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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Schottky-Drain Technology for AlGaN/GaN High-Electron Mobility Transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, we demonstrate 27% improvement in the buffer breakdown voltage of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown on Si substrate by using a new Schottky-drain contact technology. Schottky-drain ...

Lu, Bin

2

Condensate Removal by Drain Orifice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Originally the Drain Orifice Assembly was developed to solve serious steam trap maintenance problems in Navy ship's high pressure systems. Installation was between two ANSI B16.5 Flanges. The high pressure systems operate at pressures between 150 psig and 1200 psig. Based on the initial test results, a program was adopted by the U.S. Navy to replace all conventional steam traps with the Drain Orifice in all high pressure drain systems on ships in the U.S. Fleet.

Guzick, L. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reverse-order source/drain formation with double offset spacer (RODOS) for CMOS low-power, high-speed and low-noise amplifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RODOS (Reverse-Order source/drain formation with Double Offset Spacer) was proposed for low-power, high-speed and low-noise amplifiers. Relying on simulation data, we confirmed the high feasibility of the RODOS process. It showed improved performance ... Keywords: RODOS, amplifier, high-speed, low-noise, low-power, offset spacer, reverse-order

Woo Young Choi; Jong Duk Lee; Byung-Gook Park

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection inside a horizontal cylinder are compared with model results. Finally, cryogenic tank draining calculations are performed with three different wall heat fluxes to demonstrate the effect of wall heat flux on the internal tank flow field.

Analysis Model Donald; Donald Greer

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tubing drain valve  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for operating a valve means. The valve means comprises a tubular piston movable within a tubular member suitable for use in a borehole pipe string to open and close a port through the wall of the tubular member. The method comprises: biassing the valve means in its closed position; pressurizing the interior of the piston to a predetermined pressure to overcome the biassing closed force and to actuate the valve means to its open position; biassing the valve means to its open position; and actuating the valve means to its closed position by engaging a first arm of a dog pivotally mounted on the piston with an engaging means insertable through the interior of the tubular piston; moving the piston relative to the tubular member; rotating the dog about its pivot to bring a second arm of the dog into contact with a detent in the tubular member; and applying sufficient force to the first arm to continue rotating the dog about the pivot, while engaging the detent with the second arm of the dog, in order to overcome the biassing open force to actuate the valve means to its closed position. A tubing drain valve suitable for use in a borehole pipe string, comprising: a sub suitable for incorporating within a borehole pipe string; and a port between the interior and the exterior of the sub; and valve means for opening and closing the port.

Soderberg, P.B.

1987-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Hohokam Irr & Drain Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hohokam Irr & Drain Dist Hohokam Irr & Drain Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Hohokam Irr & Drain Dist Place Arizona Utility Id 8700 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Residential Power Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1110/kWh Commercial: $0.1130/kWh Industrial: $0.1040/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hohokam_Irr_%26_Drain_Dist&oldid=410831

7

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How does it work? Use heat from water you've already used to preheat more hot water, reducing your water heating costs. Any hot water that goes down the drain carries away energy with it. That's typically 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or greywater) heat recovery systems capture this energy from water you've already used (for example, to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water heating. How It Works Drain-water heat recovery technology works well with all types of water

8

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How does it work? Use heat from water you've already used to preheat more hot water, reducing your water heating costs. Any hot water that goes down the drain carries away energy with it. That's typically 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or greywater) heat recovery systems capture this energy from water you've already used (for example, to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water heating. How It Works Drain-water heat recovery technology works well with all types of water

9

High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 fuel cells - Demonstrate durability of the kinetic mass activity against DOE- specified voltage cycling tests in fuel cells - Achieve high current density performance in H 2 air...

10

Wellton-Mohawk Irr & Drain Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wellton-Mohawk Irr & Drain Dist Wellton-Mohawk Irr & Drain Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Wellton-Mohawk Irr & Drain Dist Place Arizona Utility Id 25060 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Agricultural Pumping Service Commercial General Service Commercial Large General Service Commercial Residential Service Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1000/kWh Commercial: $0.0842/kWh Industrial: $0.0956/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

11

City of Drain, Oregon (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drain, Oregon (Utility Company) Drain, Oregon (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Drain Place Oregon Utility Id 5354 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial and Industrial- Single Phase Commercial Commercial and Industrial- Three Phase Commercial Dusk to Dawn Security Light- (100W) Lighting Dusk to Dawn Security Light- (200W) Lighting Dusk to Dawn Security Light- (400W Halide) Lighting Dusk to Dawn Security Light- (70W) Lighting Outdoor Service Residential Residential Rate Residential

12

Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the...

13

Can Maxwell's Fish Eye Lens Really Give Perfect Imaging? Part II. The case with drains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use both FEM (finite element method) and FDTD (finite difference time domain method) to simulate the field distribution in Maxwell's fish eye lens with one or more passive drains around the image point. We use the same Maxwell's fish eye lens structure as the one used in recent microwave experiment [arXiv:1007.2530]: Maxwell's fish eye lens bounded by PEC (perfect electric conductor) is inserted between two parallel PEC plates (as a waveguide structure). Our simulation results indicate that if one uses an active coaxial cable as the object and set an array of passive drains around the image region, what one obtains is not an image of the object but only multiple spots resembling the array of passive drains. The resolution of Maxwell's fish eye is finite even with such passive drains at the image locations. We also found that the subwavelength spot around the passive drain is due to the local field enhancement of the metal tip of the drain rather than the fish eye medium or the ability of the drain in extra...

Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

Comparato, Joseph R. (Bloomfield, CT); Jacobs, Martin (Hartford, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Perfect drain for the Maxwell Fish Eye lens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perfect imaging for electromagnetic waves using the Maxwell Fish Eye (MFE) requires a new concept: the perfect drain. From the mathematical point of view, a perfect point drain is just like an ideal point source, except that it drains power from the electromagnetic field instead of generating it. We show here that the perfect drain for the MFE can be seen as a dissipative region the diameter of which tends to zero. The complex permittivity $\\varepsilon$ of this region cannot take arbitrary values, however, since it depends on the size of the drain as well as on the frequency. This interpretation of the perfect drain connects well with central concepts of electromagnetic theory. This opens up both the modeling in computer simulations and the experimental verification of the perfect drain.

Gonzalez, Juan C; Minano, Juan C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

60% efficient 10-GHz power amplifier with dynamic drain bias control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractThis paper describes the design, implementation, and characterization of a high-efficiency 10-GHz amplifier with dynamic drain bias control that maintains high efficiency over a range of output power levels. The power amplifier (PA) operates in class-E switched mode with 67 % drain efficiency at an output power of 20.3 dBm, 0.7 dB less than the specified maximum power for the device. A coupler and detector at the output of the PA provide a feedback signal to the drain-bias controller based on a 96 % efficient Buck dcdc converter. When compared with a PA with constant drain bias (4 V), the average efficiency of the PA with dynamic biasing is improved by a factor of 1.4. Over an output power between 1520 dBm, the drain bias varies from 2 to 4 V, and the efficiency improves from 22 % to 65 % at the lower power level. The efficiency includes the losses in the dcdc converter. Index Termsdcdc converter, dynamic biasing, high efficiency, power amplifiers (PAs). I.

Narisi Wang; Vahid Yousefzadeh; Dragan Maksimovi?; Srdjan Paji?; Student Member; Student Member; Student Member; Zoya B. Popovi?

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection i...

Donald Greer Research; Donald Greer

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Microsoft Word - S07374_Prelim Eval Trench 1 Collection Drain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site June 2011 LMS/SHP/S07374 ESL-RPT-2011-03 Cover Photo: Trench 1 Collection Drain on Floodplain LMS/SHP/S07374 ESL-RPT-2011-03 Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the Shiprock, New Mexico, Site June 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Preliminary Evaluation of the Trench 1 Collection Drain Floodplain Area of the Shiprock Site June 2011 Doc. No. S07374 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iv

19

High Activity Crud Burst Impacts and Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several PWRs have experienced particulate crud bursts during outages, which have a negative impact on outage proficiency. Consequences of these crud releases include increased reactor coolant cleanup time, elevated shutdown dose rates, elevated smearable activity levels in low flow regions, increased wear of eddy current probes, releases of activity during steam generator inspections, and increases in personnel contamination risks. This report presents the PWR High Activity Crud Template for utilities to...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Design criteria Drain Rerouting Project 93-OR-EW-2  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A--E) in the performance of Title I and II design for the Drain Rerouting Project. The Drain Rerouting project at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will provide the Y-12 Plant with the capability to reroute particular drains within buildings 9202, 9203 and 9995. Process drains that are presently connected to the storm sewer shall be routed to the sanitary sewer to ensure that any objectionable material inadvertently discharged into process drains will not discharge to East Fork Popular Creek (EFPC) without treatment. The project will also facilitate compliance with the Y-12 Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge permit and allow for future pretreatment of once-through coolant.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Active interrogation of highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

Active interrogation techniques provide reliable detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) even when passive detection is difficult. We use 50-Hz pulsed beams of bremsstrahlung photons from a 10-MeV linac or 14-MeV neutrons from a neutron generator for interrogation, thus activating the HEU. Detection of neutrons between pulses is a positive indicator of the presence of fissionable material. We detect the neutrons with three neutron detector designs based on {sup 3}He tubes. This report shows examples of the responses in these three detectors, for unshielded and shielded kilogram quantities of HEU, in containers as large as cargo containers.

Moss, C. E. (Calvin E.); Hollas, C. L. (Charles L.); Myers, W. L. (William L.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed tank--1.6 gallons; (c) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--1.6 gallons; (d) Contactor drain tank--0.40 gallons; (e) Strip effluent hold tank--0.33 gallons; (f) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--0.37 gallons; (g) Strip effluent decanter--0.14 gallons; (h) Solvent hold tank--0.30 gallon; and (i) Corrugated piping between contactors--16-21 mL. (5) After the initial vessel draining, flushing the vessels with 100 gallons of water using a spray nozzle that produces complete vessel coverage and draining the flush water reduces the source term by the following amounts: (i) Salt solution receipt tank--63X; (ii) Salt solution feed tank--63X; (iii) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--63X; (iv) Contactor drain tank--250X; (v) Strip effluent hold tank--300X; (vi) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--270X; (vii) Strip effluent decanter--710X; (viii) Solvent hold tank--330X. Understand that these estimates of film thickness are based on laboratory testing and fluid mechanics theory. The calculations assume drainage occurs by film flow. Much of the data used to develop the models came from tests with very ''clean'' fluids. Impurities in the fluids and contaminants on the vessels walls could increase liquid holdup. The application of film thickness models and source term reduction calculations should be considered along with operational conditions and H-Tank Farm/Liquid Waste operating experience. These calculations exclude the PVV/HVAC duct work and piping, as well as other areas that area outside the scope of this report.

Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hydraulically Drained Flows in Rotating Basins. Part II: Steady Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The slow, horizontal circulation in a deep, hydraulically drained basin is discussed within the context of reduced-gravity dynamics. The basin may have large topographic variations and is fed from above or from the sides by mass sources. ...

Lawrence J. Pratt

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Drain Holes for Criticality Safety Control Guidance for the Analyst  

SciTech Connect

Drain and overflow holes are integral to the nuclear criticality safety basis of many processes and provide different functions in achieving their safety goal. In most cases, unverified engineering judgement was used to conclude that the holes were adequate to accomplish their mission. Such judgement may adequately serve some configurations but is inadequate in other applications. It was determined that the exact function of every hole for both normal and upset process conditions must be understood and clearly documented. Y-12 has embarked on an effort to document engineering analyses of drain and overflow holes. This effort is essential to demonstrating that the holes are capable performing their intended safety function. The Y-12 EUO approach is based on criticality safety function and engineering analysis. The main components of the policies regarding drain holes are: C The criticality safety requirements are written in terms of function (e.g., depth in pan filter must always be less than 5 cm). C Engineering justifications are being written to show existing drains meet required function. Sometimes, detailed analysis of inflows and outflows is required. In some other cases, physical functional tests are performed. C Drains are documented on controlled drawings to ensure configuration control. A program of periodic inspections (usually annual) is in place for each required drain.

LeTellier, m.s.; Smallwood, d.j.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)  

SciTech Connect

A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Drain Holes for Criticality Safety Control Guidance for the Analyst  

SciTech Connect

Drain and overflow holes are integral to the nuclear criticality safety basis of many processes and provide different functions inachieving their safety goaL Inmost cases at the Oak RidgeY-12 Plant, unverified engineering judgment has been previously used to conclude that the holes were adequate to accomplish their mission. Such judgment may adequately serve some configurations but is inadequate in other applications. It is important to understand and document the exact function of every drain for both normal and upset process conditions. After this is accomplished, the holes must be demonstrated to be capable of penlorming their intended safety fi,mction. This paper gives examples of different types of drains used for criticality safety, gives examples of how to ensure they will work as intended, and gives guidance to the analyst who relies on such holes to prevent criticality accidents.

LeTellier, M.S.; Smallwood, D.J.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 was closed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Activated Sintering, Spark Plasma Sintering and High Voltage ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Novel Synthesis and Consolidation of Powder Materials : Activated Sintering, Spark Plasma Sintering and High Voltage Electric Discharge...

31

Comment on 'Perfect drain for the Maxwell fish eye lens'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-magnetic loss material has been proposed (2011 New J. Phys. 13 023038) to mimic a passive perfect drain in the Maxwell's fish eye lens (MFL). In this comment, we argue that this passive medium can only be treated as a perfect absorber which can totally absorb all incident radiation without scattering by it, but it cannot mimic a delta function at the image point. As a result, this passive medium cannot help to achieve a perfect focusing in MFL.

Sun, Fei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Chronic Benzodiazepine Administration Potentiates High Voltage-Activated Calcium Currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.aspetjournals.orgDownloadedfrom #12;other drugs of abuse has been reported to enhance high voltage-activated calcium channels (HVAs

Brand, Paul H.

33

Use of high performance computing in neutronics analysis activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high performance computing in neutronics analysis activities M.A. Smith Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne Illinois 60439, USA Abstract Reactor design is...

34

Method for Preparation of High Specific Activity Reactor ...  

Method for Preparation of High Specific Activity Reactor-Produced Lutetium-177 Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

35

High temperature solid oxide fuel development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC development activities and current program status. Goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 h. Test results are presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 40,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Two 25-kW SOFC customer tests units were delivered in 1992; a 20-kW SOFC system is bein manufactured and will be operated by Southern California Edison in 1995. Megawatt class generators are being developed.

Ray, E.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Active control system for high speed windmills  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

Avery, D.E.

1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

37

Active control system for high speed windmills  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

Avery, Don E. (45-437 Akimala St., Honolulu, HI 96744)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Characterization Plan for Soils Around Drain Line PLA-100115  

SciTech Connect

This Characterization Plan supports the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) closure of soils that may have been contaminated by releases from drain line PLA-100115, located within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The requirements to address the closure of soils contaminated by a potential release from this line in a characterization plan was identified in the "HWMA/RCRA Less Than 90-day Generator Closure Report for the VES-SFE-126."

D. Shanklin

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

39

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40

The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Noble gas isotope abundances in steam from the Coldwater Creek field of the Northwest Geysers, California, show mixing between a nearly pure mid-ocean ridge (MOR) type magmatic gas with high 3He/4He and low radiogenic 40*Ar (R/Ra > 8.3 and 40*Ar/4He < 0.07), and a magmatic gas diluted with crustal gas (R/Ra 0.25). The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

42

NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Press Release NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Nov 22, 2013

43

Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

J. A. (Bart) Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Method of draining water through a solid waste site without leaching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of preventing water from leaching solid waste sites by preventing atmospheric precipitation from contacting waste as the water flows through a solid waste site. The method comprises placing at least one drain hole through the solid waste site. The drain hole is seated to prevent waste material from entering the drain hole, and the solid waste site cover material is layered and graded to direct water to flow toward the drain hole and to soil beneath the waste site.

Treat, R.L.; Gee, G.W.; Whyatt, G.A.

1993-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

45

Highly Conductive and Porous Activated Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for High-Power Supercapacitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly Conductive and Porous Activated Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for High-Power Supercapacitors for a free-standing carbon film reported to date. A two-electrode supercapacitor using these carbon films. KEYWORDS: Graphene, flexible film, chemical activation, supercapacitors Free-standing thin film materials

46

Photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium.  

SciTech Connect

The physics of photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) using the delayed neutron reinterrogation method is described in this paper. Two sets of active interrogation experiments were performed using a set of subcritical configurations of cocentric HEU metal hemishells. One set of measurements utilized a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator as the active source. The second set of measurements utilized a linear accelerator-based bremsstrahlung photon source as an active interrogation source. The neutron responses were measured for both sets of experiments. The operational details and results for both measurement sets are described.

Myers, W. L. (William L.); Goulding, C. A. (Charles A.); Hollas, C. L. (Charles L.); Moss, C. E. (Calvin E.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments: Progress Report October 1998 through November 2000  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Panoche Water District, is conducting a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium (Se)-enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems which may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to the groundwater; increased exposure to the biota; and reduced productivity of farm crops. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through November 2000, as well as the results of these investigations.

Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; TerBerg, R.; Borglin, S.E.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Criticality safety considerations for MSRE fuel drain tank uranium aggregation  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a preliminary criticality safety study of some potential effects of uranium reduction and aggregation in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel drain tanks (FDTs) during salt removal operations. Since the salt was transferred to the FDTs in 1969, radiological and chemical reactions have been converting the uranium and fluorine in the salt to UF{sub 6} and free fluorine. Significant amounts of uranium (at least 3 kg) and fluorine have migrated out of the FDTs and into the off-gas system (OGS) and the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The loss of uranium and fluorine from the salt changes the chemical properties of the salt sufficiently to possibly allow the reduction of the UF{sub 4} in the salt to uranium metal as the salt is remelted prior to removal. It has been postulated that up to 9 kg of the maximum 19.4 kg of uranium in one FDT could be reduced to metal and concentrated. This study shows that criticality becomes a concern when more than 5 kg of uranium concentrates to over 8 wt% of the salt in a favorable geometry.

Hollenbach, D.F.; Hopper, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational Physics and Engineering Div.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Symmetric Active/Active Metadata Service for High Availability Parallel File Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High availability data storage systems are critical for many applications as research and business become more data-driven. Since metadata management is essential to system availability, multiple metadata services are used to improve the availability of distributed storage systems. Past research focused on the active/standby model, where each active service has at least one redundant idle backup. However, interruption of service and even some loss of service state may occur during a fail-over depending on the used replication technique. In addition, the replication overhead for multiple metadata services can be very high. The research in this paper targets the symmetric active/active replication model, which uses multiple redundant service nodes running in virtual synchrony. In this model, service node failures do not cause a fail-over to a backup and there is no disruption of service or loss of service state. We further discuss a fast delivery protocol to reduce the latency of the needed total order broadcast. Our prototype implementation shows that metadata service high availability can be achieved with an acceptable performance trade-off using our symmetric active/active metadata service solution.

He, X. [Tennessee Technological University; Ou, Li [Tennessee Technological University; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Chen, Xin [Tennessee Technological University; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Don't Let Your Money and Hot Water Go Down the Drain | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recovery systems capture some of this energy to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. How It Works In its simplest form, a drain-water...

51

Reply to comment on Perfect drain for the Maxwell fish eye lens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reply to the comments on our paper Perfect Drain for the Maxwell fish eye lens (NJP 13 (2011) 023038) made by Fei Sun. We believe that Sun comments have several mistakes in theoretical concepts and simulation results.

Gonzalez, Juan C; Minnano, Juan C; Grabovickic, Dejan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Numerical simulation of the response of sandy soils treated with pre-fabricated vertical drains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is part of the ongoing effort of the Seismic Risk Mitigation for Port Systems Grand Challenge. It addresses the problem of numerically simulating the response of sandy soils treated with earthquake drains, ...

Vytiniotis, Antonios

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Testing and Evaluation of a Moisture Separator Drain Demineralizer at Davis-Besse Nuclear Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Davis-Besse plant data show that by polishing 15-20 percent of the moisture separator drains, the entire flow from the drains can be pumped forward, increasing plant power output significantly. In addition, this process extended the useful lifetime of condensate polishers by a factor of about 6, reducing resin replacement costs by approximately $450,000/yr. Information obtained can be applied to all once-through steam generator PWRs.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Don't Let Your Money and Hot Water Go Down the Drain | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Don't Let Your Money and Hot Water Go Down the Drain Don't Let Your Money and Hot Water Go Down the Drain Don't Let Your Money and Hot Water Go Down the Drain December 9, 2008 - 4:00am Addthis John Lippert Do you look at your retirement savings statements and feel like you're sending your money down the drain? Do you deposit more money each paycheck into your retirement account, but find the balance goes down, not up? Pssst, want to invest in a "sure thing?" No, this isn't a scam. It's a device that has no moving parts to break down, but is certain to save you energy, and thus save you money by lowering your utility bills. When we all take showers and baths, wash the dishes or clothes, and wash our hands, we send heated water literally down the drain. That typically represents 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or

55

Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DRAINING HAZARDOUS FLUIDS DURING BUILDING 221-1F DEACTIVATION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Several years ago, SRS completed a four year mission to decommission {approx}250 excess facilities. As part of that effort, SRS deactivated multiple facilities (e.g. Building 247-F, Naval Fuels Facility, and Building 211-F, Outside Facilities for F-Canyon) that contained extensive piping systems filled with hazardous material (e.g. nitric acid). Draining of hazardous materials from piping was successfully completed in all facilities without incident. In early 2009, the decommissioning program at SRS was restarted as a result of funding made available by the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Under ARRA, draining of piping containing hazardous material was initiated in multiple facilities including Building 221-1F (or A-Line). This paper describes and reviews the draining of piping containing hazardous materials at A-Line, with emphasis on an incident involving the draining of nitric acid. The paper is intended to be a resource for engineers, planners, and project managers, who face similar draining challenges.

Musall, J.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

Microsoft Word - CX-HotSpringsGravityDrainsFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Todd Nicholson Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Install gravity drain system and oil stop valves, reshape west side perimeter ditch and flush out yard drains at the Hot Springs Substation. PP&A Project No.: 2383 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6, Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: T21N, R24W, S14, PM, Sanders County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: Using directional drilling equipment, approximately 3,644 linear feet of gravity drain line will be installed under the existing electrical manhole system located in the Hot Springs Substation 230 and 500 Kilovolt (kV) yards. Each manhole

58

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Acceptance test report for the AN valve pit leak detection and low point drain assembly mock up test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This document describes The Performance Mock-up Test Procedure for the Valve Pit Leak Detection and Low Point Drain Assembly Performance Mock-Up Test Procedure.

EWER, K.L.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

EVALUATION OF FABRIC MEMBRANES FOR USE IN SALTSTONE DRAIN WATER SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saltstone Disposal Unit 2 contains a sheet drain fabric intended to separate solids from drain water to be returned to the Salt Feed Tank. A similar system installed in Vault 4 appears to be ineffective in keeping solids out of the drain water return lines. Waste Solidification Engineering is considering installation of an additional fabric membrane to supplement the existing sheet drain in SDU 2. Amerdrain 200 is the product currently installed in SDU 2. This product is no longer available, so Sitedrain 94 was used as the replacement product in this testing. Fabrics with apparent opening sizes of 10, 25, 50 and 100 microns were evaluated. These fabrics were evaluated under three separate test conditions, a water flow test, a solids retention test and a grout pour test. A flow test with water showed that installation of an additional filter layer will predictably reduce the theoretical flux through the sheet drain. The manufacturer reports the flux for Sitedrain 94 as 150 gpm/ft{sup 2} by ASTM D-4491. This compares reasonably well with the 117 gpm/ft{sup 2} obtained in this testing. A combination of the 10 micron fabric with Sitedrain 94 could be expected to decrease flux by about 10 times as compared to Sitedrain 94 alone. The different media were used to filter a slag and fly ash mixture from water. Slag historically has the smallest nominal particle size of the premix components. Cement was omitted from the test because of its reactivity with water would prohibit accurately particle size measurements of the filtered samples. All four media sizes were able to remove greater than 95% of particles larger than 100 microns from the slurry. The smaller opening sizes were increasingly effective in removing more particles. The 10 micron filter captured 15% of the total amount of solids used in the test. This result implies that some insoluble particles may still be able to enter the drain water collection system, although the overall solids rejection is significantly improved over the current design. Test boxes were filled with grout to evaluate the performance of the sheet drain and fabrics in a simulated vault environment. All of the tests produced a similar amount of drain water, between 8-11% of the amount of water in the mix, which is expected with the targeted formulation. All of the collected drain waters contained some amount of solids, although the 10 micron filter did not appear to allow any premix materials to pass through. The solids collected from this box are believed to consist of calcium carbonate based on one ICP-AES measurement. Any of the four candidate fabrics would be an improvement over the sheet drain alone relative to solids removal. The 10 micron fabric is the only candidate that stopped all premix material from passing. The 10 micron fabric will also cause the largest decrease in flux. This decrease in flux was not enough to inhibit the total amount of drain water removed, but may lead to increased time to remove standing water prior to subsequent pours in the facility. The acceptability of reduced liquid flux through the 10 micron fabric will depend on the amount of excess water to be removed, the time available for water removal and the total area of fabric installed at the disposal cell.

Pickenheim, B.; Miller, D.; Burket, P.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recent CFD-Related Activities at the High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· early CFD activities at HFIR · cold-source (and other upgrades)CFD activities at HFIR · LEU Conversion this then at a research reactor ? · 1991 started at HFIR · 1992 graduation · ~ 2003 COMSOL becomes the tool of choice (Freels) Early CFD Activities at HFIR #12;Freels ,CFD Colloquium at UTK,in honor of A, J. Baker, 05

Tennessee, University of

62

CITY DRAIN - An open source approach for simulation of integrated urban drainage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last years design procedures of urban drainage systems have shifted from end of pipe design criteria to ambient water quality approaches requiring integrated models of the system for evaluation of measures. Emphasis is put on the improvement of ... Keywords: CITY DRAIN , CSO, Integrated urban drainage modeling, RTC, Receiving water, Sewer system, Simulink , Water quality

Stefan Achleitner; Michael Mderl; Wolfgang Rauch

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

eDoctor: Automatically Diagnosing Abnormal Battery Drain Issues on Smartphones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under typical usage, but at some point the battery unexpectedly started to drain faster than usual usage of the device or a particular app. An energy profiler can give the battery usage of each app phase share similar resource usage patterns. When an app starts to consume energy in an abnormal way

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

64

Technology for Examination of Boiling Water Reactor Bottom Head Drain Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes newly developed technology for the examination of the BWR vessel drain line. The technology targets the examination of the elbow and piping section deemed most susceptible to flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) attack and includes a remotely operated sensor manipulator and ultrasound data acquisition system to perform thickness measurements throughout the affected components.

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nondestructive Evaluation: Boiling Water Reactor Bottom Head Drain Line Examination - Field Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes newly developed technology for the examination of the boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel drain line. The technology targets the examination of the elbow and piping section deemed most susceptible to flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) attack. The technology developed includes a remotely operated sensor manipulator and an ultrasound data acquisition system to perform thickness measurements throughout the affected components.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

66

Drain Tank Information for Developing Design Basis of the Preliminary Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) drain tanks (DTs) serve two functions: normal operation and safety operation. Normal DTs are used for regular maintenance operations when draining is necessary. Safety DTs are used to receive the water leaked into the Vacuum Vessel (VV) after an in-vessel loss of coolant accident (LOCA) event. The preliminary design of the DTs shall be based on the information provided by this document. The capacity of the normal DTs is estimated based on the internal volume of in-vessel components [e.g., First Wall/Blanket (FW/BLK) and Divertor (DIV)]; Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) components; and TCWS piping, heat exchangers, electric heaters, pump casing, pressurizers, and valves. Water volumes have been updated based on 2004-design information, changes adopted because of approved Project Change Requests (PCRs), and data verification by US ITER and AREVA Federal Services, the US ITER A and E Company. Two tanks will store water from normal draining operations of the FW/BLK and DIV Primary Heat Transfer Systems (PHTSs). One tank will store water from normal draining operations of the NBI PHTS. The capacity of the safety DTs is based on analysis of a design basis accident: a large leak from in-vessel components. There are two safety DTs that will receive water from a VV LOCA event and drainage from the VV, as needed. In addition, there is one sump tank for the DIV that will be used for collecting drain water from the draining and drying processes and specifically for draining the DIV system as the DIV cassette lines are at a lower elevation than the DT connection point. Information documented in this report must be refined and verified during the preliminary design of the DTs, and there are several aspects to be considered to complete the preliminary design. Input to these design considerations is discussed in this report and includes, but is not limited to, water inventory; operating procedures/maintenance; Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA); tank layout and dimensions, including design margin; classification under French Nuclear Pressure Directives, Equipements Sous Pression Nucleaires (ESPN); and adaptations for construction.

Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Drain Tank Information for Developing Design Basis of the Preliminary Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) drain tanks (DTs) serve two functions: normal operation and safety operation. Normal DTs are used for regular maintenance operations when draining is necessary. Safety DTs are used to receive the water leaked into the Vacuum Vessel (VV) after an in-vessel loss of cooling accident (LOCA) event. The preliminary design of the DTs shall be based on the information provided by this document. The capacity of the normal DTs is estimated based on the internal volume of in-vessel components [e.g., First Wall/Blanket (FW/BLK) and Divertor (DIV)], Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) components, and TCWS piping, heat exchangers, electric heaters, pump casing, pressurizers, and valves. Water volumes have been updated based on 2004 design information, changes adopted because of approved Project Change Requests (PCRs), and data verification by U.S. ITER. Two tanks will store water from normal draining operations of the FW/BLK and DIV Primary Heat Transfer Systems (PHTSs). One tank will store water from normal draining operations of the NBI PHTS. The capacity of the safety DTs is based on analysis of a design-basis accident:1 a large leak from in-vessel components. There are two safety DTs that will receive water from a VV LOCA event and drainage from the VV, as needed. In addition, there is one sump tank for the DIV that will be used for collecting drain water from the draining and drying processes and specifically for draining the DIV system as the DIV cassettes lines are at a lower elevation than the DT connection point. Information documented in this report must be refined and verified during the preliminary design of the DTs, and there are several aspects to be considered to complete the preliminary design. Input to these design considerations is discussed in this report and includes, but is not limited to, water inventory; operating procedures/maintenance; Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA); tank layout anddimensions, including design margin; classification under French Nuclear Pressure Directives, Equipements Sous Pression Nucleaires (ESPN); and adaptations for construction.

Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Development of Highly Active Titania-Based Nanoparticles for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Active Titania-Based Nanoparticles for Composite Propellant Combustion ... in the combustion rate of HTPB-AP based composite solid propellants with a...

69

Identifying important action primitives for high level activity recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart homes have a user centered design that makes human activity as the most important type of context to adapt the environment according to people's needs. Sensor systems that include a variety of ambient, vision based, and wearable sensors are used ... Keywords: action primitives, activity recognition, smart homes

Atif Manzoor; Claudia Villalonga; Alberto Calatroni; Hong-Linh Truong; Daniel Roggen; Schahram Dustdar; Gerhard Trster

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Forecasting Dry Microburst Activity over the High Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The active dry microburst days during the 1982 JAWS (Joint Airport Weather Studies) Project in Colorado are examined for common characteristics. The environments on these days are shown to have similar thermodynamic structures in the vertical. In ...

Roger M. Wakimoto

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sensor networks for high-resolution monitoring of volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed and deployed a wireless sensor network for monitoring seismoacoustic activity at Volcn Reventador, Ecuador. Wireless sensor networks are a new technology and our group is among the first to apply them to monitoring volcanoes. The ...

Matt Welsh; Geoff Werner-Allen; Konrad Lorincz; Omar Marcillo; Jeff Johnson; Mario Ruiz; Jonathan Lees

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1996 - December 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is divided into the following areas: (1) experimental research program; (2) theoretical research program; (3) accelerator research and development; (4) divisional computing activities; (5) publications; (6) colloquia and conference talks; (7) high energy physics community activities; and (7) High Energy Physics Division research personnel. Summaries are given for individual research programs for activities (1), (2) and (3).

Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reporting Questionable Intelligence Activities and Significant or Highly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Reference (a)) concerning the criteria and requirements for reporting intelligence oversight matters and directs compliance with the guidance contained in Attachment 2. It establishes the procedures to ensure complete and standardized reporting by the DoD Intelligence Components and other entities involved in intelligence activities, which include both foreign intelligence and counterintelligence activities. This DTM is effective immediately; it shall be incorporated into DoD 5240.1-R (Reference (b)) within 180 days. This DTM shall expire effective 1 September 2011. Nothing in this DTM is intended to alter reporting requirements established by statute or departmental policy. DTM 08-052, June 17, 2009 Applicability. This DTM applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of

Deputy Chief; Management Officer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Mountain View, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

USENIX Association 10th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation (NSDI '13) 57 eDoctor: Automatically Diagnosing Abnormal Battery Drain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) 57 eDoctor: Automatically Diagnosing Abnormal Battery Drain Issues on Smartphones Xiao Ma , Peng increase in Abnormal Battery Drain (ABD) prob- lems that can be caused by software defects or miscon- figuration. Such issues can drain a fully-charged battery within a couple of hours, and can potentially

Zhou, Yuanyuan

77

Measurement of highly enriched uranium metal buttons with the high-level neutron coincidence counter operating in the active mode  

SciTech Connect

The portable High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter is used in the active mode with the addition of AmLi neutron sources to assay the /sup 235/U content of highly enriched metal pieces or buttons. It is concluded that the portable instrument is a practical instrument for assaying uranium metal buttons with masses in the range 1.5 to 4 kg.

