Sample records for high activity drain

  1. Temperature-Accelerated Degradation of GaN HEMTs under High-Power Stress: Activation Energy of Drain-Current Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    that allows device characterization through external test equipment [1]. A flow chart of a typical stepTemperature-Accelerated Degradation of GaN HEMTs under High- Power Stress: Activation Energy on this observation, we demonstrate a new scheme to extract the activation energy (Ea) of device degradation from step

  2. Schottky-Drain Technology for AlGaN/GaN High-Electron Mobility Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin

    In this letter, we demonstrate 27% improvement in the buffer breakdown voltage of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown on Si substrate by using a new Schottky-drain contact technology. Schottky-drain ...

  3. High Power Wideband AlGaN/GaN HEMT Feedback Amplifier Module with Drain and Feedback Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    High Power Wideband AlGaN/GaN HEMT Feedback Amplifier Module with Drain and Feedback Loop amplifier module using AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) has been developed that covers radars and communications systems. GaN-based HEMT's for high power applications at microwave frequencies

  4. Condensate Removal by Drain Orifice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzick, L. L.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Originally the Drain Orifice Assembly was developed to solve serious steam trap maintenance problems in Navy ship's high pressure systems. Installation was between two ANSI B16.5 Flanges. The high pressure systems operate at pressures between 150...

  5. NOTE: This graph charts the pH level of the water leaving active chemical drain neutralization system in the Natural Science and Engineering Cleanroom laboratory on the UTD campus. It also monitors the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeong-Bong

    NOTE: This graph charts the pH level of the water leaving active chemical drain neutralization 6 8 10 12 14 pHDeviation(8-pH) pHatDischargeTank Date NSERL Back Dock Chemical Neutralization p

  6. Behavior of the drain leakage current in metal-induced laterally crystallized thin lm transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - sistors on the same glass panel for active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Although solid phase 0 3 2 8 - 7 #12;low temperature oxide (LTO) gate insulator and 200 nm thick a-Si gate electrode were and drain regions. About 2 nm of Ni was deposited in an ultra-high vacuum evaporation system. For those TFTs

  7. Symmetric Active/Active HighSymmetric Active/Active High Availability for HighAvailability for High--PerformancePerformance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    Symmetric Active/Active HighSymmetric Active/Active High Availability for HighAvailability for High reliability and availability is deceasing rapidlyHPC system reliability and availability is deceasing rapidly memory)bit errors in ECC memory) High availability as well as high performance isHigh availability

  8. Americium/curium bushing melter drain tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.E.; Hardy, B.J.; Smith, M.E.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Americium and curium were produced in the past at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for research, medical, and radiological applications. They have been stored in a nitric acid solution in an SRS reprocessing facility for a number of years. Vitrification of the americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution will allow the material to be safely stored or transported to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. Oak Ridge is responsible for marketing radionuclides for research and medical applications. The bushing melter technology being used in the Am/Cm vitrification research work is also under consideration for the stabilization of other actinides such as neptunium and plutonium. A series of melter drain tests were conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center to determine the relationship between the drain tube assembly operating variables and the resulting pour initiation times, glass flowrates, drain tube temperatures, and stop pour times. Performance criteria such as ability to start and stop pours in a controlled manner were also evaluated. The tests were also intended to provide support of oil modeling of drain tube performance predictions and thermal modeling of the drain tube and drain tube heater assembly. These drain tests were instrumental in the design of subsequent melter drain tube and drain tube heaters for the Am/Cm bushing melter, and therefore in the success of the Am/Cm vitrification and plutonium immobilization programs.

  9. DRAINED RESIDUAL STRENGTH OF COHESIVE SOILSa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the residual friction angle is independent of the original shear strength, water content, and liquidity indexDRAINED RESIDUAL STRENGTH OF COHESIVE SOILSa Discussion by Robert W. Day,3 Fellow, ASCE The authors have preparcd an important paper on the drained residual shear strength of cohesive soil. The authors

  10. Drain Flies (Moth Flies or Filter Flies)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansone, Chris; Minzenmayer, Rick

    2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Drain flies can be a common problem in homes. They live and reproduce in drains and septic tank field lines. The first step in controlling these pests is identifying the source of the infestation. Then there are cleaning products and insecticides...

  11. State waste discharge permit application, 200-E chemical drain field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect ground would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). The Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. This document presents the State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) application for the 200-E Chemical Drain Field. Waste water from the 272-E Building enters the process sewer line directly through a floor drain, while waste water from the 2703-E Building is collected in two floor drains, (north and south) that act as sumps and are discharged periodically. The 272-E and 2703-E Buildings constitute the only discharges to the process sewer line and the 200-E Chemical Drain Field.

  12. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  13. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Brzezinski, Mark A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  14. Symmetric Active/Active High Availability for High-Performance Computing System Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xubin "Ben"

    Symmetric Active/Active High Availability for High-Performance Computing System Services Christian to pave the way for high avail- ability in high-performance computing (HPC) by focusing on efficient symmetric active/active high availability for multiple redundant head and service nodes running in virtual

  15. Lakes: Restrictions on Ditches and Drains (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The construction or alteration of new ditches and drains that may result in a lowering of the water level of a given lake must be accompanied by the construction of a dam to protect the water level...

  16. Method of making self-aligned lightly-doped-drain structure for MOS transistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating lightly-doped-drains (LDD) for short-channel metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) transistors. The process utilizes a pulsed laser process to incorporate the dopants, thus eliminating the prior oxide deposition and etching steps. During the process, the silicon in the source/drain region is melted by the laser energy. Impurities from the gas phase diffuse into the molten silicon to appropriately dope the source/drain regions. By controlling the energy of the laser, a lightly-doped-drain can be formed in one processing step. This is accomplished by first using a single high energy laser pulse to melt the silicon to a significant depth and thus the amount of dopants incorporated into the silicon is small. Furthermore, the dopants incorporated during this step diffuse to the edge of the MOS transistor gate structure. Next, many low energy laser pulses are used to heavily dope the source/drain silicon only in a very shallow region. Because of two-dimensional heat transfer at the MOS transistor gate edge, the low energy pulses are inset from the region initially doped by the high energy pulse. By computer control of the laser energy, the single high energy laser pulse and the subsequent low energy laser pulses are carried out in a single operational step to produce a self-aligned lightly-doped-drain-structure.

  17. Demonstration Projects Using Wick Drains to Stabilize Landslides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    requiring relatively short (: the wick drains are prepared for installation by rolling into long, 1 Current Address: Jordan, Jones

  18. A mathematical simulation of horizontal drain-hole performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Thomas Ru-Kang

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow Rate Obtained From This Model and From BOSS-AIM. 22 Comparison of The Gas-Oil Ratio Obtained From This Model and From BOSS-AIM. 24 Relative Positions of Conventional Well and Horizontal Drain-Hole in Simulation Runs. . . . . 27 Comparison... of The Economic Oil Recovery Obtained From Horizontal Drain-Hole and From Conventional Well. . . . . . . 28 Comparison of The Cumulative Gas-Oil Ratio Obtained From Horizontal Drain-Hole and From Conventional Well. . . 29 Effect of Horizontal Drain...

  19. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comparato, Joseph R. (Bloomfield, CT); Jacobs, Martin (Hartford, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  20. Steam reforming utilizing high activity catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setzer, H. J.

    1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    High activity, sulfur tolerant steam reforming catalysts are described comprising rhodium or nickel supported on lanthanum stabilized alumina or magnesium promoted lanthanum stabilized alumina. The catalysts have improved activity over conventionally used catalysts in the presence of sulfur containing hydrocarbon fuel (such as No. 2 fuel oil) in a steam reforming environment. The material has particular utility in autothermal, tubular, cyclic and adiabatic steam reforming processes.

  1. Characterization of septic and drain system releases at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, M.R.; Galloway, R.B. [CDM Federal Programs Corp. (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The SNL/NM Environmental Restoration (ER) Project is tasked with performing the assessment and remediation of environmental releases resulting from the almost 50 years of engineering development and testing activities. Operable Unit 1295, Septic Tanks and Drainfields, includes inactive septic and drain systems at 23 separate ER sites that were listed as Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) in the SNL/NM Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) Module Permit. These sites were identified, based on process histories and interviews with facility personnel, as the subset of all SNL/NM septic and drain systems that had the highest potential for releases of hazardous and radioactive wastes into the environment. An additional 101 septic and drain systems not currently classified as SWMUs also have been identified as needing future characterization.

  2. SYMMETRIC HEMT DRAIN CURRENT MODEL FOR INTERMODULATION DISTORTION PREDICTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GD is the gate-drain potential, is the self-heating derating due to power dissipation P, and F is a power

  3. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  4. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  5. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  6. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boomer, Kayle D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Gunter, Jason R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Joslyn, Cameron C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Vazquez, Brandon J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Garfield, John S. [AEM Consulting (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

  7. Soil science Disinfection of drain water in greenhouses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Soil science Disinfection of drain water in greenhouses using a wet condensation heater C Steinberg November 1994) Summary — A wet condensation heater has been modified to disinfect drain water were introduced into the disinfection circuit above the heater. Water was checked downstream

  8. Design criteria Drain Rerouting Project 93-OR-EW-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A--E) in the performance of Title I and II design for the Drain Rerouting Project. The Drain Rerouting project at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will provide the Y-12 Plant with the capability to reroute particular drains within buildings 9202, 9203 and 9995. Process drains that are presently connected to the storm sewer shall be routed to the sanitary sewer to ensure that any objectionable material inadvertently discharged into process drains will not discharge to East Fork Popular Creek (EFPC) without treatment. The project will also facilitate compliance with the Y-12 Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge permit and allow for future pretreatment of once-through coolant.

  9. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Brzezinski, Mark A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  10. Risk assessment of K basin twelve-inch drain valve failure from a postulated seismic initiating event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project will transfer metallic SNF from the Hanford 105 K-East and 105 K-West Basins to safe interim storage in the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The initial basis for design, fabrication, installation, and operation of the fuel removal systems was that the basin leak rates which could result from a postulated accident condition would not be excessive relative to reasonable recovery operations. However, an additional potential K Basin water leak path is through the K Basin drain valves. Three twelve-inch drain valves are located in the main basin bays along the north wall. The sumps containing the valves are filled with concrete which covers the drain valve body. Visual observations suggest that only the valve's bonnet and stem are exposed above the basin concrete floor. It was recognized, however, that damage of the drain valve bonnet or stem during a seismic initiating event could provide a potential K Basin water leak path. The objectives of this activity are to: (1) evaluate the risk of damaging the three twelve-inch drain valves located along the north wall of the main basin from a seismic initiating event, and (2) determine the associated potential leak rate from a damaged valve.

  11. Risk assessment of drain valve failure in the K-West basin south loadout pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The drain valve located in the bottom of the K-West Basin South Loadout Pit (SLOP) could provide an additional leak path from the K Basins if the drain valve were damaged during construction, installation, or operation of the cask loading system. For the K-West Basin SLOP the immersion pail support structure (IPSS) has already been installed, but the immersion pail has not been installed in the IPSS. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the risk of damaging the drain valve during the remaining installation activities or operation of the cask loading system. Valve damage, as used in this analysis, does not necessarily imply large amounts of the water will be released quickly from the basin, rather valve damage implies that the valve's integrity has been compromised. The analysis process is a risk-based uncertainty analysis where best engineering judgement is used to represent each variable in the analysis. The uncertainty associated with each variable is represented by a probability distribution. The uncertainty is propagated through the analysis by Monte Carlo convolution techniques. The corresponding results are developed as a probability distribution and the risk is expressed in terms of the corresponding complementary cumulative distribution function (''risk curve''). The total risk is the area under the ''risk curve''. The risk of potentially dropping a cask into or on the IPSS and damaging the drain valve is approximately 1 x 10{sup -4} to 2 x 10{sup -5} per year. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve is 3 x 10{sup -2} to 6 x 10{sup -3} per year. Both risks are expressed as drain value failure frequencies. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve can be significantly reduced by an impact limiter and/or installing a gating or plate over the area bounded by the back of the IPSS and the wall of the SLOP. With either of these actions there is a 90 percent confidence that the frequency of drain valve failure would be less than 1 x 10{sup -6} per year.

  12. LBNL: High Performance Active Perimeter Building Systems - 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eleanor Lee, LBNL View the Presentation LBNL: High Performance Active Perimeter Building Systems - 2015 Peer Review More Documents & Publications FLEXLAB LBNL: NYC Office...

  13. Femtosecond Chemically Activated Reactions: Concept of Nonstatistical Activation at High Thermal Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    Femtosecond chemical activation of reactions at very high thermal energies, much above the bond energyFemtosecond Chemically Activated Reactions: Concept of Nonstatistical Activation at High Thermal Energies Sang Kyu Kim, Ju Guo, J. Spencer Baskin, and Ahmed H. Zewail* Arthur Amos Noyes Chemical Physics

  14. Catalysis over activated high silica zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C. D.; Miale, N.

    1985-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for conducting organic compound conversion over a catalyst composition comprising a crystalline zeolite having a high initial silica-to-alumina mole ratio, said zeolite being prepared by calcining the zeolite, contacting said calcined zeolite with solid aluminum fluoride, and coverting said aluminum fluoride contacted material to hydrogen form.

  15. Physica E 33 (2006) 134138 Investigation of a new modified source/drain for diminished self-heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physica E 33 (2006) 134­138 Investigation of a new modified source/drain for diminished self-heating to that of a silicon-on-insulator SOI MOSFET while the self-heating effects are highly diminished and are similar regions. r 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V. PACS: 85.40.Àe Keywords: Self-heating; Silicon

  16. Expected Economic Benefits of the El Morillo Drain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, Ronald D.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.; DuBois, Megan; Rogers, Callie; Seawright, Emily

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    with conservation of approximately 900,000 acre feet of water annually. Abstract The study of the benefits (damages averted) attributable to the El Morillo Drain encompasses U.S. municipalities, industry, and agriculture. It is conservatively estimated... ......................................................................................................................... 2 Benefits .............................................................................................................................. 4 Municipal Impacts...

  17. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  18. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avery, Don E. (45-437 Akimala St., Honolulu, HI 96744)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  19. Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 #12;#12;Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors Thomas Gray, David W. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 This work is based on the unaltered text

  20. High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities Kevin Comer, Associate Principal, Antares Group Inc.

  1. Analytical methods for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity in a tile-drained field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    Analytical methods for estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity in a tile-drained field David E; Saturated hydraulic conductivity; Field scale; Tile drains; Water table 1. Introduction The use of spatially

  2. Highly Conductive and Porous Activated Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for High-Power Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Highly Conductive and Porous Activated Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for High-Power Supercapacitors for a free-standing carbon film reported to date. A two-electrode supercapacitor using these carbon films. KEYWORDS: Graphene, flexible film, chemical activation, supercapacitors Free-standing thin film materials

  3. Preferential transport of nitrate to a tile drain in an intermittent-flood-irrigated field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    Preferential transport of nitrate to a tile drain in an intermittent-flood-irrigated field: Model measured NO3 flux concentrations in a subsurface tile drain, several monitoring wells and nested reasonably well. However, NO3 flux concentrations in the subsurface tile drain and piezometers at the field

  4. Issues and design concepts for high-activity liquid packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinert, N.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Riley, D. [Walla Walla College of Engineering, Walla Walla, WA (United States); Wells, A.H. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tank waste pretreatment process involves the separation of low-level and high-level constituents. The liquid high-level defense production waste will be vitrified into thousands of glass logs at the US DOE sites and then transported to a high-level repository for final disposal. Pretreatment and vitrification technology will need to be developed and tested to assess cost-effectiveness. The appropriate pretreatment strategy for complex high-activity liquid will depend on proving a competent process. As technology development matures, actual liquid will be substituted for simulants, and pilot scale plants will replace laboratory scale process demonstrations. Development of this strategy depends on tank waste sample analyses and a high-activity liquid supply for process testing. However, high-activity liquid transportation beyond DOE site boundaries is limited to Type B quantities in volumes less than 50 mL; no licensed packaging exists for greater than 50 mL quantities. The following paper summarizes the need for a high-activity liquid packaging, and identifies the agencies effecting packaging design and transportation. The high-activity liquid packaging concept retrofits licensed spent fuel casks by replacing the spent fuel basket with a sturdy containment vessel appropriate for the chemical nature of the liquid. A Nuclear Packaging (Pacific Nuclear`s NuPat{trademark} 125-B) spent fuel cask was hypothetically retrofitted with a containment vessel filled with liquid source term, the radionuclide inventory contained in the liquid. The structural, thermal, dose rate, and criticality consequences of retrofitting the cask body were evaluated based on data in the 125-B Cask Safety Analysis Report for Packaging. In addition, future packaging development work is discussed.

  5. Characterization Plan for Soils Around Drain Line PLA-100115

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Shanklin

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Characterization Plan supports the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) closure of soils that may have been contaminated by releases from drain line PLA-100115, located within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The requirements to address the closure of soils contaminated by a potential release from this line in a characterization plan was identified in the "HWMA/RCRA Less Than 90-day Generator Closure Report for the VES-SFE-126."

  6. Drain-Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 219Does YourDrain-Water Heat Recovery

  7. Wellton-Mohawk Irr & Drain Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraphWellton-Mohawk Irr & Drain Dist Jump to:

  8. Hierarchical nanostructured conducting polymer hydrogel with high electrochemical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    and have been used in many applications such as bioelectronics and energy storage devices. They are often demonstrated great potential for a broad range of applications from energy storage devices such as biofuelHierarchical nanostructured conducting polymer hydrogel with high electrochemical activity Lijia

  9. Enzyme-polymer composites with high biocatalytic activity and stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jungbae; Kosto, Timothy J.; Manimala, Joseph C.; Nauman, E B.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2004-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have applied vacuum-spraying and electrospinning to incorporate an enzyme into a polymer matrix, creating a novel and highly active biocatalytic composite. As a unique technical approach, enzymes were co-dissolved in toluene with polymers, and the solvent was then rapidly removed by injecting the mixture into a vacuum chamber or by electrospinning. Subsequent crosslinking of the enzyme with glutaraldehyde resulted in stable entrapped enzyme within the polymeric matrices. For example, an amorphous composite of alpha-chymotrypsin and polyethylene showed no significant loss of enzymatic activity in aqueous buffer for one month. Nanofibers of alpha-chymotrypsin and polystyrene also showed no decrease in activity for more than two weeks. The normalized activity of amorphous composite in organic solvents was 3-13 times higher than that of native alpha-chymotrypsin. The activity of nanofibers was 5-7 times higher than that of amorphous composite in aqueous buffer solution. The composites of alpha-chymotrypsin and polymers demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining a wide variety of active and stable biocatalytic materials with many combinations of enzymes and polymers.

  10. Symmetric Active/Active Metadata Service for High Availability Parallel File Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, X. [Tennessee Technological University; Ou, Li [Tennessee Technological University; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Chen, Xin [Tennessee Technological University; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High availability data storage systems are critical for many applications as research and business become more data-driven. Since metadata management is essential to system availability, multiple metadata services are used to improve the availability of distributed storage systems. Past research focused on the active/standby model, where each active service has at least one redundant idle backup. However, interruption of service and even some loss of service state may occur during a fail-over depending on the used replication technique. In addition, the replication overhead for multiple metadata services can be very high. The research in this paper targets the symmetric active/active replication model, which uses multiple redundant service nodes running in virtual synchrony. In this model, service node failures do not cause a fail-over to a backup and there is no disruption of service or loss of service state. We further discuss a fast delivery protocol to reduce the latency of the needed total order broadcast. Our prototype implementation shows that metadata service high availability can be achieved with an acceptable performance trade-off using our symmetric active/active metadata service solution.

  11. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments: Progress Report October 1998 through November 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; TerBerg, R.; Borglin, S.E.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Panoche Water District, is conducting a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium (Se)-enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems which may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to the groundwater; increased exposure to the biota; and reduced productivity of farm crops. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through November 2000, as well as the results of these investigations.

  12. CSER 94-011: Use of glovebags for demister draining operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, A.L.

    1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A criticality safety review is presented for the use of plastic-sheet glovebags for the operations of draining demisters on the 26-inch vacuum system headers. A criticality drain is required because of the possibility for spilling liquid of sufficient volume and fissile content for criticality. It is recommended that the glovebag design include a rigid, 2ft {times} 2ft floor with a central drain feeding a geometrically favorable spill-catch vessel, plus a screen grid above the bottom for drain protection.

  13. Method of draining water through a solid waste site without leaching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treat, R.L.; Gee, G.W.; Whyatt, G.A.

    1993-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of preventing water from leaching solid waste sites by preventing atmospheric precipitation from contacting waste as the water flows through a solid waste site. The method comprises placing at least one drain hole through the solid waste site. The drain hole is seated to prevent waste material from entering the drain hole, and the solid waste site cover material is layered and graded to direct water to flow toward the drain hole and to soil beneath the waste site.

  14. Method of draining water through a solid waste site without leaching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treat, Russell L. (Richland, WA); Gee, Glendon W. (Richland, WA); Whyatt, Greg A. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of preventing water from leaching solid waste sites by preventing atmospheric precipitation from contacting waste as the water flows through a solid waste site. The method comprises placing at least one drain hole through the solid waste site. The drain hole is seated to prevent waste material from entering the drain hole, and the solid waste site cover material is layered and graded to direct water to flow toward the drain hole and to soil beneath the waste site.

  15. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. (Bart) Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  16. Last updated: June 13, 2013 4:29 pm Brain drain in Spain leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moro-Martin, Amaya

    Last updated: June 13, 2013 4:29 pm Brain drain in Spain leaves scientific research on the wane and other Spanish cities to highlight their plight ­ and to warn of the risks that the current brain-drain to be vacated this year. Staffing aside, scientists complain that the government is holding back funding

  17. Hepatic and portal drained viscera response to intramesenteric infusion of propionate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hepatic and portal drained viscera response to intramesenteric infusion of propionate in lactating physiological infusion of sodium proprionate, in the mesenteric vein, on liver and portal drained viscera (PDV yield and composition was observed during the infusion of propionate. It resulted in an increase (P

  18. High Efficiency Broadband Envelope-Tracking Power Amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Jonmei Johana

    M. ,   “   Wideband High Efficiency Envelope Tracking PowerPeter  M. ,  “High-Efficiency Envelope Tracking High PowerMemory! DPD! Drain! Efficiency! (%)! Gain! (dB)! Output!

  19. Balancing Cost and Risk by Optimizing the High-Level Waste and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Vienna, John D.

    2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the currently used melters, the waste loading for nearly all high-level waste (HLW) is limited by crystallization. Above a certain level of waste loading, precipitation, settling, and accumulation of crystalline phases can cause severe processing problems and shorten the melter lifetime. To decrease the cost without putting the vitrification process at an unreasonable risk, several options, such as developing melters that operate above the liquidus temperature of glass, can be considered. Alternatively, if the melter is stirred, either mechanically, by bubbling, or by temperature gradients in induction heating, the melt can contain a substantial fraction of a crystalline phase that would not settle because it would be removed from the melter with glass. In addition, an induction melter can be nearly completely drained. For current melters that operate at a fixed temperature of 1150C, optimized glass formulation within currently accepted constaints has been developed. This approach is based on mathematically formulated relationships between glass properties and glass composition. Finally, re-evaluating the liquidus-temperature constraint, which may be unnecessarily restrictive for some HLWs, has recently been investigated. An attempt is being made to assess the rate of settling of crystalline phases in the melter and evaluate the risk for melter operation. Based on a reliable estimate of such a risk, waste loading could be increased, and a substantial saving can accrue. For low-activity waste (LAW), the waste loading in glass is limited either by the product quality or by segregation of sulfate during melting. The formulation of constraints on LAW glass in terms of relevant properties has not been completed, and no property-composition relationships have been established so far for this type of waste glass.

  20. Using Highly Interactive Virtual Environments for Safeguards Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, Bradley S [ORNL] [ORNL; Alcala, Benjamin S [ORNL] [ORNL; Alcala, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL] [ORNL; Weil, Logan B [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly interactive virtual environment (HIVE) is a term that refers to interactive educational simulations, serious games and virtual worlds. Studies indicate that learning with the aid of interactive environments produces better retention and depth of knowledge by promoting improved trainee engagement and understanding. Virtual reality or three dimensional (3D) visualization is often used to promote the understanding of something when personal observation, photographs, drawings, and/or sketches are not possible or available. Subjects and situations, either real or hypothetical, can be developed using a 3D model. Models can be tailored to the audience allowing safeguards and security features to be demonstrated for educational purposes in addition to engineering evaluation and performance analysis. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has begun evaluating the feasibility of HIVEs for improving safeguards activities such as training, mission planning, and evaluating worker task performance. This paper will discuss the development workflow of HIVEs and present some recent examples.

  1. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.] [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  2. Inverse problem in anisotropic poroelasticity: Drained constants from undrained ultrasound measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.; Nakagawa, S.

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Poroelastic analysis has traditionally focused on the relationship between dry or drained constants which are assumed known and the saturated or undrained constants which are assumed unknown. However, there are many applications in this field of study for which the main measurements can only be made on the saturated/undrained system, and then it is uncertain what the eects of the uids were on the system, since the drained constants remain a mystery. The work presented here shows how to deduce drained constants from undrained constants for anisotropic systems having symmetries ranging from isotropic to orthotropic. Laboratory ultrasound data are then inverted for the drained constants in three granular packings: one of glass beads, and two others for distinct types of more or less angular sand grain packings. Experiments were performed under uniaxial stress, which resulted in hexagonal (transversely isotropic) symmetry of the poroelastic response. One important conclusion from the general analysis is that the drained constants are uniquely related to the undrained constants, assuming that porosity, grain bulk modulus, and pore uid bulk modulus are already known. Since the resulting system of equations for all the drained constants is linear, measurement error in undrained constants also propagates linearly into the computed drained constants.

  3. Development of Highly Active Titania-Based Nanoparticles for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    active toward energetic reactions and effectively incorporate them into energetic composites are reported. Activity was maximized by tuning the physical and chemical properties...

