Porous silicon layer is formed by the local dissolution which is initiated by the surface layer and is promoted by the hindrance layers composed of the silicic acid. Local etching or local dissolution is the cause of forming porous structure... of pores were 25 to 45 A with a mean value of 38 A. Microstructure of porous silicon studied by Besle et al. showed two distinct 17 patterns: the structure pattern of porous silicon film on heavily doped silicon and that on slightly doped silicon [26...

  6. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  7. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  8. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate is disclosed, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27--730 C is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including HETEROJUNCTION-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  9. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Truher, Joel B. (San Rafael, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27.degree.-730.degree. C. is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including hetero-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  10. Silicon And Silicon-germanium Epitaxy For Quantum Dot Device Fabrications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as they provide highly tunable structures for trapping and manipu- lating individual electrons/silicon- germanium material heterosystem. We describe the growth of two-dimensional electron gas structures advisor Professor James C. Sturm, whose perpetual enthusiasm, stimulating insight, and constant

  11. Seismic behavior of structural silicone glazing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarghamee, M.S.; Schwartz, T.A. [Simpson Gumpertz and Heger Inc., Arlington, MA (United States); Gladstone, M. [Dow Corning Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In seismic events, glass curtain walls undergo racking deformation, while the flat glass lites do not rack due to their high shear stiffness. If the glass curtain wall is not isolated from the building frame by specifically designed connections that accommodate relative motion, seismic racking motion of the building frame will demand significant resiliency of the sealant that secures the glass to the curtain wall framing. In typical four-sided structural silicone glazing systems used in buildings with unbraced moment frames, the magnitude of seismic racking is likely to stress the sealants significantly beyond the sealant design strength. In this paper, the extent of the expected seismic racking motion, the behavior of the structural silicone glazing when subjected to the expected racking motion, and the field performance of a building with four-sided structural silicone glazing during the Northridge earthquake are discussed. The details of a curtain wall design concept consisting of shop-glazed subframes connected to the building frame and the connections that accommodate seismic motion of the subframe relative to the building frame is developed. Specific recommendations are made for the design of the four-sided structural silicone glazing systems for seismic loads.

  12. Hybrid Silicon Evanescent Lasers John E. Bowersa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    [2]. Finally a 110 nm thick n-doped InP spacer is used as a bonding interface to silicon. The silicon factors of the silicon waveguide and the QWs can be manipulated by the silicon waveguide dimensions silicon waveguide. For the fabricated waveguide dimensions of a 0.7 µm height (H) and 0.6 µm rib

  13. A California generation capacity market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conkling, R.L.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California, overconfident with its new Power Exchange spot market, seems unaware that it could be afflicted by the same turmoil that bludgeoned the Midwest in June. An electricity capacity market should be put in place before crisis strikes. This article outlines a framework for adding an electricity capacity market in California. The new market would not create a new bureaucracy but would function within the state`s now operational PX and independent system operator (ISO) mechanisms. It would be an open market, in which capacity would be traded transparently, with freedom of entree for all willing sellers and all willing buyers.

  14. Atmospheric ageing of nanosized silicon nitride powders Janos Szepvolgyi,*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    . Introduction Silicon nitride powders produced in high temperature thermal plasmas by the vapour phase reaction of silicon tetrachloride and ammonia have many interesting properties including high purity, mainly amorphous powders subjected to atmospheric ageing, including amino, hydroxy and silanol groups, adsorbed CO2

  15. Analysis of system wide distortion in an integrated power system utilizing a high voltage DC bus and silicon carbide power devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fallier, William F. (William Frederick)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research investigates the distortion on the electrical distribution system for a high voltage DC Integrated Power System (IPS). The analysis was concentrated on the power supplied to a propulsion motor driven by an ...

  16. Efficient Wavelength Tuning Techniques for Integrated Silicon Photonics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titriku, Alex K

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    based on microring resonator devices offer a low-area and energy-efficient approach to realize both high-speed modulation and WDM with high-speed transmit-side ring modulators and high-Q receive-side drop filters. At the heart of silicon photonics...

  17. Porous Doped Silicon Nanowires for Lithium Ion Battery Anode with Long Cycle Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Porous Doped Silicon Nanowires for Lithium Ion Battery Anode with Long Cycle Life Mingyuan Ge material in a lithium ion battery. Even after 250 cycles, the capacity remains stable above 2000, 1600 in energy storage has stimulated significant interest in lithium ion battery research. The lithium ion

  18. Status and Future of Silicon Photovoltaics Presented at: Renewable energies in the service of humanity: the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    at a time 0.5 watts each $100/watt $200/watt Wafered Silicon Process Polysilicon Wafer Solar Cell Solar companies Oil companies Japanese companies Japanese roof program German FIT #12;0,60 6,00 60,00 1 10 100 Shortage Excess Capacity 81% Progress Ratio Historical Module Price Experience Curve #12;Solar PV History

  19. Making silicon stronger.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyce, Brad Lee

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon microfabrication has seen many decades of development, yet the structural reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is far from optimized. The fracture strength of Si MEMS is limited by a combination of poor toughness and nanoscale etch-induced defects. A MEMS-based microtensile technique has been used to characterize the fracture strength distributions of both standard and custom microfabrication processes. Recent improvements permit 1000's of test replicates, revealing subtle but important deviations from the commonly assumed 2-parameter Weibull statistical model. Subsequent failure analysis through a combination of microscopy and numerical simulation reveals salient aspects of nanoscale flaw control. Grain boundaries, for example, suffer from preferential attack during etch-release thereby forming failure-critical grain-boundary grooves. We will discuss ongoing efforts to quantify the various factors that affect the strength of polycrystalline silicon, and how weakest-link theory can be used to make worst-case estimates for design.

  20. Fabrication and properties of microporous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Jianzhong

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microporous silicon layers were fabricated by electrochemical etching of single crystalline silicon wafers in HF-ethanol solutions. The pore properties of porous silicon were examined by physical adsorption of nitrogen and the relationship between...

  1. Fabrication and properties of microporous silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Jianzhong

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microporous silicon layers were fabricated by electrochemical etching of single crystalline silicon wafers in HF-ethanol solutions. The pore properties of porous silicon were examined by physical adsorption of nitrogen and the relationship between...