Foley, J.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery  

SciTech Connect

A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and maintenance support. Each product is briefly described in Appendix A. Selection of the most appropriate software package for a particular application will depend on the chosen component, system, or structure. Ongoing research will determine the most appropriate choices for a successful demonstration of PHM systems in aging NPPs.

N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Symmetric active/active metadata service for high availability parallel file systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High availability data storage systems are critical for many applications as research and business become more data driven. Since metadata management is essential to system availability, multiple metadata services are used to improve the availability ... Keywords: Fault tolerance, Group communication, High availability, Metadata management, Parallel file systems

Xubin He; Li Ou; Christian Engelmann; Xin Chen; Stephen L. Scott

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to the selected alternative. Due to the large area that would require fencing, it is proposed that instead of fencing, an appropriate number of warning signs attached to tee posts be used to delineate the use restriction area. CAU 335 is located in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 335 is located in the Area 6 Well 3 Yard approximately 39 km (24 mi) north of Mercury, on the Mercury Highway and several hundred feet (ft) west along Road 6-06. CAU 335 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-20-01, Drums, Oil Waste, Spill; CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole; CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit. The site history for CAU 335 is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). Briefly, CAS 06-20-01, was used for storing material that was pumped out of CAS 06-20-02 and placed into four 208-liter (L) (55-gall [gal]) drums. The drums were taken to the NTS Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in 1991. CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action required. Any spills associated with CAS 06-20-01 are addressed and considered part of CAS 06-20-02. CAS 06-20-02 was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris for an undetermined amount of time. In 1991, the casing was emptied of its contents, excavated, and backfilled. CAS 06-23-03 was used as a depository for effluent waste from truck-washing activities from 1960-1991.

K. B. Campbell

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Sodium waste technology: A summary report. [Melt-drain-evaporation-calcination (MEDEC)  

SciTech Connect

The Sodium Waste Technology (SWT) Program was established to resolve long-standing issues regarding disposal of sodium-bearing waste and equipment. Comprehensive SWT research programs investigated a variety of approaches for either removing sodium from sodium-bearing items, or disposal of items containing sodium residuals. The most successful of these programs was the design, test, and the production operation of the Sodium Process Demonstration Facility at ANL-W. The technology used was a series of melt-drain-evaporate operations to remove nonradioactive sodium from sodium-bearing items and then converting the sodium to storable compounds.

Abrams, C.S.; Witbeck, L.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

How to Fit simply Soil Mechanics Behaviour with Incremental Modelling and to Describe Drained Cyclic Behaviours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been proposed recently a new incremental modelling to describe the mechanics of soil. It is based on two parameters called the pseudo Young modulus E=1/Co and the pseudo Poisson coefficient n, which both evolve during compression. Evolution of n is known since it shall fit the Rowe's law of dilatancy, but Co has to be evaluated from experiment. In this paper we proposed a way to evaluate the Co variation from other mechanical modelling. The way cyclic behaviour of drained sample can be modelled is also described.

P. Evesque

2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Multi-band high efficiency power amplifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baseline) Output Power (Transformer) Drain Efficiency (Performance Frequency (GHz) Output Power (Transformer) DrainEfficiency (Transformer) Output Power (Baseline) Drain

Besprozvanny, Randy-Alexander Randolph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

Michael W. Rose

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospecting For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospecting For New Faults Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospecting For New Faults Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Our previous studies found spatial associations between seismically active faults and high-temperature geothermal resources in the western Basin and Range, suggesting that recency of fault movement may be a useful criterion for resource exploration. We have developed a simple conceptual model in which recently active (Holocene) faults are preferred conduits for migration of thermal water from deep crustal depths, and we

87

CH Activation and Oxidation of Methane to Methanol in High Yield...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CH Activation and Oxidation of Methane to Methanol in High Yield with Novel Pt Complexes Speaker(s): Roy Periana Date: April 27, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

88

Optimal handling of Highly Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients during milling and blending operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates best practices for Highly Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (HAPI) milling and blending. We utilize a qualitative analysis centering on a benchmarking study and quantitative analyses using a ...

Setty, Prashant (Prashant Neelappanavara)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Primary cell of high energy density in which the anode active material is an alkali metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A primary cell of high specific energy in which the anode active material is an alkali metal and the cathode active material is sulphur oxychloride which simultaneously acts as an electrolyte solvent, said electrolyte further containing a dissolved salt and a co-solvent. The co-solvent is chosen from among phosphoryl chloride and benzoyl chloride; the dissolved salt is lithium tetrachloroaluminate.

Gabano, J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Thermal shock modeling of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics under active cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal shock resistance is one of the most important parameters in Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) since it determines their performance in various applications. In this paper, due to the fact that the material parameters of UHTCs are very sensitive ... Keywords: Active cooling, Target temperature, Thermal protection system, Thermal shock resistance, Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics

Weiguo Li; Fan Yang; Daining Fang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Passively operated spool valve for drain-down freeze protection of thermosyphon water heaters. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The work done to extend the existing drain-down valve technology to provide passive drain-down freeze protection for thermosyphon-based solar water heaters is described. The basic design of the existing valve model is that of a spool valve, employing a cylindrical spool which moves axially in a mating cartridge to open and close o-rings at the two operating extremes (drain and operate) to perform the valving function. Three passive actuators to drive the basic valving mechanism were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two piping configurations used to integrate the spool valve with the thermosyphon system are described, as are the passive actuators. The three actuator designs are: photovoltaic driven, refrigerant-based bellows, and heat motor cable-drive designs. Costs are compared for the alternative actuator designs, and operating characteristics were examined for the thermosyphon system, including field tests. The market for the valve for thermosyphon systems is then assessed. (LEW)

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Characterization of Pipes, Drain Lines, and Ducts using the Pipe Explorer System  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

MC/30172-97/C0803 MC/30172-97/C0803 Title: Characterization of Pipes, Drain Lines, and Ducts Using the Pipe Explorer System TM Authors: C.D. Cremer D.T. Kendrick E. Cramer Contractor: Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. 6100 Uptown Blvd, NE Albuquerque, NM 87100 Contract Number: DE-AC21-93MC30172 Conference: Industry Partnerships to Deploy Environmental Technology Conference Location: Morgantown, West Virginia Conference Dates: October 22-24, 1996 Conference Sponsor: Morgantown Energy Technology Center Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

93

Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP The November shipment was the final delivery this year to the Carlsbad plant, which is scheduled to undergo facility maintenance through mid-January. November 25, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

94

Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.  

SciTech Connect

An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Simultaneous pore enlargement and introduction of highly dispersed Fe active sites in MSNs for enhanced catalytic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective post-hydrothermal treatment strategy has been developed to dope highly dispersed iron catalytical centers into the framework of mesoporous silica, to keep the particle size in nanometric scale, and in the meanwhile, to expand the pore size of the synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). Characterization techniques such as XRD, BET, SEM and TEM support that the synthesized samples are long period ordered with particles size about 100 nm and a relatively large pore size of ca. 3.5 nm. UV-vis, XPS and EPR measurements demonstrate that the introduced iron active centers are highly dispersed in a coordinatively unsaturated status. NH{sub 3}-TPD verifies that the acid amount of iron-doped MSNs is quite high. The synthesized nanocatalysts show an excellent catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride, and they present relatively higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with a lower iron content and much shorter reaction time. - Graphical abstract: Uniform MSNs with iron active centers and large pore size have been prepared by a newly developed strategy, which demonstrates enhanced catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron species were introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with uniform dispersion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pore sizes of the synthesized nanocatalysts were expanded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acidic site quantities were quite high and the acidic centers were accessible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanocatalysts presented higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with significantly lower Fe content.

Gu Jinlou, E-mail: jinlougu@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Dong Xu [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Elangovan, S.P. [Nippon Chemical Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo 136-8515 (Japan); Li Yongsheng; Zhao Wenru [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Iijima, Toshio; Yamazaki, Yasuo [Nippon Chemical Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo 136-8515 (Japan); Shi Jianlin, E-mail: jlshi@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17671774 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.e. an activation energy is required for chemi- cal adsorption to occur and once that energy is supplied and gas-phase regeneration experiments were [1] Cal MP, Strickler BW, Lizzio AA. High temperature hydro, PA: US Department of Energy/Federal removal requirement set at one of the DOE's IGCC plants. Energy

Cal, Mark P.

97

Adaptive Detached Eddy Simulation of a High-Lift Wing with Active Flow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full span view of the flow past a vertical tail assembly of a commercial aircraft with active flow control at Re=360,000. Full span view of the flow past a vertical tail assembly of a commercial aircraft with active flow control at Re=360,000. Full span view of the flow past a vertical tail assembly of a commercial aircraft with active flow control at Re=360,000. This picture highlights the root and tip vortex along with the turbulent structures in the wake of a deflected rudder through isosurface of instantaneous Q criterion colored by speed on a locally adapted unstructured finite element mesh with 1.2 billion elements. Michel Rasquin, Argonne National Laboratory Adaptive Detached Eddy Simulation of a High-Lift Wing with Active Flow Control PI Name: Kenneth Jansen PI Email: jansenke@colorado.edu Institution: University of Colorado Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF:

98

Apparatus for draining lower drywell pool water into suppresion pool in boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which mitigates temperature stratification in the suppression pool water caused by hot water drained into the suppression pool from the lower drywell pool. The outlet of a spillover hole formed in the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool is connected to and in flow communication with one end of piping. The inlet end of the piping is above the water level in the suppression pool. The piping is routed down the vertical downcomer duct and through a hole formed in the thin wall separating the downcomer duct from the suppression pool water. The piping discharge end preferably has an elevation at or near the bottom of the suppression pool and has a location in the horizontal plane which is removed from the point where the piping first emerges on the suppression pool side of the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool. This enables water at the surface of the lower drywell pool to flow into and be discharged at the bottom of the suppression pool.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits Print High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits Print Many physiological processes initiated in response to external (extracellular) signals such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or light are regulated by a complex dance involving GTP-binding (G) proteins: G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), proteins integral to the cell membrane, sense the signal and activate G proteins in the cellular cytoplasm, but enzymes such as G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) inhibit the activity of the G proteins. A joint University of Michigan-University of Illinois, Chicago, team has determined the first structure of a particular G-protein-GRK2 complex. The structure in combination with previous structures of related G-protein complexes shows how Nature has evolved the G-protein structure to not only propagate activation signals but at the same time also directly respond to regulatory proteins that control the duration of the signal.

100

High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits Print High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits Print Many physiological processes initiated in response to external (extracellular) signals such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or light are regulated by a complex dance involving GTP-binding (G) proteins: G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), proteins integral to the cell membrane, sense the signal and activate G proteins in the cellular cytoplasm, but enzymes such as G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) inhibit the activity of the G proteins. A joint University of Michigan-University of Illinois, Chicago, team has determined the first structure of a particular G-protein-GRK2 complex. The structure in combination with previous structures of related G-protein complexes shows how Nature has evolved the G-protein structure to not only propagate activation signals but at the same time also directly respond to regulatory proteins that control the duration of the signal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Activation measurements of high energy deuterons in the plasma focus device  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear activation techniques were used to measure the fluence of high energy deuterons in a plasma focus device having a stored energy of 75 kilojoules at 18 kV. The $sup 12$C(d,n)$sup 13$N (330 keV threshold) and $sup 27$Al(d,p)$sup 28$Al reactions were used to provide both an absolute number of high energy deuterons and an average energy, evaluated from the $sup 13$N/$sup 28$Al ratio calculated for various energies by Young. Previous measurements indicated more than 10$sup 15$ deuterons could be accelerated to energies above 330 keV in the low pressure mode of operation, with a highly anisotropic distribution. Present measurements show that more than 10$sup 12$ deuterons achieve energies greater than 5 MeV on some high intensity shots in the low pressure mode. The presence of multi-MeV deuterons in the plasma focus device was substantiated by measuring activation as a function of depth in 1 mil Al foils, and by measurements of neutron energy using time-of-flight. (auth)

Gullickson, R.L.; Sahlin, H.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW ?s-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

MHD activity and energy loss during beta saturation and collapse at high beta poloidal in PBX  

SciTech Connect

High-..beta.. experiments, in medium to high-q tokamak plasmas, exhibit a temporal ..beta.. saturation and collapse. This behavior has been attributed to ballooning, ideal kink, or tearing modes. In PBX, a unique diagnostic capability allowed studies of the relation between MHD and energy loss for neutral-beam-heated (<6 MW), mildly indented (10 to 15%), nearly steady I/sub p/ discharges that approached the Troyon-Gruber limit. Under these conditions, correlations between MHD activity and energy losses have shown that the latter can be almost fully accounted for by various long wavelength MHD instabilities and that there is no need to invoke high-n ballooning modes in PBX. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Kugel, H.W.; Sesnic, S.; Bol, K.; Chance, M.; Fishman, H.; Fonck, R.; Gammel, G.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A look-ahead synthesis technique with backtracking for switching activity reduction in low power high-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research work done has shown that power consumption in digital integrated circuits can be effectively reduced by reducing the switching activity occurring on the functional modules. High-level synthesis of digital integrated circuits for low power often ... Keywords: High-level synthesis, Low power, Simultaneous scheduling and binding, Switching activity

Xianwu Xing; Ching Chuen Jong

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes  

SciTech Connect

Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

Lackmann, Gary

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

106

Selective Chemical Vapor Deposition of Heavily Boron Doped Silicon-Germanium Films from Disilane, Germane and Chlorine for Source/ Drain Junctions of Nanoscale CMOS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) are scaled for higher speed and reduced power, new challenges are imposed on the source/drain junctions and their (more)

Pesovic, Nemanja

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Chemical and biological systems for regenerating activated carbon contaminated with high explosives  

SciTech Connect

Activated carbon has been used as a substrate for efficiently removing high explosives (HEs) from aqueous and gaseous waste streams. Carbon that is saturated with HEs, however, constitutes a solid waste and is currently being stored because appropriate technologies for its treatment are not available. Because conventional treatment strategies (i.e., incineration, open burning) are not safe or will not be in compliance with future regulations, new and cost-effective methods are required for the elimination of this solid waste. Furthermore, because the purchase of activated carbon and its disposal after loading with HEs will be expensive, an ideal treatment method would result in the regeneration of the carbon thereby permitting its reuse. Coupling chemical and biological treatment systems, such as those described below, will effectively meet these technical requirements. The successful completion of this project will result in the creation of engineered commercial systems that will present safe and efficient methods for reducing the quantities of HE-laden activated carbon wastes that are currently in storage or are generated as a result of demilitarization activities. Biological treatment of hazardous wastes is desirable because the biodegradation process ultimately leads to the mineralization (e.g., conversion to carbon dioxide, nitrogen gas, and water) of parent compounds and has favorable public acceptance. These methods will also be cost- effective because they will not require large expenditures of energy and will permit the reuse of the activated carbon. Accordingly, this technology will have broad applications in the private sector and will be a prime candidate for technology transfer.

Knezovich, J.P.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Stenstrom, M.K.; Heilmann, H.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Civil and Engineering Dept.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 118-C-3:3, 105-C French Drains, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-016  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 118-C-3:3 french drains received condensate from the steam heating system in the 105-C Reactor Building. The 118-C-3:3 french drain meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

R. A. Carlson

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

BWRVIP-272: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR/4 Bottom Head Drain Line Radiographic Examination - Field Trial at KKM Nuclear Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes newly developed remotely operated radiography technology for the examination of the vessel drain line in a boiling water reactor Model 4 (BWR/4). The technology targets the wall-thickness examination of the elbow and piping section that is deemed most susceptible to flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) attack.BackgroundThe BWR vessel bottom head drain line has been identified as being susceptible to FAC because of its material of ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At-labeled targeted radiotherapeutics currently is a daunting task. Our central hypothesis is that improvements in 211At radiochemistry are critically dependent on gaining an understanding of and compensating for the effects of radiolysis induced by 211At {alpha}-particles. Because of the widespread interest in labeling antibodies, antibody fragments and peptides with 211At, our proposed work plan will initially focus on reagents that we have developed for this purpose. Part of our strategy is the use of synthetic precursors immobilized on polymeric resins or perfluorous and triarylphosphonium supports. Their use could eliminate the need for a purification step to separate unreacted tin precursor from labeled product and hopefully provide a simple kit technology that could be utilized at other institutions. The specific aims of this project are: (1) To optimze methods for 211At production and isolation of 211At from cyclotron targets; (2) To develop convenient and reproducible methodologies for high activity level and high specific activity radiohalogenation of biomolecules with 211At; (3) to develop a procedure for extending the shelf-life of 211At beyond a few hours so that this radionuclide can be utilized at centers remote from its site of production; and (4) to work out high activity level synthesis methods for utilizing support immobilized tin precursors for 211At labeling. If we are successful in achieving our goals, the radiochemical methodologies that are developed could greatly facilitate the use of 211At-labeled targeted cancer therapeutics in patients, even at institutions that are distant from the few sites currently available for 211At production.

MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

Research on Active Power Factor Correction of the Electronic Ballast for High-Pressure Sodium Lamps Based on L6563  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recent years, there has been a growing interest in the design of high-pressure sodium lamp electronic ballast. Two measures are proposed to improve the power factor of high-pressure sodium lamp electronic ballasts from the definition of harmonic ... Keywords: high-pressure sodium lamps, electronic ballast, active power factor correction, L6563

Sun Jing

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Subnanometer platinum clusters highly active and selective catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small clusters are known to possess reactivity not observed in their bulk analogues, which can make them attractive for catalysis. Their distinct catalytic properties are often hypothesized to result from the large fraction of under-coordinated surface atoms. Here, we show that size-preselected Pt{sub 8-10} clusters stabilized on high-surface-area supports are 40-100 times more active for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane than previously studied platinum and vanadia catalysts, while at the same time maintaining high selectivity towards formation of propylene over by-products. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that under-coordination of the Pt atoms in the clusters is responsible for the surprisingly high reactivity compared with extended surfaces. We anticipate that these results will form the basis for development of a new class of catalysts by providing a route to bond-specific chemistry, ranging from energy-efficient and environmentally friendly synthesis strategies to the replacement of petrochemical feedstocks by abundant small alkanes.

Vajda, S; Pellin, M. J.; Greeley, J. P.; Marshall, C. L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Ballentine, G. A.; Elam, J. W.; Catillon-Mucherie, S.; Redfern, P. C.; Mehmood, F.; Zapol, P.; Yale Univ.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Pu-ZR Alloy high-temperature activation-measurement foil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron flux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

McCuaig, Franklin D. (Westmont, IL)

1977-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

Upgrading drained coal mine methane to pipeline quality: a report on the commercial status of system suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's scenario of growing energy demand worldwide and rising natural gas prices, any methane emitted into the atmosphere is an untapped resource of energy and potentially a lost opportunity for additional revenue. In 2005, 9.7% of the total US anthropogenic emissions of methane were attributed to coal production. In recent years, many gassy coal mines have seized the opportunity to recover coal mine methane (CMM) and supply it to natural gas pipeline systems. With natural gas prices in the US exceeding $7.00 per million Btu, CMM pipeline sales brought in an annual revenue topping $97 million in 2005. However, significant opportunity still exists for tapping into this resource as 22% of the drained CMM remains unutilized as of 2005, primarily because its quality does not meet the requirements of natural gas pipeline systems. Recent advances in technologies now offer off-the-shelf options in the US that can upgrade the drained CMM to pipeline quality. These gas upgrading technologies are not only opening up the market to lower-quality methane resources but also providing significant means for reducing emissions, since methane is over 20 times a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. This report reviews current gas upgrading technologies available in the market for removal of typical CMM contaminants, provides examples of their successful commercial implementation and compiles a list of vendors specific to nitrogen rejection systems, since nitrogen exposes the biggest challenge to upgrading CMM. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 9 apps.

Carothers, F.P.; Schultz, M.L.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Microbial biomass and activity in high elevation (>5100 meters) soils from the Annapurna and Sagarmatha regions of the Nepalese Himalayas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial biomass and activity in high elevation (>5100 meters) soils from the AnnapurnaOnlinePublication #12;HIMALAYAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCES VOL 6 ISSUE 8 2010 27XX Research paper Microbial biomass and Sagarmatha regions of the Nepalese Himalayas. We examined microbial biomass and activity as well as key

Hammerton, James

116

On the Possible Association of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays with Nearby Active Galaxies  

SciTech Connect

Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays (CRs) with energies >57 EeV that suggests a correlation with the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) located within {approx}75 Mpc. However, this analysis does not take into account AGN morphology. A detailed study of the sample of AGN whose positions correlate with the CR events shows that most of them are classified as Seyfert 2 and low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) galaxies which do not differ from other local AGN of the same types. Therefore, the claimed correlation between the CR events observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory and local active galaxies should be considered as resulting from a chance coincidence, if the production of the highest energy CRs is not episodic in nature, but operates in a single object on long ({ge} Myr) timescales. Additionally, most of the selected sources do not show significant jet activity, and hence--in the framework of the jet paradigm--there are no reasons for expecting them to accelerate CRs up to the highest energies, {approx}10{sup 20} eV, at all. If the extragalactic magnetic fields and the sources of these CRs are coupled with matter, it is possible that the deflection angle is larger than expected in the case of a uniform source distribution due to effectively larger fields. A future analysis has to take into account AGN morphology and may yield a correlation with a larger deflection angle and/or more distant sources. We further argue that Cen A alone could be associated with at least 4 events due to its large radio extent, and Cen B can be associated with more than 1 event due to its proximity to the Galactic plane and, correspondingly, the stronger Galactic magnetic field the ultra high energy CRs (UHECRs) encounter during propagation. If the UHECRs associated with these events are indeed accelerated by Cen A and Cen B, their deflection angles may provide information on the structure of the magnetic field in the direction of these putative sources. Future -ray observations (by, e.g., Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope [GLAST], High Energy Stereoscopic System [HESS]) may provide additional clues to the nature of the accelerators of the UHECRs in the local Universe.

Moskalenko, Igor V.; Stawarz, Lukasz; Porter, Troy A.; Cheung, Chi C.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Teacher Participation in Professional Activities and Job Satisfaction: Prevalence and Associative Relationship to Retention for High School Science Teachers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, I used survey response data from 385 science teachers situated in 50 randomly selected Texas high schools to describe the prevalence of high school science teacher participation in professional activities and levels of job satisfaction. Using relative risk statistics, I determined the direction and significance of multiple associative relationships involving teachers participation in professional activities, satisfaction with working conditions, and retention state. Finally, I used these results to make specific policy recommendations. Teachers participate in diverse professional activities. Descriptive analyses of responses from teachers revealed higher rates of participation in development activities than in maintenance or management activities. Relative risk statistics exposed several positive and significant associative relationships between participation in specific professional activities (i.e., observation of other science teachers, involvement in a science education study group) and teacher retention. Additionally, results of risk analyses suggest teacher participation in maintenance activities, more than development or management, is associated with teacher retention. Researchers consider job satisfaction an important factor in teacher retention. Descriptive analyses revealed high rates of satisfaction with occupational choice and the interpersonal relationships shared with professional colleagues and administrators. Conversely, teachers expressed low rates of satisfaction with their schools science laboratory facilities and equipment or support for student involvement in informal science activities. Results of risk analyses exposed no positive associations between job satisfaction and retention for teachers. The interaction between teacher participation in professional activities and satisfaction with occupational choice was also examined. Descriptive analyses of responses from retained teachers (n=291) revealed high rates of participation in development activities in comparison to maintenance or management activities. Results of risk analyses exposed both positive and negative associations between teacher participation in professional activities and satisfaction with occupational choice, suggesting an interactive effect exists between participation in activities and satisfaction with occupational choice on retention. I used results from analyses to make state and school level policy recommendations, which included: (a) development of state standards for classroom equipment and facilities; (b) greater state involvement in defining teacher professional activities; and, (c) increasing school support for teacher participation in maintenance activities.

Bozeman, Todd Dane

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

AN OBSERVED LINK BETWEEN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND VIOLENT DISK INSTABILITIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide evidence for a correlation between the presence of giant clumps and the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in disk galaxies. Giant clumps of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} arise from violent gravitational instability in gas-rich galaxies, and it has been proposed that this instability could feed supermassive black holes (BHs). We use emission line diagnostics to compare a sample of 14 clumpy (unstable) disks and a sample of 13 smoother (stable) disks at redshift z {approx} 0.7. The majority of clumpy disks in our sample have a high probability of containing AGNs. Their [O III] {lambda}5007 emission line is strongly excited, inconsistent with low-metallicity star formation (SF) alone. [Ne III] {lambda}3869 excitation is also higher. Stable disks rarely have such properties. Stacking ultra sensitive Chandra observations (4 Ms) reveals an X-ray excess in clumpy galaxies, which confirms the presence of AGNs. The clumpy galaxies in our intermediate-redshift sample have properties typical of gas-rich disk galaxies rather than mergers, being in particular on the main sequence of SF. This suggests that our findings apply to the physically similar and numerous gas-rich unstable disks at z > 1. Using the observed [O III] and X-ray luminosities, we conservatively estimate that AGNs hosted by clumpy disks have typical bolometric luminosities of the order of a few 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, BH growth rates m-dot{sub BH}{approx}10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and that these AGNs are substantially obscured in X-rays. This moderate-luminosity mode could provide a large fraction of today's BH mass with a high duty cycle (>10%), accretion bursts with higher luminosities being possible over shorter phases. Violent instabilities at high redshift (giant clumps) are a much more efficient driver of BH growth than the weak instabilities in nearby spirals (bars), and the evolution of disk instabilities with mass and redshift could explain the simultaneous downsizing of SF and of BH growth.

Bournaud, Frederic; Juneau, Stephanie; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Mullaney, James; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Salmi, Fadia [CEA, IRFU, SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

Microsoft Word - CX-Alvey-FairviewAlvey-MartinCreek-DrainWoodPolesFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wood pole replacements on the Alvey-Fairview No. 1 230-kV, Alvey- Wood pole replacements on the Alvey-Fairview No. 1 230-kV, Alvey- Martin Creek 115-kV, and Martin Creek-Drain #1 115-kV transmission line rights-of-way (ROW) PP&A Project No.: 2308 (WO# 297303), 2310 (WO# 297305), 2319 (WO# 297996) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Alvey and Douglas counties, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace 18 deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) as well as cross arms on three other structures along the subject transmission lines. Replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to minimize ground disturbance. If necessary, an auger

120

A Conical Tear Drop as a Vacuum-Energy Drain for the Solution of the Cosmological Constant Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a partial solution to the cosmological constant problem by using the simple observation that a three-brane in a six-dimensional bulk is flat. A model is presented in which Standard Model vacuum energy is always absorbed by the transverse space. The latter is a tear-drop like space with a conical singularity, which preserves bulk supersymmetry and gives rise to conventional macroscopic 4D gravity with no cosmological constant. Its cone acts like a drain, depleting vacuum energy from the three-brane to the tear drop increasing its volume. We stress that although gravity is treated classically, Standard Model is handled quantum-field theoretically and the model is robust against Standard Model corrections and particular details. The price paid is the presence of boundaries which are nevertheless physically harmless by appropriate boundary conditions.

Alex Kehagias

2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Active filters for high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter terminals: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the technical and economic feasibility for active filtering of dc-side voltage harmonics and the ac-side current harmonics produced by a HVDC converter. The following designs for the active filter concepts are compared with the existing ac-side and dc-side passive filters used at the Dickinson terminal of the CU HVDC transmission line project: the dc-side active filter consisting of a capacitor coupled current injection source to actively ''neutralize'' the 12th, 24th and the 36th harmonics and, the ac-side active filter designed to provide the same fundamental frequency reactive VARs as the existing passive filters. Controlled currents are injected to actively filter the 11th and the 13th harmonic currents. A cost comparison is made between these active filter designs and existing passive filters supplied by the United Power Association (UPA). 22 figs., 11 tabs.

Mohan, N.; Wong, C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Lead Research and Development Activity for DOEs High Temperature...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane and MEA durability (C) Performance: High MEA performance at low relative humidity (RH) and high temperature Technical Targets FSEC plays a supporting role to the six...

123

A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target  

SciTech Connect

A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Active Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs, and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Effects of Lithium Nitrate on Highly Active Liquor in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

125

WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the grouts for measurements. All of the cured grouts were measured for bleed and set. All of the cured grouts satisfied the bleed and set requirements, where no bleed water was observed on any of the grout samples after one day and all had set within 3 days of curing. This data indicates, for a well mixed product, bleed and set requirement are satisfied for the range of acidic feeds tested in this task. The yield stress measurements provide both an indication on the mixability of the salt solution with dry materials and an indication of how quickly the grout is starting to form structure. The inability to properly mix these two streams into a well mixed grout product will lead to a non-homogeneous mixture that will impact product quality. Product quality issues could be unmixed regions of dry material and hot spots having high concentrations of americium 241. Mixes that were more difficult to incorporate typically resulted in grouts with higher yield stresses. The mixability from these tests will provide Waste Solidification Building (WSB) an indication of which grouts will be more challenging to mix. The first yield stress measurements were statistically compared to a list of variables, specifically the batched chemicals used to make the acidic solutions. The first yield stress was also compared to the physical properties of the acidic solutions, physical and pH properties of the neutralized/pH adjusted solutions, and chemical and physical properties of the grout.

Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High slip rate for a low seismicity along the Palu-Koro active fault in central Sulawesi (Indonesia, Indonesia Introduction Sulawesi Island, eastern Indonesia, is at the triple junction of the Paci®c (through- ABSTRACT In eastern Indonesia, the Central Sulawesi fault system consists of complex left-lateral strike

Vigny, Christophe

127

High School SMILE Club Activities Summer 2009 Teacher Resources Booklet SMILE Summer Teacher Workshop Aug 11th 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- coastal wetland system. Louisiana's coastal marshes produce an annual commercial fish and shellfish Workshop Aug 11th 2009 High School SMILE Club Activities Summer 2009 Ocean Science: Watersheds & Wetlands Teacher Resources Booklet Climate Conundrums Water We Have Here? Wetland Investigations Aquatic Invaders

Dever, Edward P.

128

Comparison of equilibria and kinetics of high surface area activated carbon produced from different precursors and by different chemical treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activated carbons prepared by chemical activation of coal and macadamia nutshell precursors with KOH and ZnCl{sub 2} have been studied in terms of their equilibrium and dynamic characteristics. These characteristics were then related to the micropore properties: surface area, volume, and half-width. Volumetric techniques were used for equilibria characterization and an FT-IR batch adsorber for dynamics. Carbons activated by KOH resulted in a more microporous structure, while those activated by zinc chloride were more mesoporous. High surface area samples were further studied in terms of their methane adsorption uptake. It was found that nutshell-derived activated carbons have a higher adsorption capacity per unit mass than those derived from coal; however, this was offset by lower particle density (mass/volume). High-pressure (2 GPa) pelletization of the carbons used for dynamic testing had a detrimental effect on capacity, presumably from pore collapse. Dynamic characteristics were found to be rather similar between the samples, with those treated with KOH displaying slower adsorption time scales.

Ahmadpour, A.; King, B.A.; Do, D.D. [Univ. of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland (Australia)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for the treatment of actual high activity tank waste at the INEEL using centrifugal contactors  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), formerly reprocessed spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The radioactive raffinates from the solvent extraction uranium recovery processes were converted to granular solids (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. A secondary liquid waste stream was generated during the course of reprocessing, primarily from equipment decontamination between campaigns and solvent wash activities. This acidic tank waste cannot be directly calcined due to the high sodium content and has historically been blended with reprocessing raffinates or non-radioactive aluminum nitrate prior to calcination. Fuel reprocessing activities are no longer being performed at the ICPP, thereby eliminating the option of waste blending to deplete the waste inventory. Currently, approximately 5.7 million liters of high-activity waste are temporarily stored at the ICPP in large underground stainless-steel tanks. The United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare filed a Notice of Noncompliance in 1992 contending some of the underground waste storage tanks do not meet secondary containment. As part of a 1995 agreement between the State of Idaho, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Navy, the waste must be removed from the tanks by 2012. Treatment of the tank waste inventories by partitioning the radionuclides and immobilizing the resulting high-activity and low-activity waste streams is currently under evaluation. A recent peer review identified the most promising radionuclide separation technologies for evaluation. The Transuranic Extraction-(TRUEX) process was identified as a primary candidate for separation of the actinides from ICPP tank waste.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A model for the critical voltage for electrical degradation of GaN high electron mobility transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have found that there is a critical drain-to-gate voltage beyond which GaN high-electron mobility transistors start to degrade in electrical-stress experiments. The critical voltage depends on the detailed voltage biasing ...

Joh, Jungwoo

131

RESULTS OF CAUSTIC DISSOLUTION OF ALUMINOSILICATE SCALE AND CHARACTERIZATION DATA FOR SAMPLES FROM THE EVAPORATOR POT AND GRAVITY DRAIN LINE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The build-up of sodium aluminosilicate scale in the 2H Evaporator system continues to cause operational difficulties. The use of a nitric acid cleaning operation proved successful in 2001. However, the operation required additional facilities to support spent cleaning solution neutralization and was quite costly. A proposed caustic cleaning flowsheet has many advantages over the acid flowsheet. Therefore, samples were retrieved from the evaporator system (gravity drain line and pot) for both chemical and radiological characterization and dissolution testing. The characterization of these scale samples showed the presence of nitrated cancrinite along with a dehydrated zeolite. Small amounts of depleted uranium were also found in these samples as expected and the amount of uranium ranged from 0.5 wt% to 2 wt%. Dissolution in sodium hydroxide solutions of various caustic concentrations showed that the scale slowly dissolves at elevated temperature (90 C). Data from similar testing indicate that the scale removed from the GDL in 2005 dissolves slower than that removed in 1997. Differences in the particle size of these samples of scale may well explain the measured dissolution rate differences.