  4. Effectiveness of PV Drains for Mitigating Earthquake-Induced Deformations in Sandy Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vytiniotis, Antonios

    This paper considers the effectiveness of a Pre-fabricated Vertical (PV) drain array for mitigating the earthquake-induced permanent ground deformations of a water-fronting loose sand fill based on results of numerical ...

  5. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional septic systems have traditionally been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of conventional septic tank/drain fields, as well as estimated costs...

  6. High-capacity electric double-layer capacitor with high-density-activated carbon fiber electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the authors have presented a method to prepare activated carbon fiber with high bulk density (HD-ACF) without using any binders. The possibility of using the HD-ACF as an electrode for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) was examined in this paper. The capacitance of the EDLC with the HD-ACF electrode increased with the increase of bulk density of the HD-ACF, indicating that individual fibers are highly packed without losing their capacitance. The capacitance also increased in proportion to the size of the HD-ACF electrode. The initial discharge current of the EDLC showed little dependency on either the bulk density or the size of the HD-ACF electrode. These results clarified that the HD-ACF electrode is suitable for constructing a high-power EDLC. The initial discharge current was directly proportional to the conductivity of aqueous KCI used as the electrolyte, indicating that the resistance of the electrolyte is much higher than that of the HD-ACF electrode. This result showed that the efficiency of the HD-ACF was well above the efficiency of the electrolyte used in this study and that the improvement of the ionic conductivity of electrolyte is also necessary for developing a high-power EDLC.

  7. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

  8. JOSHUA: Symmetric Active/Active Replication for Highly Available HPC Job and Resource Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhlemann, Kai [ORNL; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Steven L [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of today's HPC systems employ a single head node for control, which represents a single point of failure as it interrupts an entire HPC system upon failure. Furthermore, it is also a single point of control as it disables an entire HPC system until repair. One of the most important HPC system service running on the head node is the job and resource management. If it goes down, all currently running jobs loose the service they report back to. They have to be restarted once the head node is up and running again. With this paper, we present a generic approach for providing symmetric active/active replication for highly available HPC job and resource management. The JOSHUA solution provides a virtually synchronous environment for continuous availability without any interruption of service and without any loss of state. Replication is performed externally via the PBS service interface without the need to modify any service code. Test results as well as a reliability analysis of our proof-of-concept prototype implementation show that continuous availability can be provided by JOSHUA with an acceptable performance trade-off.

  9. Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospectin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the level of unrecognized active faults present in these areas. Analysis of low-sun-angle aerial photography acquired over the Needle Rocks, Astor Pass, Empire, and Lee...

  10. DRAINING HAZARDOUS FLUIDS DURING BUILDING 221-1F DEACTIVATION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musall, J.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Several years ago, SRS completed a four year mission to decommission {approx}250 excess facilities. As part of that effort, SRS deactivated multiple facilities (e.g. Building 247-F, Naval Fuels Facility, and Building 211-F, Outside Facilities for F-Canyon) that contained extensive piping systems filled with hazardous material (e.g. nitric acid). Draining of hazardous materials from piping was successfully completed in all facilities without incident. In early 2009, the decommissioning program at SRS was restarted as a result of funding made available by the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Under ARRA, draining of piping containing hazardous material was initiated in multiple facilities including Building 221-1F (or A-Line). This paper describes and reviews the draining of piping containing hazardous materials at A-Line, with emphasis on an incident involving the draining of nitric acid. The paper is intended to be a resource for engineers, planners, and project managers, who face similar draining challenges.

  11. Adaptive Detached Eddy Simulation of a High Lift Wing with Active...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and slat support). Adaptive Detached Eddy Simulation of a High Lift Wing with Active Flow Control PI Name: Kenneth Jansen PI Email: jansenke@colorado.edu Institution:...

  12. Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop including an overview about Fraunhofer IPM, new funding situation in Germany, high temperature material and modules, energy-autarkic sensors, and thermoelectric...

  13. activity high stability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field. It is argued that spontaneous generation of magnetic field does not take place at high temperature due to nonperturbative magnetic screening. Furthermore, the dispersion...

  14. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Guo, Q. L., E-mail: kdf@ynao.ac.cn [College of Mathematics Physics and Information Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314001 (China)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  15. Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    produce high-activity modified green rusts (HMGRs) that demonstrate higher degradation rates. Methods of modifying GRs to obtain high reactivity for degradation of PCE and nitrate were developed and reduction kinetics of PCE and nitrate by HMGRs were...

  16. Acceptance test report for the AN valve pit leak detection and low point drain assembly mock up test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EWER, K.L.

    1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes The Performance Mock-up Test Procedure for the Valve Pit Leak Detection and Low Point Drain Assembly Performance Mock-Up Test Procedure.

  17. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, D.L.; Baraszu, D.J.; Foulkes, D.M.; Gomes, E.G.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine`s crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages. 4 figs.

  18. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

  19. active high surface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 Trap Surface Formation in High-Energy Black Holes Collision HEP - Theory (arXiv) Summary: We investigate classical formation...

  20. activated high gain: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gain Observer and High-Order Sliding Mode Controller for a DFIG-Based Wind Turbine in variable speed wind turbines. In this context, a control strategy is proposed to ensure...

  1. EVALUATION OF FABRIC MEMBRANES FOR USE IN SALTSTONE DRAIN WATER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickenheim, B.; Miller, D.; Burket, P.

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Saltstone Disposal Unit 2 contains a sheet drain fabric intended to separate solids from drain water to be returned to the Salt Feed Tank. A similar system installed in Vault 4 appears to be ineffective in keeping solids out of the drain water return lines. Waste Solidification Engineering is considering installation of an additional fabric membrane to supplement the existing sheet drain in SDU 2. Amerdrain 200 is the product currently installed in SDU 2. This product is no longer available, so Sitedrain 94 was used as the replacement product in this testing. Fabrics with apparent opening sizes of 10, 25, 50 and 100 microns were evaluated. These fabrics were evaluated under three separate test conditions, a water flow test, a solids retention test and a grout pour test. A flow test with water showed that installation of an additional filter layer will predictably reduce the theoretical flux through the sheet drain. The manufacturer reports the flux for Sitedrain 94 as 150 gpm/ft{sup 2} by ASTM D-4491. This compares reasonably well with the 117 gpm/ft{sup 2} obtained in this testing. A combination of the 10 micron fabric with Sitedrain 94 could be expected to decrease flux by about 10 times as compared to Sitedrain 94 alone. The different media were used to filter a slag and fly ash mixture from water. Slag historically has the smallest nominal particle size of the premix components. Cement was omitted from the test because of its reactivity with water would prohibit accurately particle size measurements of the filtered samples. All four media sizes were able to remove greater than 95% of particles larger than 100 microns from the slurry. The smaller opening sizes were increasingly effective in removing more particles. The 10 micron filter captured 15% of the total amount of solids used in the test. This result implies that some insoluble particles may still be able to enter the drain water collection system, although the overall solids rejection is significantly improved over the current design. Test boxes were filled with grout to evaluate the performance of the sheet drain and fabrics in a simulated vault environment. All of the tests produced a similar amount of drain water, between 8-11% of the amount of water in the mix, which is expected with the targeted formulation. All of the collected drain waters contained some amount of solids, although the 10 micron filter did not appear to allow any premix materials to pass through. The solids collected from this box are believed to consist of calcium carbonate based on one ICP-AES measurement. Any of the four candidate fabrics would be an improvement over the sheet drain alone relative to solids removal. The 10 micron fabric is the only candidate that stopped all premix material from passing. The 10 micron fabric will also cause the largest decrease in flux. This decrease in flux was not enough to inhibit the total amount of drain water removed, but may lead to increased time to remove standing water prior to subsequent pours in the facility. The acceptability of reduced liquid flux through the 10 micron fabric will depend on the amount of excess water to be removed, the time available for water removal and the total area of fabric installed at the disposal cell.

  2. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho, E-mail: kihos@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive ?-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of ?-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-? and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  3. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Mountain View, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  4. Draining our Glass: An Energy and Heat Characterization of Google Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    Draining our Glass: An Energy and Heat Characterization of Google Glass Robert LiKamWa, Zhen Wang, such as hands-free video chat and web search. However, its shape also hampers its potential: (1) battery size characterizing the Glass system. Others have documented technical specifica- tions [22], privacy, security

  5. OFDR DISTRIBUTED TEMPERATURE AND STRAIN MEASUREMENTS WITH OPTICAL FIBRE SENSING CABLES: APPLICATION TO DRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sodium coolant fast breeder reactor in current dismantling). Measurements have been performed during measurements, have been qualified and afterwards installed along a sodium drain line at Superphénix NPP (liquid capacity along a single optical fibre. 1 SCOPE AND MOTIVATION In a liquid metal coolant reactor, all

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Application of the DNDC model to tile-drained Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    . Modeling efficiency ranged from 0.25 to 0.85 in comparison with measured drainage and leachate valuesORIGINAL PAPER Application of the DNDC model to tile-drained Illinois agroecosystems: model Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Abstract We applied the Denitrification- Decomposition (DNDC

  7. Drain Tank Information for Developing Design Basis of the Preliminary Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) drain tanks (DTs) serve two functions: normal operation and safety operation. Normal DTs are used for regular maintenance operations when draining is necessary. Safety DTs are used to receive the water leaked into the Vacuum Vessel (VV) after an in-vessel loss of coolant accident (LOCA) event. The preliminary design of the DTs shall be based on the information provided by this document. The capacity of the normal DTs is estimated based on the internal volume of in-vessel components [e.g., First Wall/Blanket (FW/BLK) and Divertor (DIV)]; Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) components; and TCWS piping, heat exchangers, electric heaters, pump casing, pressurizers, and valves. Water volumes have been updated based on 2004-design information, changes adopted because of approved Project Change Requests (PCRs), and data verification by US ITER and AREVA Federal Services, the US ITER A and E Company. Two tanks will store water from normal draining operations of the FW/BLK and DIV Primary Heat Transfer Systems (PHTSs). One tank will store water from normal draining operations of the NBI PHTS. The capacity of the safety DTs is based on analysis of a design basis accident: a large leak from in-vessel components. There are two safety DTs that will receive water from a VV LOCA event and drainage from the VV, as needed. In addition, there is one sump tank for the DIV that will be used for collecting drain water from the draining and drying processes and specifically for draining the DIV system as the DIV cassette lines are at a lower elevation than the DT connection point. Information documented in this report must be refined and verified during the preliminary design of the DTs, and there are several aspects to be considered to complete the preliminary design. Input to these design considerations is discussed in this report and includes, but is not limited to, water inventory; operating procedures/maintenance; Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA); tank layout and dimensions, including design margin; classification under French Nuclear Pressure Directives, Equipements Sous Pression Nucleaires (ESPN); and adaptations for construction.

  8. Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and maintenance support. Each product is briefly described in Appendix A. Selection of the most appropriate software package for a particular application will depend on the chosen component, system, or structure. Ongoing research will determine the most appropriate choices for a successful demonstration of PHM systems in aging NPPs.

  9. Planning and scheduling of concurrent high-level activities for UUV mission operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Larry, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a mission planning and scheduling algorithm that enables a single Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (UUV) to concurrently perform high level activities, while managing various resources in a dynamic ocean ...

  10. Technical baseline description of high-level waste andlow-activity waste feed mobilization and delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papp, I.G. [Numatec Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of information related to the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) feed staging, mobilization, and transfer/delivery issues. Information relevant to current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) inventories and activities designed to feed the Phase I Privatization effort at the Hanford Site is included. Discussions on the higher level Phase II activities are offered for a perspective on the interfaces.

  11. Flood Management This impromptu activity was contrived by playing with a storm drain that entered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

    waterways. Concept: Students practice with hydrology and flood control terms as well as measuring drainage sloped downward to other water sources, we decided that this might be a good as guess as any for practice that "real" people do on a regular basis in which the students will complete the task in 1-2 hours (except

  12. High Heat Flux Exposure Tests on 10mm Beryllium Tiles Brazed on Actively Cooled Vapotron made from CUCRZR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Heat Flux Exposure Tests on 10mm Beryllium Tiles Brazed on Actively Cooled Vapotron made from CUCRZR

  13. Words into Action | 99 Forget the brain drain today's highly skilled migrants circulate between the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxenian, AnnaLee

    the US and developing countries, creating new technology businesses and spreading prosperity along the way. The new Argonauts J uly Systems, which develops technology for selling content such as games headquarters are in California's Silicon Valley, near game developers and mobile-content firms, it develops its

  14. Geophysical investigations of French Drain 116-B-9, and Dry Well 116-B-10, 100 B/C Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, K.A.; Fassett, J.W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    French Drain 116-B-9 and Dry Well 116-B-10 are both located within the 100 B/C-2 Operable Unit, 100 B/C Area (Figure 1). The 116-B-9 French Drain is approximately 4 ft in diameter by 3 ft deep. The exact location or use of the drain in not clear. The 116-B-10 Dry Well is a 3 ft-diameter, tile-lined well on a concrete slab, 7 ft below the surface, overlain by a manhole cover (DOE-RL 1991). The exact location of the well is uncertain. The objective of the survey was to locate the Dry Well and the French Drain. The area to be investigated had several buildings in the area which subsequently have been torn down. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) was the geophysical method chosen for the investigation.

  15. Non-linear response of carbon dioxide and methane emissions to oxygen availability in a drained histosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNicol, Gavin; Silver, Whendee L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions to oxygen availability in a drained HistosolIncreased O 2 availability from wetland drainage and climateunder greater O 2 availability. We varied gas-phase O 2

  16. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  17. APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael W. Rose

    2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

  18. Comparison of experimental and simulated thermal ratings of drain-back solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.H.; Carlson, W.T.; Duff, W.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)); Schaefer, P.J.; Beckman, W.A.; Klein, S.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-term experimental tests of drain-back solar water heaters are compared to ratings obtained using TRNSYS to determine if computer simulations can effectively replace laboratory thermal ratings of solar domestic hot water heating systems. The effectiveness of TRNSYS in predicting changes in rating due to limited changes in collector area, collector flow rate, recirculation flow rate, storage tank volume, and storage tank design is validated to within [plus minus]10 percent. Storage tank design is varied by using a stratification manifold in place of the standard drop tube. Variations in other component sizes and operating factors are based on current industry standards.

  19. Highly Stable and Active Pt-Cu Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts Based on Mesoporous Graphitic Carbon Supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Gupta, Gaurav [University of Texas, Austin; Kumar, Pavan [University of Texas, Austin; Wiggins-camacho, Jaclyn [University of Texas, Austin; Wang, Xiqing [ORNL; Swinnea, Steven [University of Texas, Austin; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Stevenson, Keith J [ORNL; Johnston, Keith [University of Texas, Austin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of oxygen reduction catalysts for fuel cells often decreases markedly (30-70%) during potential cycling tests designed to accelerate catalyst degradation. Herein we achieved essentially no loss in electrochemical surface area and catalyst activity during potential cycling from 0.5 to 1.2 V for presynthesized Pt-Cu nanoparticles of controlled composition that were infused into highly graphitic disordered mesoporous carbons (DMC). The high stability is favored by the strong metal-support interactions and low tendency for carbon oxidation, which mitigates the mechanisms of degradation. Electrochemical dealloying transforms the composition from Pt{sub 20}Cu{sub 80} to Pt{sub 85}Cu{sub 15} with a strained Pt-rich shell, which exhibits an enhanced ORR activity of 0.46 A/mg{sub Pt}, >4 fold that of pure Pt catalysts. The high uniformity in particle size and composition both before and after dealloying, as a consequence of the presynthesis/infusion technique, is beneficial for elucidating the mechanism of catalyst activity and, ultimately, for designing more active catalysts.

  20. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE EMISSION IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent analysis of observations taken with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope instruments on Hinode suggests that well-constrained measurements of the temperature distribution in solar active regions can finally be made. Such measurements are critical for constraining theories of coronal heating. Past analysis, however, has suffered from limited sample sizes and large uncertainties at temperatures between 5 and 10 MK. Here we present a systematic study of the differential emission measure distribution in 15 active region cores. We focus on measurements in the 'inter-moss' region, that is, the region between the loop footpoints, where the observations are easier to interpret. To reduce the uncertainties at the highest temperatures we present a new method for isolating the Fe XVIII emission in the AIA/SDO 94 A channel. The resulting differential emission measure distributions confirm our previous analysis showing that the temperature distribution in an active region core is often strongly peaked near 4 MK. We characterize the properties of the emission distribution as a function of the total unsigned magnetic flux. We find that the amount of high-temperature emission in the active region core is correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, while the emission at lower temperatures, in contrast, is inversely related. These results provide compelling evidence that high-temperature active region emission is often close to equilibrium, although weaker active regions may be dominated by evolving million degree loops in the core.

  1. An active queue management scheme to contain high bandwidth flows at a congested router

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smitha

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be incorporated in RED, an active queue management scheme. The proposed scheme possesses all the advantages of RED. In addition, it lowers the drop rates of short-lived flows and also those high bandwidth flows that reduce their sending rate when congestion...

  2. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1990--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, E.; Moonier, P.; May, E.; Norem, J. (eds.)

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report is presented of research and development activities conducted in the High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory during the six month period July 1 through December 31, 1990. Analyses of data from experiments performed by members of the Division are summarized, and the status of experiments taking data and of those being prepared is reviewed. Descriptions are included of research on theoretical and phenomenological topics in particle physics. Progress reports are provided on accelerator research and development, detector research and development, and experimental facilities research. Lists are presented of publications, of colloquia and conference talks, and of significant external community activities of members of the Division.

  3. Measuring bi-directional current through a field-effect transistor by virtue of drain-to-source voltage measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Steven Richard

    2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring current, and particularly bi-directional current, in a field-effect transistor (FET) using drain-to-source voltage measurements. The drain-to-source voltage of the FET is measured and amplified. This signal is then compensated for variations in the temperature of the FET, which affects the impedance of the FET when it is switched on. The output is a signal representative of the direction of the flow of current through the field-effect transistor and the level of the current through the field-effect transistor. Preferably, the measurement only occurs when the FET is switched on.

  4. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.] [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW ?s-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  5. Single-molecule imaging at high fluorophore concentrations by local activation of dye

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Geertsema, Hylkje J. [Zernike Inst. of Advanced Materials, Groningen (The Netherlands); Mangel, Walter F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schulte, Aartje C. [Zernike Inst. of Advanced Materials, Groningen (The Netherlands); Spenkelink, Lisanne M. [Zernike Inst. of Advanced Materials, Groningen (The Netherlands); McGrath, William J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morrone, Seamus R. [John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sohn, Jungsan [John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Robinson, Andrew [Zernike Inst. of Advanced Materials, Groningen (The Netherlands); van Oijen, Antoine M. [Zernike Inst. of Advanced Materials, Groningen (The Netherlands)

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is a powerful approach to observe biomolecular interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. Detecting fluorescent signals from individual, labeled proteins above high levels of background fluorescence remains challenging, however. For this reason, the concentrations of labeled proteins in in vitro assays are often kept low compared to their in vivo concentrations. Here, we present a new fluorescence imaging technique by which single fluorescent molecules can be observed in real time at high, physiologically relevant concentrations. The technique requires a protein and its macromolecular substrate to be labeled each with a different fluorophore. Then, making use of short-distance energy-transfer mechanisms, the fluorescence from only those proteins bound to their substrate are selectively activated. This approach is demonstrated by labeling a DNA substrate with an intercalating stain, exciting the stain, and using energy transfer from the stain to activate the fluorescence of only those labeled DNA-binding proteins bound to the DNA. Such an experimental design allowed us to observe the sequence-independent interaction of Cy5-labeled interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) with DNA and the sliding via one-dimensional diffusion of Cy5-labeled adenovirus protease (pVIc-AVP) on DNA in the presence of a background of hundreds of nM Cy5 fluorophore.

  6. US/Japan Cooperation in High Energy Physics. Review of activities, 1988--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Implementing Arrangement was to further the energy programs of both countries by establishing a framework for cooperation in the field of high energy physics, including research, accelerator and detector instrumentation research and development, the fabrication and subsequent use of new experimental devices and facilities, and related joint efforts as may be mutually agreed. Over the years, this cooperation has been very effective and has strengthened the overall collaborative efforts and the understanding between our nations and their citizens. It has demonstrated to the world our ability to work together to attack difficult problems. High Energy Physics goes across national borders; the bond is clearly intellectual and common ground is shared for the benefit of all in a most effective manner. This review covers the activities conducted under the aegis of the US/Japan Committee for Cooperation in High Energy Physics during the past five years (1988--1993). This was the second such US review of the US/Japan cooperative activities; the first was held in 1987.

  7. Measurement of Tc-99 in Savannah River Site High Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPrete, D.P.

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste cleanup efforts currently underway at the Savannah River Site have created a need to characterize Tc-99 in the various high activity waste matrices currently in Site inventories. The traditional method our laboratory used for analyzing Tc-99 in higher activity matrices was a solvent-solvent extraction method using Aliquat-336 in xylene, which resulted in the problematic generation of mixed waste. In an effort to eliminate the generation of mixed wastes resulting from the Aliquat 336/xylene process, a variety of different separation methodologies have been studied. Eichrom TEVA solid phase extractions using column technology have been employed in a case by case basis over the last several years. More recently, applications using Eichrom TEVA extraction discs and 3M Empore Tc extraction discs have also been explored.

  8. High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackmann, Gary

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

  9. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B.; Morreale, Bryan D.; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  10. ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At-labeled targeted radiotherapeutics currently is a daunting task. Our central hypothesis is that improvements in 211At radiochemistry are critically dependent on gaining an understanding of and compensating for the effects of radiolysis induced by 211At {alpha}-particles. Because of the widespread interest in labeling antibodies, antibody fragments and peptides with 211At, our proposed work plan will initially focus on reagents that we have developed for this purpose. Part of our strategy is the use of synthetic precursors immobilized on polymeric resins or perfluorous and triarylphosphonium supports. Their use could eliminate the need for a purification step to separate unreacted tin precursor from labeled product and hopefully provide a simple kit technology that could be utilized at other institutions. The specific aims of this project are: (1) To optimze methods for 211At production and isolation of 211At from cyclotron targets; (2) To develop convenient and reproducible methodologies for high activity level and high specific activity radiohalogenation of biomolecules with 211At; (3) to develop a procedure for extending the shelf-life of 211At beyond a few hours so that this radionuclide can be utilized at centers remote from its site of production; and (4) to work out high activity level synthesis methods for utilizing support immobilized tin precursors for 211At labeling. If we are successful in achieving our goals, the radiochemical methodologies that are developed could greatly facilitate the use of 211At-labeled targeted cancer therapeutics in patients, even at institutions that are distant from the few sites currently available for 211At production.

  11. Planar Fully Depleted SOI Technology: the Convergence of High Performance and Low Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Borivoje

    voltages. Index Terms--28nm, FD-SOI, CMOS, high-performance, low- power, mobile, SoC, efficiency, Back conditions. B. Electrostatics Due to the reduction of the spacing between the drain and the source/IOFF current ratio originates from SCE. The drain and source capacitances jeopardize the gate control over

  12. Impact of component selection and operation on thermal ratings of drain-back solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.H.; Carlson, W.T.; Duff, W.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Solar Energy Applications Lab.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a half-factorial, two-level experimental design is used to determine the effects of changes in collector area, storage tank volume, collector flow rate, recirculation flow rate, and storage tank design on thermal rating of a solar drain-back water heating system. Experimental ratings are determined in accordance with the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation guidelines. Storage tank design is varied by using a stratification manifold in place of the standard drop tube. Variations in other component sizes and operating factors are based on current industry standards. Statistical analyses indicate that a change in collector area accounts for nearly 90 percent of the variation in heat output. Doubling collector area from 2.78 m[sup 2] to 5.56 m[sup 2] increases delivered solar energy by 31 percent. Use of a stratification manifold increases the delivery of solar energy by six percent. Doubling collector flow rate from 0.057 to 0.114 1/s increases solar output by aproximately three percent; however, the increase in pumping energy outweighs the benefits of increasing collector flow rate. The effects of recirculation flow rate and tank volume are obscured by experimental error.

  13. Subnanometer platinum clusters highly active and selective catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vajda, S; Pellin, M. J.; Greeley, J. P.; Marshall, C. L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Ballentine, G. A.; Elam, J. W.; Catillon-Mucherie, S.; Redfern, P. C.; Mehmood, F.; Zapol, P.; Yale Univ.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small clusters are known to possess reactivity not observed in their bulk analogues, which can make them attractive for catalysis. Their distinct catalytic properties are often hypothesized to result from the large fraction of under-coordinated surface atoms. Here, we show that size-preselected Pt{sub 8-10} clusters stabilized on high-surface-area supports are 40-100 times more active for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane than previously studied platinum and vanadia catalysts, while at the same time maintaining high selectivity towards formation of propylene over by-products. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that under-coordination of the Pt atoms in the clusters is responsible for the surprisingly high reactivity compared with extended surfaces. We anticipate that these results will form the basis for development of a new class of catalysts by providing a route to bond-specific chemistry, ranging from energy-efficient and environmentally friendly synthesis strategies to the replacement of petrochemical feedstocks by abundant small alkanes.

  14. Title: Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Title: Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high intensity ultrasound Authors: Jérôme GATEAU, Jean-François AUBRY, Mathieu PERNOT / INSERM, U979 / Université Denis Diderot, Paris VII Key words: single nucleation events, ultrafast active

  15. In-growth of an electrically active defect in high-purity silicon after proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Juul Pedersen, H.; Christian Petersen, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Privitera, V. [CNR-IMM, Institute of Microelectronics and Microsystems, Catania (Italy)] [CNR-IMM, Institute of Microelectronics and Microsystems, Catania (Italy); Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A. [IM2NP, CNRS (UMR 7334) and Université Aix-Marseille, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)] [IM2NP, CNRS (UMR 7334) and Université Aix-Marseille, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Defect-related energy levels in the lower half of the band gap of silicon have been studied with transient-capacitance techniques in high-purity, carbon and oxygen lean, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition grown, n-and p-type silicon layers after 2-MeV proton irradiations at temperatures at or just below room temperature. The in-growth of a distinct line in deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra, corresponding to a level in the band gap at E{sub V} + 0.357 eV where E{sub V} is the energy of the valence band edge, takes place for anneal temperatures at around room temperature with an activation energy of 0.95 ± 0.08 eV. The line disappears at an anneal temperature of around 450 K. The corresponding defect is demonstrated not to contain boron, carbon, oxygen, or phosphorus. Possible defect candidates are discussed.