  2. Vertical silicon nanowire arrays for gas sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hangbo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to fabricate and characterize vertically aligned silicon nanowire gas sensors. Silicon nanowires are very attractive for gas sensing applications and vertically aligned silicon nanowires are ...

  3. Fabrication of porous silicon membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue, Wing Kong

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiencies. The silicon difluoride, SiFq, is an unstable substance. It reacts with hydrofluoric acid forming silicic acid (HqSiFs) and hydrogen gas(Hq): SiFs + 2HF ? & SiF4+ Hs, (2) Si F4 + 2 H F ~ Hr Si Fs. In dilute HF solution, silicon can also react.... In step 1, the surface of silicon is covered with fluorine ions. In step 2, when an electric field is applied across the interface, holes move towards the surface. In step 3, some of the holes are trapped at the surface, and they weaken the silicon...

  4. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  5. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  6. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  7. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  8. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

  9. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing,more »between the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection.« less

  10. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing, between the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection.

  11. Process feasibility study in support of silicon material Task I. Final report, October 1, 1975-February 6, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Li, K.Y.; Hopper, J.R.; Fang, C.S.; Hansen, K.C.

    1981-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project is directed toward effective cost reduction in the production of silicon for solar cells. Results are presented for process system properties, chemical engineering and economic analyses of the new technologies and processes being developed for the production of lower cost silicon for solar cells. Major physical, thermodynamic and transport property data are reported for the following silicon source and processing chemical materials: silane, silicon tetrachloride, trichlorosilane, dichlorosilane, silicon tetrafluoride, and silicon. The property data are reported for critical temperature, critical pressure, critical volume, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, heat capacity, density, surface tension, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat of formation and Gibb's free energy of formation. Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1000 MT/yr capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished for the following processes: UCC silane process for silicon, BCL process for silicon, conventional polysilicon process (Siemens technology), SiI/sub 4/ decomposition process, and DCS process (dichlorosilane).Major activities in chemical engineering analyses include base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provides detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process. Using detailed data from the process design package, economic analyses for a 1000 MT/yr silicon plant were accomplished. Primary results from the economic analyses included plant capital investment and product cost. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  12. Philips Lumileds Is Exploring the Use of Silicon Substrates to Lower the Cost of LEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Philips Lumileds is exploring the use of nitride epitaxy on 150mm silicon substrates to produce low-cost, warm-white, high-performance general-illumination LEDs. Most LEDs are made with C-plane sapphire substrates, but silicon—at roughly half a penny per square millimeter—is much cheaper, and it's also easier to obtain. Philips Lumileds is attempting to adapt the use of silicon to the manufacture of LEDs, drawing upon the knowledge base and depreciated equipment of the computer industry, which has been using silicon substrates for decades.

  13. Silicon carbide process development for microengine applications : residual stress control and microfabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Dongwon, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high power densities expected for the MIT microengine (silicon MEMS-based micro-gas turbine generator) require the turbine and compressor spool to rotate at a very high speed at elevated temperatures (1300 to 1700 K). ...

  14. Reuse Distance Based Circuit Replacement in Silicon Photonic Interconnection Networks for HPC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    -scale distance, can help to further scale data-movement capabilities in high performance computing (HPC demands within high performance computing (HPC) systems. Silicon photonic (SiP) interconnects [1-3], which

  15. Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Timothy D.; Oka, Daichi; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have emerged as a leading candidate for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes. However, the low electrical conductivity of Si requires the use of conductive additives in the anode film. Here we report a solution-based synthesis of Si nanowires with a conductive carbon skin. Without any conductive additive, the Si nanowire electrodes exhibited capacities of over 2000 mA h g-1 for 100 cycles when cycled at C/10 and over 1200 mA h g-1 when cycled more rapidly at 1C against Li metal.. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation reveals that the carbon skin performs dual roles: it speeds lithiation of the Si nanowires significantly, while also constraining the final volume expansion. The present work sheds light on ways to optimize lithium battery performance by smartly tailoring the nanostructure of composition of materials based on silicon and carbon.

  16. Method for forming silicon on a glass substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method by which single-crystal silicon microelectronics may be fabricated on glass substrates at unconventionally low temperatures. This is achieved by fabricating a thin film of silicon on glass and subsequently forming the doped components by a short wavelength (excimer) laser doping procedure and conventional patterning techniques. This method may include introducing a heavily boron doped etch stop layer on a silicon wafer using an excimer laser, which permits good control of the etch stop layer removal process. This method additionally includes dramatically reducing the remaining surface roughness of the silicon thin films after etching in the fabrication of silicon on insulator wafers by scanning an excimer laser across the surface of the silicon thin film causing surface melting, whereby the surface tension of the melt causes smoothing of the surface during recrystallization. Applications for this method include those requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, such as display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard and high temperature electronics. 15 figs.

  17. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

    1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

  18. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Carapella, Jeffrey C. (Evergreen, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH.sub.4) over a high temperature, 2000.degree. C., tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400.degree. C., substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20-30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content.

  19. EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 16: Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    ;3 Screen Printed Solar Cells · Firing the contacts ­ The furnace heats the cell to a high temperature by Efficiency 22 Rear Panel before Lamination 23 Buried Contact Solar Cells · High Efficiency · Laser groved1 EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 16: Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication Techniques Dr. Todd J. Kaiser

  20. High Power, Linear CMOS Power Amplifier for WLAN Applications /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afsahi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components in silicon, achieving a high power enhancement ratio from a single stage LC matching network or single transformer

  1. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  2. In-situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy observation of silicon nanocrystal nucleation in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, T. C.-J., E-mail: terry.yang@unsw.edu.au; Wu, L.; Lin, Z.; Jia, X.; Puthen-Veettil, B.; Zhang, T.; Conibeer, G.; Perez-Wurfl, I. [School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Kauffmann, Y.; Rothschild, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix was observed at temperatures as low as 450?°C. This was achieved by aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with real-time in-situ heating up to 600?°C. This technique is a valuable characterization tool especially with the recent interest in Si nanostructures for light emitting devices, non-volatile memories, and third-generation photovoltaics which all typically require a heating step in their fabrication. The control of size, shape, and distribution of the Si nanocrystals are critical for these applications. This experimental study involves in-situ observation of the nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix fabricated through radio frequency co-sputtering. The results show that the shapes of Si nanocrystals in amorphous SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrices are irregular and not spherical, in contrast to many claims in the literature. Furthermore, the Si nanocrystals are well confined within their layers by the amorphous SiO{sub 2}. This study demonstrates the potential of in-situ HRTEM as a tool to observe the real time nucleation of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} bilayered matrix. Furthermore, ideas for improvements on this in-situ heating HRTEM technique are discussed.