Wilmarth, B; Rita Sullivan, R; Chris Martino, C

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Active devices for high temperature microcircuitry. [Silicon and gallium arsenide devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of a program to develop high temperature electronics for geothermal well instrumentation, a number of solid state diode and transistor types were characterized from room temperature to 300/sup 0/C. The temperature dependence and aging stability of transport and leakage properties were measured. Included in the study were silicon diodes, bipolar transistors, JFETs, MOSFETs, and GaAs MESFETs and JFETs. In summary the results are: diodes and bipolar transistors became extremely leaky at high temperature and are therefore of limited use; silicon MOSFETs and GaAs devices showed unacceptable aging instabilities at high temperatures; silicon JFETs from certain manufacturers were sufficiently stable and had suitable temperature dependent characteristics so that operational circuits could be made. Comparisons were made of experimental device characteristics and those predicted by theory. The theoretical calculations were done using standard equations revised to include appropriate temperature dependent parameters. Close agreement between theory and experiment was found, indicating that unexpected high temperature effects were insignificant. In order to facilitate the use of devices in high temperature hybrids, it was necessary to develop bonding and prescreening techniques. A large variance of JFET 300/sup 0/C operating parameters was found even within a single production lot. Consequently, high temperature prescreening allowed each circuit to be specifically ''pretuned.'' Standard solder, epoxy, and chip and wire attachment technologies were not functional at 300/sup 0/C. Gold-germanium solder, aluminum wire to DuPont 9910 gold film, and diffusion barrier pads were developed to allow high temperature attachment.

Palmer, D.W.; Draper, B.L.; McBrayer, J.D.; White, K.R.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems  

SciTech Connect

In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

Guo, Jiquan; /SLAC

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

High active carrier concentration in n-type, thin film Ge using delta-doping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate CVD in situ doping of Ge by utilizing phosphorus delta-doping for the creation of a high dopant diffusion source. Multiple monolayer delta doping creates source phosphorous concentrations above 1 10[superscript ...

Cai, Yan

135

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

136

A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target  

SciTech Connect

A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Acxtive Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed.

Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Activation measurement of the 3He(a,g)7Be reaction cross section at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The astrophysically important 3He(a,g)7Be reaction was studied at high energies where the available experimental data are in contradiction. A thin window 3He gas cell was used and the cross section was measured with the activation method. The obtained cross sections at energies between Ec.m. = 1.5 and 2.5 MeV are compared with the available data and theoretical calculations. The present results support the validity of the high energy cross section energy dependence observed by recent experiments.

C. Bordeanu; Gy. Gyrky; Z. Halsz; T. Szcs; G. G. Kiss; Z. Elekes; J. Farkas; Zs. Flp; E. Somorjai

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

A new experimental setup for high-pressure catalytic activity measurements on surface deposited mass-selected Pt clusters  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental setup to study catalytic and electronic properties of size-selected clusters on metal oxide substrates from the viewpoint of cluster-support interaction and to formulate a method for the development of heterogeneous catalysts such as automotive exhaust catalysts has been developed. The apparatus consists of a size-selected cluster source, a photoemission spectrometer, a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and a high-pressure reaction cell. The high-pressure reaction cell measurements provided information on catalytic properties in conditions close to practical use. The authors investigated size-selected platinum clusters deposited on a TiO{sub 2}(110) surface using a reaction cell and STM. Catalytic activity measurements showed that the catalytic activities have a cluster-size dependency.

Watanabe, Yoshihide; Isomura, Noritake [Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193, Japan and Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Synthesis of a high-yield activated carbon by air gasification of macadamia nut shell charcoal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Macadamia nut shell charcoal was heated in an inert environment to temperatures above 1000 K (carbonized), reacted with oxygen (Po{sub 2} = 2.68--11.3 kPa) at temperatures between 525 and 586 K (oxygenated), and heated again in an inert environment to temperatures above 1000 K (activated) to produce an activated carbon. Carbons produced by this process possess surface areas and iodine numbers in the range of 400--550. Overall yields of these carbons (based on the dry, raw macadamia nut shell feed) ranged from 24 to 30 wt %. Under the conditions employed in this work, the rates of chemisorption and gasification were not mass transfer limited. Initially, the gasification reaction was first-order with respect to oxygen concentration but became independent of oxygen concentration as the surface sites of the carbon became saturated with oxygen.

Dai, X.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

PERGAMON Carbon 38 (2000) 17571765 High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directly, as in a traditional H , 23.1% CO, 5.8% CO , 6.6% H O, 0.5% H S, and2 2 2 2 coal-fired power plant was activated using coal-fired power plants. With improved gas turbine tech- steam by replacing the N flow temperature was examined as a2 function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal

Cal, Mark P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during JanuaryAugust 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

James O'Brien

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Program on Technology Innovation: Volume Reduction Methods and Waste Form Changes for High-Activity Spent Resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has initiated a series of studies to mitigate the impact of limited disposal-site access on continued light water reactor operations. A previous EPRI report, Program on Technology Innovation: Volume Reduction Methods and Waste Form Changes for High-Activity Spent Resin: A Feasibility Study (1025303), established that cation and anion resin beads could be separated for the purpose of rendering the anion resin as Class A resin waste, and ...

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

Review of Cyclotron Production and Quality Control of High Specific Activity Radionuclides for Biomedical, Biological, Industrial and Environmental Applications at INFN-LASA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of Cyclotron Production and Quality Control of High Specific Activity Radionuclides for Biomedical, Biological, Industrial and Environmental Applications at INFN-LASA

Birattari, C; Groppi, F; Gini, L

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Future Changes in Tropical Cyclone Activity Projected by the New High-Resolution MRI-AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New versions of the high-resolution 20- and 60-km-mesh Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) atmospheric general circulation models (MRI-AGCM version 3.2) have been developed and used to investigate potential future changes in tropical cyclone (...

Hiroyuki Murakami; Yuqing Wang; Hiromasa Yoshimura; Ryo Mizuta; Masato Sugi; Eiki Shindo; Yukimasa Adachi; Seiji Yukimoto; Masahiro Hosaka; Shoji Kusunoki; Tomoaki Ose; Akio Kitoh

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

2008 SMILE Summer Teacher Workshop High School Club Activities Project Brine Shrimp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in bold are provided by SMILE) Air Pump Petri Dishes Empty 2-litre Soda Bottle Desk Lamp (with high watt or aged tap water Baking soda 2 Common Pollutants (e.g. motor oil, soap or bleach) pH Paper Non of the base and connect the other end to an air pump, turning the air pump on. Place the air pump

Dever, Edward P.

146

High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for junior high/middle school science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some basic topics on the subject of solar energy are outlined in the form of a teaching manual. The manual is geared toward junior high or middle school science students. Topics include solar collectors, solar water heating, solar radiation, insulation, heat storage, and desalination. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate the solar energy topics are provided. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities July 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1997--December 31, 1997. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Schuur, C.; Wagner, R. [eds.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

High Energy Physics division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1998--June 30, 1998.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1998 through June 30, 1998. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

Ayres, D. S.; Berger, E. L.; Blair, R.; Bodwin, G. T.; Drake, G.; Goodman, M. C.; Guarino, V.; Klasen, M.; Lagae, J.-F.; Magill, S.; May, E. N.; Nodulman, L.; Norem, J.; Petrelli, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Repond, J.; Schoessow, P. V.; Sinclair, D. K.; Spinka, H. M.; Stanek, R.; Underwood, D.; Wagner, R.; White, A. R.; Yokosawa, A.; Zachos, C.

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

Target design considerations for high specific activity [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the routine preparation of {sup 11}C-labeled compounds through N-[{sup 11}C]-methylation using [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I, total masses are always higher than synthesis mass contribution, suggesting that the target system contributes carrier carbon to the final product mass. This conclusion prompted this evaluation of target materials and target design for [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} production. Ultimately, one is faced with the sprospect of compromising between [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} specific activity and the amount that can be extracted from the target after a reasonable irradiation time.

Ferrieri, R.A.; Alexoff, D.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; McDonald, K.; Wolf, A.P.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Active high-power RF pulse compression using optically switched resonant delay lines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors present the design and a proof of principle experimental results of an optically controlled high power rf pulse compression system. The design should, in principle, handle few hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band. The system is based on the switched resonant delay line theory. It employs resonant delay lines as a means of storing rf energy. The coupling to the lines is optimized for maximum energy storage during the charging phase. To discharge the lines, a high power microwave switch increases the coupling to the lines just before the start of the output pulse. The high power microwave switch, required for this system, is realized using optical excitation of an electron-hole plasma layer on the surface of a pure silicon wafer. The switch is designed to operate in the TE{sub 01} mode in a circular waveguide to avoid the edge effects present at the interface between the silicon wafer and the supporting waveguide; thus, enhancing its power handling capability.

Tantawi, S.G.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E. [Stanford Univ., CA (US). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Zolotorev, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Solute-travel time estimates for tile-drained fields. III. Removal of a geothermal brine spill from soil by leaching  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The time required to leach a slug of saline, sodic geothermal brine from the point of injection to the tile outlet of an artificially drained field is calculated. Sprinkler, complete, and partial ponding leaching methods are compared as a function of drain spacing and initial location of the spill, with ponding requiring more water but less time to leach brine out of the system for all situations except where the brine spill occurs near the midpoint between tile lines. Calculation results are presented in dimensionless parameters which scale the drainage system dimensions and the soil water transport properties. A simple calculation is proposed to estimate the volume of leaching fluid required to remove excess Na/sup +/ from the exchange complex, and was found to be in good agreement with the results of laboratory soil column experiments. For fine-textured soils in the Imperial Valley of California it may require up to 30 pore volumes of leaching fluid to lower Na/sup +/ concentrations if saturated gypsum solution is used in reclamation. The results of these calculations suggest that reclamation of fine textured soils could require a prohibitive amount of time unless the brine spill is localized around a drain.

Jury, W.A.; Weeks, L.V.

1978-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

Calculation of the performance of activated carbon at high relative humidities  

SciTech Connect

The Dubinin-Radushkevich potential theory was extended to include a term giving the effect of relative humidity on the uptake of adsorbate. This extended equation permit the adsorptive capacity of the activated charcoal in a respirator cartridge to be estimated for any combination of temperature, relative humidity, and concentration of contaminant. Application of this theory to previously published data of Werner showed a good correlation between theory and experiment. This equation is consistent with the experimental observations that 1) below a certain value, the relative humidity has little effect on the uptake of adsorbate, and 2) the effect of relative humidity, if observed, is more severe for lower than for higher concentration of contaminant.

Underhill, D.W.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Highly Active Pt(3)Pb and Core-Shell Pt(3)Pb-Pt Electrocatalysts for Formic Acid Oxidation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Formic acid is a promising chemical fuel for fuel cell applications. However, due to the dominance of the indirect reaction pathway and strong poisoning effects, the development of direct formic acid fuel cells has been impeded by the low activity of existing electrocatalysts at desirable operating voltage. We report the first synthesis of Pt{sub 3}Pb nanocrystals through solution phase synthesis and show they are highly efficient formic acid oxidation electrocatalysts. The activity can be further improved by manipulating the Pt{sub 3}Pb-Pt core-shell structure. Combined experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the high activity from Pt{sub 3}Pb and the Pt-Pb core-shell nanocrystals results from the elimination of CO poisoning and decreased barriers for the dehydrogenation steps. Therefore, the Pt{sub 3}Pb and Pt-Pb core-shell nanocrystals can improve the performance of direct formic acid fuel cells at desired operating voltage to enable their practical application.

Kang Y.; Stach E.; Qi L.; Li M.; Diaz R.E.; Su D.; Adzic R.R.; Li J.; Murray C.B.

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

Conditioning the gamma spectrometer for activity measurement at very high background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of a high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer in determining the fuel element burnup in a future reactor is studied. The HPGe detector is exposed by a Co60 source with varying irradiation rate from 10 kcps to 150 kcps to simulate the input counting rate in real reactor environment. A Cs137 and a Eu152 source are positioned at given distances to generate certain event rate in the detector with the former being proposed as a labeling nuclide to measure the burnup of fuel element. It is shown that both the energy resolution slightly increasing with the irradiation rate and the passthrough rate at high irradiation level match the requirement of the real application. The influence of the background is studied in different parameter sets used in the particularly developed procedure of the background subtraction. It is demonstrated that with the typical input irradiation rate and Cs137 intensity relevant to deep burnup situation, the precision of the Cs137 counting rate in the current experiment is consistently below 2.8%, indicating a promising feasibility of utilizing an HPGe detector in the burnup measurement in future bed-like reactor.

Weihua Yan; Liguo Zhang; Zhao Zhang; Zhigang Xiao

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Current Activities Assessing Butt Fusion Joint Integrity in High Density Polyethylene Piping  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, conducted initial studies to evaluate the effectiveness of nondestructive examinations (NDE) coupled with mechanical testing for assessing butt fusion joint integrity in high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The work provided insightful information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of volumetric inspection techniques for detecting lack of fusion (LOF) conditions in the fusion joints. HDPE has been installed on a limited basis in American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 3, buried piping systems at several operating U.S. nuclear power plants and has been proposed for use in new construction. A comparison was made between the results from ultrasonic and microwave nondestructive examinations and the results from mechanical destructive evaluations, specifically the high-speed tensile test and the side-bend test, for determining joint integrity. The data comparison revealed that none of the NDE techniques detected all of the lack-of-fusion conditions that were revealed by the destructive tests. Follow-on work has recently been initiated at PNNL to accurately characterize the NDE responses from machined flaws of varying size and location in PE 4710 materials as well as the LOF condition. This effort is directed at quantifying the ability of volumetric NDE techniques to detect flaws in relation to the critical flaw size associated with joint integrity. A status of these latest investigations is presented.

Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Doctor, Steven R.; Denslow, Kayte M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

FY-97 operations of the pilot-scale glass melter to vitrify simulated ICPP high activity sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

A 3.5 liter refractory-lined joule-heated glass melter was built to test the applicability of electric melting to vitrify simulated high activity waste (HAW). The HAW streams result from dissolution and separation of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcines and/or radioactive liquid waste. Pilot scale melter operations will establish selection criteria needed to evaluate the application of joule heating to immobilize ICPP high activity waste streams. The melter was fabricated with K-3 refractory walls and Inconel 690 electrodes. It is designed to be continuously operated at 1,150 C with a maximum glass output rate of 10 lbs/hr. The first set of tests were completed using surrogate HAW-sodium bearing waste (SBW). The melter operated for 57 hours and was shut down due to excessive melt temperatures resulting in low glass viscosity (< 30 Poise). Due to the high melt temperature and low viscosity the molten glass breached the melt chamber. The melter has been dismantled and examined to identify required process improvement areas and successes of the first melter run. The melter has been redesigned and is currently being fabricated for the second run, which is scheduled to begin in December 1997.

Musick, C.A.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst. [Design of a flow microreactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the design of a high selectivity alcohol catalyst continued. During the first quarter of this project, our goals have been to overhaul key experimental equipment used in the previous project, plan and design new equipment and to identify a person to carry out the research program. The flow microreactor, previously assembled, has been reactivated and major improvements have been made both to the reactor and its attendant analytical instrumentation. This equipment is described later in this report. In addition to this, a state-of-the-art hydrogen chemisorption instrument has been designed and the components for its construction have been ordered. Additionally, four recent publications by the principal investigators on the subject of this project have appeared. 3 figs.

Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

1990-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Lead Research and Development Activity for DOE's High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program (Topic 2)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energys High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program was begun in 2006 with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) as the lead organization. During the first three years of the program, FSEC was tasked with developing non-Nafion proton exchange membranes with improved conductivity for fuel cells. Additionally, FSEC was responsible for developing protocols for the measurement of in-plane conductivity, providing conductivity measurements for the other funded teams, developing a method for through-plane conductivity and organizing and holding semiannual meetings of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG). The FSEC membrane research focused on the development of supported poly[perfluorosulfonic acid] (PFSA) Teflon membranes and a hydrocarbon membrane, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The fourth generation of the PFSA membrane (designated FSEC-4) came close to, but did not meet, the Go/No-Go milestone of 0.1 S/cm at 50% relative humidity at 120 C. In-plane conductivity of membranes provided by the funded teams was measured and reported to the teams and DOE. Late in the third year of the program, DOE used this data and other factors to decide upon the teams to continue in the program. The teams that continued provided promising membranes to FSEC for development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) that could be tested in an operating fuel cell. FSEC worked closely with each team to provide customized support. A logic flow chart was developed and discussed before MEA fabrication or any testing began. Of the five teams supported, by the end of the project, membranes from two of the teams were easily manufactured into MEAs and successfully characterized for performance. One of these teams exceeded performance targets, while the other requires further optimization. An additional team developed a membrane that shows great promise for significantly reducing membrane costs and increasing membrane lifetime.