  16. High baseline activity in inferior temporal cortex improves neural and behavioral discriminability during visual categorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emadi, Nazli

    Spontaneous firing is a ubiquitous property of neural activity in the brain. Recent literature suggests that this baseline activity plays a key role in perception. However, it is not known how the baseline activity contributes ...

  17. On the GCR intensity and the inversion of the heliospheric magnetic field during the periods of the high solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krainev, M B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the long-term behavior of the solar and heliospheric parameters and the GCR intensity in the periods of high solar activity and the inversions of heliospheric magnetic field (HMF). The classification of the HMF polarity structures and the meaning of the HMF inversion are discussed. The procedure is considered how to use the known HMF polarity distribution for the GCR intensity modeling during the periods of high solar activity. We also briefly discuss the development and the nearest future of the sunspot activity and the GCR intensity in the current unusual solar cycle 24.

  18. Direct power control of shunt active filter using high selectivity filter (HSF) under distorted or unbalanced conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    4 Direct power control of shunt active filter using high selectivity filter (HSF) under distorted.A. Djaffar) Abstract This paper describes the design of a new configuration of direct power control (DPC, Direct power control (DPC), Switching table, High selectivity filter, Distorted or unbalanced conditions

  19. Investigation of the Highly Active Manganese Superoxide Dismutase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabelli, D.E.; Barnese, K.; Sheng, Y.; Stich, T.A.; Gralla, E.B.; Britt, R.D.; Valentine, J.S.

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) from different species differs in its efficiency in removing high concentrations of superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}), due to different levels of product inhibition. Human MnSOD exhibits a substantially higher level of product inhibition than the MnSODs from bacteria. In order to investigate the mechanism of product inhibition and whether it is a feature common to eukaryotic MnSODs, we purified MnSOD from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScMnSOD). It was a tetramer with 0.6 equiv of Mn per monomer. The catalytic activity of ScMnSOD was investigated by pulse radiolysis and compared with human and two bacterial (Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans) MnSODs. To our surprise, ScMnSOD most efficiently facilitates removal of high concentrations of O{sub 2}{sup -} among these MnSODs. The gating value k{sub 2}/k{sub 3} that characterizes the level of product inhibition scales as ScMnSOD > D. radiodurans MnSOD > E. coli MnSOD > human MnSOD. While most MnSODs rest as the oxidized form, ScMnSOD was isolated in the Mn{sup 2+} oxidation state as revealed by its optical and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. This finding poses the possibility of elucidating the origin of product inhibition by comparing human MnSOD with ScMnSOD.

  20. Characterization of the Highly Active Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase of Chromobacterium Sp. Strain Usm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhubalan, Kesaven

    The synthesis of bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) is very much dependent on the expression and activity of a key enzyme, PHA synthase (PhaC). Many efforts are being pursued to enhance the activity and broaden the ...

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 118-C-3:3, 105-C French Drains, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-016

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The 118-C-3:3 french drains received condensate from the steam heating system in the 105-C Reactor Building. The 118-C-3:3 french drain meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  2. Characteristics of high-frequency precursors to edge-localized activity in the PBX-M tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaye, S.M.; Manickam, J.; Bell, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Kessel, C.; Kugel, H.; Paul, S.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Asakura, N. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan)); Lau, Y.T. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High {beta}{sub pol} H-mode plasmas in the PBX-M tokamak often exhibit periods of Edge Localized Mode (ELM) activity, with each ELM preceded by a short duration ({le} 350 {mu}sec) burst of high frequency (200 to 250 kHz) magnetic activity. The burst grows on a time scale of 10 {mu}sec, and disappears just prior to the rapid increase in the D{sub {alpha}} emission that is characteristic of the ELM. The burst of activity is observed at all poloidal locations, with the largest amplitudes seen on the coils on the inner major radius side, indicating that the mode is not outward ballooning in character. Stability calculations indicate that a likely candidate for this high frequency ELM precursor is the pressure-driven ideal kink. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Extraction chromatographic separation of promethium from high active waste solutions of Purex origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanujam, A.; Achuthan, P.V.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Kannan, R.; Mathur, J.N. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extraction chromatographic procedure for the separation of {sup 147}Pm from High Active Waste solutions of Purex process has been developed. Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide(CMPO) and 2-ethylhexyl-2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (KSM-17), both sorbed separately on an inert support(chromosorb-102) have been sequentially employed for this purpose. In the CMPO column, the rare earths and the trivalent actinides are sorbed together with uranium, plutonium and traces of few other fission products. The elution of this column with 0.04 M HNO{sub 3} gives an eluate containing trivalent actinides and lanthanides. This solution, after adjusting the pH to 2.0, is used as feed for the second extraction chromatographic column based on KSM-17. All the trivalent metal ions are sorbed on the column leaving the trace impurities in the effluent. Fractional elution of the metal ions from this column is carried out with nitric acid of varying concentrations. At 0.09 M HNO{sub 3}, the pure beta emitting fraction of {sup 147}Pm has been obtained. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. High-resolution observations of active region moss and its dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, R J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The \\textit{High resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C)} has provided the sharpest view of the EUV corona to date. In this paper we exploit its impressive resolving power to provide the first analysis of the fine-scale structure of moss in an active region. The data reveal that the moss is made up of a collection of fine threads, that have widths with a mean and standard deviation of $440\\pm190$~km (Full Width Half Maximum). {The brightest moss emission is located at the visible head of the fine-scale structure and the fine structure appears to extend into the lower solar atmosphere.} The emission decreases along the features implying the lower sections are most likely dominated by cooler transition region plasma. These threads appear to be the cool, lower legs of the hot loops. In addition, the increased resolution allows for the first direct observation {of physical displacements of the moss fine-structure in a direction transverse to its central axis. Some of these transverse displacements demonstrate periodic b...

  5. New developments in plasma-activated high-rate EB evaporation for metal strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiller, S.; Goedicke, K.; Hoetzsch, G. [Fraunhofer Institute, Dresden (Germany)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The coating of metal strips by EB evaporation is well known since many years. But up to now the application on an industrial scale is very limited. One of the reasons are the costs and the progress of ECD technologies in the last ten years. But there are opportunities for the evaporation technology if layers with new properties can be produced. One way to meet this target is the application of a plasma-activated and ion-assisted process. However, the plasma density and the ion current density on the substrate must fit the high deposition rates. Many efforts in our institute are dedicated to the development of appropriate plasma sources. The systems are explained and main parameters are given. Using a plasma the layer properties can be improved remarkably. Therefore new applications come into play. First results are shown. Layers consisting of compounds will play a growing role for corrosion and abrasion protection. The technologies are explained and important film properties are presented.

  6. Near Infrared Spectroscopy of High Redshift Active Galactic Nuclei. I. A Metallicity-Accretion Rate Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Shemmer; H. Netzer; R. Maiolino; E. Oliva; S. Croom; E. Corbett; L. di Fabrizio

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new near infrared spectroscopic measurements of the H_beta region for a sample of 29 luminous high redshift quasars. We have measured the width of H_beta in those sources, and added archival H_beta width measurements, to create a sample of 92 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for which H_beta width and rest-frame UV measurements of N V \\lambda 1240 and C IV \\lambda 1549 emission-lines are available. Our sample spans six orders of magnitude in luminosity and includes 31 radio-loud AGNs. It also includes 10 narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies and one broad absorption-line quasar. We find that metallicity, indicated by the N V/C IV line ratio, is primarily correlated with accretion rate, which is a function of luminosity and H_beta line-width. This may imply an intimate relation between starburst, responsible for the metal enrichment of the nuclear gas, and AGN fueling, represented by the accretion rate. The correlation of metallicity with luminosity, or black hole (BH) mass, is weaker in contrast with recent results which were based on measurements of the width of C IV. We argue that using C IV as a proxy to H_beta in estimating M_BH might be problematic and lead to spurious BH mass and accretion rate estimates in individual sources. We discuss the potential implications of our new result in the framework of the starburst-AGN connection and theories of BH growth.

  7. UP2 400 High Activity Oxide Legacy Waste Retrieval Project Scope and Progress-13048

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabeuf, Jean-Michel; Varet, Thierry [AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site (France)] [AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Activity Oxide facility (HAO) reprocessed sheared and dissolved 4500 metric tons of light water reactor fuel the fuel of the emerging light water reactor spent fuel between 1976 and 1998. Over the period, approximately 2200 tons of process waste, composed primarily of sheared hulls, was produced and stored in a vast silo in the first place, and in canisters stored in pools in subsequent years. Upon shutdown of the facility, AREVA D and D Division in La Hague launched a thorough investigation and characterization of the silos and pools content, which then served as input data for the definition of a legacy waste retrieval and reconditioning program. Basic design was conducted between 2005 and 2007, and was followed by an optimization phase which lead to the definition of a final scenario and budget, 12% under the initial estimates. The scenario planned for the construction of a retrieval and reconditioning cell to be built on top of the storage silo. The retrieved waste would then be rinsed and sorted, so that hulls could subsequently be sent to La Hague high activity compacting facility, while resins and sludge would be cemented within the retrieval cell. Detailed design was conducted successfully from 2008 until 2011, while a thorough research and development program was conducted in order to qualify each stage of the retrieval and reconditioning process, and assist in the elaboration of the final waste package specification. This R and D program was defined and conducted as a response and mitigation of the major project risks identified during the basic design process. Procurement and site preparatory works were then launched in 2011. By the end of 2012, R and D is nearly completed, the retrieval and reconditioning process have been secured, the final waste package specification is being completed, the first equipment for the retrieval cell is being delivered on site, while preparation works are allowing to free up space above and around the silo, to allow for construction which is scheduled to being during the first semester of 2013. The elaboration of the final waste package is still undergoing and expected to be completed by then end of 2013, following some final elements of R and D required to demonstrate the full compatibility of the package with deep geological repository. The HAO legacy waste retrieval project is so far the largest such project entering operational phase on the site of La Hague. It is on schedule, under budget, and in conformity with the delivery requirements set by the French Safety Authority, as well as other stakeholders. This project paves the way for the successful completion of AREVA La Hague other legacy waste retrieval projects, which are currently being drafted or already in active R and D phase. (authors)

  8. Activities for Junior High and High School Students Sessions filled on a first come basis. Four ways to participate: Scheduled Activities (sign up for sessions at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Professional Engineers at Boise State ­ Ages 10-Adult, Ah Fong Room (D) - Microgravity, Boise State ­ Ages 10) - The Bullbots, Treasure Valley Robotics Teams (O) - Making Waves with LIGO, LIGO Hanford Observatory (O Group (BoRG) (O) - High Altitude Balloons, NearSys (O) - New - Astronomy Club (O) Engineering Building

  9. CARISMA: A Networking Project for High Temperature PEMFC MEA Activities in Europe

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation on high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells was given at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  10. High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia, Indonesia Introduction Sulawesi Island, eastern Indonesia, is at the triple junction of the Paci®c (through- ABSTRACT In eastern Indonesia, the Central Sulawesi fault system consists of complex left-lateral strike

  11. Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening: Classifying the activities of various compounds towards Cobalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening to the existing HTS method, via Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) using Artificial Neural in solving non-linear pattern classification problems, we propose several different models of neural networks

  12. WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the grouts for measurements. All of the cured grouts were measured for bleed and set. All of the cured grouts satisfied the bleed and set requirements, where no bleed water was observed on any of the grout samples after one day and all had set within 3 days of curing. This data indicates, for a well mixed product, bleed and set requirement are satisfied for the range of acidic feeds tested in this task. The yield stress measurements provide both an indication on the mixability of the salt solution with dry materials and an indication of how quickly the grout is starting to form structure. The inability to properly mix these two streams into a well mixed grout product will lead to a non-homogeneous mixture that will impact product quality. Product quality issues could be unmixed regions of dry material and hot spots having high concentrations of americium 241. Mixes that were more difficult to incorporate typically resulted in grouts with higher yield stresses. The mixability from these tests will provide Waste Solidification Building (WSB) an indication of which grouts will be more challenging to mix. The first yield stress measurements were statistically compared to a list of variables, specifically the batched chemicals used to make the acidic solutions. The first yield stress was also compared to the physical properties of the acidic solutions, physical and pH properties of the neutralized/pH adjusted solutions, and chemical and physical properties of the grout.

  13. Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocata...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced OER activity in Fe-doped -NiOOH, in which Fe sites have near-optimum binding energies for OER intermediates. The conversion of solar energy and water to hydrogen is a...

  14. High Performance Repetitive Control of an Active Filter under Varying Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    -Castell´o, Shane Malo, Robert Gri~n´o Institut d'Organitzaci´o i Control de Sistemes Industrials (IOC), Universitat proposed including parallel (shunt active filters), serial and hybrid serial-parallel connections, mixed

  15. CONSTRAINTS ON THE HEATING OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE ACTIVE REGION LOOPS: OBSERVATIONS FROM HINODE AND THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of high-temperature emission in the core of a solar active region using instruments on Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). These multi-instrument observations allow us to determine the distribution of plasma temperatures and follow the evolution of emission at different temperatures. We find that at the apex of the high-temperature loops the emission measure distribution is strongly peaked near 4 MK and falls off sharply at both higher and lower temperatures. Perhaps most significantly, the emission measure at 0.5 MK is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude from the peak at 4 MK. We also find that the temporal evolution in broadband soft X-ray images is relatively constant over about 6 hr of observing. Observations in the cooler SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) bandpasses generally do not show cooling loops in the core of the active region, consistent with the steady emission observed at high temperatures. These observations suggest that the high-temperature loops observed in the core of an active region are close to equilibrium. We find that it is possible to reproduce the relative intensities of high-temperature emission lines with a simple, high-frequency heating scenario where heating events occur on timescales much less than a characteristic cooling time. In contrast, low-frequency heating scenarios, which are commonly invoked to describe nanoflare models of coronal heating, do not reproduce the relative intensities of high-temperature emission lines and predict low-temperature emission that is approximately an order of magnitude too large. We also present an initial look at images from the SDO/AIA 94 A channel, which is sensitive to Fe XVIII.

  16. A High-Conduction Ge Substituted Li3AsS4 Solid Electrolyte with Exceptional Low Activation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, Gayatri [ORNL; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [ORNL; Chen, Yan [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes show potential to enable high-energy-density secondary batteries and offer distinctive safety features as an advantage over traditional liquid electrolytes. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity, low activation energy, and outstanding electrochemical stability in crystalline solid electrolytes is a challenge for the synthesis of novel solid electrolytes. Herein we report an exceptionally low activation energy (Ea) and high room temperature superionic conductivity via facile aliovalent substitution of Li3AsS4 by Ge, which increased the conductivity by two orders of magnitude as compared to the parent compound. The composition Li3.334Ge0.334As0.666S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.12 mScm-1 at 27oC. Local Li+ hopping in this material is accompanied by distinctive low activation energy Ea of 0.17 eV being the lowest of Li+ solid conductors. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the efficacy of surface passivation of solid electrolyte to achieve compatibility with metallic lithium electrodes.

  17. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jiquan; /SLAC

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  18. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for R&D activities relating to Nb3Sn superconducting wire for the High Luminosity LHC project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for R&D activities relating to Nb3Sn superconducting wire for the High Luminosity LHC project

  19. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, B.

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, single particle composition and size distributions at a high-elevation research site from March 2011 are presented.

  20. active x-band high: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will be important for clarifying the problems in theoretical calculations of high-energy neutron transport. H. Matsumura; N. Kinoshita; H. Iwase; A. Toyoda; Y. Kasugai; N....

  1. activated si-gaas high-voltage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: ??This thesis is concerned with developing a new approach to high voltage transformers condition monitoring, which involve partial discharge (PD) measurement and...

  2. activated self-propagating high-temperature: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of different instabilities that lead to many competing orders. In high-temperature superconduct- ors, besides the superconducting phase, many competing or- ders, such as...

  3. Biodegradation of high explosives on granular activated carbon [GAC]: Enhanced desorption of high explosives from GAC -- Batch studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, M.C.; Speitel, G.E. Jr. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption to GAC is an effective method for removing high explosives (HE) compounds from water, but no permanent treatment is achieved. Bioregeneration, which treats adsorbed contaminants by desorption and biodegradation, is being developed as a method for reducing GAC usage rates and permanently degrading RDX and HMX. Because desorption is often the limiting mass transfer mechanism in bioregeneration systems, several methods for increasing the rate and extent of desorption of RDX and HMX are being studied. These include use of cosolvents (methanol and ethanol), surfactants (both anionic and nonionic), and {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrins. Batch experiments to characterize the desorption of these HEs from GAC have been completed using Northwestern LB-830, the GAC being used at Pantex. Over a total of 11 days of desorption, about 3% of the adsorbed RDX was desorbed from the GAC using buffered water as the desorption fluid. In comparison, about 96% of the RDX was extracted from the GAC by acetonitrile over the same desorption period. Ethanol and methanol were both effective in desorbing RDX and HMX; higher alcohol concentrations were able to desorb more HE from the GAC. Surfactants varied widely in their abilities to enhance desorption of HEs. The most effective surfactant that was studied was sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which desorbed 56.4% of the adsorbed RDX at a concentration of 500 mg SDS/L. The cyclodextrins that were used were marginally more effective than water. Continuous-flow column tests are underway for further testing the most promising of these methods. These results will be compared to column experiments that have been completed under baseline conditions (using buffered water as the desorption fluid). Results of this research will support modeling and design of further desorption and bioregeneration experiments.

  4. Relaxed active space: Fixing tailored-CC with high order coupled cluster. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnichuk, Ann, E-mail: melnichu@qtp.ufl.edu; Bartlett, Rodney J. [Quantum Theory Project, Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the steep increase in computational cost with the inclusion of higher-connected cluster operators in coupled-cluster applications, it is usually not practical to use such methods for larger systems or basis sets without an active space partitioning. This study generates an active space subject to unambiguous statistical criteria to define a space whose size permits treatment at the CCSDT level. The automated scheme makes it unnecessary for the user to judge whether a chosen active space is sufficient to correctly solve the problem. Two demanding applications are presented: twisted ethylene and the transition states for the bicyclo[1,1,0]butane isomerization. As bi-radicals both systems require at least a CCSDT level of theory for quantitative results, for the geometries and energies.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation an d Recovery Act metals. Both biased surface and subsurface soil sampling will be conducted, augmented by visual inspection, video surveys, and electromagnetic surveys. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  6. Breakthrough in platinum structures maintains high catalytic activity and could lead to reduced costs for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs for hydrogen fuel cells, which hold the promise of powering vehicles and buildings. Hydrogen fuel cells could power the vehicles of tomorrow. With platinum an essential catalyst in fuel cells-specific-activity catalysts that have shown good durability under potential cycling conditions. The NREL Fuel Cell Team starts

  7. High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footworkeHigh-Order

  8. A Highly Active Protein Repair Enzyme from an Extreme Thermophile: The L-Isoaspartyl Methyltransferase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Steven

    and Biochemistry and the Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 to be intermediate between those of the high-affinity human enzyme and those of the lower-affinity wheat, nematode

  9. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed 2 nm Rh and 1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the...

  10. Volume 1, 1st Edition, Multiscale Tailoring of Highly Active and Stable Nanocomposite Catalysts, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veser, Goetz

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanomaterials have gained much attention as catalysts since the discovery of exceptional CO oxidation activity of nanoscale gold by Haruta. However, many studies avoid testing nanomaterials at the high-temperatures relevant to reactions of interest for the production of clean energy (T > 700°C). The generally poor thermal stability of catalytically active noble metals has thus far prevented significant progress in this area. We have recently overcome the poor thermal stability of nanoparticles by synthesizing a platinum barium-hexaaluminate (Pt-BHA) nanocomposite which combines the high activity of noble metal nanoparticles with the thermal stability of hexaaluminates. This Pt-BHA nanocomposite demonstrates excellent activity, selectivity, and long-term stability in CPOM. Pt-BHA is anchored onto a variety of support structures in order to improve the accessibility, safety, and reactivity of the nanocatalyst. Silica felts prove to be particularly amenable to this supporting procedure, with the resulting supported nanocatalyst proving to be as active and stable for CPOM as its unsupported counterpart. Various pre-treatment conditions are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in removing residual surfactant from the active nanoscale platinum particles. The size of these particles is measured across a wide temperature range, and the resulting “plateau” of stability from 600-900°C can be linked to a particle caging effect due to the structure of the supporting ceramic framework. The nanocomposites are used to catalyze the combustion of a dilute methane stream, and the results indicate enhanced activity for both Pt-BHA as well as ceria-doped BHA, as well as an absence of internal mass transfer limitations at the conditions tested. In water-gas shift reaction, nanocomposite Pt-BHA shows stability during prolonged WGS reaction and no signs of deactivation during start-up/shut-down of the reactor. The chemical and thermal stability, low molecular weight, and wealth of literature on the formation of mesoporous silica materials motivated investigations of nanocomposite silica catalysts. High surface area silicas are synthesized via sol-gel methods, and the addition of metal-salts lead to the formation of stable nanocomposite Ni- and Fe- silicates. The results of these investigations have increased the fundamental understanding and improved the applicability of nanocatalysts for clean energy applications.

  11. PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17571765 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a New Mexico Tech, Dept. Env. Engr., 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801, USA b Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., 104 types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H S from a simulated coal coal gas containing 0.5% H S, 49.5% N , 13% H , 8.5% H O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO , had a breakthrough time

  12. Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James O'Brien

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during January–August 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

  13. Integrated treatment and handling of highly activated components from nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.A.; Kiolbassa, A.; Rose, K.A. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Raymont, J.M. Jr. [WasteChem, Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete Underwater Treatment System (UTS) is described for activated/contaminated components of various origins in the nuclear industry. The system comprises different kinds of cutting/compacting equipment: the USC (Underwater Shear/compactor), the SCS (Stellite Corner Shear), the VLS (Velocity Limiter Shear) and the LCS (Light Crusher Shear). Transfer and loading equipment, the STB (Shielded Transfer Bell) provides safe and economic loading of containers with cut components. Operating experience and performance data are presented.

  14. Very-High Energy Gamma-Ray Flux Limits for Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Herr; W. Hofmann; for the H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining the results of targeted observations, H.E.S.S. has accumulated a large amount of extra-galactic exposure at TeV energies. Due to its large field of view a considerable part of the sky (0.6 sr) has been observed with high sensitivity outside the targeted observation positions. Since this exposure region contains little inherent bias, it is well suited for studies of extra-galactic source populations. Given the correlation between ultra-high energy cosmic rays and nearby extra-galactic objects recently claimed by the Auger collaboration, this unbiased sky sample by H.E.S.S. is of interest since it includes (besides the targeted sources) 63 AGN within 100 Mpc, for which very-high energy gamma-ray flux limits are derived.

  15. High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footworke

  16. Control of high power IGBT modules in the active region for fast pulsed power converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cravero, JM; Garcia Retegui, R; Maestri, S; Uicich, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At CERN, fast pulsed power converters are used to supply trapezoidal current in different magnet loads. These converters perform output current regulation by using a high power IGBT module in its ohmic region. This paper presents a new strategy for pulsed current control applications using a specifically designed IGBT driver.

  17. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.; Moonier, P.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  18. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  19. One of the first activities of the High Value Manufacturing technology and innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Results of "Future Trends" Study HVM Technology and Innovation Centre news Investing in the future W announced that over £200m will be invested in a network of elite technology and innovation centres in Coventry. Newsletter of the High Value Manufacturing Technology and Innovation Centre related

  20. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  1. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics ACTIVE CONTROL OF HIGH TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the nearby structures and the landing surfaces. These high-pressure and acoustic loads are also accompanied and a major source of noise pollution for the personnel in the aircraft vicinity. Flow field properties behavior of the impinging jets is due to a feedback loop between the fluid and acoustic fiel

  2. Highly Active Electrolytes for Rechargeable Mg Batteries Based on [Mg2(?-Cl)2]2+ Cation Complex in Dimethoxyethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yingwen; Stolley, Ryan M.; Han, Kee Sung; Shao, Yuyan; Arey, Bruce W.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Helm, Monte L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun; Li, Guosheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly active electrolytes based on a novel [Mg2(?-Cl)2]2+ cation complex for reversible Mg deposition were developed and analyzed in this work. These electrolytes were formulated in dimethoxyethane through dehalodimerization of non-nucleophilic MgCl2 by reacting with either Mg salts (such as Mg(TFSI)2, TFSI= bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonylimide) or Lewis acid salts (such as AlEtCl2 or AlCl3). The cation complex was identified for the first time as [Mg2(?-Cl)2(DME)4]2+ (DME=dimethoxyethane) and its molecular structure was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and NMR. The electrolyte synthesis process was studied and rational approaches for formulating highly active electrolytes were proposed. Through control of the anions, electrolytes with efficiency close to 100%, wide electrochemical window (up to 3.5V) and high ionic conductivity (> 6 mS/cm) were obtained. The electrolyte synthesis and understandings developed in this work could bring significant opportunities for rational formulation of electrolytes with the general formula [Mg2(?-Cl)2(DME)4][anion]x for practical Mg batteries.