  3. Growth of GaN Thin Films on Silicon Using Single Source Precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boo, Jin-Hyo

    Growth of GaN Thin Films on Silicon Using Single Source Precursors and Development of New We have grown the GaN thin films on silicon substrates using the newly developed single source precursors by thermal MOCVD method. Highly oriented GaN thin films in the [002] direction with hexagonal

  4. High-Rate, High-Capacity Binder-Free Electrode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electrode 4 Why it is better than other technologies Carbon Nanotubes Composite Materials C. Ban, Z. Wu, LChen, Y. Yan and A.C. Dillon Adv. Mat., 2010 Vol22,...

  5. Silicon nitride ceramic comprising samaria and ytterbia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeckley, Russell L. (Oakham, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising samaria and ytterbia for enhanced toughness.

  6. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schriver, Maria Christine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Photovoltaic Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Amorphous Silicon as a Photovoltaic Material 2.1.2ii Photovoltaic Model . . . . . . . . . . .

  7. Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    utility customers. Using a hybrid energy resource optimization framework, we explore optimal configurationKampung Capacity Local Solutions for Sustainable Rural Energy in the Baram River Basin, Sarawak Energy Laboratory (RAEL) & Energy and Resources Group and Goldman School of Public Policy Release Date

  8. Data aggregation for capacity management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yong Woo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a methodology for data aggregation for capacity management. It is assumed that there are a very large number of products manufactured in a company and that every product is stored in the database with its standard unit per hour...

  9. Strain control of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on silicon (111) by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aidam, Rolf; Diwo, Elke; Rollbuehler, Nicola; Kirste, Lutz; Benkhelifa, Fouad [Fraunhofer-Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the use of plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy of AlGaN/GaN-based high electron mobility transistor structures grown on 4 in. Si (111) substrates. In situ measurements of wafer curvature during growth proved to be a very powerful method to analyze the buffer layer's thickness dependent strain. The Ga/N ratio at the beginning of growth of the GaN buffer layer is the critical parameter to control the compressive strain of the entire grown structure. An engineered amount of compressive strain must be designed into the structure to perfectly compensate for the tensile strain caused by differences in the thermal expansion coefficient between the epi-layer and substrate during sample cool down from growth temperatures. A maximum film thickness of 4.2 {mu}m was achieved without the formation of any cracks and a negligible bow of the wafers below 10 {mu}m. Measurement of the as-grown wafers revealed depth profiles of the charge carrier concentration comparable to values achieved on SiC substrates and mobility values of the two dimensional electron gas in the range 1230 to 1350 cm{sup 2}/Vs at a charge carrier concentration of 6.5-7 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}. First results on processed wafers with 2 {mu}m thick buffer layer indicate very promising results with a resistance of the buffer, measured on 200 {mu}m long contacts with 15 {mu}m pitch, in the range of R > 10{sup 9}{Omega} at 100 V and breakdown voltages up to 550 V.

  10. Process for producing organic products containing silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and organic amines and products formed thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1988-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity organic reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon. The process comprises reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity reactive amine reactant in a liquid state at a temperature of from about O/degree/C up to about 300/degree/C. A high purity silicon carbide/silicon nitride ceramic product can be formed from this intermediate product, if desired, by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200-1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours or the organic reaction product may be employed in other chemical uses.

  11. The Capacity Loss of Dense Constellations Tobias Koch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    high SNR, our results recover the power loss of 1.53dB for square signal constellations without-noise channels for suitably high signal- to-noise ratio. Our expression for the capacity loss recovers the power loss of 1.53dB for square signal constellations. I. INTRODUCTION As it is well known, the channel

  12. Development of large-capacity gas-insulated transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, E.; Tanaka, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Japan)] [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Japan); Toda, K.; Ikeda, M.; Teranishi, T.; Inaba, M.; Yanari, T. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)] [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of population and business activities result in high electricity demand in urban areas. This requires the construction of large-capacity underground substations. Oilless, non-flammable and non-explosive equipment is recommended for underground substations. Therefore, several types of large-capacity gas-insulated transformer have been developed. Because the gas forced cooling type was considered to be available up to approximately 60 MVA, all of these gas-insulated transformers are liquid cooled. But the liquid cooling type has the disadvantage of a complex structure for liquid cooling. For this reason, the authors have been studying the development of a simple design for a gas forced cooling, large-capacity gas-insulated transformer. This paper discusses research and development of cooling and insulation technology for a large-capacity gas-insulated transformer and the development of a 275 kV, 300 MVA gas-insulated transformer.

  13. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kun Hyung [Korea Gas Corporation, Incheon, 406-130 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  14. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar (Pleasantville, NY); Holland, Orin Wayne (Lenoir City, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  15. Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin . Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin . Abstract: Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have...

  16. Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2002--28 February 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Narayanan, M.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objectives of this program were to continue advances of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The Program included work in the following areas. (1) Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations. (2) Developing wire saws to slice 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers on 290-..mu..m-centers. (3) Developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers. (4) Developing cell processes using 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%. (5) Expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control. (6) Establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology. (7) Facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock..

  17. Production of solar grade (SoG) silicon by refining liquid metallurgical grade (MG) silicon: Annual Report: June 10 1998--October 19, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khattak, C.P.; Joyce, D.B.; Schmid, F.

    1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyro-metallurgical refining techniques are being developed for use with molten metallurgical-grade (MG) silicon so that directionally solidified refined MG silicon can be used as solar-grade (SoG) silicon feedstock for photovoltaic applications. The most problematic impurity elements are B and P because of their high segregation coefficients. Refining processes such as evacuation, formation of impurity complexes, oxidation of impurities, and slagging have been effective in removal of impurities from MG silicon. Charge sizes have been scaled up to 60 kg. Impurity analysis of 60-kg charges after refining and directional solidification has shown reduction of most impurities to <1 ppma and B and P to the 10-ppma level. It has been demonstrated that B and P, as well as other impurities, can be reduced from MG silicon. Further reduction of impurities will be necessary for use as SoG silicon. The procedures developed are simple and scaleable to larger charge sizes and carried out in a foundry or MG silicon production plant. Therefore, SoG silicon production using these procedures should be at low cost.