James Fenton, PhD; Darlene Slattery, PhD; Nahid Mohajeri, PhD

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Services Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen50% CNG fuel.

Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Force interaction of high pressure glow discharge with fluid flow for active separation control  

SciTech Connect

Radio frequency based discharges at atmospheric pressures are the focus of increased interest in aerodynamics because of the wide range of potential applications including, specifically, actuation in flows at moderate speeds. Recent literature describing promising experimental observations, especially on separation control, has spurred efforts in the development of parallel theoretical modeling to lift limitations in the current understanding of the actuation mechanism. The present effort demonstrates higher fidelity first-principle models in a multidimensional finite-element framework to predict surface discharge-induced momentum exchange. The complete problem of a dielectric barrier discharge at high pressure with axially displaced electrodes is simulated in a self-consistent manner. Model predictions for charge densities, the electric field, and gas velocity distributions are shown to mimic trends reported in the experimental literature. Results show that a residual of electrons remains deposited on the dielectric surface downstream of the exposed powered electrode for the entire duration of the cycle and causes a net electric force in the direction from the electrode to the downstream surface. For the first time, results document the mitigation process of a separation bubble formed due to flow past a flat plate inclined at 12 degree sign angle of attack. This effort sets the basis for extending the formulation further to include polyphase power input in multidimensional settings, and to apply the simulation method to flows past common aerodynamic configurations.

Roy, Subrata; Gaitonde, Datta V. [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States); Computational Sciences Branch, Air Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Our short-term outlook for a wide array of energy prices has been adjusted upward as international and domestic energy supply conditions have tightened. We think that crude oil prices are as likely as not to end the year $2 to $3 per barrel higher than our previous projections. Thus, we think that the probability of West Texas Intermediate costing an average of $30 per barrel or more at midwinter is about 50 percent. On their current track, heating oil prices are likely to be about 30 percent above year-ago levels in the fourth quarter. Prices for Q1 2001 seem more likely now to match or exceed the high level seen in Q1 2000. Tight oil markets this year and an inherent propensity for high gas utilization in incremental power supply have resulted in rising North American natural gas

164

A Tracker for the Mu3e Experiment based on High-Voltage Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mu3e experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay mu+ -> e+e-e+, aiming for a branching fraction sensitivity of 10^-16. This requires an excellent momentum resolution for low energy electrons, high rate capability and a large acceptance. In order to minimize multiple scattering, the amount of material has to be as small as possible. These challenges can be met with a tracker built from high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS), which can be thinned to 50 um and which incorporate the complete read-out electronics on the sensor chip. To further minimise material, the sensors are supported by a mechanical structure built from 25 um thick Kapton foil and cooled with gaseous helium.

Berger, Niklaus; Bachmann, Sebastian; Kiehn, Moritz; Peri?, Ivan; Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Philipp, Raphael; Schning, Andr; Stumpf, Kevin; Wiedner, Dirk; Windelband, Bernd; Zimmermann, Marco

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Tracker for the Mu3e Experiment based on High-Voltage Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mu3e experiment searches for the lepton flavour violating decay mu+ -> e+e-e+, aiming for a branching fraction sensitivity of 10^-16. This requires an excellent momentum resolution for low energy electrons, high rate capability and a large acceptance. In order to minimize multiple scattering, the amount of material has to be as small as possible. These challenges can be met with a tracker built from high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors (HV-MAPS), which can be thinned to 50 um and which incorporate the complete read-out electronics on the sensor chip. To further minimise material, the sensors are supported by a mechanical structure built from 25 um thick Kapton foil and cooled with gaseous helium.

Niklaus Berger; Heiko Augustin; Sebastian Bachmann; Moritz Kiehn; Ivan Peri?; Ann-Kathrin Perrevoort; Raphael Philipp; Andr Schning; Kevin Stumpf; Dirk Wiedner; Bernd Windelband; Marco Zimmermann

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Calculation of activities and solubilities of alkali metal perchlorates at high ionic strengths in multicomponent aqueous systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equations of Nyvlt, of Bromley, and of Pitzer for the representation of activity coefficients of electrolytes in multicomponent ionic systems have been used to fit solubility data for some alkali metal perchlorates and ammonium perchlorate in mixture with other electrolytes at ionic strengths varying from 0.08 mol-kg/sup -1/ to as high as 24 mol-kg/sup -1/. Only the Pitzer equations can be used reliably to fit the solubility data over the whole range of ionic strengths encountered for ternary systems but there are certain limitations and certain assumptions which have to be made concerning the Pitzer ionic interaction parameters. A method is also proposed for the calculation of the Pitzer single electrolyte parameters, ..beta../sup 0/, ..beta../sup 1/, and C/sup phi/, for the less soluble perchlorates from fitting their solubility data over a wide range of high ionic strengths.

Chan, C.; Khoo, K.H.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

On the response of polar cap dynamics to its solar wind and magnetotail drivers at high levels of geomagnetic activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for many levels of geomagnetic activity, J. Geophys. Res. ,1988), IMF control of geomagnetic activity, Adv. Spacecontrol of auroral zone geomagnetic activity, Geophys. Res.

Gao, Ye

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effect of high-energy neutron flux on fiber optics in an active diagnostic on TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bundle of 1-mm-diam fused silica optical fibers on an existing TFTR diagnostic has been exposed to 11 high-power DT discharges. Each shot subjected the fibers to a peak fast (14.7 MeV) neutron flux of [approx]2[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]/s and a [gamma]-dose rate of 500 rad(Si)/s for 0.75--1.0 s. The total fast-neutron fluence for these shots was [approx]5[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]. A 15-m-long section of the bundle ran along the tokamak's toroidal field coils and the remaining 15 m ran radially away from the reactor. Fiber luminescence at 660 nm was [approx]10[sup 10] photons/s/sr/cm[sup 2]/A for the above flux ([approx]5%--10% of the bremsstrahlung emission), and varied linearly with DT neutron rate. Luminescence at 530 nm was 50% stronger, consistent with a Cerenkov radiation spectrum. Sensitivity to 3.5 MeV DD neutrons was [approx]1/3 to 1/2 of that for DT neutrons. Fiber transmission decreased with the time integral of the neutron source rate and was reduced by 4% for the above flux. The fiber recovered rapidly: within 10 s, the transmission loss was only 2.5%. Shortly thereafter, the rate of recovery slowed to [approx]0.05% per minute, but was sufficient to restore 75% of the transmission loss within two to four discharges. Recovery continued at [approx]0.1% per hour and slowed overnight to [approx]0.1% per day. Within the relative error of [lt]0.2%, full transmission was recovered after five days.

Paul, S.F.; Goldstein, J.L.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

High sensitivity assay of cement encapsulated spent nuclear fuel sludge using the Imaging Passive Active Neutron (IPAN) system  

SciTech Connect

A new technique has been developed for high sensitivity assay of grouted spent nuclear fuel (SNF) sludge waste in 208 liter drums. The method uses the Imaging Passive Active Neutron (IPAN{sup TM}) system to provide regulatory acceptable measurements. At the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility in Hanford, two IPAN{sup TM} systems have been successfully calibrated and validated for assay of SNF grouted sludge drums (encapsulated with a cement mixture). The systems have been demonstrated to be capable of performing low level waste (LLW) / transuranic (TRU) waste sorting even in the presence of high gamma radiation fields emitted by the fission and activation products associated with SNF. The active and passive modes of the IPAN{sup TM} provide a wide dynamic range of assay: from below the TRU/LLW sorting threshold (100 nCi/g or 3700 Bq/g) up to several hundred grams of Weapons Grade Pu Equivalent. A new calibration technique was developed that uses a radial weighted average method to define the imaging response matrix. This method provides the required sensitivity to the height distribution of special nuclear material within the 208 liter drum, and makes use of the uniform radial distribution that will occur for a distribution of a large population of small particles in a homogeneous matrix. Extensive validation and testing with specially designed surrogate grouted sludge drums and radioactive standards have resulted in regulatory acceptance of this technique, permitting ultimate disposal of the SNF sludge drums at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. (authors)

Simpson, A.P. [BIL Solutions Inc, Santa Fe, NM (United States); Abdurrahman, N.M. [Fluor Hanford, Richland, WA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Motor representations and practice affect brain systems underlying imagery: an fMRI study of internal imagery in novices and active high jumpers. Open Neuroimaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate differences in brain activity between one group of active high jumpers and one group of high jumping novices (controls) when performing motor imagery of a high jump. It was also investigated how internal imagery training affects neural activity. The results showed that active high jumpers primarily activated motor areas, e.g. pre-motor cortex and cerebellum. Novices activated visual areas, e.g. superior occipital cortex. Imagery training resulted in a reduction of activity in parietal cortex. These results indicate that in order to use an internal perspective during motor imagery of a complex skill, one must have well established motor representations of the skill which then translates into a motor/internal pattern of brain activity. If not, an external perspective will be used and the corresponding brain activation will be a visual/external pattern. Moreover, the findings imply that imagery training reduces the activity in parietal cortex suggesting that imagery is performed more automatic and results in a more efficient motor representation more easily accessed during motor performance.

C. -j. Olsson; Bert Jonsson; Anne Larsson; Lars Nyberg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously assumed (Q3 instead of Q2). Our current estimate for the average import cost this past January is now $25 per barrel, a nearly $15-per-barrel increase from January 1999. Crude oil prices are expected to remain at relatively high levels for the first half of 2000, but

173

ON THE SIMULTANEOUS GENERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION AND SUBMILLIMETER/INFRARED RADIATION FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we study the role of the mechanism of quasi-linear diffusion (QLD) in producing the high-energy emission in the MeV-GeV domains strongly connected with the submillimeter/infrared radiation. Considering the kinetic equation governing the stationary regime of the QLD, we investigate the feedback of the diffusion on electrons. We show that this process leads to the distribution of particles by pitch angles, implying that the synchrotron mechanism is no longer prevented by energy losses. Examining a reasonable interval of physical parameters, we show that it is possible to produce MeV-GeV {gamma}-rays that are strongly correlated with submillimeter/infrared bands.

Osmanov, Z., E-mail: z.osmanov@iliauni.edu.g [Centre for Theoretical Astrophysics, ITP, Ilia State University, Kazbegi Str. 2a, 0160 Tbilisi (Georgia)

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Parametric Evaluation of Active Neutron Interrogation for the Detection of Shielded Highly-Enriched Uranium in the Field  

SciTech Connect

Parametric studies using numerical simulations are being performed to assess the performance capabilities and limits of active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). Varying the shield material, HEU mass, HEU depth inside the shield, and interrogating neutron source energy, the simulations account for both neutron and photon emission signatures from the HEU with resolution in both energy and time. The results are processed to represent different irradiation timing schemes and several different classes of radiation detectors, and evaluated using a statistical approach considering signal intensity over background. This paper describes the details of the modeling campaign and some preliminary results, weighing the strengths of alternative measurement approaches for the different irradiation scenarios.

D. L. Chcihester; E. H. Seabury; S. J. Thompson; R. R. C. Clement

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

Burns, H.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Annual report, May 1, 1995--April 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economics success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. The project is a cooperative venture between Michigan Technological University (MTU), Western Michigan University (WMU), and Terra Energy (now Cronus Development Co.). During the fall of 1995, the demonstration well for this project, the TOW No. 1-3 well in Crystal Field, Montcalm County, Michigan, was completed in the Dundee Formation and for the first three months of operation produced 50 bbl/day oil with no water cut. Because surface facilities were inadequate to handle full production, the well was produced for 12 hrs/day and shut in for 12 hrs/day. In January, 1996, new surface Facilities were completed and production was raised to 100 bbl/day. Daily production has varied from about 75 to 100 BOPD since that time. To date, the well has produced over 10, 000 bbls. The water cut remains at 0% and pressure has been maintained at 1445 psi by an active water drive. If expectations are met, the well will pay out in less than 1 year and continue on production for at least 5 years. Cronus Development Co. is tentatively planning to drill three more horizontal wells in the Dundee in Crystal Field. Thus, the play concept we chose to test, that bypassed attic oil remained in the Dundee reservoir between wells that had been produced at excessively high flow rates and had coned water during primary production, appears to be correct, and the TOW No. 1-3 HD-1 well is now a scientific, and appears soon to become an economic, success.

Wood, J.R.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Elimination of phosphate and zirconium in the high-activity fraction resulting from TRUEX partitioning of ICPP zirconium calcines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory testing was undertaken with the aim of developing a TRUEX flowsheet that would efficiently remove actinides from solutions of dissolved zirconium calcine and minimize the glass volume produced from the ensuing high-activity fraction. A TRUEX flowsheet is recommended for testing in the 2-cm centrifugal contactor pilot-plant based on the results from this testing. These laboratory tests show that zirconium recovery in the high activity fraction is minimized by scrubbing with an optimized NHF concentration of 0.2 M. This NH4F concentration in the scrub allowed the HEDPA strip concentration to be reduced from 0.04 M to 0.004 M because HEDPA is not consumed by zirconium. Complete TRU stripping was also achieved in these laboratory tests with 0.004 M HEDPA. Data from the small-scale laboratory batch contact tests were used in the Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) to evaluate the proposed flowsheet under counter-current conditions. GTM results indicate the raffinate will meet the Class A non-TRU limit of < 10 nCi/g in six extraction stages (O/A = 1), and quantitative actinide recovery will be achieved with the 0.004 M HEDPA in six strip stages (O/A = 1). Only 6.6 % of the initial zirconium concentration is anticipated to be recovered with the actinides, indicating the four scrub stages (O/A = 3) efficiently removes zirconium from the TRUEX solvent. In addition to recommending an improved TRUEX flowsheet for testing in the 2-cm centrifugal contactor pilot-plant, this work has shown that small reductions in zirconium extraction drastically improves flowsheet performance. These small changes in zirconium extraction can be accomplished by modifying the calcine dissolution parameters. Therefore, further calcine dissolution testing followed by TRUEX testing with the resulting feed solutions is also recommended.

Brewer, K.N.; Tillotson, R.D.; Tullock, P.A. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Linking high and low temperature plasticity in bulk metallic glasses: thermal activation, extreme value statistics and kinetic freezing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At temperatures well below their glass transition, the deformation properties of bulk metallic glasses are characterised by a sharp transition from elasticity to plasticity, a reproducible yield stress, and an approximately linear decrease of this stress with increasing temperature. In the present work it shown that when the well known properties of the under-cooled liquid regime, in terms of the underlying potential energy landscape, are assumed to be also valid at low temperature, a simple thermal activation model is able to reproduce the observed onset of macro-scopic yield. At these temperatures, the thermal accessibility of the complex potential energy landscape is drastically reduced, and the statistics of extreme value and the phenomenon of kinetic freezing become important, affecting the spatial heterogeneity of the irreversible structural transitions mediating the elastic-to-plastic transition. As the temperature increases and approaches the glass transition temperature, the theory is able to smoothly transit to the high temperature deformation regime where plasticity is known to be well described by thermally activated viscoplastic models.

P. M. Derlet; R. Maa

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, July 1995--September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes well drilling and logging activities performed at Crystal Field. Progress on reservoir characterization, data acquisition and analysis is discussed.

Wood, J.R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Dependence on proton energy of degradation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of proton irradiation energy on dc, small signal, and large signal rf characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were investigated. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs were irradiated with protons at fixed fluence of 51015/cm2 and energies of 5, 10, and 15 MeV. Both dc and rf characteristics revealed more degradation at lower irradiation energy, with reductions of maximum transconductance of 11%, 22%, and 38%, and decreases in drain saturation current of 10%, 24%, and 46% for HEMTs exposed to 15, 10, and 5MeV protons, respectively. The increase in device degradation with decreasing proton energy is due to the increase in linear energy transfer and corresponding increase in nonionizing energy loss with decreasing proton energy in the active region of the HEMTs. After irradiation, both subthreshold drain leakage current and reverse gate current decreased more than 1 order of magnitude for all samples. The carrier removal rate was in the range 121 336 cm1 over the range of proton energies employed in this study

Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xi, Y. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Wang, Y.l. [University of Florida; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Kim, H.-Y. [Korea University; Kim, J. [Korea University; Fitch, Robert C [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Walker, Dennis E [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Chabak, Kelson D [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Gillespie, James k [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Tetlak, Stephen E [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Via, Glen D [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Crespo, Antonio [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Development of Microfabricated Microbial Fuel Cell Array as a High Throughput Screening Platform for Electrochemically Active Microbes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are novel green technologies that convert chemical energy stored in biomass into electricity through microbial metabolisms. Both fossil fuel depletion and environmental concern have fostered significant interest in MFCs for both wastewater treatment and electricity generation. However, MFCs have not yet been used for practical applications due to their low power outputs and challenges associated with scale-up. High throughput screening devices for parallel studies are highly necessary to significantly improve and optimize MFC working conditions for future practical applications. Here in this research, microfabricated platforms of microbial fuel cell array as high throughput screening devices for MFC parallel studies have been developed. Their utilities were described with environmental sample screening to uncover electricigens with higher electrochemical activities. The first version of the MFC arrays is a batch-mode miniaturized 24-well MFC array using ferricyanide as catholyte. Several environmental species that showed higher electricity generation capabilities than Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SO) were uncovered using the developed MFC array, with one environmental electricigen, Shewanella sp. Hac353 (dq307734.1)(7Ca), showing 2.3-fold higher power output than SO. The second MFC array platform developed is an air-cathode MFC array using oxygen in air as electron acceptor, which is sustainable compared to ferricyanide that depletes over time. Environmental electricigen screenings were also conducted, showing parallel comparison capabilities of the developed array. The third MFC array platform is a microfluidic-cathode MFC array that enables long-term operations of miniature MFC arrays with improved power generation abilities. The capability of the microfluidic-cathode MFC array to support long-term parallel analysis was demonstrated by characterizing power generation of SO and 7Ca, proving extended operation time and improved power outputs compared to batch-mode MFC array. The fourth MFC array platform enables both catholyte and anolyte replenishments for long-term characterization of various carbon substrate performances. Finally, the 24-well microfluidic MFC array was further scaled up to 96 wells, which greatly increased the throughput of MFC parallel studies. The developed MFC arrays as high throughput screening platforms are expected to greatly impact how current MFC studies are conducted and ultimately lead to significant improvement in MFC power output.