  3. Can chemicals go down the drain? The management of hazardous waste is regulated at the federal level by the United States Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Can chemicals go down the drain? The management of hazardous waste is regulated at the federal Resources (PADEP) also regulates the disposal of hazardous waste. These regulations are contained in 25 PA system may create a variety of hazards including the following: · Fire and/or explosion hazards within

  4. Growing Potatoes Soil Potatoes are adapted to a wide range of soil types, though a deep, well-drained sandy loam is ideal.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Growing Potatoes Soil Potatoes are adapted to a wide range of soil types, though a deep, well to plant earlier. If irrigation is available, sandy soil will produce a good potato crop. Poorly drained contribute to tuber rot. Grow potatoes in soils with a pH of 5.2 to 5.5 to prevent potato scab. If the level

  5. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  6. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  7. Ramos, A. M. et al. (2012). Geotechnique 62, No. 6, 471478 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1680/geot.10.P.109] Modelling diffuse instabilities in sands under drained conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrade, Jose

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drained conditions, such as the Wachusett Dam failure in 1907, and analysed by Olson et al. (2000 instabilities that occur well before failure, and which have been reported in case studies of puzzling slope instability failures under fully drained conditions. KEYWORDS: failure; numerical modelling; plasticity; sands

  8. Multi-scale Mechanical Characterization of Highly Swollen Photo-activated Collagen Hydrogels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Tronci; Colin A. Grant; Neil H. Thomson; Stephen J. Russell; David J. Wood

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological hydrogels have been increasingly sought after as e.g. wound dressings or scaffolds for regenerative medicine, due to their inherent biofunctionality in biological environments. Especially in moist wound healing, the ideal material should absorb large amounts of wound exudate whilst remaining mechanically competent in-situ. Despite their large hydration, however, current biological hydrogels still leave much to be desired in terms of mechanical properties in physiological conditions. To address this challenge, a multi-scale approach is presented for the synthetic design of cyto-compatible collagen hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties (from nano- up to the macro-scale), uniquely high swelling ratios and retained (>70%) triple-helical features. Type I collagen was covalently functionalized with three different monomers, i.e. 4 vinylbenzyl chloride, glycidyl methacrylate and methacrylic anhydride, respectively. Backbone rigidity, hydrogen-bonding capability and degree of functionalization (F: 16±12 &ndash 91±7 mol.-%) of introduced moieties governed the structure-property relationships in resulting collagen networks, so that the swelling ratio (SR: 707±51 &ndash 1996±182 wt.-%), bulk compressive modulus (Ec: 30±7 &ndash 168±40 kPa) and Atomic Force Microscopy elastic modulus (EAFM: 16±2 &ndash 387±66 kPa) were readily adjusted. In light of their remarkably high swelling and mechanical properties, these tunable collagen hydrogels may be further exploited for the design of advanced dressings for chronic wound care.

  9. Maximization of waste loading for a vitrified Hanford high-activity simulated waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fini, P.T. [State Univ. of New York, Alfred, NY (United States). Coll. of Ceramics; Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulated high-level nuclear waste glasses incorporating up to 70 wt % Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) were prepared. For the waste loading (W) range of 40 to 55 wt %, alkaliborosilicate glasses were formulated with a melting temperature of 1,150 C; for W > 55 wt %, only silica was added to the waste and the melting temperature was 1,150 C. Properties measured included durability and crystallinity of slowly cooled glasses and glasses heat treated for 24 hours at 1,050 C. Acceptable durability (by the Environmental Assessment glass standard) was retained up to W = 70 wt %, which is the maximum NCAW waste loading if no limit on crystallinity is imposed. If < 1 vol% of spinel is acceptable in the melt at 1,050 C, a waste loading of approximately 50 wt % is possible. If no crystallinity is permissible at 1,050 C, W = 34 wt % is the estimated maximum.

  10. Lead Research and Development Activity for DOE's High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program (Topic 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Fenton, PhD; Darlene Slattery, PhD; Nahid Mohajeri, PhD

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program was begun in 2006 with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) as the lead organization. During the first three years of the program, FSEC was tasked with developing non-Nafion® proton exchange membranes with improved conductivity for fuel cells. Additionally, FSEC was responsible for developing protocols for the measurement of in-plane conductivity, providing conductivity measurements for the other funded teams, developing a method for through-plane conductivity and organizing and holding semiannual meetings of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG). The FSEC membrane research focused on the development of supported poly[perfluorosulfonic acid] (PFSA) – Teflon membranes and a hydrocarbon membrane, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The fourth generation of the PFSA membrane (designated FSEC-4) came close to, but did not meet, the Go/No-Go milestone of 0.1 S/cm at 50% relative humidity at 120 °C. In-plane conductivity of membranes provided by the funded teams was measured and reported to the teams and DOE. Late in the third year of the program, DOE used this data and other factors to decide upon the teams to continue in the program. The teams that continued provided promising membranes to FSEC for development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) that could be tested in an operating fuel cell. FSEC worked closely with each team to provide customized support. A logic flow chart was developed and discussed before MEA fabrication or any testing began. Of the five teams supported, by the end of the project, membranes from two of the teams were easily manufactured into MEAs and successfully characterized for performance. One of these teams exceeded performance targets, while the other requires further optimization. An additional team developed a membrane that shows great promise for significantly reducing membrane costs and increasing membrane lifetime.

  11. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  12. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  13. Verification of high-energy transport codes on the basis of activation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. E. Titarenko; V. F. Batyaev; M. A. Butko; D. V. Dikarev; S. N. Florya; K. V. Pavlov; A. Yu. Titarenko; R. S. Tikhonov; V. M. Zhivun; A. V. Ignatyuk; S. G. Mashnik; A. Boudard; S. Leray; J. -C. David; J. Cugnon; D. Mancusi; Y. Yariv; H. Kumawat; K. Nishihara; N. Matsuda; G. Mank; W. Gudowski

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclide production cross sections measured at ITEP for the targets of nat-Cr, 56-Fe, nat-Ni, 93-Nb, 181-Ta, nat-W, nat-Pb, 209-Bi irradiated by protons with energies from 40 to 2600 MeV were used to estimate the predictive accuracy of several popular high-energy transport codes. A general agreement of the ITEP data with the data obtained by other groups, including the numerous GSI data measured by the inverse kinematics method was found. Simulations of the measured data were performed with the MCNPX (Bertini and ISABEL options), CEM03.02, INCL4.2+ABLA, INCL4.5+ABLA07, PHITS, and CASCADE.07 codes. Deviation factors between the calculated and experimental cross sections have been estimated for each target and for the whole energy range covered by our measurements. Two-dimensional diagrams of deviation factor values were produced for estimating the predictive power of every code for intermediate, not measured masses of nuclei-targets and bombarding energies of protons. Further improvements of all tested here codes are recommended. In addition, new measurements at ITEP of nuclide yields from a 208-Pb target irradiated by 500 MeV protons are presented. A good agreement between these new data and the GSI measurements obtained by the inverse kinematics method was found

  14. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-type Superflare Stars. II. Stellar Rotation, Starspots, and Chromospheric Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notsu, Yuta; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted high dispersion spectroscopic observations of 50 superflare stars with Subaru/HDS. These 50 stars were selected from the solar-type superflare stars that we had discovered from the Kepler data. More than half (34 stars) of these 50 target superflare stars show no evidence of binarity, and we estimated stellar parameters of these 34 stars in our previous study (Notsu et al. 2015, hereafter called Paper I). According to our previous studies using Kepler data, superflare stars show quasi-periodic brightness variations whose amplitude (0.1-10\\%) is much larger than that of the solar brightness variations (0.01-0.1\\%) caused by the existence of sunspots on the rotating solar surface. In this study, we investigated whether these quasi-periodic brightness variations of superflare stars are explained by the rotation of a star with fairly large starspots, by using stellar parameters derived in Paper I. First, we confirmed that the value of the projected rotational velocity $v \\sin i$ is consistent with th...

  15. A PVT Aware Accurate Statistical Logic Library for High-Metal-Gate Nano-CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    (T) which may be due to the environment, through self-heating effects or a combination of the two- tion which leads to high electric field and a high GIDL current [16]. (2) The high- gate dielectric and SiO2 spacers meet at the surface of the drain region, causing a high electric field leading to a high

  16. RESULTS OF CAUSTIC DISSOLUTION OF ALUMINOSILICATE SCALE AND CHARACTERIZATION DATA FOR SAMPLES FROM THE EVAPORATOR POT AND GRAVITY DRAIN LINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilmarth, B; Rita Sullivan, R; Chris Martino, C

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The build-up of sodium aluminosilicate scale in the 2H Evaporator system continues to cause operational difficulties. The use of a nitric acid cleaning operation proved successful in 2001. However, the operation required additional facilities to support spent cleaning solution neutralization and was quite costly. A proposed caustic cleaning flowsheet has many advantages over the acid flowsheet. Therefore, samples were retrieved from the evaporator system (gravity drain line and pot) for both chemical and radiological characterization and dissolution testing. The characterization of these scale samples showed the presence of nitrated cancrinite along with a dehydrated zeolite. Small amounts of depleted uranium were also found in these samples as expected and the amount of uranium ranged from 0.5 wt% to 2 wt%. Dissolution in sodium hydroxide solutions of various caustic concentrations showed that the scale slowly dissolves at elevated temperature (90 C). Data from similar testing indicate that the scale removed from the GDL in 2005 dissolves slower than that removed in 1997. Differences in the particle size of these samples of scale may well explain the measured dissolution rate differences.

  17. Calculational analysis of structural activation induced by 20-100 MeV proton beam loss in high-power linear accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Stacey Kirsten

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering CALCULATIONAL ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL ACTIVATION INDUCED BY 20-100 MEV PROTON BEAM LOSS IN HIGH-POWER LINEAR ACCELERATORS A Thesis...) Carl A. Beard (Member) / John . Poston (Head of Department) August 1994 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering ABSTRACT Calculational Analysis of Structural Activation Induced by 20-100 MeV Proton Beam Loss in High-Power Linear Accelerators. (August...

  18. A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

  19. Aluminium doped ceria–zirconia supported palladium-alumina catalyst with high oxygen storage capacity and CO oxidation activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu, E-mail: shuyin@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Guo, Chongshen; Wu, Xiaoyong; Kimura, Takeshi; Sato, Tsugio

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} possessed high OSC and CO oxidation activity at low temperature. - Highlights: • A new OSC material of Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is prepared via a mechanochemical method. • Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed high OSC even after calcination at 1000 °C for 20 h. • Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited the highest CO oxidation activity at low temperature correlates with enhanced OSC. - Abstract: The Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst prepared by a mechanochemical route and calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h in air atmosphere to evaluate the thermal stability. The prepared Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was characterized for the oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and CO oxidation activity in automotive catalysis. For the characterization, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique were employed. The OSC values of all samples were measured at 600 °C using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 41 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 583 ?mol-O g{sup ?1} and good OSC performance stability. The same synthesis route was employed for the preparation of the CeO{sub 2}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.5}O{sub 2}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for comparison.

  20. Particle acceleration and high-frequency (X-ray and $?$-ray) emission in the jets of active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Usov; M. V. Smolsky

    1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested that the outflowing plasma in the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is inhomogeneous and consists of separate clouds. These clouds are strongly magnetized and move away from the central engine at relativistic speeds. The clouds interact with an ambient medium which is assumed to be at rest. In the process of this interaction, particles of the ambient medium are accelerated to high energies at the cloud front and flow ahead of the front. It is shown that the radiation of the accelerated particles may be responsible for the X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray emission from AGN jets. TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission is generated in the inner parts of AGN jets where the Lorentz factor of the cloud fronts is $\\Gamma_0\\geq 30$, while GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission emanates from the outer parts of AGN jets where $\\Gamma_0$ is $\\sim 10$.

  1. Parametric Evaluation of Active Neutron Interrogation for the Detection of Shielded Highly-Enriched Uranium in the Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Chcihester; E. H. Seabury; S. J. Thompson; R. R. C. Clement

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric studies using numerical simulations are being performed to assess the performance capabilities and limits of active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). Varying the shield material, HEU mass, HEU depth inside the shield, and interrogating neutron source energy, the simulations account for both neutron and photon emission signatures from the HEU with resolution in both energy and time. The results are processed to represent different irradiation timing schemes and several different classes of radiation detectors, and evaluated using a statistical approach considering signal intensity over background. This paper describes the details of the modeling campaign and some preliminary results, weighing the strengths of alternative measurement approaches for the different irradiation scenarios.

  2. The Application of High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (HRGS) to Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation, and Arms Control Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, Walter R.; Lemley, James R.; Forman, Leon

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    While well-developed methodologies exist for the employment of high- resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) in determining the isotopic composition of plutonium samples, the potential capabilities of such measurements in determining the properties of nuclear materials otherwise remain largely unexploited. These measurements contain information sufficiently detailed such that not only can the isotopic composition of uranium and plutonium materials be determined, but the details of the spectrum obtained will depend reproducibly upon other factors including the total mass, density, chemical composition, and geometrical configuration of the material, and for certain materials, the elapsed time since chemical processing. The potential thus exists to obtain a `gamma-ray fingerprint` for typical containers or assemblies of nuclear material which will then serve to identify that class of item in a later confirmatory measurement. These measurements have the additional advantage that, by comparison with active interrogation techniques which usually require the introduction of some extraneous form of radiation or other intrusive activity, they are totally passive, and thus impose only minimal additional safety or regulatory burdens on the operators. In the application of these measurements to the verification of treaty-limited items, where the information acquired may be sensitive in nature, the use of the CIVET (Controlled Intrusiveness Verification Technique) approach, where a computer-based interface is employed to limit access to the information obtained, may be followed.

  3. The Ultraviolet Emission Properties of Five Low-Redshift Active Galactic Nuclei at High Signal to Noise and Spectral Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; John N. Bahcall; Buell T. Jannuzi; Donald P. Schneider; Richard F. Green; George F. Hartig

    1993-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the ultraviolet (UV) emission line and continuum properties of five low-redshift active galactic nuclei (four luminous quasars: PKS~0405$-$123, H1821+643, PG~0953+414, and 3C273, and one bright Seyfert 1 galaxy: Mrk~205). The HST spectra have higher signal-to-noise ratios (typically $\\sim 60$ per resolution element) and spectral resolution ($R = 1300$) than all previously- published UV spectra used to study the emission characteristics of active galactic nuclei. We include in the analysis ground-based optical spectra covering \\hb\\ and the narrow [O III] $\\lambda\\lambda$4959,5007 doublet. The following new results are obtained: \\lyb/\\lya=0.03$-$0.12 for the four quasars, which is the first accurate measurement of the long-predicted \\lyb\\ intensity in QSOs. The cores of \\lya\\ and C~IV are symmetric to an accuracy of better than 2.5% within about 2000 km s$^{-1}$ of the line peak. This high degree of symmetry of \\lya\\ argues against models in which the broad line cloud velocity field has a significant radial component. The observed smoothness of the \\lya\\ and C~IV line profiles requires at least $\\sim 10^4$ individual clouds if bulk velocity is the only line-broadening mechanism. The overall similarity of the \\lya\\ and C IV $\\lambda$1549 profiles rules out models for the broad line region (BLR) with a radial distribution of virialized....

  4. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-50:5 Process Sewers (183-DR Sedimentation Basin Drains), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-D-50:5 subsite encompasses the southern process sewers formerly servicing the 183-DR coagulation and sedimentation basins and proximate surface runoff collection drains. The results of confirmatory sampling of pipeline sediments and underlying soils at the 100-D-50:5 subsite demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  5. GeoChip 3.0: A High Throughput Tool for Analyzing Microbial Community, Composition, Structure, and Functional Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Tu, Qichao; Xu, Meiying; Hemme, Chris; Wu, Liyou; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Xingyuan; Gentry, Terry; Yin, Yifeng; Liebich, Jost

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Microarray-based genomic technology has been widely used for microbial community analysis, and it is expected that microarray-based genomic technologies will revolutionize the analysis of microbial community structure, function and dynamics. A new generation of functional gene arrays (GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with 27,812 probes covering 56,990 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance, and organic contaminant degradation. Those probes were derived from 2,744, 140, and 262 species for bacteria, archaea, and fungi, respectively. GeoChip 3.0 has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating, and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Our computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes had a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Also, experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036percent-0.025percent false positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which demonstrated that the structure, composition, and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. All results indicate that GeoChip 3.0 is a high throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning. To our knowledge, GeoChip 3.0 is the most comprehensive microarrays currently available for studying microbial communities associated with geobiochemical cycling, global climate change, bioenergy, agricuture, land use, ecosystem management, environmental cleanup and restoration, bioreactor systems, and human health.

  6. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  7. Single Electron Charging in Optically Active Nanowire Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a back-gate. We combine these two field-effects to isolate a single electron and independently tune direction or by an electrostatic back-gate that modi- fies the overall potential landscape of the nanowire-6 nm high and 30 nm in diameter.10 The nanowires are contacted by a titanium (Ti) source and drain

  8. HIGH STABILITY CURRENT SUPPLY FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motamedi, Maryam Melani

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the current regulator. The power losses through the powerFETs are (31): Power Loss = I drain V ds The drain current (by design to lower the power loss is the drain to source

  9. Brain Abscess Associated with Isolated Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Left Atrium in the Absence of Coronary Sinus and Atrial Septal Defect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erol, Ilknur [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology Unit (Turkey)], E-mail: ilknur_erol@yahoo.co; Cetin, I. Ilker [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Cardiology Unit (Turkey); Alehan, Fuesun [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology Unit (Turkey); Varan, Birguel [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Cardiology Unit (Turkey); Ozkan, Sueleyman [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Turkey); Agildere, A. Muhtesem [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Tokel, Kursad [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Cardiology Unit (Turkey)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously healthy 12-year-old girl presented with severe headache for 2 weeks. On physical examination, there was finger clubbing without apparent cyanosis. Neurological examination revealed only papiledema without focal neurologic signs. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed the characteristic features of brain abscess in the left frontal lobe. Cardiologic workup to exclude a right-to-left shunt showed an abnormality of the systemic venous drainage: presence of isolated left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium in the absence of coronary sinus and atrial septal defect. This anomaly is rare, because only a few other cases have been reported.

  10. A Highly Reactive Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)?Oxo Complex That Can Activate the Strong C?H Bonds of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Davis, Katherine M.; Lee, Yong-Min; Chen, Junying; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Pushkar, Yulia N.; Nam, Wonwoo (Ewha); (Purdue)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A mononuclear non-heme manganese(IV)-oxo complex has been synthesized and characterized using various spectroscopic methods. The Mn(IV)-oxo complex shows high reactivity in oxidation reactions, such as C-H bond activation, oxidations of olefins, alcohols, sulfides, and aromatic compounds, and N-dealkylation. In C-H bond activation, the Mn(IV)-oxo complex can activate C-H bonds as strong as those in cyclohexane. It is proposed that C-H bond activation by the non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex does not occur via an oxygen-rebound mechanism. The electrophilic character of the non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex is demonstrated by a large negative {rho} value of {approx}4.4 in the oxidation of para-substituted thioanisoles.

  11. Diverse roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK2 revealed by high-throughput target identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Scott M. (Scott Moore)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many major human oncogenes contribute to cancer in large part by activating the mitogenactivated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK1 and ERK2 (ERK). These kinases are critical in normal physiological processes from development to ...

  12. Active wear and failure mechanisms of TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining powder metallurgically made stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, L.; Haenninen, H.; Paro, J.; Kauppinen, V. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, active wear and failure mechanisms of both TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining stainless steels made by powder metallurgy in low and high cutting speed ranges, respectively, have been investigated. Abrasive wear mechanisms, fatigue-induced failure, and adhesive and diffusion wear mechanisms mainly affected the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools at cutting speeds below 35 m/min, between 35 and 45 m/min, and over 45 m/min, respectively. Additionally, fatigue-induced failure was active at cutting speeds over 45 m/min in the low cutting speed range when machining powder metallurgically made duplex stainless steel 2205 and austenitic stainless steel 316L. In the high cutting speed range, from 100 to 250 m/min, fatigue-induced failure together with diffusion wear mechanism, affected the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining both 316L and 2205 stainless steels. It was noticed that the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools used in the low cutting speed range when machining 2205 steel was longer than that when machining 316L steel, whereas the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools used in the high cutting speed range when machining 316L steel was longer than that when machining 2205 steel.

  13. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B) Measurement of p11c tetramer + , CD8 + T cells throughoutare expressed as percent of tetramer + , CD8 + T cells onthe Mamu A*01 specific gag tetramer, p11C (CTPY- DINQM). All

  14. Non-linear response of carbon dioxide and methane emissions to oxygen availability in a drained histosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNicol, Gavin; Silver, Whendee L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Purity (UHP) N 2 (Praxair, Richmond, CA) at 10 PSI.or UHP O 2 (99.993 % O 2 ; Praxair, Richmond, CA). Treatment

  15. 1 Oxidation of Ethidium Using TAML Activators: A Model for High 2 School Research Performed in Partnership with University Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumberg, Bruce

    Bruce Blumberg,§ Terrence J. Collins, and Steven G. Sogo*, 6 Laguna Beach High School, Laguna Beach-Based/Discovery Learning, Problem Solving/Decision Making, Oxidation/Reduction, 24 Green Chemistry, UV-Vis Spectroscopy 25 school-college interface. 42 The Advanced Chemical Research course (ACR) at Laguna 43 Beach High School

  16. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material characterization %3CU%2B2013%3E active stimulation of highly enriched uranium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Clarke, Shaun D. [University of Michigan; Monterial, Mateusz [University of Michigan; Paff, Marc [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara A. [University of Michigan

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

  17. Highly Active Yeast MnSOD has a Novel Mechanism Involving Six-coordinate Mn(3+) Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Yuewei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the NE2(Gln154)???O(solv) bond. Both Tyr34 and Gln154 areof the NE2(Gln154)???O(solv) bond. The active site reductionconserve a NE2(Gln154)???O(solv) H-bond of 2.85– 2.95 Å (

  18. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO?, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO? hydrogenation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Jose A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, Wenqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ramirez, Pedro J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Univ. Central De Venezuela, Caracas (Venesuela); Stachiola, Dario [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brito, Joaquin L. [Inst. Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela)

    2015-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo?C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu?(MoO?)?(OH)?, a-NiMoO? and CoMoO?•nH?O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was ?-Mo?C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu²?, Ni²? and Co²? cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo?C, Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C catalysts were highly active for the hydrogenation of CO?. The metal/Mo?C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo?C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO?, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).

  19. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-H-6:2, 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils; the 118-H-6:3, 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils; The 118-H-6:3 Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils; the 100-H-9, 100-H-10, and 100-H-13 French Drains; the 100-H-11 and 100-H-12 Expansion Box French Drains; and the 100-H-14 and 100-H-31 Surface Contamination Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of removal actions for the 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils (subsite 118-H-6:2); 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils (118-H-6:3); and Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils. This CVP also documents remedial actions for the following seven additional waste sties: French Drain C (100-H-9), French Drain D (100-H-10), Expansion Box French Drain E (100-H-11), Expansion Box French Drain F (100-H-12), French Drain G (100-H-13), Surface Contamination Zone H (100-H-14), and the Polychlorinated Biphenyl Surface Contamination Zone (100-H-31).

  20. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO?, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO? hydrogenation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo?C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu?(MoO?)?(OH)?, a-NiMoO? and CoMoO?•nH?O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was ?-Mo?C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu²?, Ni²? and Co²? cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo?C, Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C catalysts were highlymore »active for the hydrogenation of CO?. The metal/Mo?C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo?C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO?, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).« less

  1. Module greenhouse with high efficiency of transformation of solar energy, utilizing active and passive glass optical rasters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korecko, J.; Jirka, V. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Sourek, B. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University of Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague (Czech Republic); Cerveny, J. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Institute of Physical Biology, Zamek 136, 373 33 Nove Hrady (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the eighties of the 20th century, various types of linear glass rasters for architectural usage have been developed in the Czech Republic made by the continuous melting technology. The development was focused on two main groups of rasters - active rasters with linear Fresnel lenses in fixed installation and with movable photo-thermal and/or photo-thermal/photo-voltaic absorbers. The second group are passive rasters based on total reflection of rays on an optical prism. During the last years we have been working on their standardization, exact measuring of their optical and thermal-technical characteristics and on creation of a final product that could be applied in solar architecture. With the project supported by the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic we were able to build an experimental greenhouse using these active and passive optical glass rasters. The project followed the growing number of technical objectives. The concept of the greenhouse consisted of interdependence construction - structural design of the greenhouse with its technological equipment securing the required temperature and humidity conditions in the interior of the greenhouse. This article aims to show the merits of the proposed scheme and presents the results of the mathematical model in the TRNSYS environment through which we could predict the future energy balance carried out similar works, thus optimizing the investment and operating costs. In this article description of various technology applications for passive and active utilization of solar radiation is presented, as well as some results of short-term and long-term experiments, including evaluation of 1-year operation of the greenhouse from the energy and interior temperature viewpoints. A comparison of the calculated energy flows in the greenhouse to real measured values, for verification of the installed model is also involved. (author)

  2. GeoChip 3.0: A High Throughput Tool for Analyzing Microbial Community, Composition, Structure, and Functional Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhili

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as automatic updates. 3. GeoChip 3.0 analyses showed thatindicating that GeoChip 3.0 has a high specificity.evaluation of GeoChip 3.0 A. B. Clustering analysis of nifH

  3. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  4. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  5. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  6. Neutron activation analysis of the 30Si content of highly enriched 28Si: proof of concept and estimation of the achievable uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Agostino, Giancarlo; Oddone, Massimo; Prata, Michele; Bergamaschi, Luigi; Giordani, Laura

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the use of neutron activation to estimate the 30Si mole fraction of the ultra-pure silicon material highly enriched in 28Si for the measurement of the Avogadro constant. Specifically, we developed a relative method based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and using a natural-Si sample as a standard. To evaluate the achievable uncertainty, we irradiated a 6 g sample of a natural-Si material and modeled experimentally the signal that would be produced by a sample of the 28Si-enriched material of similar mass and subjected to the same measurement conditions. The extrapolation of the expected uncertainty from the experimental data indicates that a measurement of the 30Si mole fraction of the 28Si-enriched material might reach a 4% relative combined standard uncertainty.