  18. Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.

  19. Arnold Schwarzenegger SINGLE CRYSTAL SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this report. #12;ENERGY INNOVATIONS SMALL GRANT (EISG) PROGRAM INDEPENDENT ASSESSMENT REPORT (IAR) SINGLEArnold Schwarzenegger Governor SINGLE CRYSTAL SILICON SHEET GROWTH Prepared For: California Energy Commission Energy Innovations Small Grant Program Prepared By: Energy Materials Research

  20. Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Niedermayr; Kirill Lakhmanskiy; Muir Kumph; Stefan Partel; Johannes Edlinger; Michael Brownnutt; Rainer Blatt

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

  1. Optically initiated silicon carbide high voltage switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA); Sullivan, James S. (Livermore, CA); Sanders; David M. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved photoconductive switch having a SiC or other wide band gap substrate material, such as GaAs and field-grading liners composed of preferably SiN formed on the substrate adjacent the electrode perimeters or adjacent the substrate perimeters for grading the electric fields.

  2. High-purity, isotopically enriched bulk silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Russia. The stated isotope enrichments are summarized inenrichments >99% have been achieved for each isotope andthe enrichment is highest, are presented. isotope at. % nat.

  3. Silicon carbide oxidation in high temperature steam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Ramsey Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial nuclear power industry is continually looking for ways to improve reactor productivity and efficiency and to increase reactor safety. A concern that is closely regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ...

  4. (Preoxidation cleaning optimization for crystalline silicon)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of controlled experiments has been performed in Sandia's Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory to evaluate the effect of various chemical surface treatments on the recombination lifetime of crystalline silicon wafers subjected to a high-temperature dry oxidation. From this series of experiments we have deduced a relatively simple yet effective cleaning sequence. We have also evaluated the effect of different chemical damage-removal etches for improving the recombination lifetime and surface smoothness of mechanically lapped wafers. This paper presents the methodology used, the experimental results obtained, and our experience with using this process on a continuing basis over a period of many months. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell Alloy Anodes Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic...

  6. Capacity expansion in contemporary telecommunication networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivaraman, Raghavendran

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study three capacity expansion problems in contemporary long distance telecommunication networks. The first two problems, motivated by a major long distance provider, address capacity expansion in national hybrid long ...

  7. FURTHER EXPERIMENTS IN FISHWAY CAPACITY, 1957

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capacity trials 7 Maximum entry and exit 7 Entry capacity 8 Maximum number of fish present in the fishway 8 on 16 and a mean depth of 6. 3 feet. Maximum observed entry and exit of salmonids are discussed

  8. Intermediate Band Properties of Femtosecond-Laser Hyperdoped Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    . The high concentration of dopants forms an intermediate band (IB), instead of discrete energy levels exhibits broad-band light absorption to wavelengths deep below the corresponding bandgap energy of silicon) using secondary ion mass spectrometry. By varying the pressure of SF6, we find that the surface adsorbed

  9. LOW-POWER SILICON NEURONS, AXONS, AND SYNAPSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazzaro, John

    LOW-POWER SILICON NEURONS, AXONS, AND SYNAPSES John Lazzaro and John Wawrzynek Computer Science neuron circuit from (Mead, 1989), that uses a high-gain voltage amplifier with a sigmoidal nonlinearity of Cf and C. Vp VoIi C Cf Vc 5 V 5 nA 5 ms Ii Vo Figure 1. Spiking neuron circuit and function

  10. Heteroepitaxial Self Assembling Noble Metal Nanoparticles in Monocrystalline Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Michael S.

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    , such as measuring X-rays emitted by U-235, by selecting materials that have high absorption related to electron energy level transitions at selected energies. For instance, it might be possible to make depleted uranium nanoparticles in silicon, which could have...

  11. X-ray and synchrotron studies of porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivkov, V. N., E-mail: svn@dm.komisc.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Lomov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Physical-Technological Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Physical-Technological Institute (Russian Federation); Vasil'ev, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Nekipelov, S. V. [Komi State Pedagogical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Komi State Pedagogical Institute (Russian Federation); Petrova, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of comprehensive studies of layers of porous silicon of different conductivity types, grown by anodizing standard Si(111) substrates in an electrolyte based on fluoric acid and ethanol with the addition of 5% of iodine and kept in air for a long time, are discussed. Measurements are performed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and ultrasoft X-ray spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The structural parameters of the layers (thickness, strain, and porosity) and atomic and chemical composition of the porous-silicon surface are determined. It is found that an oxide layer 1.5-2.3-nm thick is formed on the surface of the silicon skeleton. The near-edge fine structure of the Si 2p absorption spectrum of this layer corresponds to the fine structure of the 2p spectrum of well coordinated SiO{sub 2}. In this case, the fine structure in the Si 2p-edge absorption region of the silicon skeleton is identical to that of the 2p absorption spectrum of crystalline silicon.

  12. Project Profile: Hybrid Organic Silicone HTF Utilizing Endothermic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at 550C. High thermal stability Low vapor pressure Sub-ambient melting points Low viscosity slopes. The thermal heat capacity of this fluid is supplemented by the integration...

  13. Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Enhance Program Capacity Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program...

  14. DAMPE silicon tracker on-board data compression algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yifan; Qiao, Rui; Peng, Wenxi; Fan, Ruirui; Gong, Ke; Wu, Di; Wang, Huanyu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is an upcoming scientific satellite mission for high energy gamma-ray, electron and cosmic rays detection. The silicon tracker (STK) is a sub detector of the DAMPE payload with an excellent position resolution (readout pitch of 242um), which measures the incident direction of particles, as well as charge. The STK consists 12 layers of Silicon Micro-strip Detector (SMD), equivalent to a total silicon area of 6.5m$^2$. The total readout channels of the STK are 73728, which leads to a huge amount of raw data to be dealt. In this paper, we focus on the on-board data compression algorithm and procedure in the STK, which was initially verified by cosmic-ray measurements.