Hou, Huijie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High rate mesophilic, thermophilic, and temperature phased anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge: A pilot scale study  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High temperatures were tested in single and two-stage anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The increased temperature demonstrated the possibility of improving typical yields of the conventional mesophilic process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The temperature phased anaerobic digestion process (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) showed the best performances with yields of 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia and phosphate released from solids destruction determined the precipitation of struvite in the reactor. - Abstract: The paper reports the findings of a two-year pilot scale experimental trial for the mesophilic (35 Degree-Sign C), thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) and temperature phased (65 + 55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge. During the mesophilic and thermophilic runs, the reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 20 days. In the temperature phased run, the first reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 15 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 2 days while the second reactor operated at an organic loading rate of 2.2 kgVS/m{sup 3}d and a hydraulic retention time of 18 days (20 days for the whole temperature phased system). The performance of the reactor improved with increases in temperature. The COD removal increased from 35% in mesophilic conditions, to 45% in thermophilic conditions, and 55% in the two stage temperature phased system. As a consequence, the specific biogas production increased from 0.33 to 0.45 and to 0.49 m{sup 3}/kgVS{sub fed} at 35, 55, and 65 + 55 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The extreme thermophilic reactor working at 65 Degree-Sign C showed a high hydrolytic capability and a specific yield of 0.33 gCOD (soluble) per gVS{sub fed}. The effluent of the extreme thermophilic reactor showed an average concentration of soluble COD and volatile fatty acids of 20 and 9 g/l, respectively. Acetic and propionic acids were the main compounds found in the acids mixture. Because of the improved digestion efficiency, organic nitrogen and phosphorus were solubilised in the bulk. Their concentration, however, did not increase as expected because of the formation of salts of hydroxyapatite and struvite inside the reactor.

Bolzonella, David, E-mail: david.bolzonella@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Cavinato, Cristina, E-mail: cavinato@unive.it [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Computer Science and Statistics, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Fatone, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.fatone@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Pavan, Paolo, E-mail: pavan@unive.it [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Computer Science and Statistics, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Cecchi, Franco, E-mail: franco.cecchi@univr.it [University of Verona, Department of Biotechnology, Strada Le Grazie, 15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect

In partial response to a Department of Energy (DOE) request to evaluate the state of measurements of special nuclear material, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) evaluated and classified all highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide items in its inventory. Because of a lack of traceable HEU standards, no items were deemed to fit the category of well measured. A subsequent DOE-HQ sponsored survey by New Brunswick Laboratory resulted in their preparation of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements], a unit of which was delivered to LLNL in October of 1999. This paper describes the approach to calibration of the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of poorly measured/unmeasured HEU oxide inventory. Included are discussions of (1) the calibration effort, including the development of the mass calibration curve; (2) the results from an axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber, and (3) an error model for the total (systematic + random) uncertainty in the predicted mass that includes the uncertainties in calibration and sample position.

Mount, M.; Glosup, J.; Cochran, C.; Dearborn, D.; Endres, E.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division, semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses research being conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory in the following areas: Experimental High Energy Physics; Theoretical High Energy Physics; Experimental Facilities Research; Accelerator Research and Development; and SSC Detector Research and Development.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Coordinating government funding of file system and I/O research through the high end computing university research activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, the High End Computing Revitalization Task Force designated file systems and I/O as an area in need of national focus. The purpose of the High End Computing Interagency Working Group (HECIWG) is to coordinate government spending on File Systems ... Keywords: file systems, high end computing, storage

Gary Grider; James Nunez; John Bent; Steve Poole; Rob Ross; Evan Felix

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Possible Change of Extratropical Cyclone Activity due to Enhanced Greenhouse Gases and Sulfate AerosolsStudy with a High-Resolution AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the possible impacts of enhanced greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols on extratropical cyclone activity, two 20-yr time-slice experimentsthe control run and the global warming runare performed with a high-resolution AGCM (T106) ...

Quanzhen Geng; Masato Sugi

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Comparison of explicitly simulated and downscaled tropical cyclone activity in a high-resolution global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of tropical cyclone activity to climate change is a matter of great inherent interest and practical importance. Most current global climate models are not, however, capable of adequately resolving tropical ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

190

Method Development to Evaluate the Oxygen Reduction Activity of High-Surface-Area Catalysts for Li-Air Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a new method to quantitatively determine the electrocatalytic activity of Vulcan carbon and Vulcan-supported Au nanoparticles, dispersed as catalyst thin films on glass carbon, for oxygen reduction in ...

Lu, Yi-Chun

191

Intensive culture of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings on poorly drained sites in the Western Gulf region of the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant acreage of poorly drained sites occurs in the Western Gulf region of the United States. These sites experience standing water through much of the winter and spring, resulting in poor seedling survival. In addition, the sites occasionally experience a summer drought that affects tree growth. This study was designed to determine the effects of intensive forest management on seedling growth and physiology, and to enhance seedling performance under these harsh conditions. Fertilization, chemical vegetation control and mechanical site preparation were used in different combinations to test the effects of these intensive forest management tools on seedling above- and below-ground growth, survival, water status, gas exchange attributes, and nutrient concentrations in the foliage and soil solution. Ten sites were established in southern Arkansas in 1998 and 1999 to monitor loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedling performance in three consecutive growing seasons between 1998 and 2000. Fertilization, chemical vegetation control and mechanical site preparation increased above-ground growth. Growth increment from mechanical site preparation was comparable to that from fertilization. Survival was not affected by any treatment. Fertilization enhanced root growth, more so in the shallow soil layers. Subsoil bulk density greatly restricted root growth, resulting in decreased above-ground growth. Chemical vegetation control made more soil water available to the seedlings during drought, resulting in increased seedling water potential. The effect of chemical vegetation control on seedling water potential was absent in the early growing season when soil moisture was abundant. Seedlings on plots treated with bedding-plus-fertilizer or bedding alone experienced stomatal closure at times of severe water stress while those treated with chemical vegetation control were able to continue net carbon dioxide assimilation. Fertilization did not increase needle nutrient concentrations, but increased needle weight, thereby increasing total nutrient content. Fertilization increased base cation concentrations in the soil solution, but had no effect on nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. Intensive forest management was found to be a viable tool for optimum loblolly pine seedling growth and survival on poorly drained sites in the Western Gulf region of the United States.

Rahman, Mohd Shafiqur

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The eect of the high-speed stream following the corotating interaction region on the geomagnetic activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eect of the high-speed stream following the corotating interaction region on the geomagnetic that the geomagnetic ®eld is continuously disturbed in the high-speed stream in question. The geomagnetic disturbances, the observed intensities of the geomagnetic disturbances were dierent for each recur- rent period

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Installation of River and Drain Instrumentation Stations to Monitor Flow and Water Quality and Internet Data Sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last five years, the Paso del Norte Watershed Councils Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations and flood control. This report presents major components of the Project developed from August of 2005 through July of 2007 through funding provided by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) through the Water 2025 Challenge Grant Program to the El Paso Water Utilities, Texas A&M University, and New Mexico State University. Additional documentation of related Project activities is provided through final project reports being submitted by the City of Las Cruces (CLC) and Elephant Butte Irrigation District (EBID) for the work conducted through linked USBR-funded Projects. Tasks accomplished in the phase of work funded by the USBR include the following specific outcomes, which are detailed in later sections of the report: * Continued compilation and inclusion of new data sources identified as relevant by Project partners and users; * Installation and calibration of additional new monitoring stations and equipment and inclusion of these monitoring sites in web-based GIS map products to fill data gaps and provide additional real-time data; * Linking to additional monitoring sites being implemented by EBID through their Project work and inclusion of these sites and data in web-based GIS map products; * Development and implementation of a user needs survey focusing on new data sets of interest, enhanced access mechanisms, and other suggestions to improve the Project website; * Development and deployment of an online, downloadable Microsoft Access database of Project water resource data to provide search and query functions; * Development and deployment of an online help facility to make the site easier for users to navigate and use; * Exploration of new tools to enhance online data sharing and access; and * Implementation of suggestions compiled in the User Needs Assessment, including resolution of problems related to accessing the Project website using Firefox and Mozilla web browsers. Keywords: Paso del Norte watershed, water resources database, GIS map, ArcIMS, data sharing and transfer, user needs assessment, Rio Grande, Rio Grande Project, gage station, surface water flow, groundwater, downloadable Microsoft Access database.

Sheng, Z.; Brown, C.; Creel, B.; Srinivasan, R.; Michelsen, A.; Fahy, M. P.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1989--June 30, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discuss the following areas on High Energy Physics at Argonne National Laboratory: experimental program; theory program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Changes in Tropical Cyclone Activity due to Global Warming: Results from a High-Resolution Coupled General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the possible changes that greenhouse global warming might generate in the characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs). The analysis has been performed using scenario climate simulations carried out with a fully coupled high-...

S. Gualdi; E. Scoccimarro; A. Navarra

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evolution of Lightning Activity and Storm Charge Relative to Dual-Doppler Analysis of a High-Precipitation Supercell Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-precipitation tornadic supercell storm was observed on 2930 May 2004 during the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment. Observational systems included the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array, mobile balloon-borne soundings, and ...

Kristin M. Calhoun; Donald R. MacGorman; Conrad L. Ziegler; Michael I. Biggerstaff

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluation of the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of the high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station was evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a study that included filtration tests, ion exchange column tests, and ion exchange distribution tests. The contaminated waters, the SDS flowsheet, and the experiments made are described. The experimental results were used to predict the SDS performance and to indicate potential improvements.

Campbell, D.O., Collins, E.D., King, L.J., Knauer, J.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities. Semi-annual progress report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1995 - December 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

Norem, J.; Bajt, D.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Highly Insulating Windows - Publ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Insulating Windows - Publications Future Advanced Windows for Zero-Energy Homes, J. Apte, D. Arasteh, J. Huang, 2003 ASHRAE Annual Meeting, 2002 Nine representative window products are examined in eight representative U.S. climates. Annual energy and peak demand impacts are investigated. We conclude that a new generation of window products is necessary for zero-energy homes if windows are not to be an energy drain on these homes. Performance Criteria for Residential Zero Energy Windows, D. Arasteh, H. Goudey, J. Huang, C. Kohler, R. Mitchell, 2006, submitted to ASHRAE Through the use of whole house energy modeling, typical efficient products are evaluated in five US climates and compared against the requirements for ZEHs. Products which meet these needs are defined as a function of climate.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Successful Use of Remote Engineering Technology to Upgrade Electrical Power Supplies to a Plant Producing Vitrified Highly Active Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a remote handling intervention project on the Sellafield site in the UK that successfully replaced a critical part of a critical plant in a highly radioactive and contaminated cell. The aim of the project was to replace the existing design of electrical power supplies inside the plant that vitrifies high level liquid waste with a new improved design. The project designed and built a hydraulic manipulator and associated work-heads and tooling to be deployed in cell to remotely replace the power supplies. As part of this replacement process, the project also designed and built a drilling rig to remotely drill holes through the cell wall suitable for the new design of electrical power supplies. (authors)

Harken, J.P. [Nexia Solutions Ltd, Workington, Cumbria CA (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

OPERATIONAL LIMITATIONS FOR DEMOLITION OF A HIGHLY ALPHA CONTAMINATED BUILDING MODLES VERSUS MEASURED AIR & SURFACE ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The demolition of a facility historically used for processing and handling transuranic materials is considered. Residual alpha emitting radionuclide contamination poses an exposure hazard if released to the local environment during the demolition. The process of planning for the demolition of this highly alpha contaminated building, 232-Z, included a predemolition modeling analysis of potential exposures. Estimated emission rates were used as input to an air dispersion model to estimate frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures. Postdemolition modeling was also conducted, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. The modeling results indicated that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. During the demolition of 232-Z, airborne radiation and surface contamination were monitored. The resultant non-detect monitoring results indicate a significant level of conservatism in the modeled results. This comparison supports the use of more realistic assumption in the estimating emission rates. The resultant reduction in modeled levels of potential exposures has significant implications in terms of the projected costs of demolition of such structures.

LLOYD, E.R.

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

206

Does brain activity stem from high-dimensional chaotic dynamics? Evidence from the human electroencephalogram, cat cerebral cortex and artificial neuronal networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear time series analyses have suggested that the human electroencephalogram (EEG) may share statistical and dynamical properties with chaotic systems. During slow-wave sleep or pathological states like epilepsy, correlation dimension measurements display low values, while in awake and attentive subjects, there is not such low dimensionality, and the EEG is more similar to a stochastic variable. We briefly review these results and contrast them with recordings in cat cerebral cortex, as well as with theoretical models. In awake or sleeping cats, recordings with microelectrodes inserted in cortex show that global variables such as local field potentials (local EEG) are similar to the human EEG. However, in both cases, neuronal discharges are highly irregular and exponentially distributed, similar to Poisson stochastic processes. To attempt reconcile these results, we investigate models of randomly-connected networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, and also contrast global (averaged) variables, with neuronal activity. The network displays different states, such as "synchronous regular" (SR) or "asynchronous irregular" (AI) states. In SR states, the global variables display coherent behavior with low dimensionality, while in AI states, the global activity is high-dimensionally chaotic with exponentially distributed neuronal discharges, similar to awake cats. Scale-dependent Lyapunov exponents and epsilon-entropies show that the seemingly stochastic nature at small scales (neurons) can coexist with more coherent behavior at larger scales (averages). Thus, we suggest that brain activity obeys similar scheme, with seemingly stochastic dynamics at small scales (neurons), while large scales (EEG) display more coherent behavior or high-dimensional chaos.

Sami El Boustani; Alain Destexhe

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

An active-optic x-ray fluorescence analyzer with high energy resolution, large solid angle coverage, and a large tuning range  

SciTech Connect

A crystal-optic x-ray fluorescence energy analyzer has been designed and tested, which combines the features of electron-volt energy resolution, large solid angle coverage, and tunability over several kilo-electron-volts. The design is based upon the principle of active optics, with ten actuators available to optimally adjust the shape of a silicon crystal used in the Bragg geometry. In most applications the shape is that of a logarithmic spiral for high energy resolution with a spatially nonresolving detector, but a wide range of other shapes is also possible for applications such as imaging or single-shot spectroscopy in a spectral range of the operator's choosing.

Adams, Bernhard W.; Attenkofer, Klaus [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Research program in theoretical high-energy physics. Progress report. [Summaries of research activities at Brown Univ  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Last year's research program dealt with a large range of topics in high energy theoretical physics. Included in the problems studied were: flavor mixing angles in flavor gauge theory; grand unification schemes; neutral current phenomenology; charmonium decays; perturbative aspects of soft hadronic phenomena within the framework of the dual topological expansion; Regge trajectory slopes and the shape of the inclusive spectra; bound states in quantum electrodynamics; calculations of the Lamb Shift and hyperfine splitting in hydrogen (and muonium) through order ..cap alpha..(Z..cap alpha..)/sup 6/; perturbation theory resummation techniques; collective behavior of instantons in quantum chromodynamics; 1/N expansion and mean field expansion techniques (applied to the nonlinear sigma model, classical solutions to Yang-Mills theories, and renormalized four-Fermi models of weak interactions); semiclassical calculation of Z/sub 1/(..cap alpha..) in scalar QED; group theoretic studies of spontaneous symmetry breaking; fibre bundles applied to the topological aspects of gauge theories; strong-coupling expansions (as an aspect of infrared behavior, as a systematic perturbation expansion with reference to lattice extrapolation, applied to classical statistical mechanics, applied to problems with nonquadratic kinetic energy terms, and in transfer matrix formulations); eikonal methods (three-body Coulomb scattering, quark-antiquark potentials); computer augmented solutions to quantum field theory; topological excitations in two-dimensional models and WKB approximation on a lattice. A list of publications is included.