  7. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  8. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  9. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  10. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  11. Does brain activity stem from high-dimensional chaotic dynamics? Evidence from the human electroencephalogram, cat cerebral cortex and artificial neuronal networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sami El Boustani; Alain Destexhe

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear time series analyses have suggested that the human electroencephalogram (EEG) may share statistical and dynamical properties with chaotic systems. During slow-wave sleep or pathological states like epilepsy, correlation dimension measurements display low values, while in awake and attentive subjects, there is not such low dimensionality, and the EEG is more similar to a stochastic variable. We briefly review these results and contrast them with recordings in cat cerebral cortex, as well as with theoretical models. In awake or sleeping cats, recordings with microelectrodes inserted in cortex show that global variables such as local field potentials (local EEG) are similar to the human EEG. However, in both cases, neuronal discharges are highly irregular and exponentially distributed, similar to Poisson stochastic processes. To attempt reconcile these results, we investigate models of randomly-connected networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, and also contrast global (averaged) variables, with neuronal activity. The network displays different states, such as "synchronous regular" (SR) or "asynchronous irregular" (AI) states. In SR states, the global variables display coherent behavior with low dimensionality, while in AI states, the global activity is high-dimensionally chaotic with exponentially distributed neuronal discharges, similar to awake cats. Scale-dependent Lyapunov exponents and epsilon-entropies show that the seemingly stochastic nature at small scales (neurons) can coexist with more coherent behavior at larger scales (averages). Thus, we suggest that brain activity obeys similar scheme, with seemingly stochastic dynamics at small scales (neurons), while large scales (EEG) display more coherent behavior or high-dimensional chaos.

  12. Defect Mapping and Adaptive Configuration of Nanoelectronic Circuits Based on a CNT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Bao

    Source CNT Drain CNT Molecules Back Gate Redox Active Fig. 2. A n-type MOSFET-like reconfigurable double behavior, (2) MOSFET-like CNFETs including doped p(n) source and drain regions, which provide high doped p+(n+) source and drain re- gions, which provide ultra low off current suitable for low power

  13. High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) imager. Final report, 29 August 1991-29 August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance, C.; Eather, R.

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-light-level monochromatic imaging system was designed and fabricated which was optimized to detect and record optical emissions associated with high-power rf heating of the ionosphere. The instrument is capable of detecting very low intensities, of the order of 1 Rayleigh, from typical ionospheric atomic and molecular emissions. This is achieved through co-adding of ON images during heater pulses and subtraction of OFF (background) images between pulses. Images can be displayed and analyzed in real time and stored in optical disc for later analysis. Full image processing software is provided which was customized for this application and uses menu or mouse user interaction.

  14. Application of electrolytic in-process dressing for high-efficiency grinding of ceramic parts. Research activities 1995--96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of Electrolytic In-Process Dressing (ELID) for highly efficient and stable grinding of ceramic parts is discussed. This research was performed at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Tokyo, Japan, June 1995 through August 1995. Experiments were conducted using a vertical machining center. The silicon nitride work material, of Japanese manufacture and supplied in the form of a rectangular block, was clamped to a vice which was firmly fixed on the base of a strain gage dynamometer. The dynamometer was clamped on the machining center table. Reciprocating grinding was performed with a flat-faced diamond grinding wheel. The output from the dynamometer was recorded with a data acquisition system and the normal component of the force was monitored. Experiments were carried out under various cutting conditions, different ELID conditions, and various grinding wheel bonds types. Rough grinding wheels of grit sizes {number_sign}170 and {number_sign}140 were used in the experiments. Compared to conventional grinding, there was a significant reduction in grinding force with ELID grinding. Therefore, ELID grinding can be recommended for high material removal rate grinding, low rigidity machines, and low rigidity workpieces. Compared to normal grinding, a reduction in grinding ratio was observed when ELID grinding was performed. A negative aspect of the process, this reduced G-ratio derives from bond erosion and can be improved somewhat by adjustments in the ELID current. The results of this investigation are discussed in detail in this report.

  15. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole • CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  16. Jitter Tracking Bandwidth Optimization Using Active-Inductor-Based Bandpass Filtering in High-speed Forwarded Clock Transceivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    po ns e(d B) 20 Equating equation (2.21) and (2.23), it can be approximated that g1827g3045 ? g2009g3030 g1827, (2.24) g2010g3045 ? g3436g2009g3013 + g2009g30092g2009g3030 g3440 g2010. (2.25) Equation (2.25) is established for small g.... The typical skew value for high speed forwarded clock system is 5 to 10 UI. Differential Jitter A data jitter sequence is given by g1836g3005 = g1836g3017 g1871g1861g1866 g34352g2024g1858g3037 g1847g1835 ? g1866g3439, (2.29) g1836g3017 is the peak...

  17. DEEP SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF INFRARED-FAINT RADIO SOURCES: HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Ray P.; Mao, Minnie [CSIRO Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW, 1710 (Australia); Afonso, Jose [Observatorio Astronomico de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisbon (Portugal); Cava, Antonio [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Farrah, Duncan; Oliver, Seb [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Huynh, Minh T.; Mauduit, Jean-Christophe; Surace, Jason [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Jarvis, Matt [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Lacy, Mark [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Maraston, Claudia [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Middelberg, Enno [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Seymour, Nick, E-mail: Ray.Norris@csiro.au [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UCL, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRSs) are a rare class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelengths but very faint at infrared and optical wavelengths. Here we present sensitive near-infrared observations of a sample of these sources taken as part of the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey. Nearly all the IFRSs are undetected at a level of {approx}1 {mu}Jy in these new deep observations, and even the detections are consistent with confusion with unrelated galaxies. A stacked image implies that the median flux density is S{sub 3.6{mu}m} {approx} 0.2 {mu}Jy or less, giving extreme values of the radio-infrared flux density ratio. Comparison of these objects with known classes of object suggests that the majority are probably high-redshift radio-loud galaxies, possibly suffering from significant dust extinction.

  18. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information, results of laboratory tests, thermodynamic calculations, process description, and operational parameters, and addresses safety concerns.

  19. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Dutta, Saikat [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state {sup 13}C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N{sub 2} sorption, HR-TEM, and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, ?-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  20. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Tu, Q.; Xu, M.; Hemme, C.L.; Li, X.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.J.; Yin, Y.; Liebich, J.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of functional gene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with {approx}28,000 probes covering approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes would have a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036-0.025% false-positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which showed that the structure, composition and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning.

  1. C-H surface diamond field effect transistors for high temperature (400?°C) and high voltage (500?V) operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawarada, H., E-mail: kawarada@waseda.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Institute of Nano-Science and Nano-Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Material Science and Technology, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Tsuboi, H.; Naruo, T.; Yamada, T.; Xu, D.; Daicho, A.; Saito, T. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Hiraiwa, A. [Institute of Nano-Science and Nano-Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    By forming a highly stable Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide on a C-H bonded channel of diamond, high-temperature, and high-voltage metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) has been realized. From room temperature to 400?°C (673?K), the variation of maximum drain-current is within 30% at a given gate bias. The maximum breakdown voltage (V{sub B}) of the MOSFET without a field plate is 600?V at a gate-drain distance (L{sub GD}) of 7 ?m. We fabricated some MOSFETs for which V{sub B}/L{sub GD}?>?100?V/?m. These values are comparable to those of lateral SiC or GaN FETs. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited on the C-H surface by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 450?°C using H{sub 2}O as an oxidant. The ALD at relatively high temperature results in stable p-type conduction and FET operation at 400?°C in vacuum. The drain current density and transconductance normalized by the gate width are almost constant from room temperature to 400?°C in vacuum and are about 10 times higher than those of boron-doped diamond FETs.

  2. Activated Boron Nitride Derived from Activated Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    combination of chemical, thermal, and electrical properties. The utility of activated carbon suggests is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and surface area analysis. The activated BN microstructure is similar

  3. Dynamically stable, self-similarly evolving, and self-organized states of high beta tokamak and reversed pinch plasmas and advanced active control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Fukasawa, Toshinobu [Division of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Generalized simultaneous eigenvalue equations derived from a generalized theory of self-organization are applied to a set of simultaneous equations for two-fluid model plasmas. An advanced active control by using theoretical time constants is proposed by predicting quantities to be controlled. Typical high beta numerical configurations are presented for the ultra low q tokamak plasmas and the reversed-field pinch (RFP) ones in cylindrical geometry by solving the set of simultaneous eigenvalue equations. Improved confinement with no detectable saw-teeth oscillations in tokamak experiments is reasonably explained by the shortest time constant of ion flow. The shortest time constant of poloidal ion flow is shown to be a reasonable mechanism for suppression of magnetic fluctuations by pulsed poloidal current drives in RFP experiments. The bifurcation from basic eigenmodes to mixed ones deduced from stability conditions for eigenvalues is shown to be a good candidate for the experimental bifurcation from standard RFP plasmas to their improved confinement regimes.

  4. Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Kovarik, Libor; Wan, Haiying; Albrecht, Karl O.; Gerber, Mark A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dagle, Robert A.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of stable MgAl2O4 spinel-supported Rh and Ir catalysts for the steam methane reforming (SMR) reaction. Firstly, catalytic performance for a series of noble metal catalysts supported on MgAl2O4 spinel was evaluated for SMR at 600-850°C. Turnover rate at 850°C follows the order: Pd > Pt > Ir > Rh > Ru > Ni. However, Rh and Ir were found to have the best combination of activity and stability for methane steam reforming in the presence of simulated biomass-derived syngas. It was found that highly dispersed ~2 nm Rh and ~1 nm Ir clusters were formed on the MgAl2O4 spinel support. Scanning Transition Electron Microscopy (STEM) images show that excellent dispersion was maintained even under challenging high temperature conditions (e.g. at 850°C in the presence of steam) while Ir and Rh catalysts supported on Al2O3 were observed to sinter at increased rates under the same conditions. These observations were further confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations which find that ~1 nm Rh and Ir particles (50-atom cluster) bind strongly to the MgAl2O4 surfaces via a redox process leading to a strong metal-support interaction, thus helping anchor the metal clusters and reduce the tendency to sinter. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that these supported smaller Rh and Ir particles have a lower work function than larger more bulk-like ones, which enables them to activate both water and methane more effectively than larger particles, yet have a minimal influence on the relative stability of coke precursors. In addition, theoretical mechanistic studies were used to probe the relationship between structure and reactivity. Consistent with the experimental observations, our theoretical modeling results also suggest that the small spinel-supported Ir particle catalyst is more active than the counterpart of Rh catalyst for SMR. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE)’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute. Computing time was granted by a user proposal at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) located at PNNL. Part of the computational time was provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  5. Evaluation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment drain tanks for reuse in salt disposal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to identify the source documentation used to evaluate the drain tanks in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The evaluation considered the original quality of the tanks, their service history, and their intended use during the removal of fluoride salts. It also includes recommendations for a quality verification plan. The estimates of corrosion damage to the salt containing system at the MSRE are low enough to lend optimism that the system will be fit for its intended use, which is disposal of the salt by transferring it to transport containers. The expected corrosion to date is estimated between 10 and 50 mil, or 2 to 10% of the shell wall. The expected corrosion rate when the tanks are used to remove the salt at 110 F is estimated to be .025 to 0.1 mil per hour of exposure to HF and molten salt. To provide additional assurance that the estimates of corrosion damage are accurate, cost effective nondestructive examination (NDE) has been recommended. The NDE procedures are compared with industry standards and give a perspective for the extent of additional measures taken in the recommendation. A methodology for establishing the remaining life has been recommended, and work is progressing towards providing an engineering evaluation based upon thickness and design conditions for the future use of the tanks. These extra measures and the code based analysis will serve to define the risk of salt or radioactive gases leaking during processing and transfer of the salt as acceptable.

  6. ID-69 Sodium drain experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, D.C.

    1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes experiments to determine the sodium retention and drainage from the two key areas of an ID-69. This information is then used as the initiation point for guidelines of how to proceed with washing an ID-69 in the IEM Cell Sodium Removal System.

  7. Condensate Removal by Drain Orifice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzick, L. L.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption) in the Guadalcanal was only 56% of that in the Iwo Jima. Based on the above results, it is estimated that each ship in this Class wilil save 240,000 gallons of fuel per year as a result of orifice installation. The Navy hasl approved...

  8. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng [School of Resources and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Li Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  9. Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherkas, Dmytro

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the ‘add a source’ basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay. The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

  10. P-doping-free III-nitride high electron mobility light-emitting diodes and transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Baikui; Tang, Xi; Chen, Kevin J., E-mail: eekjchen@ust.hk [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang, Jiannong [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that a simple metal-AlGaN/GaN Schottky diode is capable of producing GaN band-edge ultraviolet emission at 3.4?eV at a small forward bias larger than ?2?V at room temperature. Based on the surface states distribution of AlGaN, a mature impact-ionization-induced Fermi-level de-pinning model is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of the electroluminescence (EL) process. By experimenting with different Schottky metals, Ni/Au and Pt/Au, we demonstrated that this EL phenomenon is a “universal” property of metal-AlGaN/GaN Schottky diodes. Since this light-emitting Schottky diode shares the same active structure and fabrication processes as the AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, straight-forward and seamless integration of photonic and electronic functional devices has been demonstrated on doping-free III-nitride heterostructures. Using a semitransparent Schottky drain electrode, an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility light-emitting transistor is demonstrated.

  11. Vitrification of Low-Activity Radioactive Waste Streams and a High-Level Radioactive Waste Stream in Support of the Hanford River Protection Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.L.

    2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford tank waste consists of about 190 million curies in 54 million gallons of highly radioactive and mixed hazardous waste stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The tank waste includes solids (sludge), liquids (supernatant), and salt cake (dried salts that dissolve in water to form supernatant). The tank waste will be remediated through treatment and immobilization to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) preferred alternative to remediate the Hanford tank waste is to pretreat the waste by separating it into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW), followed by immobilization of the LAW for on-site disposal and immobilization of the HLW for ultimate disposal in a national repository. This paper describes the crucible-scale vitrification and associated wasteform product tests in support of the WTP at Hanford. The two different LAW glasses produced in this study were from pretreated Envelope A (Tank 241-AN-103) and Envelope C (Tank 241-AN-102) waste. The HLW glass was produced from Tank C-106 HLW sludge and the HLW radionuclide products separated from Hanford Site tank samples AN-103, AN-102 and AZ-102. Pretreatment of these three supernates consisted of characterization, strontium and transuranics removal by precipitation and filtration, and final Cs-137 and Tc-99 removal by ion exchange (IX). The glasses were produced from formulations supplied by Vitreous State Laboratory of the Catholic University of America (CUA). Formulations were based on previous surrogate testing and the actual characterization data from the radioactive feed streams. Crucible-scale vitrifications were performed in platinum/gold crucibles in a custom-designed furnace fit with an offgas containment system. Both LAW and HLW melter feed slurries were evaporated, calcined, and then melted at 1150 degrees C. The LAW and HLW glasses were heat-treated per a modeled centerline cooling curve for the LAW canister and HLW canister, respectively.

  12. Self-heating simulation of GaN-based metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors including hot electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Peide "Peter"

    Self-heating simulation of GaN-based metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors the results of self-heating simulations of the GaN-based MOS-HEMTs, including hot electron and quantum effects of the gate and source/drain extension lengths on both the output performance and self-heating is discussed

  13. Successful Characterization Strategies for the Active High Risk Y-12 National Security Complex 9201-5 (Alpha-5) Facility, Oak Ridge, TN - 12164

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birchfield, Joseph W. III [Link Technologies (United States); Albrecht, Linda [Alliant Corporation (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building 9201-5 (Alpha 5) was completed in May 1944 and served as a production facility for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 Weapons Plant. During the Manhattan Project, it functioned as a uranium enrichment facility. The facility was renovated and altered over the years, converting the calutrons to support other missions. Alpha 5 consists of 4 floors and a basement measuring approximately 600,000 square feet. The facility contains various pieces of equipment remaining from legacy operations. A significant amount (approximately 200,000 kgs) of mercury (Hg) has been spilled in the facility over the operational history of the building. To further complicate matters, beryllium (Be) contamination in 9201-5 is found throughout approximately sixty percent of the facility. Concentrations varying from very low (< 0.2 micrograms (?g)/100 cm{sup 2}) to areas where concentrations are relatively high, approximately 600 ?g/100 cm{sup 2}, in regulated beryllium areas. The primary site related contaminants (SRCs) for the waste in this facility are enriched uranium, depleted uranium, beryllium and mercury. This facility represents the highest environmental risk for DOE-ORO EM and NNSA at Y-12 and must be quickly addressed to minimize impacts to future Y-12 missions, as well as human health and the environment. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), approximately 700,000 cubic feet of legacy material was removed in 2010 and 2011. In addition, characterization of the 9201-5 facility was scheduled in the winter and spring of 2011. This activity was initiated in January 2011 and was completed in July 2011. Heavy schedule pressure was further complicated by the fact that this building has active utility, security and process systems. Given these complex variables, a unique, out of the box characterization strategy was forged in an effort to bound radiological and chemical contaminants, as well as providing the appropriate level of quality to ensure that this data could be used to develop waste profiles when deactivation, decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities are authorized at a future date. The characterization strategy involved a hybrid model of statistically-based and biased sampling events. To achieve the desired results, traditional intrusive sampling and laboratory analysis, as well as a number of field-based characterization methodologies (e.g., X-ray Fluorescence [XRF], Lumex and Non-Destructive Assay [NDA]) were utilized. Results were captured and synthesized into meaningful, usable conclusions in a facility characterization report that will more accurately aid D and D cost estimates for future remedial actions. This massive characterization campaign involved over 1,200 separate sample locations using 4 separate characterization methods and was successfully completed to meet a performance-based milestone within 8 months of initiation. (authors)

  14. MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

  15. 198 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, VOL. 49, NO. 1, JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013 A High-Efficiency Active Battery-Balancing Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    recently. In EV and PHEV, a high-power traction battery plays an important role. Lithium-ion batteries. Unlike lead­acid batteries, lithium-ion batteries are highly intolerant to overcharging, and their safety a large number of lithium-ion battery cells are connected in series for high-power and high- energy

  16. Solar coronal magnetic field topology inferred from high resolution optical and x-ray movies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, T.; Frank, Z.; Hurlburt, N.; Morrison, M.; Shine, R.; Title, A.; Acton, L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors are using high resolution digital movies of solar active regions in optical and X-ray wavelengths to study solar flares and other transients. The optical movies were collected at the Swedish Solar Observatory on La Palma using the Lockheed tunable filtergraph system, in May-July, 1992. They include longitudinal and transverse magnetograms, H-alpha Doppler and intensity images at many wavelengths, Ca K, Na D, and white light images. Simultaneous X-ray images from Yohkoh are available much of the time. Several ways to establish the connectivity of some coronal magnetic field lines are being explored. Some of the clues available are: magnetic footpoint polarities and transverse field direction; H-alpha fibrils and loops seen in several wavelengths; proper motion and Dopper shifts of blobs moving along field lines; footprint brightening in micro-flares; spreading of flare ribbons during gradual phases of flares; X-ray morphology and correlations with H-alpha; and draining of flare loops. Examples of each of these will be shown on video.

  17. Cage assembly of DegP protease is not required for substrate-dependent regulation of proteolytic activity or high-temperature cell survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seokhee

    DegP, a member of the highly conserved HtrA family, performs quality-control degradation of misfolded proteins in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria and is required for high-temperature survival of Escherichia coli. ...

  18. Active region based on graded-gap InGaN/GaN superlattices for high-power 440- to 470-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F., E-mail: Andrew@beam.ioffe.ru; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Ber, B. Ya.; Kazantsev, D. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Mizerov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Center for Microelectronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Park, Hee Seok [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of); Hytch, M.; Hue, F. [National Center for Scientific Research, Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (France)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural and optical properties of light-emitting diode structures with an active region based on ultrathin InGaN quantum wells limited by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices from both sides have been investigated. The dependences of the external quantum efficiency on the active region design are analyzed. It is shown that the use of InGaN/GaN structures as limiting graded-gap short-period superlattices may significantly increase the quantum efficiency.

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 52, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2004 2621 High-Q Active Resonators Using Amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Sangwook

    -Q Active Resonators Using Amplifiers and Their Applications to Low Phase-Noise Free-Running and Voltage in the design of low phase-noise oscillators. The proposed new technique uses an amplifier to generate and their applications to the low phase-noise oscillators

  20. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GeoChip 3.0 as a High-Throughput Tool for Analyzinggene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with ~contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other

  1. Calculational analysis of structural activation induced by 20-100 MeV proton beam loss in high-power linear accelerators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Stacey Kirsten

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain dose rate estimates at several locations near the accelerator. To perform these calculations, simplified computer models were developed from detailed engineering drawings of a typical high-power accelerator design. This research focused on the 20...

  2. High-differential-quantum-efficiency, long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers using five-stage bipolar-cascade active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koda, R.; Wang, C.S.; Lofgreen, D.D.; Coldren, L.A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Raytheon Vision Systems, Goleta, California 93117 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present five-stage bipolar-cascade vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers emitting at 1.54 {mu}m grown monolithically on an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A differential quantum efficiency of 120%, was measured with a threshold current density of 767 A/cm{sup 2} and voltage of 4.49 V, only 0.5 V larger than 5x0.8 V, the aggregate photon energy. Diffraction loss study on deeply etched pillars indicates that diffraction loss is a major loss mechanism for such multiple-active region devices larger than 20 {mu}m. We also report a model on the relationship of diffraction loss to the number of active stages.

  3. High-precision determination of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in natural waters and carbonates by ICPMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketterer, M.E. [John Carroll Univ., University Heights, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Khourey, C.J. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed for precise measurement of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in natural waters and carbonates using quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A recovery of 80--85% of seawater U is achieved by Fe(III) coprecipitation followed by extraction chromatography with a supported dipentyl pentane phosphonate material; 90--95% of U is recovered from carbonates, which are dissolved in HNO{sub 3} and subjected to the same extraction chromatographic preparation. Isotopic measurements are made via recirculating pneumatic nebulization of small volumes of solutions containing 0.5--5 mg/L U. {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U is measured as a proxy for determination of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U; iridium is added to sample solutions and the ion ratio {sup 191}Ir{sup 40}Ar{sup +}/{sup 193}Ir{sup 40}Ar{sup +} is measured for internal mass discrimination correction {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in the range 1.143--1.154 are observed for 13 seawater and contemporary corals, in agreement with the established marine {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio. For samples sizes of 5--25 {micro}g U, ICPMS uncertainties of {+-} 0.2--0.5% relative, 2{theta} standard error, approach those obtained for < 0.1 {micro}g U by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in bottled waters, Lake Erie surface waters, mollusk fossils, and fertilizers are also demonstrated.

  4. High Activity of Ce1-xNixO2-y for H2 Production through Ethanol Steam Reforming: Tuning Catalytic Performance through Metal-Oxide Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G Zhou; L Barrio; S Agnoli; S Senanayake; J Evans; A Kubacka; M Estrella; J Hanson; A Martinez-Arias; et al.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of the oxide: Ce{sub 0.8}Ni{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-y} is an excellent catalyst for ethanol steam reforming. Metal-oxide interactions perturb the electronic properties of the small particles of metallic nickel present in the catalyst under the reaction conditions and thus suppress any methanation activity. The nickel embedded in ceria induces the formation of O vacancies, which facilitate cleavage of the OH bonds in ethanol and water.

  5. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101-104 Search for Very High Energy Gamma-Rays from Active Galactic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101-104 Search for Very High Energy Gamma, Australia (f) Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia (g-0394, Japan (l) Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano, Nagano 480-8553, Japan (m) Solar

  6. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEARS 2000 - 2003; HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS GROUP; SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY; EXPERIMENTAL TASK A AND THEORY TASK B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ryszard Stroynowski

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental program in High Energy Physics at SMU was initiated in 1992. Its main goal is the search for new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SSC, LHC) and the study of the properties of heavy quarks and leptons (CLEO, BTeV).

  7. Hidden activity in high-redshift spheroidal galaxies from mid-infrared and X-ray observations in the GOODS-North field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodighiero, G; Civano, F; Comastri, A; Franceschini, A; Mignoli, M; Fritz, J; Vignali, C; Treu, T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We exploit very deep mid-IR (MIR) and X-ray observations by Spitzer and Chandra in the GOODS North to identify signs of hidden (either starburst or AGN) activity in spheroidal galaxies between z~0.3 and 1. Our reference is a complete sample of 168 morphologically classified spheroidal galaxies with z[AB]<22.5 selected from GOODS ACS imaging. Nineteen of these have 24 micron detections in the GOODS catalogue, half of which have an X-ray counterpart in the 2 Ms Chandra catalogue, while about 25% have 1.4 GHz fluxes larger than 40 microJy. Traces of hidden activity in the spheroidal population are also searched for in the deep X-ray images and 14 additional galaxies are detected in X-rays only. The nature of the observed MIR emissions is investigated by modelling their SEDs based on the available multi-wavelength photometry, including X-ray, UV, optical, near-IR, MIR and radio fluxes, and optical spectroscopy. The amount of dust derived from the IR emission observed by Spitzer appears in excess of that expect...

  8. A study of the relationship between distance transported to school and attendance, grades, and participation in extra-curricular activities of Burleson County, Texas high school students, 1952

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Robert Jim

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' Relationship 'Jet+san Tr r tioi: tion in h+h Sohool-Sponsored. Cln&s snd, Organiaat iona ani . rane-, ort tion 'selationshiI Between rattiolpation ih Hoes Community Ct. ups an~ 'rganisatlons snd Tr@n sf. o!'tw 't 1 on ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ '. ~elationsnip ~etwe...pation in Athlstios af Transported sn4 tion-Tr~nsnnrtsi', Bu?lemon County High sohool Stuuents, 19~~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ?3 Average iiursusr of i:. s;, . berships ln Sohool- Sponsored Clubs an& O". rani~ations of Trans- ports& ann Son...

  9. The effects of bus transportation on grades, attendance records, and participation in extra-curricular activities of high school students in Tyler County, Texas, 1953

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEntire, Gerald

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mr. %. G. Adklns for the helpful suggestions offered by each. Special mention of indebtedness goes to the school officials in Tyler County, Texas~ for their cooperation in working with the writer and permitting him to uss their schools... A~Bat t, I Y k, ll ?ugl:oaf1'tl p T, , p. MEFSODOLOQY The sub)sots of this study are Q7g white students who attended the high schools at Chester, Colmssneil, Spurger, Waxz en and Woodville ~ These schools are all in Tyler County, Texzas...

  10. K-12 Lesson Plans and Activities Gallery | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Activities Gallery K-12 Lesson Plans and Activities Gallery Addthis Independence High School Students visit Department of Energy. 1 of 10 Independence High School Students...