  15. Electric field geometries dominate quantum transport coupling in silicon nanoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Tsung-Han, E-mail: askaleeg@gmail.com, E-mail: sfhu.hu@gmail.com; Hu, Shu-Fen, E-mail: askaleeg@gmail.com, E-mail: sfhu.hu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations on the relation between the geometries of silicon nanodevices and the quantum phenomenon they exhibit, such as the Aharonov–Bohm (AB) effect and the Coulomb blockade, were conducted. An arsenic doped silicon nanoring coupled with a nanowire by electron beam lithography was fabricated. At 1.47?K, Coulomb blockade oscillations were observed under modulation from the top gate voltage, and a periodic AB oscillation of ?B?=?0.178?T was estimated for a ring radius of 86?nm under a high sweeping magnetic field. Modulating the flat top gate and the pointed side gate was performed to cluster and separate the many electron quantum dots, which demonstrated that quantum confinement and interference effects coexisted in the doped silicon nanoring.

  16. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  17. Capacity additions ease tight methanol supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greek, B.F. (C and EN, Houston, TX (US))

    1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two menthanol plants now in operation - one in the U.S., the other in Chile - will boost global supplies of methanol more than 375 million gal annually. This large capacity addition and smaller expansions in other parts of the world will exceed demand growth during 1988 and 1989, easing the squeeze on supplies. As the result of increased supplies, methanol prices could slip slightly in the fourth quarter. They are more likely to decline next year, however. The two plants, which started up in August, are owned and operated by Tenneco Oil Co. Processing and Marketing and by Cape Horn Methanol (CHM). The Tenneco plant, located in Pasadena, Tex., was restarted after a shutdown in 1982 when prices for methanol were low. It now is running at full capacity of 125 million gal per year. The plant uses the low-pressure process technology of Lurgi, reportedly requiring for feedstock and energy between 100,000 and 125,000 cu ft of methane per gallon. Global trade in methanol smooths out the supply and demand inconsistencies. Surging methanol demand in the U.S. and in Western Europe has been met by imports from areas where methanol production is most economical - that is, where natural gas is readily available and has no other application as high in value. Canada, Chile, and Trinidad are examples of those areas.

  18. Can Science and Technology Capacity be Measured?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Caroline S; Dutta, Arindum

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of a nation to participate in the global knowledge economy depends to some extent on its capacities in science and technology. In an effort to assess the capacity of different countries in science and technology, this article updates a classification scheme developed by RAND to measure science and technology capacity for 150 countries of the world.

  19. Ge-on-Si light-emitting materials and devices for silicon photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaochen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid growing needs for high data transmission bandwidth challenge the metal interconnection technology in every area from chip-level interconnects to long distance communication. Silicon photonics is an ideal platform ...

  20. Hybridization process for back-illuminated silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuette, Daniel R.

    We present a unique hybridization process that permits high-performance back-illuminated silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) to be bonded to custom CMOS readout integrated circuits (ROICs) - a hybridization ...

  1. Germanium-rich silicon-germanium materials for field-effect modular application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jongthammanurak, Samerkhae

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of electric-field-induced optical modulation in the materials capable of monolithically integrated on silicon (Si) substrates offer the possibility of high-speed modulation in a pico second timeframe as ...

  2. Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  3. Retrograde melting in transition metal-silicon systems : thermodynamic modeling, experimental verification, and potential application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenning, David P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical framework is presented in this work for retrograde melting in silicon driven by the retrograde solubility of low-concentration metallic solutes at temperatures above the binary eutectic. High enthalpy of ...

  4. Intel Corporation CREOL April 1 2005 SiliconSilicon PhotonicsPhotonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Recent resultsRecent results ­­IntelIntel''s Silicon Lasers Silicon Laser SummarySummary #12;*Third party of their respective ownerve owner 44 Industry standard silicon manufacturing processes couldIndustry standard silicon manufacturing processes could enable integration, bring volume economics to optical.enable integration, bring

  5. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schriver, Maria Christine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogen dilution in silane on light induced degradation of hydrogenated amor- phous silicon films for solar photovoltaichydrogen content from 14-22%[76]. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon has promise as a photovoltaic

  6. Design of a silicon waver breaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukaddam, Kabir James, 1983-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Usually multiple MEMS or IC devices are fabricated on a single silicon wafer. Manually separating the components from each other involves scribing and fracturing the silicon. This thesis presents a design for a tool to aid ...

  7. Nucleation and solidification of silicon for photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appapillai, Anjuli T. (Anjuli Tara)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of solar cells produced today are made with crystalline silicon wafers, which are typically manufactured by growing a large piece of silicon and then sawing it into ~200 pm wafers, a process which converts ...

  8. Capacities and Research in Homeland Security The University at Buffalo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    , and Biophotonics (ILPB) and the Center for Spin Effects and Quantum Information in Nanostructures (CSEQuIN) conduct multidisciplinary science and technology programs focusing on the development of: (1) high capacity data storage devices for "smart sensor" systems to detect biological and chemical agents. These research directions

  9. A CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING THE DATA INTEGRITY CAPACITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvine, Cynthia E.

    assurance components, as well as the integrity of data read from high assurance repositories and displayedA CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING THE DATA INTEGRITY CAPACITY OF CERTAIN SECURE SYSTEMS Cynthia E. Irvine of architecture. We discuss the general integrity property that systems can only be trusted to manage modi able

  10. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis P August 2002 Abstract A complete capacity fade analysis was carried out for Sony 18650 cells cycled the other losses. # 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Capacity fade; Sony 18650

  11. Silicon crystal growing by oscillating crucible technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwuttke, G.H.; Kim, K.M.; Smetana, P.

    1983-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for growing silicon crystals from a molten melt comprising oscillating the container during crystal growth is disclosed.

  12. Copper doped polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lovelace, Alan M. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space (La Canada, CA); Koliwad, Krishna M. (La Canada, CA); Daud, Taher (La Crescenta, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic cells having improved performance are fabricated from polycrystalline silicon containing copper segregated at the grain boundaries.

  13. Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines 1 Silicon Micromachined Dimensional Calibration Artifact for Mesoscale Measurement Machines 2...