  11. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

  12. Field Dependent Transport Properties in InAs Nanowire Field Effect Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    highlights the potential of such nanoscale devices for high performance electronic applications. Indeed, back transport properties have been reported. However,thevertical(gate-channel)andlateral(source-drain) field drain length, is considered to be the active portion of the NWFET device. Top-gated devices

  13. High Resolution Nanoimprint for Nanophotonics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Youwei

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    of SERS-active device depends on two main factors: good reproducibility and high enhancement factor. Ordered metallic nanostructures with high resolution are usually preferred for SERS application. Nanoimprint lithography can provide a low-cost and high...

  14. and solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memorie Della; K. Georgieva; C. Bianchi; B. Kirov

    Abstract. Solar activity, together with human activity, is considered a possible factor for the global warming observed in the last century. However, in the last decades solar activity has remained more or less constant while surface air temperature has continued to increase, which is interpreted as an evidence that in this period human activity is the main factor for global warming. We show that the index commonly used for quantifying long-term changes in solar activity, the sunspot number, accounts for only one part of solar activity and using this index leads to the underestimation of the role of solar activity in the global warming in the recent decades. A more suitable index is the geomagnetic activity which reflects all solar activity, and it is highly correlated to global temperature variations in the whole period for which we have data. Key words. Solar activity, Global warming 1. Sunspot number and global temperature The most popular index of solar activity is the International sunspot number (R). A reconstruction

  15. Activated carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. High Performance Networks for High Impact Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

  17. Some Investigations of the Reaction of Activated Charcoal with Fluorine and Uranium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Fiedor, J.N.; Simmons, D.W.; Toth, L.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Williams

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969, when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N drain tanks at the reactor site. Over time, fluorine (F{sub 2}) and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) moved from the salt through the gas piping to a charcoal bed, where they reacted with the activated charcoal. Some of the immediate concerns related to the migration of F{sub 2} and UF{sub 6} to the charcoal bed were the possibility of explosive reactions between the charcoal and F{sub 2}, the existence of conditions that could induce a criticality accident, and the removal and recovery of the fissile uranium from the charcoal. This report addresses the reactions and reactivity of species produced by the reaction of fluorine and activated charcoal and between charcoal and F{sub 2}-UF{sub 6} gas mixtures in order to support remediation of the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) and the recovery of the fissile uranium. The chemical identity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and potential for explosive decomposition of the primary reaction product, fluorinated charcoal, was determined.

  18. Money down the drain Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    for water use. In one instance an assessment of the irrigation system found that a combination plants are UCU's most frequent recommendation for ailing irrigation systems and guarantee instant savings interactive lawn irrigation tool to test out different irrigation systems and practices without the cost

  19. Preparation of high specific activity technetium-96

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Prach, Thomas (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of producing Tc-96 from the proton irradiation of a rhodium target and a technique for isolating under remote hot cell conditions the Tc-96 from the proton irradiated target.

  20. Current collapse imaging of Schottky gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by electric field-induced optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsuno, Takashi, E-mail: e1417@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Uesugi, Tsutomu [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional current collapse imaging of a Schottky gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor device was achieved by optical electric field-induced second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurements. EFISHG measurements can detect the electric field produced by carriers trapped in the on-state of the device, which leads to current collapse. Immediately after (e.g., 1, 100, or 800??s) the completion of drain-stress voltage (200?V) in the off-state, the second-harmonic (SH) signals appeared within 2??m from the gate edge on the drain electrode. The SH signal intensity became weak with time, which suggests that the trapped carriers are emitted from the trap sites. The SH signal location supports the well-known virtual gate model for current collapse.

  1. International fuel cycle and waste management technology exchange activities sponsored by the United States Department of Energy: FY 1982 evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakey, L.T.; Harmon, K.M.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY 1982, DOE and DOE contractor personnel attended 40 international symposia and conferences on fuel reprocessing and waste management subjects. The treatment of high-level waste was the topic most often covered in the visits, with geologic disposal and general waste management also being covered in numerous visits. Topics discussed less frequently inlcude TRU/LLW treatment, airborne waste treatment, D and D, spent fuel handling, and transportation. The benefits accuring to the US from technology exchange activities with other countries are both tangible, e.g., design of equipment, and intangible, e.g., improved foreign relations. New concepts initiated in other countries, particularly those with sizable nuclear programs, are beginning to appear in US efforts in growing numbers. The spent fuel dry storage concept originating in the FRG is being considered at numerous sites. Similarly, the German handling and draining concepts for the joule-heated ceramic melter used to vitrify wastes are being incorporated in US designs. Other foreigh technologies applicable in the US include the slagging incinerator (Belgium), the SYNROC waste form (Australia), the decontamination experience gained in decommissioning the Eurochemic reprocessing plant (Belgium), the engineered surface storage of low- and intermediate-level waste (Belgium, FRG, France), the air-cooled storage of vitrified high-level waste (France, UK), waste packaging (Canada, FRG, Sweden), disposal in salt (FRG), disposal in granite (Canada, Sweden), and sea dumping (UK, Belgium, The Netherlands, Switzerland). These technologies did not necessarily originated or have been tried in the US but for various reasons are now being applied and extended in other countries. This growing nuclear technological base in other countires reduces the number of technology avenues the US need follow to develop a solid nuclear power program.

  2. High-performance MoS{sub 2} transistors with low-resistance molybdenum contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Jiahao; Liu, Wei; Banerjee, Kaustav, E-mail: kaustav@ece.ucsb.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, molybdenum (Mo) is introduced and evaluated as an alternative contact metal to atomically-thin molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}), and high-performance field-effect transistors are experimentally demonstrated. In order to understand the physical nature of the interface and highlight the role of the various factors contributing to the Mo-MoS{sub 2} contacts, density functional theory (DFT) simulations are employed, which reveal that Mo can form high quality contact interface with monolayer MoS{sub 2} with zero tunnel barrier and zero Schottky barrier under source/drain contact, as well as an ultra-low Schottky barrier (0.1?eV) at source/drain-channel junction due to strong Fermi level pinning. In agreement with the DFT simulations, high mobility, high ON-current, and low contact resistance are experimentally demonstrated on both monolayer and multilayer MoS{sub 2} transistors using Mo contacts. The results obtained not only reveal the advantages of using Mo as a contact metal for MoS{sub 2} but also highlight the fact that the properties of contacts with 2-dimensional materials cannot be intuitively predicted by solely considering work function values and Schottky theory.

  3. HIGH-TECH BUILDINGS MARKET TRANSFORMATION PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49112 HT-457 HIGH-TECH BUILDINGS MARKET TRANSFORMATION PROJECT Cleanroom Energy Benchmarking High-Performance Fume Hood Demonstration/Test Market Transformation Activities FINAL REPORT ........................................................................................3 Market Transformation Activities

  4. Degradation of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors in the current-controlled off-state breakdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzmik, J., E-mail: jan.kuzmik@savba.sk; Jurkovi?, M.; Gregušová, D.; ?apajna, M. [Institute of Electrical Engineering SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Brunner, F.; Cho, M.; Würfl, J. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institute, Leibnitz Institute für Höchfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Meneghesso, G. [Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, via Gradenigo, 6/B 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate degradation mechanisms in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs which were repeatedly driven into the current-controlled off-state breakdown or subject to 60 s voltage- or current-controlled off state stresses. The current-controlled sweep in to the breakdown allows the sustainability of breakdown that can not be observed in the voltage controlled sweep. Only temporal changes were observed in the HEMT dc performance after repetitive sweeps, which were explained by charging/discharging of the HEMT surface at the gate-to-drain access region and in the GaN buffer below the gate. Similar changes were observed also if high-voltage stress has been applied on the drain; however, permanent degradation appears after 60 s current-controlled breakdown stress. In this case, the drain leakage current, as well as the breakdown current, increases significantly. On the other hand, the breakdown voltage, as well as the gate characteristics, remains unaltered. We suggest that the avalanche-injection process is governing the off-state breakdown event with a dominant role of the potential barrier at the channel-buffer interface.

  5. T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect.

  6. EVIDENCE OF IMPULSIVE HEATING IN ACTIVE REGION CORE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A., E-mail: d.tripathi@damtp.cam.ac.u [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a full spectral scan of an active region from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) we have obtained emission measure EM(T) distributions in two different moss regions within the same active region. We have compared these with theoretical transition region EMs derived for three limiting cases, namely, static equilibrium, strong condensation, and strong evaporation from Klimchuk et al. The EM distributions in both the moss regions are strikingly similar and show a monotonically increasing trend from log T[K] = 5.15-6.3. Using photospheric abundances, we obtain a consistent EM distribution for all ions. Comparing the observed and theoretical EM distributions, we find that the observed EM distribution is best explained by the strong condensation case (EM{sub con}), suggesting that a downward enthalpy flux plays an important and possibly dominant role in powering the transition region moss emission. The downflows could be due to unresolved coronal plasma that is cooling and draining after having been impulsively heated. This supports the idea that the hot loops (with temperatures of 3-5 MK) seen in the core of active regions are heated by nanoflares.

  7. Identifying Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Adrian S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of active constraints in constrained optimization is of interest from both practical and theoretical viewpoints, as it holds the promise of reducing an inequality-constrained problem to an equality-constrained problem, in a neighborhood of a solution. We study this issue in the more general setting of composite nonsmooth minimization, in which the objective is a composition of a smooth vector function c with a lower semicontinuous function h, typically nonsmooth but structured. In this setting, the graph of the generalized gradient of h can often be decomposed into a union (nondisjoint) of simpler subsets. "Identification" amounts to deciding which subsets of the graph are "active" in the criticality conditions at a given solution. We give conditions under which any convergent sequence of approximate critical points finitely identifies the activity. Prominent among these properties is a condition akin to the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, which ensures boundedness of the set of...

  8. Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010, on Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status. The presentation provides a high-level overview of the...

  9. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Office of River Protection review of the High Level Waste Facility heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. Independent Oversight Activity Report,...

  10. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  11. An economical route to high quality lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andre, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Hahn, S.K.; Kwon, S.H.; Min, W.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current rends in the automotive and industrial markets toward more efficient engines, longer drain intervals, and lower emissions all contribute to placing increasingly stringent performance requirements on lubricants. The demand for higher quality synthetic and non-conventional basestocks is expected to grow at a much faster rate than that of conventional lube basestocks to meet these higher performance standards. Yukong Limited has developed a novel technology (the Yukong UCO Lube Process) for the economic production of high quality, high-viscosity-index lube basestocks from a fuels hydrocracker unconverted oil stream. A pilot plant based on this process has been producing oils for testing purposes since May 1994. A commercial facility designed to produce 3,500 BPD of VHVI lube basestocks cane on-stream at Yukong`s Ulsan refinery in October 1995. The Badger Technology Center of Raytheon Engineers and Constructors assisted Yukong during the development of the technology and prepared the basic process design package for the commercial facility. This paper presents process aspects of the technology and comparative data on investment and operating costs. Yukong lube basestock product properties and performance data are compared to basestocks produced by conventional means and by lube hydrocracking.

  12. High density plasma damage in InGaP/GaAs as AlGaAs/GaAs high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.W.; Pearton, S.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Ren, F.; Kopf, R.F.; Kuo, J.M. [Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States). Lucent Technologies; Shul, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Constantine, C.; Johnson, D. [Plasma-Therm Inc., St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of plasma damage in InGaP/GaAs and AlGaAs/GaAs high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been investigated using both inductively coupled plasma and electron cyclotron resonance Ar discharges. The saturated drain-source current is found to be decreased through introduction of compensating deep levels into the InGaP or AlGaAs donor layer. The degradation of device performance is a strong function of ion energy and ion flux, and an advantage of both high density plasma tools is that ion energy can be reduced by increasing the plasma density. Increasing process pressure and source power, and decreasing radio-frequency chuck power produce the lowest amounts of plasma damage in HEMTs.

  13. Geothermics 35 (2006) 368408 Tectonic and magmatic evolution of the active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doglioni, Carlo

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    times (Siebert and Simkin, 2002). The widespread magmatic activity has resulted in a relatively high

  14. SiO2 Passivation Effects on the Leakage Current in Dual-Gate AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    was grown on c-plane sapphire substrate by MOCVD. Undoped 30 nm-thick Al0.26Ga0.74N and Fe-doped 3 m GaN substrate 3 nm undoped GaN 0.26 0.74 Source DrainMain-GateSiO2 2DEG SiO2 SiO2 Additional Gate 5 m3 m3 m 3 mSiO2 Passivation Effects on the Leakage Current in Dual-Gate AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility

  15. 2009 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Highly Distinguished Bowers Michelle Diane Highly Distinguished Bowling Joseph David Highly Distinguished Ashley Highly Distinguished Bryant Catherine Clancy Highly Distinguished Buckheister Elaine A Highly

  16. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Copsey, Jesse F. (Germantown, MD); Garber, Jr., William E. (Poolesville, MD); Kwong, Vincent H. (Vancouver, CA); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Steiner, Paul E. (Olney, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  17. High PRF high current switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Stuart L. (Fredericksburg, VA); Hutcherson, R. Kenneth (College Park, MD)

    1990-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  18. Overview of seismic panel activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1991, the DOE-EM appointed a Seismic Panel to develop seismic criteria that can be used for evaluation of underground storage tanks containing high level radioactive wastes. The Panel expects to issue the first draft of the criteria report in January 1992. This paper provides an overview of the Panel's activities and briefly discusses the criteria. 3 refs.

  19. The impact of individualised cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk estimates and lifestyle advice on physical activity in individuals at high risk of CVD. A Pilot 2x2 Factorial "Understanding Risk" Trial.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Hermione C; Tucker, Lynne; Griffin, Simon J; Holman, Rury R

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    in adults at high risk of CVD. Methods/Design In a 2 × 2 factorial design participants are allocated at random to a personalised 10-year CVD risk estimate or numerical CVD risk factor values (systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and fasting glucose...

  20. 2011 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Elizabeth Campbell Highly Distinguished Bowker Ripley Eden Highly Distinguished Brandfass Lara Rose Highly Distinguished Brotherton Cara Price Highly Distinguished Brown Anna Laughlin Highly Distinguished Brown Chloe Alix Highly Distinguished Brown Kelsey Michelle Highly Distinguished Brown Kyle Truman Highly

  1. Improvement of granulation of raw material by using the high-agitating mixer at Kokura No. 3 sintering plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadano, Yasuhiko; Murai, Tatsunori; Kawaguchi, Yosizumi; Komatsu, Shusaku; Sasakawa, Akira; Kawaguchi, Takazo; Matsumura, Masaru

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there have been experiments aimed at increasing the pulverized coal injection rate of a blast furnace. When increasing the pulverized coal injection rate, the gas permeability resistance in a blast furnace increases. One of the methods to decrease the gas permeability resistance in a blast furnace is to use an iron ore burden with high iron content and low slag volume. However, the problem of resource drain has already occurred in the hematite deposit in West Australia, which is the principal supplier of a good quality lumpy iron ore. As a result, pellet feed iron ore must be selected as its substitute. In this paper, the authors investigated a granulation technique for producing an iron ore sinter with high iron content and low slag volume. In addition, they developed the granulation technique of agitating materials and water at high speed. It was used in Kokura No. 3 Sinter Plant.

  2. Non-focusing active warhead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hornig, H.C.

    1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal is disclosed. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught. 4 figs.

  3. 2012 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Highly Distinguished Beck Misty Nicole Highly Distinguished Beckett Ethan Patrick Highly Distinguished Sara Nicole Highly Distinguished Borland Kelly Nicole Highly Distinguished Bosshardt Zachary Michael

  4. Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities)'

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infobook Activities (19 Activities) Grades: 9-12 Topics: Energy Basics Owner: NEED This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy...

  5. 2012 Fall : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Distinguished Andersen Meredith Esther Highly Distinguished Anderson Anna Kathleen Highly Distinguished Anderson Leah Ellen Highly Distinguished Anderson Lucy Paige Highly Distinguished Andrews James Matheson Highly Distinguished Aquino Jeri-Lynn Highly Distinguished Armistead Mary Chandler Highly Distinguished Armstrong Jessa

  6. Synthesis and anticancer activity of epipolythiodiketopiperazine alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Nicolas

    The epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) alkaloids are a highly complex class of natural products with potent anticancer activity. Herein, we report the application of a flexible and scalable synthesis, allowing the construction ...

  7. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Haibing (Houston, TX); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, TX)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  8. Active, polymer-based composite material implementing simple shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Jin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel active material for controllable, high work density applications was designed, fabricated, analyzed, and tested. This active material uses a lens-shaped element to implement simple shear motion with gas pressure actuation. The lens element...

  9. Active dc filter for HVDC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, W. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)); Asplund, G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is a case history of the installation of active dc filters for high-performance, low-cost harmonics filtering at the Lindome converter station in the Konti-Skan 2 HVDC transmission link between Denmark and Sweden. The topics of the article include harmonics, interference, and filters, Lindome active dc filter, active dc filter design, digital signal processor, control scheme, protection and fault monitoring, and future applications.

  10. Active Appearance Models for Face Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhulai, Sandjai

    the performance and the computational speed of Active Appearance Models. #12;4 #12;5 Acknowledgements This paper to recognize faces, there are some difficulties to overcome. Faces are highly variable, deformable objects Appearance Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.4 The Active Appearance Search Algorithm

  11. Microwave Sensors Active and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    waves up through high energy gamma waves. Microwaves extend over an important part of the elec be classified as either passive (radiometers) or active (radars). Each sensor class provides unique insight instruments can be divided into two broad classes: pas- sive, known as radiometers, and active, known

  12. Geothermal materials development activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

  13. High Energy Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. D. Hoffman

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the history, motivation and current status of high energy neutrino telescopes. Many years after these detectors were first conceived, the operation of kilometer-cubed scale detectors is finally on the horizon at both the South Pole and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new detectors will perhaps provide us the first view of high energy astrophysical objects with a new messenger particle and provide us with our first real glimpse of the distant universe at energies above those accessible by gamma-ray instruments. Some of the topics that can be addressed by these new instruments include the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the mechanisms at work in high energy astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebula and supernova remnants.

  14. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  15. Characterizing guayule rubber transferase activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornish, K.; Backhaus, R.A. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA))

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rubber transferase (RuT) activity, measured as incorporation of {sup 14}C(isopentenyl pyrophosphate) (IPP) into rubber, was assayed in suspensions of rubber particles purified from bark tissue of Parthenium argentatum, Gray. Rubber particle suspensions (RSP) have high RuT activity which is not diminished by repeated washing of the particles, demonstrating the firm association of the enzyme system with the particles. RuT activity varied with line: 11591 yielded more rubber particles with a greater activity per particle, than did other lines tested. Variation in activity also varied with bark age and season. Activity rapidly declined at temperatures above 16{degree}C in line 593, but was more stable in RSP isolated form line 11591. IPP-incorporation depends upon the concentration of two substrates, IPP and the starter molecule farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). In lines 593 and 11591, 20 uM FPP saturated the enzyme present in 6 {times} 10{sup 10} particles {times} cm{sup {minus}3}, whereas about 1 mM IPP was required for saturation. Under saturating FPP, the apparent K{sub m} of RuT was about 250 uM.

  16. LANL | Physics | Active Interrogation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Division activities in standoff active-interrogation for detecting terrorist nuclear devices, 2011 Detonation of a terrorist nuclear device in a major city would have...

  17. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

  18. Characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors with triple delta-doped sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Kuei-Yi [National Cheng-Kung University, Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering (China); Chiang, Meng-Hsueh, E-mail: mhchiang@niu.edu.tw; Cheng, Shiou-Ying, E-mail: sycheng@niu.edu.tw [National II an University, Department of Electronic Engineering (China); Liu, Wen-Chau [National Cheng-Kung University, Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering (China)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental and insightful characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs double channel pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (DCPHEMTs) with graded and uniform triple {delta}-doped sheets are coomprehensively studied and demonstrated. To gain physical insight, band diagrams, carrier densities, and direct current characteristics of devices are compared and investigated based on the 2D semiconductor simulator, Atlas. Due to uniform carrier distribution and high electron density in the double InGaAs channel, the DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped sheets exhibits better transport properties, higher and linear transconductance, and better drain current capability as compared with the uniformly triple {delta}-doped counterpart. The DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped structure is fabricated and tested, and the experimental data are found to be in good agreement with simulated results.

  19. Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »Usage »DownloadSolar »MiddleHighHighEnergy SourcesSec.Activities (19

  20. Secondary Energy Infobook and Secondary Infobook Activities (19 Activities)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »Usage »DownloadSolar »MiddleHighHighEnergy SourcesSec.Activities (19|

  1. 2013 Fall : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Anderson Chelsea Mariah Highly Distinguished Anderson Madison Olivia Highly Distinguished Andrews James Askew Mary Frances Highly Distinguished Augustine Andrew William Highly Distinguished Austin Adrian Bailes Mary Elizabeth Highly Distinguished Bailey Erika Leigh Highly Distinguished Bailey Margaret

  2. active fire detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in North America from long-term records of the advanced very high resolution radiometer Geosciences Websites Summary: Interannual changes of active fire detectability in...

  3. america fy08 activities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in North America from long-term records of the advanced very high resolution radiometer Geosciences Websites Summary: Interannual changes of active fire detectability in...

  4. activity instrument ltpai: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two popular scientific disciplines of this nature are brain science and high-energy physics. The analysis of brain activity data gathered from the MEG Buyya, Rajkumar 18...

  5. active cavity radiometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in North America from long-term records of the advanced very high resolution radiometer Geosciences Websites Summary: Interannual changes of active fire detectability in...

  6. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redwine, Robert

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  7. High e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footworke ne rgy data s am

  8. High-frequency performance of graphene field effect transistors with saturating IV-characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    reported for top-gated (a) (b) Figure 1. GFET device structure. (a) Schematic illustration of the back, 6]. The GFETs characterized here are created with a back gate as shown in Fig. 1a. A split-beam patterning of source and drain contacts with approximately 50-nm gate- to-source and gate-to-drain spacings

  9. High-performance amorphous gallium indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors through N{sub 2}O plasma passivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jaechul; Kim, Sangwook; Kim, Changjung; Kim, Sunil; Song, Ihun; Yin, Huaxiang; Kim, Kyoung-Kok; Lee, Sunghoon; Hong, Kiha; Park, Youngsoo [Semiconductor Device Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 449-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaecheol; Jung, Jaekwan; Lee, Eunha [Analytical Engineering Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 449-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kee-Won [Department of Semiconductor Systems Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous-gallium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-GIZO) thin filmtransistors (TFTs) are fabricated without annealing, using processes and equipment for conventional a-Si:H TFTs. It has been very difficult to obtain sound TFT characteristics, because the a-GIZO active layer becomes conductive after dry etching the Mo source/drain electrode and depositing the a-SiO{sub 2} passivation layer. To prevent such damages, N{sub 2}O plasma is applied to the back surface of the a-GIZO channel layer before a-SiO{sub 2} deposition. N{sub 2}O plasma-treated a-GIZO TFTs exhibit excellent electrical properties: a field effect mobility of 37 cm{sup 2}/V s, a threshold voltage of 0.1 V, a subthreshold swing of 0.25 V/decade, and an I{sub on/off} ratio of 7.

  10. 423A HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING/NUMERICAL The International Journal of High Performance Computing Applications,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    423A HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING/NUMERICAL The International Journal of High Performance Computing and barriers in the development of high-performance computing (HPC) algorithms and software. The activity has computing, numerical analy- sis, roadmap, applications and algorithms, software 1 The High-performance

  11. Active Humidity Control Through Gas-Fired Desiccant Humidity Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novosel, D.; Griffiths, W. C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High equipment first cost and high operating costs, if electricity is used to drive such a system, have prohibited the application of active humidity control equipment in comfort conditioning in the past. Instead, passive techniques have been...

  12. The variability of warm absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Robert R. (Robert Ross)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents three studies of warm (photoionized) absorber variability in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) using high-resolution X-ray spectra provided by the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). The first ...

  13. High frequency reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  14. EXPERIMENTS with PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS for high school science students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    EXPERIMENTS with PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS for high school science students By Dick Erickson ­ Pleasant Activity ­ Testing Photovoltaic Cells ..........................5 Expected Observations: ........................................................................................................8 II. LAB ACTIVITY - TESTING PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS ..................................9 BEFORE YOU START

  15. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  16. High-throughput quantification of glycoprotein sialylation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markely, Lam Raga Anggara

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sialic acid can improve qualities of therapeutic glycoproteins, such as circulatory half-life, biological activity, and solubility. In production of therapeutic glycoproteins, a high-throughput method (HTM) is required for ...

  17. Advanced Metal-Hydrides-Based Thermal Battery: A New Generation of High Density Thermal Battery Based on Advanced Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The University of Utah is developing a compact hot-and-cold thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides that could offer efficient climate control system for EVs. The team’s innovative designs of heating and cooling systems for EVs with high energy density, low-cost thermal batteries could significantly reduce the weight and eliminate the space constraint in automobiles. The thermal battery can be charged by plugging it into an electrical outlet while charging the electric battery and it produces heat and cold through a heat exchanger when discharging. The ultimate goal of the project is a climate-controlling thermal battery that can last up to 5,000 charge and discharge cycles while substantially increasing the driving range of EVs, thus reducing the drain on electric batteries.

  18. Draining the Pool: Electricity Trading in England & Wales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    , not fuel payment #12;What do generators get? · If they run: PPP + (Strike - PPP) - fuel payment · If not: (Strike - PPP) + Unscheduled Availability · Gain from running: (PPP - UA) - fuel payment #12;Isn

  19. Methanogen Communities in a Drained Bog: Effect of Ash Fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    amplification of the methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcr) gene, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE-M reductase (mcrA) gene [10]. Mcr, a key enzyme in methanogen metabolism, catalyzes the reduction of methyl

  20. Bi-directionally draining pore fluid extraction vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prizio, Joseph (Boulder, CO); Ritt, Alexander (Lakewood, CO); Mower, Timothy E. (Wheat Ridge, CO); Rodine, Lonn (Arvada, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is used to extract pore fluid from porous solids through a combination of mechanical compression and inert-gas injection and comprises a piston for axially compressing samples to force water out, and top and bottom drainage plates for capturing the exuded water and using inert gas to force water to exit when the limits of mechanical compression have been reached.

  1. Expected Economic Benefits of the El Morillo Drain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, Ronald D.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.; DuBois, Megan; Rogers, Callie; Seawright, Emily

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    $16.3 and $30.3 million. This does not include effects on landscapes, industry that is dependant on low saline water, and water treatment plants. Accounting for the costs to agriculture from crop losses of about $26.7 million, the total annual impact...

  2. Computer-aided-design of agricultural drains under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Luis Alfredo

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be constructed. Using drainage helps dissolve and remove some excess salts and alkal ines. The balance between the amount of salts brought in by irrigation and the amount taken out by drainage is referred to as the salt balance of the area (Scofi eld 1940... for the depth, D, and spacing, L. D, L & 0 (4. 5) This MPP did not include uncertainty. In the next section uncertainty will be incorporated into the MPP. The ful I deterministic NPP is shown below: 35 Min [Ci + C2 + C3 + C4 + s. t. L2Qd D + d' ? (d...

  3. TECHNICAL NOTES Determination of Length of a Horizontal Drain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    . Chahar1 Abstract: An earth dam can be prevented from a seepage failure due to softening of the downstream

  4. Source/drain profile engineering with plasma implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.C.; Cheung, N.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jiqun Shao; Denholm, A.S. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow junction profiles are controlled by the variable implant profile, implant damage profile and annealing cycle. For plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) systems, the dopant and damage profiles vary with plasma source conditions and implanter waveforms. These can lead to different implant profiles for the same dose and energy, and different junction profiles after annealing. In the low energy regime, the as-implanted profiles resemble those from conventional implanters. In the Berkeley PIH system, a 55 mn p{sup +} junction is formed by 1 kV BF{sub 3} PIII implantation and a two-step rapid thermal annealing cycle.

  5. Drain-Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome | Documents Memorandum fromErnest Moniz

  6. Hohokam Irr & Drain Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to: navigation,Jersey: EnergySpain)Hockley

  7. City of Drain, Oregon (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity of Dayton, IowaDothan,

  8. A development of MOS linear active load schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallett, Robert Alan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resistor. A solution to this problem is to use a single or multiply interconnected MOS transistors to simulate resistors. These simulated resistors are termed "active loads". The advantages of using MOSFETs over passive monolithic resistors are the high...'s inverted parallel load . General description of the fully linear active block Fully linear active block Three transistor fully linear block Cktl Ckt2 Ckt3 Ckt4 Complex single transistor loads IPL DEPR FLAB I ? V measuring system THD measuring...

  9. Recent CFD-Related Activities at the High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    from the best · show others in the nuclear industry how it should be done · where better to do/18/2010 · permanent Be replacement (CFX) · beam tube upgrades (CFX) · cold source moderator vessel (CFX, PICMSS, FLUENT) · cold source pressurizer (NASTRAN, HEATING, FEMLAB) · cold source test heater (COMSOL) Upgrade

  10. High Activity catalysts for Polyols Production From C-6 Sugars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Werpy; Alan Zacher; John Frye; Keith Peterson; Gary Neuenschwander; Eric Alderson; Daniel Muzatko; Jim White

    2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this project, many significant discoveries have been made in the process for the conversion of sorbitol to value added products. The object was developing a process for the production of propylene glycol (PG), ethylene glycol (EG), and glycerol from sorbitol.

  11. Exploration Guides For Active High-Temperature Geothermal Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and hydrothermal events and duration of the hydrothermal event, iii) distance between the cooling magma body and the geothermal field (or ore deposit), iv) hydrothermal fluids and...

  12. Highly Potent Bactericidal Activity of Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged3Education »Center for Gas

  13. LBNL: High Performance Active Perimeter Building Systems - 2015 Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM to 2:05PMDOE-STD-1107-97LSEED: WhyGetting|

  14. Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreach toTransmission and6/15/2015 U.SClimate

  15. A highly active manganese precatalyst for the hydrosilylation of ketones

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced Charged-CurrentN NA goldenand

  16. The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformation 2EnergyCityGreen DataThe Needles

  17. Heavy Duty HCCI Development Activities - DOE High Efficiency Clean

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TO THEHudson HazleRyanCombustion (HECC) |

  18. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p a a r r t t m m e1

  19. Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

  20. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  1. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  2. Processing of Activated Core Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

  3. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA); Woolman, Joseph N. (Davis, CA); Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  4. Rethinking the idealized morphology in high-performance organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rethinking the idealized morphology in high-performance organic photovoltaics December 9, 2011 Tweet EmailPrint Traditionally, organic photovoltaic (OPV) active layers are viewed...

  5. Comparative study of InGaP/GaAs high electron mobility transistors with upper and lower delta-doped supplied layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jung-Hui, E-mail: jhtsai@nknucc.nknu.edu.tw; Ye, Sheng-Shiun [National Kaohsiung Normal University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Taiwan (China); Guo, Der-Feng [Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung, Department of Electronic Engineering, Taiwan (China); Lour, Wen-Shiung [National Taiwan Ocean University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Influence corresponding to the position of {delta}-doped supplied layer on InGaP/GaAs high electron mobility transistors is comparatively studied by two-dimensional simulation analysis. The simulated results exhibit that the device with lower {delta}-doped supplied layer shows a higher gate potential barrier height, a higher saturation output current, a larger magnitude of negative threshold voltage, and broader gate voltage swing, as compared to the device with upper {delta}-doped supplied layer. Nevertheless, it has smaller transconductance and inferior high-frequency characteristics in the device with lower {delta}-doped supplied layer. Furthermore, a knee effect in current-voltage curves is observed at low drain-to-source voltage in the two devices, which is investigated in this article.

  6. Stress reorganisation and response in active solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoda J. Hawkins; Tanniemola B. Liverpool

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a microscopic model of a disordered viscoelastic active solid, i.e. an active material whose long time behaviour is elastic as opposed to viscous. It is composed of filaments, passive crosslinks and molecular motors powered by stored chemical energy, e.g. actomyosin powered by ATP. Our model allows us to study the collective behaviour of contractile active elements and how their interaction with each other and the passive elastic elements determines the macroscopic mechanical properties of the active material. As a result of the (un)binding dynamics of the active elements, we find that this system provides a highly responsive material with a dynamic mechanical response strongly dependent on the amount of deformation.

  7. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  8. A 10 GHz Integrated Class-E Oscillating Annular Ring Element for High-Efficiency Transmitting Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and separate feed- back loop. More recent designs have used rectangular patches as a radiator in the feedback are theoreti- cally eliminated and 100% drain efficiency is ideally attainable. Transmission-line microwave class-E am- #12;plifiers have been demonstrated first in [7]. Recently drain efficiencies of 70% have

  9. adolescents reporting high: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARA Gro G520T Egrett high altitude research aircraft with three BAT probes. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Geosciences Websites Summary: The ARA Gro G520T Egrett high...

  10. LANSCE | News & Media | Activity Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    background News Multimedia Events Profiles Highlights Activity Reports The Pulse User Program Headlines News & Media dotline Activity Reports 2012 2011 LANSCE Activity Report 2012...

  11. Alabama Power- UESC Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

  12. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress August 2014 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Conservation Standards Activities Report to Congress | Page i Message from the...

  13. NAIS: Nuclear activation-based imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Günther, M. M.; Britz, A.; Harres, K.; Hoffmeister, G.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Pelka, A.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Schlossgartenstr. 9, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik, Schlossgartenstr. 9, Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Clarke, R. J. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appelton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appelton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Vogt, K. [GSI – Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] [GSI – Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the development of high power laser systems led to focussed intensities of more than 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} at high pulse energies. Furthermore, both, the advanced high power lasers and the development of sophisticated laser particle acceleration mechanisms facilitate the generation of high energetic particle beams at high fluxes. The challenge of imaging detector systems is to acquire the properties of the high flux beam spatially and spectrally resolved. The limitations of most detector systems are saturation effects. These conventional detectors are based on scintillators, semiconductors, or radiation sensitive films. We present a nuclear activation-based imaging spectroscopy method, which is called NAIS, for the characterization of laser accelerated proton beams. The offline detector system is a combination of stacked metal foils and imaging plates (IP). After the irradiation of the stacked foils they become activated by nuclear reactions, emitting gamma decay radiation. In the next step, an autoradiography of the activated foils using IPs and an analysis routine lead to a spectrally and spatially resolved beam profile. In addition, we present an absolute calibration method for IPs.

  14. The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Guedel

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have led to the escape of important amounts of atmospheric constituents. The present dry atmosphere of Venus and the thin atmosphere of Mars may be a product of early irradiation and heating by solar high-energy radiation. High levels of magnetic activity are also inferred for the pre-main sequence Sun. At those stages, interactions of high-energy radiation and particles with the circumsolar disk in which planets eventually formed were important. Traces left in meteorites by energetic particles and anomalous isotopic abundance ratios in meteoritic inclusions may provide evidence for a highly active pre-main sequence Sun. The present article reviews these various issues related to the magnetic activity of the young Sun and the consequent interactions with its environment.

  15. High Heat Flux Components Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, J.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

  16. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in yield and 4 cP in viscosity in comparison to high AA pulp for the oxygen delignification. This difference is also seen for high-kappa SW kraft pulps with an average improvement of {approx}3% in yield and 3 cP in viscosity for low AA high kappa number 50 pulp. Low AA hardwood kappa number 20 pulp had an average improvement of {approx}4% in yield and 6-12 cP in viscosity as compared to high AA pulp. Lower kraft cooking temperature (160 vs. 170 C) in combination with the medium AA provides a practical approach for integrating high kappa pulping of hardwoods (i.e., low rejects) with an advanced extended oxygen delignification stage. ECF pulp bleaching of low and high kappa kraft SW and HW pulps exhibit comparable optical and physical strength properties when bleached D(EPO)D.

  17. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  18. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  19. High-Responsivity Graphene-Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D; Efetov, Dimitri; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H L; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cut-off at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron-phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photorespo...

  20. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  1. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e/sup +/e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC.

  2. DIAGNOSING THE TIME DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution coolward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a 'nanoflare train' and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration {Delta} {sub H} to the post-train cooling and draining timescale {Delta} {sub C}, where {Delta} {sub H} depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time interval between successive events ({tau} {sub C}); (3) {tau} {sub C} may be diagnosed from the width of the hot component of the emission measure provided that the temperature bins are much smaller than 0.1 dex; (4) the slope of the emission measure alone is not sufficient to provide information about any timescale associated with heating-the length and density of the heated structure must be measured for {Delta} {sub H} to be uniquely extracted from the ratio {Delta} {sub H}/{Delta} {sub C}.

  3. Active optical zoom system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  4. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

    2009-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

  5. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Terence M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Nyati, Shyam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ross, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Rehemtulla, Alnawaz, E-mail: alnawaz@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  6. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  7. Thematic note to substantiate Ris's strategy impact on society Customer-driven activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Competitive power as high-technology society Introduction Customer-driven activities are activities undertakenThematic note to substantiate Risø's strategy ­ impact on society Customer-driven activities Impact and embedding Risø's research in society and thereby having significant impact. To Risø, the activities provide

  8. High-k shallow traps observed by charge pumping with varying discharging times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang@mail.phys.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lu, Ying-Hsin; Lo, Wen-Hung; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Wang, Bin-Wei; Cao, Xi-Xin [Department of Embedded System Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, P.R.China (China); Chen, Hua-Mao [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Chen, Tsai-Fu [Device Department, United Microelectronics Corporation, Tainan Science Park, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of falling time and base level time on high-k bulk shallow traps measured by charge pumping technique in n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with HfO{sub 2}/metal gate stacks. N{sub T}-V{sub high} {sub level} characteristic curves with different duty ratios indicate that the electron detrapping time dominates the value of N{sub T} for extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps. N{sub T} is the number of traps, and I{sub cp} is charge pumping current. By fitting discharge formula at different temperatures, the results show that extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps at high voltage are in fact high-k bulk shallow traps. This is also verified through a comparison of different interlayer thicknesses and different Ti{sub x}N{sub 1?x} metal gate concentrations. Next, N{sub T}-V{sub high} {sub level} characteristic curves with different falling times (t{sub falling} {sub time}) and base level times (t{sub base} {sub level}) show that extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps decrease with an increase in t{sub falling} {sub time}. By fitting discharge formula for different t{sub falling} {sub time}, the results show that electrons trapped in high-k bulk shallow traps first discharge to the channel and then to source and drain during t{sub falling} {sub time}. This current cannot be measured by the charge pumping technique. Subsequent measurements of N{sub T} by charge pumping technique at t{sub base} {sub level} reveal a remainder of electrons trapped in high-k bulk shallow traps.

  9. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  10. Focused active inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Daniel S., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In resource-constrained inferential settings, uncertainty can be efficiently minimized with respect to a resource budget by incorporating the most informative subset of observations - a problem known as active inference. ...

  11. Active terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hou-tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate planar terahertz metamaterial devices enabling actively controllable transmission amplitude, phase, or frequency at room temperature via carrier depletion or photoexcitation in the semiconductor substrate or in semiconductor materials incorporated into the metamaterial structure.

  12. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  13. Improvement of magnetic and structural stabilities in high-quality Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 1?x}Al{sub x}/Si heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, S., E-mail: yamada@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Tanikawa, K.; Oki, S.; Kawano, M.; Miyao, M. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hamaya, K. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Gobancho, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study high-quality Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 1?x}Al{sub x} Heusler compound/Si (0 ? x ? 1) heterointerfaces for silicon (Si)-based spintronic applications. In thermal treatment conditions, the magnetic and structural stabilities of the Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 1?x}Al{sub x}/Si heterointerfaces are improved with increasing x in Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 1?x}Al{sub x}. Compared with L2{sub 1}-ordered Co{sub 2}FeSi/Si, B2-ordered Co{sub 2}FeAl/Si can suppress the diffusion of Si atoms into the Heusler-compound structure. This experimental study will provide an important knowledge for applications in Si-based spin transistors with metallic source/drain contacts.

  14. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  15. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  16. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  17. activation promotes tumorigenesis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  18. activation promotes antithrombotic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  19. activity promotes dna: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  20. activation promotes myonuclear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  1. actively promotes initiation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  2. activity promotes natural: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  3. ace2 activation promotes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  4. alf promoter activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  5. activity promotion project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  6. activator inhibitor-1 promotes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help this work. With the growing rate of obesity, the high cost of gas and climate change, we must rethink and reshape our transportation systems and networks to promote active...

  7. A study of plasma etching for use on active metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishimoto, Keane T. (Keane Takeshi), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active metals can be used as a getter pump, removing impurities in ultra-pure high vacuum environments. To relieve the difficulties involved with the transportation, storage and handling of these metals, a process is being ...

  8. active aromatic polyamides: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rodriguez-Lattuada, Sylian J. 2005-01-01 33 High-Yield Activation of Scaffold Polymer Surfaces To Attach Cell Adhesion Molecules Chemistry Websites Summary: continues to grow...

  9. Reporting Unethical or Illegal Activity | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reporting Unethical or Illegal Activity Doing What's Right How we work is as important at the work we do High standards are more than a slogan or catch phrase - they represent the...

  10. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  11. Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Sae Bom

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -EDS) were used to identify minerals in chemical mixtures that have high activities. Results indicate that active agents for PCE degradation in Portland cement slurries and in cement extracts might be one of several AFm phases. However, systems without cement...

  12. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for...

  13. Spontaneous motion in hierarchically assembled active matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Sanchez; Daniel T. N. Chen; Stephen J. DeCamp; Michael Heymann; Zvonimir Dogic

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently non-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for developing biomimetic active materials from microscopic components that consume energy to generate continuous motion. Being actively driven, these materials are not constrained by the laws of equilibrium statistical mechanics and can thus exhibit highly sought-after properties such as autonomous motility, internally generated flows and self-organized beating. Starting from extensile microtubule bundles, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of conventional polymer gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubules form a percolating active network characterized by internally driven chaotic flows, hydrodynamic instabilities, enhanced transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, 3D networks spontaneously adsorb onto the droplet surfaces to produce highly active 2D nematic liquid crystals whose streaming flows are controlled by internally generated fractures and self-healing, as well as unbinding and annihilation of oppositely charged disclination defects. The resulting active emulsions exhibit unexpected properties, such as autonomous motility, which are not observed in their passive analogues. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblages of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are starkly different from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks, challenging us to develop a theoretical framework that would allow for a systematic engineering of their far-from-equilibrium material properties.

  14. NSLS 2009 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta K.; Mona R.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 was an incredibly exciting year for light sources at Brookhaven. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) hosted more than 2,200 visiting researchers, who, along with the about 50 members of our scientific staff, produced a total of 957 publications - about 20 percent of which appeared in premier journals. Covering topics ranging from Alzheimer's disease detection to ethanol-powered fuel cells, a sampling of these findings can be found in this Activity Report. We've also seen the resurfacing of some of our long-time users hard work. I was very proud to hear that two of the three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have ties to the NSLS. Venki Ramakrishnan, a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department and long-time user of the NSLS, now at Cambridge University, and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for their work on the structure and function of the ribosome. In the late 1990s, Ramakrishnan and Steitz used protein crystallography at the NSLS to gather atomic-level images of two ribosome subunits: 30S (Ramakrishnan) and 50S (Steitz). Both laureates solved the high-resolution structures for these subunits based on this data. After struggling with a rough budget for several years, we received excellent funding, and then some, this year. In addition to NSLS operations funding, we received $3 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). We used that additional money for two exciting projects: construction of a full-field x-ray microscope and acquisition of several advanced x-ray detectors. The x-ray microscope will be able to image objects with a targeted spatial resolution of 30 nanometers. This capability will be particularly important for new initiatives in energy research and will prepare our users for the projected 1-nanometer resolution benchmark at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The detectors project is expected to increase the throughput of several high-demand beamlines by an order of magnitude as well as enable new classes of experiments. In addition, a huge chunk of ARRA money - $150 million - was put toward accelerating the construction of NSLS-II, which is now taking shape across the street. Now physically much more than just a pile of dirt, NSLS-II was granted Critical Decision 3 status by the Department of Energy (DOE) early last year, giving the official go-ahead for construction. In July, construction began, marked by a groundbreaking ceremony that attracted elected officials, media, and DOE, Battelle, and Stony Brook University representatives from across the state and the country. As progress on NSLS-II continues, we're working with Stony Brook University to identify ways to capitalize on the facility's unique capabilities through the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). Included in this effort is a series of workshops to encourage the development and application of the photon sciences with collaborative research between industries, universities, and national laboratories. We helped host three of these workshops this year, focusing on microelectronics, energy storage, and materials in next-generation energy systems. The conversation and ideas generated at these meetings has been fresh and valuable and we hope to use this model to organize research opportunities in other scientific fields. Also this year: Brookhaven was deemed the lead institution for one of DOE's 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, focused on understanding the underlying nature of superconductivity in complex materials by using techniques at the NSLS and CFN; DOE awarded a $100,000 supplemental grant to our detector program to continue the development of a new generation of x-ray detectors that use germanium sensors, which, at high energies, are much more efficient than equivalent ones based on silicon; and funding for one of our largest consortia, Case Western Reserve University's Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), was renewed through the National Inst

  15. The Physical Activity Resource Assessment (PARA) instrument: Evaluating features, amenities and incivilities of physical activity resources in urban neighborhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Rebecca E.; Booth, Katie M.; Reese-Smith, Jacqueline Y.; Regan, Gail; Howard, Hugh H.

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of a variety of PA resources. Method: The one-page Physical Activity Resource Assessment (PARA) instrument was developed to assess all publicly available PA resources in thirteen urban lower income, high ethnic minority concentration neighborhoods...

  16. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The...

  17. Lab active in support of science activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -Lab Subcontractoractive in support

  18. Two-stage Model for Lifetime Prediction of Highly Stable Amorphous-Silicon Thin-Film Transistors under Low-Gate Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that (i) a "unified stretched exponential fit" models the drain current degradation from 60°C to 140 stable back-channel passivated (BCP) a-Si TFTs were fabricated with a standard bottom-gate non field of 2.0×105 V/cm) and a constant drain voltage of 7.5V. The positive threshold voltage shift of a

  19. Nonequilibrium Glass Transition in Mixtures of Active-Passive Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Huai; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a mode coupling theory(MCT) to study the nonequilibrium glass transition behavior of a mono-disperse mixture of active-passive hard-sphere particles. The MCT equations clearly demonstrate that the glass transition is shifted to higher values of total volume fraction when doping a passive system with active particles. Interestingly, we find that the glass transition point may show a non-monotonic dependence on the effective diffusivity of the active component, indicating a nontrivial type of activity induced reentrance behavior. Analysis based on the nonergodic parameters suggest that the glassy state at small activity is due to the caging effect, while that at high activity could result from activity induced dynamic clustering.

  20. 4-H Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    4-H 3-5.213 4/05 18 U.S.C. 707 4-H activities offer young people many exciting opportunities for personal development. These activities often are a part of their projects. For exam- ple, a community beautification project group might tour a local.... Service and civic clubs, community groups and other organi- zations offer additional opportunities for giving demonstrations. Judging Judging is an effective way to teach. It can be as simple as deciding between two items and choosing the best. All 4-H...

  1. Activities and Accomplishments

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply Comments AT&T, SENSI NOT27 AcquisitionActive Project Activities

  2. Biointerfacial Characterization of Neuromuscular Activity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craelius, William

    between electrical activities pertaining to volitional activity and the subsequent muscular response. Design: The Myokinetic Interface (MKI) is a wearable sleeve array of force-sensitive resistors (FSR

  3. Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Zia Haq, Senior Analyst, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

  4. activation cross-section library: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The experimental data are analyzed and compared to the results of the...

  5. alcan-aasf50-ferric coated activated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GPa regime, within the rule of mixtures of its constituents. Friction tests at high temperature shows the films to have a temperature activated self lubrication...

  6. 172 Newark High School 83 Reynoldsburg High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    AU09 HS 172 Newark High School 83 Reynoldsburg High School 71 Heath High School 69 Granville High School 57 Licking Valley High School 54 Northridge High School 54 Watkins Memorial High Scho 51 Sheridan High School 50 Lincoln High School 49 Mount Vernon High School 46 Tri-valley High School 43 Utica High

  7. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  8. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  9. Detecting Bots Based on Keylogging Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Hammadi, Yousof

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bot is a piece of software that is usually installed on an infected machine without the user's knowledge. A bot is controlled remotely by the attacker under a Command and Control structure. Recent statistics show that bots represent one of the fastest growing threats to our network by performing malicious activities such as email spamming or keylogging. However, few bot detection techniques have been developed to date. In this paper, we investigate a behavioural algorithm to detect a single bot that uses keylogging activity. Our approach involves the use of function calls analysis for the detection of the bot with a keylogging component. Correlation of the frequency of a specified time-window is performed to enhance he detection scheme. We perform a range of experiments with the spybot. Our results show that there is a high correlation between some function calls executed by this bot which indicates abnormal activity in our system.

  10. Double active region index-guided semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.R.; Kajanto, M.; Zhuang, Y.; Yariv, A.

    1989-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A buried crescent InGaAsP/InP laser with a double active layer was fabricated. The laser showed very high characteristic temperature T/sub 0/ and highly nonlinear light versus current characteristics. A theoretical model using a rate equation approach showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature,...

  12. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath, E-mail: Somnath.Bhattacharyya@wits.ac.za [Nano-Scale Transport Physics Laboratory, School of Physics and DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2–300?K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80–300?K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65?GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  13. Element Abundances at High Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I review measurements of element abundances in different components of the high redshift universe, including the Lyman alpha forest, damped Lyman alpha systems, and Lyman break galaxies. Although progress is being made in all three areas, recent work has also produced some surprises and shown that established ideas about the nature of the damped Lyman alpha systems in particular may be too simplistic. Overall, our knowledge of metal abundances at high z is still very sketchy. Most significantly, there seems to be an order of magnitude shortfall in the comoving density of metals which have been measured up to now compared with those produced by the star formation activity seen in Lyman break galaxies. At least some of the missing metals are likely to be in hot gas in galactic halos and proto-clusters.

  14. Electron density and currents of AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bairamis, A.; Zervos, Ch.; Georgakilas, A., E-mail: alexandr@physics.uoc.gr [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Adikimenakis, A.; Kostopoulos, A.; Kayambaki, M.; Tsagaraki, K.; Konstantinidis, G. [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer have been analyzed theoretically and experimentally, and the effects of the AlN barrier and GaN buffer layer thicknesses on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and transport properties have been evaluated. HEMT structures consisting of [300?nm GaN/ 200?nm AlN] buffer layer on sapphire were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and exhibited a remarkable agreement with the theoretical calculations, suggesting a negligible influence of the crystalline defects that increase near the heteroepitaxial interface. The 2DEG density varied from 6.8?×?10{sup 12} to 2.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} as the AlN barrier thickness increased from 2.2 to 4.5?nm, while a 4.5?nm AlN barrier would result to 3.1?×?10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} on a GaN buffer layer. The 3.0?nm AlN barrier structure exhibited the highest 2DEG mobility of 900?cm{sup 2}/Vs for a density of 1.3?×?10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2}. The results were also confirmed by the performance of 1??m gate-length transistors. The scaling of AlN barrier thickness from 1.5?nm to 4.5?nm could modify the drain-source saturation current, for zero gate-source voltage, from zero (normally off condition) to 0.63?A/mm. The maximum drain-source current was 1.1?A/mm for AlN barrier thickness of 3.0?nm and 3.7?nm, and the maximum extrinsic transconductance was 320 mS/mm for 3.0?nm AlN barrier.

  15. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  16. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  17. Proposed SOLCOST maintenance activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a short description of work that has been accomplished to date and work in progress. A discussion of the program status as it is currently configured follows and finally proposed work by Solar Environmental Engineering Company (SEEC) in its most recently signed contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) is given. Early statements are designed to give the reader a good background so that the suggested SOLCOST maintenance activities will be more easily understood.