  14. Birefringence Measurements on Crystalline Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krüger, Christoph; Khalaidovski, Alexander; Steinlechner, Jessica; Nawrodt, Ronny; Schnabel, Roman; Lück, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline silicon has been proposed as a new test mass material in third generation gravitational wave detectors such as the Einstein Telescope (ET). Birefringence can reduce the interferometric contrast and can produce dynamical disturbances in interferometers. In this work we use the method of polarisation-dependent resonance frequency analysis of Fabry-Perot-cavities containing silicon as a birefringent medium. Our measurements show a birefringence of silicon along the (111) axis of the order of $\\Delta\\, n \\approx 10^{-7}$ at a laser wavelength of 1550nm and room temperature. A model is presented that explains the results of different settings of our measurements as a superposition of elastic strains caused by external stresses in the sample and plastic strains possibly generated during the production process. An application of our theory on the proposed ET test mass geometry suggests no critical effect on birefringence due to elastic strains.

  15. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon is described in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon. 1 fig.

  16. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T.sub.2 gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon.

  17. Development of a melting and directional solidification process for improving the grain structure and electronic properties of a silicon wafer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenlee, Alison S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A manufacturing process that produces high quality, inexpensive kerfless silicon wafers for photovoltaic cells is highly desirable. The process herein described was developed to melt and directionally solidify fine-grained ...

  18. Beam Test Performance and Simulation of Prototypes for the ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Conrad

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The silicon pixel detector (SPD) of the ALICE experiment in preparation at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is designed to provide the precise vertex reconstruction needed for measuring heavy flavor production in heavy ion collisions at very high energies and high multiplicity. The SPD forms the innermost part of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) which also includes silicon drift and silicon strip detectors. Single assembly prototypes of the ALICE SPD have been tested at the CERN SPS using high energy proton/pion beams in 2002 and 2003. We report on the experimental determination of the spatial precision. We also report on the first combined beam test with prototypes of the other ITS silicon detector technologies at the CERN SPS in November 2004. The issue of SPD simulation is briefly discussed.

  19. Power and capacity fade mechanism of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.0502 composite cathodes in high-power lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostecki, Robert; McLarnon, Frank

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIFE REDUCTION IN HIGH-POWER LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES RobertRaman, AFM Introduction Lithium-ion batteries are being

  20. Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voldrich, W. (Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components' gas-pressure sinterable Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

  1. Thermoelectric power factor enhancement with gate-all-around silicon nanowires Benjamin M. Curtin and John E. Bowers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    Thermoelectric power factor enhancement with gate-all-around silicon nanowires Benjamin M. Curtin and thermoelectric properties of very high power factor Fe3O4/SiO2/p-type Si(001) devices J. Appl. Phys. 115, 033709 (2014); 10.1063/1.4861729 A comprehensive study of thermoelectric and transport properties of -silicon

  2. Niobium Silicon alloys for Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvo, M; Monfardini, A; Benoit, A; Boudou, N; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Dumoulin, L; Goupy, J; Sueur, H Le; Marnieros, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are studying the properties of Niobium Silicon amorphous alloys as a candidate material for the fabrication of highly sensitive Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), optimized for very low optical loads. As in the case of other composite materials, the NbSi properties can be changed by varying the relative amounts of its components. Using a NbSi film with T_c around 1 K we have been able to obtain the first NbSi resonators, observe an optical response and acquire a spectrum in the band 50 to 300 GHz. The data taken show that this material has very high kinetic inductance and normal state surface resistivity. These properties are ideal for the development of KID. More measurements are planned to further characterize the NbSi alloy and fully investigate its potential.

  3. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y. Simon (Golden, CO); Landry, Marc D. (Lafayette, CO); Pitts, John R. (Lakewood, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystallline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation.

  4. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Landry, M.D.; Pitts, J.R.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystalline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation. 2 figs.

  5. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  6. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Chen, Yong (San Diego, CA)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  7. Cryogenic Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perea-Solano, B

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CERN is presently constructing the LHC, which will produce collisions of 7 TeV protons in 4 interaction points at a design luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The radiation dose resulting from the operation at high luminosity will cause a serious deterioration of the silicon tracker performance. The state-of-art silicon microstrip detectors can tolerate a fluence of about 3 1014 cm-2 of hadrons or charged leptons. This is insufficient, however, for long-term operation in the central parts of the LHC trackers, in particular after the possible luminosity upgrade of the LHC. By operating the detectors at cryogenic temperatures the radiation hardness can be improved by a factor 10. This work proposes a cryogenic microstrip detector module concept which has the features required for the microstrip trackers of the upgraded LHC experiments at CERN. The module can hold an edgeless sensor, being a good candidate for improved luminosity and total cross-section measurements in the ATLAS, CMS and TOTEM experiments. The design o...

  8. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  9. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotovsky, J; Tooker, A; Horsley, D A

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This work offers the first, thin, MEMS contact-stress (CS) sensor capable of accurate in situ measruement of time-varying, contact-stress between two solid interfaces (e.g. in vivo cartilage contact-stress and body armor dynamic loading). This CS sensor is a silicon-based device with a load sensitive diaphragm. The diaphragm is doped to create piezoresistors arranged in a full Wheatstone bridge. The sensor is similar in performance to established silicon pressure sensors, but it is reliably produced to a thickness of 65 {micro}m. Unlike commercial devices or other research efforts, this CS sensor, including packaging, is extremely thin (< 150 {micro}m fully packaged) so that it can be unobtrusively placed between contacting structures. It is built from elastic, well-characterized materials, providing accurate and high-speed (50+ kHz) measurements over a potential embedded lifetime of decades. This work explored sensor designs for an interface load range of 0-2 MPa; however, the CS sensor has a flexible design architecture to measure a wide variety of interface load ranges.

  10. Power and capacity fade mechanism of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.0502 composite cathodes in high-power lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostecki, Robert; McLarnon, Frank

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIGH-POWER LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES Robert Kostecki and FrankAFM Introduction Lithium-ion batteries are being seriously1.2 M LiPF 6 /graphite batteries for hybrid electric vehicle

  11. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  12. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  13. Microelectromechanical pump utilizing porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lantz, Jeffrey W. (Albuquerque, NM); Stalford, Harold L. (Norman, OK)

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a porous silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The porous silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.