  18. Science Activities in Biomass

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch BriefsTenney, Office of ScienceActivities in Biomass

  19. Nuclear vs. Circumnuclear Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Diaz; M. P. Aguero; H. Dottori

    2004-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the frequency and properties of the nuclear activity in a sample of galaxies with circumnuclear rings and spirals (CNRs). This sample was compared with a control sample of galaxies with very similar global properties but without circumnuclear rings. We discuss the relevance of the results in regard to the AGN feeding processes and present the following results: (i) bright companion galaxies seem not to be important for the appearance of CNRs, which appear to be more related to intrinsic properties of the host galaxies or to minor merger processes; (ii) the proportion of strong bars in galaxies with an AGN and a CNR is somewhat higher than the expected ratio of strongly barred AGN galaxies from the results of Ho and coworkers; (iii) the incidence of Seyfert activity coeval with CNRs is clearly larger than the rate expected from the morphological distribution of the host galaxies; (iv) the rate of Sy 2 to Sy 1 type galaxies with CNRs is about three times larger than the expected ratio for galaxies without CNRs and is opposite to that predicted by the geometric paradigm of the classical unified model for AGNs, although it does support the hypothesis that Sy 2 activity is linked to circumnuclear star formation.

  20. Effect of buffer structures on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xi, Y. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Cao, Yu [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with three different types of buffer layers, including a GaN/AlGaN composite layer, or 1 or 2 lm GaN thick layers, were fabricated and their reliability compared. The HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layer showed the lowest critical voltage (Vcri) during off-state drain step-stress, but this was increased by around 50% and 100% for devices with the composite AlGaN/GaN buffer layers or thinner GaN buffers, respectively. The Voff - state for HEMTs with thin GaN and composite buffers were 100 V, however, this degraded to 50 60V for devices with thick GaN buffers due to the difference in peak electric field near the gate edge. A similar trend was observed in the isolation breakdown voltage measurements, with the highest Viso achieved based on thin GaN or composite buffer designs (600 700 V), while a much smaller Viso of 200V was measured on HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layers. These results demonstrate the strong influence of buffer structure and defect density on AlGaN/GaN HEMT performance and reliability.

  1. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  2. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S. (Albuquerque, NM); Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  3. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  4. High School Science Teacher Induction in Texas: Implications for Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivey, Toni Ann

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    principals' perceptions of teacher induction. Analyses indicated that high school principals had an overwhelmingly narrow focus of mentoring and provided mentor teachers with little support or training. Findings indicated that induction activities...

  5. The digestive adaptation of flying vertebrates: High intestinal paracellular absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    The digestive adaptation of flying vertebrates: High intestinal paracellular absorption compensates analysis. Significantly greater amplification of digestive surface area by villi in small birds, also in actively flying vertebrates. digestion gut morphometrics nutrient absorption paracellular uptake Birds have

  6. TALL : rethinking the systems of the contemporary high rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namkung, Kenneth, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The life of modern work is complex. What once entailed simple activities encapsulated within simple and hierarchically designed spaces has evolved into a highly volatile and complex organism. Businesses and workers are ...

  7. Water and Solute Flow in a Highly-Structured Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallmark, C. Tom; Wilding, Larry P.; McInnes, Kevin J.; Heuvelman, Willem J.

    Prevention of groundwater contamination by agricultural activities is a high priority in the United States. Water and contaminants often follow particular flow paths through the soil that lead to rapid movement of pesticides out of the rootzone...

  8. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobensack, J.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  9. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  10. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  11. Activities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you're a16-17, 201529, 2015 8:00AMChapter6, MarchActive

  12. Fermilab Today - Upcoming Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruaryInThe, 2015 spacer7,,Upcoming Activities

  13. Reduced lattice temperature high-speed operation of pseudomorphic InGaAdGaAs field-effect transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodzey, James

    ,um GaAs buffer, 170 A Ino.zGao,sAs strained channel, 50 A undoped Ale,,,Ga,,,As undoped spacer, S dimensions of 0.25 x 200 pm and 0.5 X 200 pm with a source-drain spacing of 2 ,um. The MODFETs have gate dimensions of 0.35~ 100 pm and 0.47X 100 pm with a source-drain spacing of 1 ,um. The MISFETs have

  14. HIGH-POWER, HIGH-EFFICIENCY FELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. Kumada, "Scaling of the FEL-ID Equations", ELF Note 128,Instability in a High-power, Short- Wavelength FEL", Proc.of the Ninth FEL" Conference, Williamsburg (1988), and

  15. Constitutive modeling of active polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Therkelsen, Scott V. (Scott Vincent), 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a three-dimensional constitutive model of active polymeric materials, including changes in material volume and properties due to actuation. Active polymers reversibly change shape, volume and/or material ...

  16. Active Magnetic Regenerator Experimental Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    the potential to create more efficient and compact refrigeration devices is an Active Magnetic Regenerative temperature refrigerators, as well as efficient gas liquefaction plants (AMRLs). Active Magnetic Regenerator Refrigeration exploits the magnetocaloric effect displayed by magnetic materials whereby a reversible

  17. Texas Nitrogen Leaching Index TECHNICAL NOTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Potential A Deep, well-drained to excessively drained sands and gravels. High High Low B Moderately deep to deep, well to moderately well drained, moderately fine to moderately course texture. Moderate Moderate in the NRCS Soil Data Mart and Web Soil Survey (WSS) by generating the "Water Features Report". Under

  18. The effect of some processing variables on the canning stability of raw and parboiled long-grain rice varieties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demont, James Ira

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water 0. 25$ 0. 5+ Response 3 22 -1. 24 -2. 01 For the reason mentioned above and the possibility that calcium lactate causes sloughing ot' grain material as does magnesium sulfate (9), the calcium lactate treatment resulted in high drained weights... treatments . . 23 Drained weight response to pH diff'erences 24 Drained weight response to calcium lactate treatments 24 Drained weight response to blanch time dif'ferences . 25 Drained weight response to variety x parboil irteraction 25 10. Drained...

  19. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S. (Albuquerque, NM); Beyer, James B. (Madison, WI); Nordman, James E. (Madison, WI); Hohenwarter, Gert K. G. (Madison, WI)

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  20. Clean Cities Education & Outreach Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Education Project (CTEP) Principal Investigator: Anne Tazewell North Carolina Solar Center North Carolina State University Clean Cities Education & Outreach Activities...

  1. Donaldson Active Regeneration PM System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Modeling - FEA * Failure Mode Analysis & Life Prediction - Reliability Analysis * FMEA, Fault Tree Analysis, Risk Assessment, etc. Active System Durability & Reliability...

  2. Catalysis over activated zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miale, J.N.; Chang, C.D.

    1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for conducting organic compound conversion over a catalyst composition comprising a supported crystalline zeolite having a high initial silica-to-alumina mole ratio, said supported zeolite being prepared by compositing said crystalline zeolite with alumina, reacting the composite with a particular hydrogen fluoride solution in a specified way, drying the hydrogen fluoride reacted composite, treating the dried composite by hydrolysis, ammonolysis and/or by contact with an ammonium salt solution, and calcining the resulting material.

  3. Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements...

  5. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric...

  6. High Voltage Safety Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Voltage Safety Act is to prevent injury to persons and property and interruptions of utility service resulting from accidental or inadvertent contact with high-voltage...

  7. A novel activated carbon for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Haijie [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Liu, Enhui, E-mail: liuenhui99@sina.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Xiang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Zhengzheng; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yuhu; Wu, Zhilian; Xie, Hui [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel activated carbon was prepared from phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon has large surface area with microporous, and high heteroatom content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteroatom-containing functional groups can improve the pseudo-capacitance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical properties lead to the good electrochemical properties. -- Abstract: A novel activated carbon has been prepared by simple carbonization and activation of phenol-melamine-formaldehyde resin which is synthesized by the condensation polymerization method. The morphology, thermal stability, surface area, elemental composition and surface chemical composition of samples have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurement, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 6 mol L{sup -1} potassium hydroxide. The activated carbon shows good capacitive behavior and the specific capacitance is up to 210 F g{sup -1}, which indicates that it may be a promising candidate for supercapacitors.

  8. High-temperature molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlGaN/GaN on GaN templates with reduced interface impurity levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koblmueller, G. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Chu, R. M.; Raman, A.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present combined in situ thermal cleaning and intentional doping strategies near the substrate regrowth interface to produce high-quality AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on semi-insulating (0001) GaN templates with low interfacial impurity concentrations and low buffer leakage. By exposing the GaN templates to an optimized thermal dissociation step in the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy environment, oxygen, carbon, and, to lesser extent, Si impurities were effectively removed from the regrowth interface under preservation of good interface quality. Residual Si was further compensated by C-doped GaN via CBr{sub 4} to yield highly resistive GaN buffer layers. Improved N-rich growth conditions at high growth temperatures were then utilized for subsequent growth of the AlGaN/GaN device structure, yielding smooth surface morphologies and low residual oxygen concentration with large insensitivity to the (Al+Ga)N flux ratio. Room temperature electron mobilities of the two-dimensional electron gas at the AlGaN/GaN interface exceeded >1750 cm{sup 2}/V s and the dc drain current reached {approx}1.1 A/mm at a +1 V bias, demonstrating the effectiveness of the applied methods.

  9. High power microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  10. High-performance combinatorial algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinar, Ali

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mathematics, and high performance computing. The numericalalgorithms on high performance computing platforms.algorithms on high performance computing platforms, which

  11. High energy astrophysical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the high energy astrophysical processes that are related to the production of high energy $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino signals and are likely to be important for the energy loss of high and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We also give examples for neutrino fluxes generated by different astrophysical objects and describe the cosmological link provided by cosmogenic neutrinos.

  12. High performance systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, M.B. [comp.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

  13. High Performance Computing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamatakis, Alexandros

    High Performance Computing in Bioinformatics Thomas Ludwig (t.ludwig@computer.org) Ruprecht PART I: High Performance Computing Thomas Ludwig PART II: HPC Computing in Bioinformatics Alexandros #12;© Thomas Ludwig, Alexandros Stamatakis, GCB'04 3 PART I High Performance Computing Introduction

  14. System and method for collisional activation of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Belov, Mikhail E; Prior, David C

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A collision cell is disclosed that provides ion activation in various selective modes. Ion activation is performed inside selected segments of a segmented quadrupole that provides maximum optimum capture and collection of fragmentation products. The invention provides collisional cooling of precursor ions as well as product fragments and further allows effective transmission of ions through a high pressure interface into a coupled mass analysis instrument.

  15. Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferraris, J.P. [Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

  16. Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Ferraris, J.P. (Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

  17. Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Pe-Der

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina... to human health if they exist in the water supply at relatively high concentrations. A wide variety of treatment processes are available to remove organic matter from wastewater. Biological treatment is the most cost effective method for removing oxygen...

  18. Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, F.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

  19. Reduced activation ferritic alloys for fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced activation martensitic alloys can now be developed with properties similar to commercial counterparts, and oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are under consideration. However, low chromium Bainitic alloys with vanadium additions undergo severe irradiation hardening at low irradiation temperatures and excessive softening at high temperatures, resulting in a very restricted application window. Manganese additions result in excessive embrittlement, as demonstrated by post-irradiation Charpy impact testing. The best composition range for martensitic alloys appears to be 7 to 9 Cr and 2 W, with swelling of minor concern and low temperature irradiation embrittlement perhaps eliminated. Therefore, reduced activation martensitic steels in the 7 to 9 Cr range should be considered leading contenders for structural materials applications in power-producing fusion machines.

  20. Increased reliability of a-Si TFT's deposited on clear plastic substrates at high temperatures K. Long, A. Kattamis, I.-C. Cheng, H. Gleskova, S. Wagner, and J. C. Sturm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the standard inverted-staggered structure, with a bottom gate and top source/drain contacts. The TFT channel is defmed by a back-channel-etch. Using this structure we successfully fabricated TFT's at 250°C and 280°C and it is not related to hot carrier (little drain voltage dependence) [3]. We performed gate stress testing on the TFT

  1. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation.

  2. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.; Steyert, W.A.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for refrigeration are disclosed which provides efficient refrigeration over temperature ranges in excess of 20/sup 0/C and which requires no maintenance and is, therefore, usable on an unmanned satellite. The apparatus comprises a superconducting magnet which may be solenoidal. A piston comprising a substance such as a rare earth substance which is maintained near its Curie temperature reciprocates through the bore of the solenoidal magnet. A magnetic drive rod is connected to the piston and appropriate heat sinks are connected thereto. The piston is driven by a suitable mechanical drive such as an electric motor and cam. In practicing the invention, the body of the piston is magnetized and demagnetized as it moves through the magnetic field of the solenoid to approximate any of the following cycles or a condition thereof as well as, potentially, other cycles: Brayton, Carnot, Ericsson, and Stirling. Advantages of the present invention include: that refrigeration can be accomplished over at least a 20/sup 0/C scale at superconducting temperatures as well as at more conventional temperatures; very high efficiency, high reliability, and small size. (LCL)

  3. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  4. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  5. Beta-arrestin inhibits CAMKKbeta-dependent AMPK activation downstream of protease-activated-receptor-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ping; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Yinsheng; Shyy, John Y; DeFea, Kathryn A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dependent AMPK activation downstream of protease-activated-of the cofilin pathway downstream of protease- activateddependent AMPK activation downstream of protease- activated-

  6. RAMA Surveillance Capsule and Component Activation Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, Kenneth E.; Jones, Eric N. [TransWare Enterprises Inc., 1565 Mediterranean Dr., Sycamore, IL 60178 (United States); Carter, Robert G. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W. T. Harris Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the calculated-to-measured ratios associated with the application of the RAMA Fluence Methodology software to light water reactor surveillance capsule and reactor component activation evaluations. Comparisons to measurements are performed for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor surveillance capsule activity specimens from seventeen operating light water reactors. Comparisons to measurements are also performed for samples removed from the core shroud, top guide, and jet pump brace pads from two reactors. In conclusion: The flexible geometry modeling capabilities provided by RAMA, combined with the detailed representation of operating reactor history and anisotropic scattering detail, produces accurate predictions of the fast neutron fluence and neutron activation for BWR and PWR surveillance capsule geometries. This allows best estimate RPV fluence to be determined without the need for multiplicative bias corrections. The three-dimensional modeling capability in RAMA provides an accurate estimate of the fast neutron fluence for regions far removed from the core mid-plane elevation. The comparisons to activation measurements for various core components indicate that the RAMA predictions are reasonable, and notably conservative (i.e., C/M ratios are consistently greater than unity). It should be noted that in the current evaluations, the top and bottom fuel regions are represented by six inch height nodes. As a result, the leakage-induced decrease in power near the upper and lower edges of the core are not well represented in the current models. More precise predictions of fluence for components that lie above and below the core boundaries could be obtained if the upper and lower fuel nodes were subdivided into multiple axial regions with assigned powers that reflect the neutron leakage at the top and bottom of the core. This use of additional axial sub-meshing at the top and bottom of the core is analogous to the use of pin-wise meshing in peripheral bundles to accurately represent radial leakage effects. The representation of thermal neutron fluence and activations are found to be reasonably accurate and consistently conservative, as demonstrated by comparison to the reactor component thermal neutron reaction activation measurements. Further improvement in the comparisons to measurements could be achieved by exploring the impact of enhanced sub-meshing of the geometry near the components of interest. The mesh densities utilized in the current evaluation are consistent with the mesh requirements for high energy neutron transport. The substantially shorter transport lengths for thermal neutrons relative to high energy neutrons suggests that localized regions of finer meshing are needed in the vicinity of those reactor components requiring thermal neutron fluence evaluations. (authors)

  7. Factors affecting the lipase activity of milk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tallamy, Paul Thomas

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    skimmilk as the enzyme source and pasteurized homogenized cream as the substrate during a study of milk lipase. The milk lipase was activated between a pH range of 5. 2 and 9. 8. 11 The optima of the lipase system under study varied... with the concentration of milk fat in the reaction mixture. Using high concentrations of milk fat (16%), optima were observed at pH 8. 5, 6. 5 ? 7. 0, and 7. 9. At relatively low substrate concentration (0. 92)() a broad pH optimum between 7. 0 and 8. 0 was recorded...

  8. AGN Activity in Giant LSB Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Schombert

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A search of large, HI-rich disk galaxies finds a significantly higher fraction of low luminosity AGN signatures compared to other late-type galaxies. Approximately half of the galaxies selected in this sample have AGN-like behavior in their cores, the rest have HII nuclei resulting from simple star formation. Since AGN behavior is not evident in all the sample galaxies, which where selected by high gas mass, we speculate that it is the fuel flow rate that is the common feature between late-type LSB disks and other active nuclear galaxies.

  9. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

  10. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA)

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  11. On Line Beamline Commissioning Activity Approval Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commissioning Activity Approval Form This form is to be filled by the Commissioning Activity Team Leader. No beamline commissioning activities will be allowed to run without a...

  12. Report on geologic exploration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breslin, J.; Laughon, R. B.; Hall, R. J.; Voss, J. W. [comps.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of the geological exploration activities being carried out as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program, which has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop the technology and provide the facilities for the safe, environmentally acceptable isolation of civilian high-level and transuranic nuclear wastes, including spent fuel elements, for which the Federal government is responsible. The principal programmatic emphasis is on disposal in mined geologic repositories. Explorations are being conducted or planned in various parts of the country to identify potential sites for such repositories. The work is being undertaken by three separate but coordinated NWTS project elements. Under the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), basalt formations underlying DOE's Hanford Reservation are being investigated. Granite, tuff, and shale formations at the DOE Nevada Test Site (NTS) are being similarly studied in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI). The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) is investigating domed salt formations in several Gulf Coast states and bedded salt formations in Utah and Texas. The ONWI siting studies are being expanded to include areas overlying crystalline rocks, shales, and other geohydrologic systems. The current status of these NWTS efforts, including the projected budgets for FY 1981, is summarized, and the criteria and methodology being employed in the explorations are described. The consistency of the overall effort with the recommendations presented in the Report to the President by the Interagency Review Group on Nuclear Waste Management (IRG), as well as with documents representing the national technical consensus, is discussed.

  13. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Köhler; Volker Schaller; Andreas R. Bausch

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsative collective long range dynamics. The reorganizations in the highly dynamic steady state of the active gel are characterized by alternating periods of runs and stalls resulting in a superdiffusive dynamics of the network's constituents. They are dominated by the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network: Collective dynamics are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. The feedback between structure formation and dynamics can be resolved by combining these experiments with phenomenological simulations based on simple interaction rules.

  14. High energy density redox flow device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  15. Effect of Ni and Co additives on phase decomposition in TiB2-WB2 solid solutions formed by induction field activated combustion synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibuya, M; Yoneda, T; Yamamoto, Y; Ohyanagi, M; Munir, Zuhair A

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated Self- Propagating High- Temperature Synthesis ofG. Merzhanov, “Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis:Self-Propagating Exothermic Reac- tions: The Synthesis of High-Temperature

  16. Group-III nitride based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with barrier/spacer layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chavarkar, Prashant; Smorchkova, Ioulia P.; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh; Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Wu, Yifeng

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Group III nitride based high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) is disclosed that provides improved high frequency performance. One embodiment of the HEMT comprises a GaN buffer layer, with an Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N (y=1 or y 1) layer on the GaN buffer layer. An Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5) barrier layer on to the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer, opposite the GaN buffer layer, Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer having a higher Al concentration than that of the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. A preferred Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer has y=1 or y.about.1 and a preferred Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer has 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. A 2DEG forms at the interface between the GaN buffer layer and the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer. Respective source, drain and gate contacts are formed on the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. The HEMT can also comprising a substrate adjacent to the buffer layer, opposite the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer and a nucleation layer between the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N buffer layer and the substrate.

  17. NETL R&D Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory, Office of Research and Development (ORD) Research Activities within the Coal and Coal-biomass Liquids Program The Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids program focuses...

  18. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Fuel Cell Activities Mr. Pete Devlin U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Market Transformation Manager Stationary Fuel Cell Applications First National...

  19. Alternative Energy Engineering Activity (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes an alternative energy engineering activity to provide on-site technical assistance for alternative energy and conservation projects; develop information materials and...

  20. High Resolution EELS | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EELS EMSL's ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface chemistry-high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) system is designed to study the molecular-level chemistry...

  1. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  2. High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ever-demanding workloads 13:01 Gary Grider, HPC Divison Leader The High Performance Computing (HPC) Division supports the Laboratory mission by managing world-class...

  3. Beverly Hills High Emily Bloom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    Students Ali Abadi Beverly Hills High Emily Bloom Bakersfield High Camila Castro Rodriguez Mills E. Godwin High Nafiz'Ammar Fatani Da Vinci Science High Diana Felix San Marino High Karen Girdner

  4. Analysis of local carrier modulation in InAs semiconductor nanowire transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    , and drain compared with that of back gate. Com- pared to a surrounding-gate geometry, a top-gate structure as a function of probe tip position, at both high and low drain bias, reveal that carrier and current modulation is strongest when the probe tip is near the source and drain nanowire contacts, and decreases at greater tip

  5. Information Technologies Activity Report J U N E AU G U S T 2 0 1 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    the 309 Gore Hall Web page. High Performance Computing Cluster As announced in the June 2011 IT Activity Report, IT is in the process of building the UD Community Cluster, a high performance computing (HPC

  6. High coking value pitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  7. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting Diode Testing High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting...

  8. A Search for TeV Emission from Active Galaxies using the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    that observes very high energy gamma rays (100 GeV to 100 TeV) using the water-Cerenkov technique Mexico, Milagro observes most of the Northern Hemisphere over the course of a day. The high duty cycleV candidates. Active galaxies have been observed to be highly variable at TeV energies. To test for episodic

  9. Infrared spectroscopic diagnostics for Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luigi Spinoglio

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared spectroscopy in the mid- and far-infrared provides powerful diagnostics for studying the emission regions in active galaxies. The large variety of ionic fine structure lines can probe gas conditions in a variety of physical conditions, from highly ionized gas excited by photons originated by black hole accretion to gas photoionized by young stellar systems. The critical density and the ionization potential of these transitions allow to fully cover the density-ionization parameter space. Some examples of line ratios diagrams using both mid-infrared and far-infrared ionic fine structure lines are presented. The upcoming space observatory Herschel will be able to observe the far-infrared spectra of large samples of local active galaxies. Based on the observed near-to-far infrared emission line spectrum of the template galaxy NGC1068, are presented the predictions for the line fluxes expected for galaxies at high redshift. To observe spectroscopically large samples of distant galaxies, we will have to wait fot the future space missions, like SPICA and, ultimately, FIRI.

  10. Designing Water Smart Landscapes Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Designing Water Smart Landscapes Activity Objective: Create a water smart home landscape. Materials://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/publications/publications.html Draw the plants, using tracing paper. Citizenship Activity Develop a water smart plan for a non generations. Reference For additional assistance with planning your home landscape, refer to "Planning

  11. Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory Presentation on INEENL's...

  12. CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals CLEERS Activities: Diesel Soot Filter Characterization & NOx Control Fundamentals 2009 DOE Hydrogen...

  13. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction...

  14. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Laboratory - January 2014 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2013 Independent Activity Report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July...

  15. Electric Restructuring Outreach Activities and Information Disseminati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Restructuring Outreach Activities and Information Dissemination to State Public Utility Regulators Electric Restructuring Outreach Activities and Information Dissemination to State...

  16. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  17. Old Galaxies at High Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Dunlop

    1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The most passive galaxies at high redshift are unlikely to be identified by either narrow-band emission-line searches, or by Lyman limit searches (both techniques which have been highlighted at this meeting) simply because such selection methods rely on the presence of a strong ultraviolet component. Selection on the basis of extreme radio power has also proved to yield optically active objects with the majority of high-redshift objects studied to date displaying complex elongated optical/UV morphologies, relatively blue optical-ultraviolet continuum colours, and strong emission lines. These features, coupled with the failure to detect any spectral signatures of old stars at $z > 1$, has led to the suggestion that these galaxies are being observed close to or even during a general epoch of formation. However, we have recently demonstrated that radio selection at significantly fainter (mJy) flux densities can be used to identify apparently passively evolving elliptical galaxies at high redshift. Deep Keck spectra have now been obtained for two such objects yielding absorption line redshifts $z \\simeq 1.5$; 53W091 at $z = 1.552$ (Dunlop et al. 1996) and most recently 53W069 at $z = 1.432$. The ultraviolet SEDs of these galaxies indicate minimum ages $> 3$ Gyr while, as stressed in this article, the strength of the reddenning-independent ultraviolet spectral breaks actually indicate a greater minimum age of 5 Gyr for both objects assuming solar metallicity. Since the spectra comprise the integrated light of each galaxy to radii greater than $r_e$, I argue that it is difficult to justify the adoption of significantly super-solar metallicity in interpreting these data. It thus seems hard to escape the conclusion that $\\Omega_0 5$).

  18. High Performance Networks for High Impact Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May| ArgonneHighDISCLAIMER

  19. Driven active and passive nematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumesh P. Thampi; Ramin Golestanian; Julia M. Yeomans

    2015-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate similarities in the micro-structural dynamics between externally driven and actively driven nematics. Walls, lines of strong deformations in the director field, and topological defects are characteristic features of an active nematic. Similar structures form in driven passive nematics when there are inhomogeneities in imposed velocity gradients due to non-linear flow fields or geometrical constraints. Specifically, pressure driven flow of a tumbling passive nematic in an expanding-contracting channel produces walls and defects similar to those seen in active nematics. We also study the response of active nematics to external driving, confirming that imposed shear suppresses the hydrodynamic instabilities. We show that shear fields can lead to wall alignments and the localisation of active turbulence.

  20. Driven active and passive nematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Yeomans, Julia M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate similarities in the micro-structural dynamics between externally driven and actively driven nematics. Walls, lines of strong deformations in the director field, and topological defects are characteristic features of an active nematic. Similar structures form in driven passive nematics when there are inhomogeneities in imposed velocity gradients due to non-linear flow fields or geometrical constraints. Specifically, pressure driven flow of a tumbling passive nematic in an expanding-contracting channel produces walls and defects similar to those seen in active nematics. We also study the response of active nematics to external driving, confirming that imposed shear suppresses the hydrodynamic instabilities. We show that shear fields can lead to wall alignments and the localisation of active turbulence.