  14. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part I. Cycling performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part I. Cycling performance P of Sony 18650 Li-ion cells increases with increase in temperature. After 800 cycles, the cells cycled the capacity fade of commercial Li-ion cells cycled at high temperatures. We choose Sony 18650 cells with Li

  15. Non-Coherent Capacity of Secret-Key Agreement with Public Discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khisti, Ashish

    1 Non-Coherent Capacity of Secret-Key Agreement with Public Discussion Anurag Agrawal, Zouheir--We study the non-coherent capacity of secret-key agreement with public discussion over i.i.d. Rayleigh state information (CSI). We present two results. At high Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), the secret

  16. Solar Energy and Capacity Value (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a one-page, two-sided fact sheet on the capacity of solar power to provide value to utilities and power system operators.

  17. Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Increasing water holding capacity for irrigation Reseachers recommend solutions for sediment trapping in irrigation system LANL and SNL leveraged technical expertise to determine...

  18. Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Name Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action...

  19. Quantum Capacities of Channels with small Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael M. Wolf; David Perez-Garcia

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the quantum capacity of noisy quantum channels which can be represented by coupling a system to an effectively small environment. A capacity formula is derived for all cases where both system and environment are two-dimensional--including all extremal qubit channels. Similarly, for channels acting on higher dimensional systems we show that the capacity can be determined if the channel arises from a sufficiently small coupling to a qubit environment. Extensions to instances of channels with larger environment are provided and it is shown that bounds on the capacity with unconstrained environment can be obtained from decompositions into channels with small environment.

  20. Rheology and stability kinetics of bare silicon nanoparticle inks for low-cost direct printing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    More, Priyesh V.; Jeong, Sunho; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Jip [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 Korea and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University 5-1 Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Sahn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University 5-1 Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly dispersed and stable silicon nanoparticles ink is formulated for its application in direct printing or printable electronics. These dispersions are prepared from free-standing silicon nanoparticles which are not capped with any organic ligand, making it suitable for electronic applications. Silicon nanoparticles dispersions are prepared by suspending the nanoparticles in benzonitrile or ethanol by using polypropylene glycol (PPG) as a binder. All the samples show typical shear thinning behavior while the dispersion samples show low viscosities signifying good quality dispersion. Such thinning behavior favors in fabrication of dense films with spin-coating or patterns with drop casting. The dispersion stability is monitored by turbiscan measurements showing good stability for one week. A low-cost direct printing method for dispersion samples is also demonstrated to obtain micro-sized patterns. Low electrical resistivity of resulting patterns, adjustable viscosity and good stability makes these silicon nanoparticles dispersions highly applicable for direct printing process.

  1. Introduction! Low Cost, High Volume, Scale-up Photovoltaic Manufacturing!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    mechanical strength and! solar cell integrity! q Silicon wafering (diamond wire sawing)! q Silicon waferIntroduction! Low Cost, High Volume, Scale-up Photovoltaic Manufacturing! Prof. Shreyes Melkote volume PV manufacturing, therefore to reduce manufacturing cost and accelerate PV use. ! q Silicon wafer

  2. Photonic Crystal Cavities in Cubic (3C) Polytype Silicon Carbide Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Radulaski; Thomas M. Babinec; Sonia Buckley; Armand Rundquist; J Provine; Kassem Alassaad; Gabriel Ferro; Jelena Vu?kovi?

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities from cubic (3C) thin films (thickness ~ 200 nm) of silicon carbide (SiC) grown epitaxially on a silicon substrate. We demonstrate cavity resonances across the telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1,250 - 1,600 nm. Finally, we discuss possible applications in nonlinear optics, optical interconnects, and quantum information science.

  3. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  4. Thin Single Crystal Silicon Solar Cells on Ceramic Substrates: November 2009 - November 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, A.; Ravi, K. V.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this program we have been developing a technology for fabricating thin (< 50 micrometres) single crystal silicon wafers on foreign substrates. We reverse the conventional approach of depositing or forming silicon on foreign substrates by depositing or forming thick (200 to 400 micrometres) ceramic materials on high quality single crystal silicon films ~ 50 micrometres thick. Our key innovation is the fabrication of thin, refractory, and self-adhering 'handling layers or substrates' on thin epitaxial silicon films in-situ, from powder precursors obtained from low cost raw materials. This 'handling layer' has sufficient strength for device and module processing and fabrication. Successful production of full sized (125 mm X 125 mm) silicon on ceramic wafers with 50 micrometre thick single crystal silicon has been achieved and device process flow developed for solar cell fabrication. Impurity transfer from the ceramic to the silicon during the elevated temperature consolidation process has resulted in very low minority carrier lifetimes and resulting low cell efficiencies. Detailed analysis of minority carrier lifetime, metals analysis and device characterization have been done. A full sized solar cell efficiency of 8% has been demonstrated.

  5. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  6. Managing nuclear predominant generating capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouget, Y.H.; Herbin, H.C.; Carbonnier, D.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common belief, associated with nuclear power plant, leads to the conclusion that it can only operate, as a base load plant. This observation can be reversed, by just looking at large generating capacity, using an important nuclear generation mix. Nuclear plants may certainly load follow and contribute to the grid frequency control. The French example illustrates these possibilities. The reactor control of French units has been customized to accommodate the grid requests. Managing such a large nuclear plant fleet requires various actions be taken, ranging from a daily to a multi-annual perspective. The paper describes the various contributions leading to safe, reliable, well accepted and cost competitive nuclear plants in France. The combination of all aspects related to operations, maintenance scheduling, nuclear safety management, are presented. The use of PWR units carries considerable weight in economic terms, with several hundred million francs tied in with outage scheduling every year. This necessitates a global view of the entire generating system which can be mobilized to meet demand. There is considerable interaction between units as, on the one hand, they are competing to satisfy the same need, and, on the other hand, reducing maintenance costs means sharing the necessary resources, and thus a coordinated staggering of outages. In addition, nuclear fuel is an energy reserve which remains in the reactor for 3 or 4 years, with some of the fuel renewed each year. Due to the memory effect, the fuel retains a memory of past use, so that today's choices impact upon the future. A medium-term view of fuel management is also necessary.

  7. Mitochondrial Respiratory Capacity Is a Critical Regulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    respiratory capacity (SRC). SRC is the extra capacity available in cells to produce energy in response. In response to antigen (Ag) and costimulation, CD8+ T cells undergo a developmental program characterized- ating in response to Ag, it is thought that quiescent T cells (e.g., naive and memory T cells), like

  8. REDUCTION CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE AND SALTSTONE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The duration that saltstone retains its ability to immobilize some key radionuclides, such as technetium (Tc), plutonium (Pu), and neptunium (Np), depends on its capacity to maintain a low redox status (or low oxidation state). The reduction capacity is a measure of the mass of reductants present in the saltstone; the reductants are the active ingredients that immobilize Tc, Pu, and Np. Once reductants are exhausted, the saltstone loses its ability to immobilize these radionuclides. The reduction capacity values reported here are based on the Ce(IV)/Fe(II) system. The Portland cement (198 {micro}eq/g) and especially the fly ash (299 {micro}eq/g) had a measurable amount of reduction capacity, but the blast furnace slag (820 {micro}eq/g) not surprisingly accounted for most of the reduction capacity. The blast furnace slag contains ferrous iron and sulfides which are strong reducing and precipitating species for a large number of solids. Three saltstone samples containing 45% slag or one sample containing 90% slag had essentially the same reduction capacity as pure slag. There appears to be some critical concentration between 10% and 45% slag in the Saltstone formulation that is needed to create the maximum reduction capacity. Values from this work supported those previously reported, namely that the reduction capacity of SRS saltstone is about 820 {micro}eq/g; this value is recommended for estimating the longevity that the Saltstone Disposal Facility will retain its ability to immobilize radionuclides.

  9. Strained-Silicon on Silicon and Strained-Silicon on Silicon-Germanium on Silicon by Relaxed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the self-heating effect. This self-heating effect is of most concern in high-power devices and can lead

  10. Silicon Pixel Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Graeme Douglas

    Recent advances in particle accelerators have increased the demands being placed on detectors. Novel detector designs are being implemented in many different areas including, for example, high luminosity experiments at the LHC or at next generation synchrotrons. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise some of these novel detectors. The first of the new detector types is called a 3D detector. This design was first proposed by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). In this design, doped electrodes are created that extend through the silicon substrate. When compared to a traditional photodiode with electrodes on the opposing surfaces, the 3D design can combine a reasonable detector thickness with a small electrode spacing resulting in fast charge collection and limited charge sharing. The small electrode spacing leads to the detectors having lower depletion voltages. This, combined with the fast collection time, makes 3D detectors a candidate for radiation hard applications. These applications include the upgra...

  11. Bipolar monolithic preamplifiers for SSC silicon calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Todd, R.A.; Bauer, M.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Kennedy, E.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Bugg, W.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes preamplifiers designed specifically to address the requirements of silicon calorimetry for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Eight different preamplifiers designed for detector capacitances ranging from 20 pF to 500 pF and operating temperatures from 25{degree}C to {minus}20{degree}C are discussed. The preamplifiers were fabricated with two different high-frequency processes (one with the VTC, Inc. VJ900 process, seven with the Harris Semiconductor VHF Process). The different topologies and their features are discussed in addition to the design methodologies employed. The results for noise, power consumption, speed, and radiation damage effects as well as data for post-damage annealing are presented for the VTC process preamplifier. Simulations for the VHF Process circuits are presented. This work was funded through SSC Generic Detector funding, SSC Detector Subsystem funding, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Detector Center.

  12. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  13. DECODING THE MESSAGE FROM METEORITIC STARDUST SILICON CARBIDE GRAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate, E-mail: maria.lugaro@monash.edu, E-mail: karen.michelle.lewis@gmail.com, E-mail: bkgibson@uclan.ac.uk, E-mail: kpilkington@uclan.ac.uk [Monash Centre for Astrophysics (MoCA), Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analyzed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carries the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modeling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  14. Strained Silicon on Silicon by Wafer Bonding and Layer Transfer from Relaxed SiGe Buffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacson, David M.

    We report the creation of strained silicon on silicon (SSOS) substrate technology. The method uses a relaxed SiGe buffer as a template for inducing tensile strain in a Si layer, which is then bonded to another Si handle ...

  15. Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Fabricated by Pulsed Rapid Thermal Annealing of Amorphous Silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, I-Syuan

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    optimized. The novel nickel-induced crystallization with low thermal budget was demonstrated. Polycrystalline silicon thin films were formed from the amorphous silicon thin films by the pulsed rapid thermal annealing process enhanced with a thin nickel...

  16. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  17. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  18. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Semiannual technical report, 1 January 1996--30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J. [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (United States)] [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two specific objectives of Solarex`s program are to reduce the manufacturing cost for polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic modules to less than $1.20/watt and to increase the manufacturing capacity by a factor of three. This report highlights accomplishments during the period of January 1 through June 30, 1996. Accomplishments include: began the conversion of production casting stations to increase ingot size; operated the wire saw in a production mode with higher yields and lower costs than achieved on the ID saws; developed and qualified a new wire guide coating material that doubles the wire guide lifetime and produces significantly less scatter in wafer thickness; completed a third pilot run of the cost-effective Al paste back-surface-field (BSF) process, verifying a 5% increase in cell efficiency and demonstrating the ability to process and handle the BSF paste cells; completed environmental qualification of modules using cells produced by an all-print metallization process; optimized the design of the 15.2-cm by 15.2-cm polycrystalline silicon solar cells; demonstrated the application of a high-efficiency process in making 15.2-cm by 15.2-cm solar cells; demonstrated that cell efficiency increases with decreasing wafer thickness for the Al paste BSF cells; qualified a vendor-supplied Tedlar/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) laminate to replace the combination of separate sheets of EVA and Tedlar backsheet; demonstrated the operation of a prototype unit to trim/lead attach/test modules; and demonstrated the operation of a wafer pull-down system for cassetting wet wafers.

  19. Microstructure and properties of IN SITU toughened silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Zhang, Xiao Feng

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A silicon carbide with a fracture toughness as high as 9.1 MPa.m1/2 has been developed by hot pressing b-SiC powder with aluminum, boron, and carbon additions (ABC-SiC). Central in this material development has been systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mechanical characterizations. In particular, atomic-resolution electron microscopy and nanoprobe composition quantification were combined in analyzing grain boundary structure and nanoscale structural features.

  20. Process for strengthening silicon based ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, A.J.

    1991-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for strengthening silicon based ceramic monolithic materials and composite materials that contain silicon based ceramic reinforcing phases that requires that the ceramic be exposed to a wet hydrogen atmosphere at about 1400{degrees}C. The process results in a dense, tightly adherent silicon containing oxide layer that heals, blunts, or otherwise negates the detrimental effect of strength limiting flaws on the surface of the ceramic body.