Feldman, D.; Fried, H.M.; Guralnik, G.S.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Preparation and photocatalytic activity of high-efficiency visible-light-responsive photocatalyst SnS{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible-light-responsive composite photocatalysts SnS{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} and SnS/TiO{sub 2} with different mass ratios were prepared by in-situ synthesis technology in solution with commercial TiO{sub 2}. The junction-based materials SnS{sub x} (x=1, 2)/TiO{sub 2} were found to have high visible-light photocatalytic performance and possess much better activity than the single-phase SnS{sub x} or TiO{sub 2}. The greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity of the SnS{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} composites was mainly attributed to the matching band potentials and efficient charge transfer and separation at the tight-bonding interface between SnS{sub x} and TiO{sub 2}. The fact was confirmed by the comparison of photocatalytic activities of the SnS{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} samples prepared by physical mixing method and in-situ synthesis technique. - Graphical Abstract: Visible-light-responsive composite photocatalysts SnS{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} and SnS/TiO{sub 2} with different mass ratios were prepared by in-situ synthesis technology in solution with commercial TiO{sub 2}. The photocatalysts SnS{sub x} (x=1, 2) and SnS{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} possess excellent photocatalytic activities. The greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity of the SnS{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} composites was mainly attributed to the matching band potentials and efficient charge transfer and separation at the tight-bonding interface between SnS{sub x} and TiO{sub 2}.

Yang Chongyin; Wang Wendeng; Shan Zhichao [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Huang Fuqiang, E-mail: huangfq@mail.sic.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effect of high-energy neutron flux on fiber optics in an active diagnostic on TFTR (abstract)[sup a  

SciTech Connect

A bundle of 1-mm-diam fused silica optical fibers on an existing TFTR diagnostic has been exposed to 11 high-power DT discharges. Each shot subjected the fibers to a peak fast (14.7 MeV) neutron flux of [approx]2[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]/s and a [gamma]-dose rate of 500 rad(Si)/s for 0.75--1.0 s. The total fast-neutron fluence for these shots was [approx]5[times]10[sup 12] n/cm[sup 2]. A 15-m-long section of the bundle ran along the tokamak's toroidal field coils and the remaining 15 m ran radially away from the reactor. Fiber luminescence at 660 nm was [approx]10[sup 10] photons/s/sr/cm[sup 2]/A for the above flux ([approx]5%--10% of the bremsstrahlung emission), and varied linearly with DT neutron rate. Luminescence at 530 nm was 50% stronger, consistent with a Cerenkov radiation spectrum. Sensitivity to 3.5 MeV DD neutrons was [approx]1/3 to 1/2 of that for DT neutrons. Fiber transmission decreased with the time integral of the neutron source rate and was reduced by 4% for the above flux. The fiber recovered rapidly: within 10 s, the transmission loss was only 2.5%. Shortly thereafter, the rate of recovery slowed to [approx]0.05% per minute, but was sufficient to restore 75% of the transmission loss within two to four discharges. Recovery continued at [approx]0.1% per hour and slowed overnight to [approx]0.1% per day. Within the relative error of [lt]0.2%, full transmission was recovered after five days.

Paul, S.F.; Goldstein, J.L.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gamma/neutron analysis for SNM signatures at high-data rates(greater than 107 cps) for single-pulse active interrogation  

SciTech Connect

We are developing a high data gamma/neutron spectrometer suitable for active interrogation of special nuclear materials (SNM) activated by a single burst from an intense source. We have tested the system at Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Mercury pulsed-power facility at distances approaching 10 meters from a depleted uranium (DU) target. We have found that the gamma-ray field in the target room 'disappears' 10 milliseconds after the x-ray flash, and that gamma ray spectroscopy will then be dominated by isomeric states/beta decay of fission products. When a polyethylene moderator is added to the DU target, a time-dependent signature of the DU is produced by thermalized neutrons. We observe this signature in gamma-spectra measured consecutively in the 0.1-1.0 ms time range. These spectra contain the Compton edge line (2.2 MeV) from capture in hydrogen, and a continuous high energy gamma-spectrum from capture or fission in minority constituents of the DU.

Forman L.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information, results of laboratory tests, thermodynamic calculations, process description, and operational parameters, and addresses safety concerns.

Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Comparison of dc performance of Pt/Ti/Au- and Ni/Au-Gated AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have demonstrated significant improvements of AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) dc performance by employing Pt/Ti/Au instead of the conventional Ni/Au gate metallization. During off-state bias stressing, the typical critical voltage for HEMTs with Ni/Au gate metallization was ~ -45 to -65V. By sharp contrast, no critical voltage was observed for HEMTs with Pt/Ti/Au gate metallization, even up to -100V, which was the instrumental limitation in this experiment. After the off-state stressing, the drain current of Ni/Au gated-HEMTs decreased by~ 15%. For the Pt-gate HEMTs, no degradation of the drain current occurred and there were minimal changes in the Schottky gate characteristics for both forward and reverse bias conditions. The HEMTs with Pt/Ti/Au metallization showed an excellent drain on/off current ratio of 1.5 108. The on/off drain current ratio of Ni-gated HEMTs was dependent on the drain bias voltage and ranged from 1.2 107 at Vds=5V and 6 105

Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Lo, C. F. [University of Florida; Kang, Tsung Sheng [University of Florida, Gainesville; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Ren, F. [University of Florida

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

THE LOW-MASS, HIGHLY ACCRETING BLACK HOLE ASSOCIATED WITH THE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS 2XMM J123103.2+110648  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical spectra and images taken with the Baade 6.5 m Magellan telescope confirm that 2XMM J123103.2+110648, a highly variable X-ray source with an unusually soft spectrum, is indeed associated with a type 2 (narrow-line) active nucleus at a redshift of z = 0.11871. The absence of broad H{alpha} or H{beta} emission in an otherwise X-ray unabsorbed source suggests that it intrinsically lacks a broad-line region. If, as in other active galaxies, the ionized gas and stars in J1231+1106 are in approximate virial equilibrium, and the M{sub BH} - {sigma}{sub *} relation holds, the exceptionally small velocity dispersion of {sigma} = 33.5 km s{sup -1} for [O III] {lambda}5007 implies that M{sub BH} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, among the lowest ever detected. Such a low black hole mass is consistent with the general characteristics of the host, a small, low-luminosity, low-mass disk galaxy. We estimate the Eddington ratio of the black hole to be {approx}>0.5, in good agreement with expectations based on the X-ray properties of the source.

Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Minjin [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Terashima, Yuichi [Department of Physics, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft{sup 2}, and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance.

Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

Sun Meng [School of Resources and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Li Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping [School of Science, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330031 (China)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Calibration Tools for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Oxide and Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide with a Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed an extensive effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler (Canberra Model JCC-92) for accountability measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide and HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. Earlier papers described the PAN shuffler calibration over a range of item properties by standards measurements and an extensive series of detailed simulation calculations. With a single normalization factor, the simulations agree with the HEU oxide standards measurements to within {+-}1.2% at one standard deviation. Measurement errors on mixed U-Pu oxide samples are in the {+-}2% to {+-}10% range, or {+-}20 g for the smaller items. The purpose of this paper is to facilitate transfer of the LLNL procedure and calibration algorithms to external users who possess an identical, or equivalent, PAN shuffler. Steps include (1) measurement of HEU standards or working reference materials (WRMs); (2) MCNP simulation calculations for the standards or WRMs and a range of possible masses in the same containers; (3) a normalization of the calibration algorithms using the standard or WRM measurements to account for differences in the {sup 252}Cf source strength, the delayed-neutron nuclear data, effects of the irradiation protocol, and detector efficiency; and (4) a verification of the simulation series trends against like LLNL results. Tools include EXCEL/Visual Basic programs which pre- and post-process the simulations, control the normalization, and embody the calibration algorithms.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P

2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Failure testing of active solar energy components  

SciTech Connect

Component and system reliability of active solar energy systems continue to be a major concern of designers, manufacturers, installers, and consumers. Six test loops were constructed and the Solar Energy Research Institute, in Golden, Colorado, to thermally cycle active solar energy system components. Drain valves, check valves, air vents, vacuum breakers, tempering valves, and polybutylene pipe were included in the testing. The test methods and results are discussed in this report. Test results show poor reliability of some of the components and limited performance from others. The results lead to a better understanding of certain failures in the field and present designers with realistic expectations for these components. Recommendations are given to improve component reliability and for further testing.

Farrington, R.B.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Update on Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect

In October of 1999, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began an effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron (PAN) drum shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide. A single unit of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] was used to (1) develop a mass calibration curve for HEU oxide in the nominal range of 393 g to 3144 g {sup 235}U, and (2) perform a detailed axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber. Results from these efforts were reported at the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 41st Annual Meeting in July 2000. This paper describes subsequent efforts by LLNL to use a unit of CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to CRM 149 and CRM 146 units and a selected set of containers with CRM 149-equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to (1) extend the low range of the reported mass calibration curve to 10 g {sup 235}U, (2) evaluate the effect of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (5.24 cm to 12.17 cm inside diameter and 6.35 cm to 17.72 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop mass calibration curves for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} enriched to 20.1 wt% {sup 235}U and 52.5 wt% {sup 235}U.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Mixed Oxide  

SciTech Connect

As a follow-on to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide, a method has been developed to extend the use of the PAN shuffler to the measurement of HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. This method uses the current LLNL HEU oxide calibration algorithms, appropriately corrected for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, and recently developed PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithms to yield the mass of {sup 235}U present via differences between the expected count rate for the PuO{sub 2} and the measured count rate of the mixed U-Pu oxide. This paper describes the LLNL effort to use PAN shuffler measurements of units of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] and CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] and a selected set of LLNL PuO{sub 2}-bearing containers in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to each to (1) establish and validate a correction to the HEU calibration algorithm for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, (2) develop a PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithm that includes the effect of PuO{sub 2} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (8.57 cm to 9.88 cm inside diameter and 9.60 cm to 13.29 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop and validate the method for establishing the mass of {sup 235}U present in an unknown of mixed U-Pu oxide.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project--Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities (11/7/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 7, 2000 November 7, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 TO : Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery facilities. Project No.: F3204 Location: Prosser and Toppenish, Yakima County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

226

STUDY OF PLASMA PHENOMENA AT HIGH ELECTRIC FIELDS IN APPLICATIONS FOR ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL AND ULTRA-SHORT PULSE LASER DRILLING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Plasma engineering is one of the most actively growing research areas in modern science. Over the past decade, plasma engineering became a significant part of (more)

Likhanskii, Alexandre

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Active region based on graded-gap InGaN/GaN superlattices for high-power 440- to 470-nm light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

The structural and optical properties of light-emitting diode structures with an active region based on ultrathin InGaN quantum wells limited by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices from both sides have been investigated. The dependences of the external quantum efficiency on the active region design are analyzed. It is shown that the use of InGaN/GaN structures as limiting graded-gap short-period superlattices may significantly increase the quantum efficiency.

Tsatsulnikov, A. F., E-mail: Andrew@beam.ioffe.ru; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Ber, B. Ya.; Kazantsev, D. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Mizerov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Center for Microelectronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Park, Hee Seok [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of); Hytch, M.; Hue, F. [National Center for Scientific Research, Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (France)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

High Precision Long-Term Monitoring of Radiatively Active and Related Trace Gases at Surface Sites and from Aircraft in the Southern Hemisphere Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routine high precision measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4, CO, H2, N2O, and CO2 stable isotopes are conducted by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia). Of particular relevance to global monitoring of ...

R. J. Francey; L. P. Steele; R. L. Langenfelds; B. C. Pak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A high resolution geophysical investigation of spatial sedimentary processes in a paraglacial turbid outwash fjord: Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simpson Bay is a turbid, outwash fjord located in northeastern Prince William Sound, Alaska. A high ratio of watershead:basin surface area combined with high precipitation and an easily erodable catchment create high sediment inputs. Fresh water from heavy precipitation and meltwater from high alpine glaciers enter Simpson Bay through bay head rivers and small shoreline creeks that drain the catchment. Side scan sonar, seismic profiling, and high resolution bathymetry were used to investigate the record of modern sedimentary processes. Four bottom types and two seismic faces were described to delineate the distribution of sediment types and sedimentary processes in Simpson Bay. Sonar images showed areas of high backscatter (coarse grain sediment, bedrock outcrops and shorelines) in shallow areas and areas of low backscatter (estuarine mud) in deeper areas. Seismic profiles showed that high backscatter areas reflected emergent glacial surfaces while low backscatter areas indicated modern estuarine mud deposition. The data show terminal morainal bank systems and grounding line deposits at the mouth of the bay and rocky promontories, relict medial moraines, that extend as terrestrial features through the subtidal and into deeper waters. Tidal currents and mass wasting are the major influences on sediment distribution. Hydrographic data showed high spatial variability in surface and bottom currents throughout the bay. Bottom currents are tide dominated, and are generally weak (5-20 cm s-1) in the open water portions of the bay while faster currents are found associated with shorelines, outcrops, and restrictive sills. Tidal currents alone are not enough to cause the lack of estuarine mud deposition in shallow areas. Bathymetric data showed steep slopes throughout the bay suggesting sediment gravity flows. Central Alaska is a seismically active area, and earthquakes are most likely the triggering mechanism of the gravity flows.

Noll, Christian John, IV

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

High Activity of Ce1-xNixO2-y for H2 Production through Ethanol Steam Reforming: Tuning Catalytic Performance through Metal-Oxide Interactions  

SciTech Connect

The importance of the oxide: Ce{sub 0.8}Ni{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-y} is an excellent catalyst for ethanol steam reforming. Metal-oxide interactions perturb the electronic properties of the small particles of metallic nickel present in the catalyst under the reaction conditions and thus suppress any methanation activity. The nickel embedded in ceria induces the formation of O vacancies, which facilitate cleavage of the OH bonds in ethanol and water.

G Zhou; L Barrio; S Agnoli; S Senanayake; J Evans; A Kubacka; M Estrella; J Hanson; A Martinez-Arias; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

REPORT OF RESEARCH ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEARS 2000 - 2003; HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS GROUP; SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY; EXPERIMENTAL TASK A AND THEORY TASK B  

SciTech Connect

The experimental program in High Energy Physics at SMU was initiated in 1992. Its main goal is the search for new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SSC, LHC) and the study of the properties of heavy quarks and leptons (CLEO, BTeV).

Dr. Ryszard Stroynowski

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Application of In-Situ High Energy-Resolution Fluorescence Detection and Time-Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy: Catalytic Activation of Oxygen over Supported Gold Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Life-time-broadening reduction in high-energy-resolution fluorescence detected XAS produced spectra of unprecedented detail. Au L3 edge spectra of a Au/Al2O3 catalyst under various reaction conditions showed the interaction of oxygen with the gold particles on this catalyst. A reaction path on the gold particle in the oxidation of CO was established.

Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Tromp, Moniek [University of Southampton, School of Chemistry, Southampton (United Kingdom); Glatzel, Pieter; Safonova, Olga [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

Impact of proton irradiation on dc performance of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of proton irradiation dose on dc characteristics and the reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were investigated. The HEMTs were irradiated with protons at a fixed energy of 5 MeV and doses ranging from 109 to 2 1014 cm-2. For the dc characteristics, there was only minimal degradation of saturation drain current (IDSS), transconductance (gm), electron mobility and sheet carrier concentration at doses below 2 1013 cm-2, while the reduction of these parameters were 15%, 9%, 41% and 16.6%, respectively, at a dose of 2 1014 cm-2. At this same dose condition, increases of 37% in drain breakdown voltage (VBR) and of 45% in critical voltage (Vcri) were observed. The improvement of device reliability was attributed to the modification of the depletion region due to the introduction of a higher density of defects after irradiation at a higher dose.

Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Cuervo, C.V. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xi, Y. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Kim, H.-Y. [Korea University; Kim, J. [Korea University; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The effects of proton irradiation on the reliability of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the effect of proton irradiation on reliability of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Devices were subjected to 5-15 MeV proton irradiations with a fixed dose of 5 1015 cm-2, or to a different doses of 2 1011, 5 1013 or 2 1015 cm-2 of protons at a fixed energy of 5 MeV. During off-state electrical stressing, the typical critical voltage for un-irradiated devices was 45 to 55 V. By sharp contrast, no critical voltage was detected for proton irradiated HEMTs up to 100 V, which was instrument-limited. After electrical stressing, no degradation was observed for the drain or gate current-voltage characteristics of the proton-irradiated HEMTs. However, the drain current decreased ~12%, and the reverse bias gate leakage current increased more than two orders of magnitude for un-irradiated HEMTs as a result of electrical stressing.

Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Lo, C. F. [University of Florida; Xi, Y. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Wang, Y.l. [University of Florida; Kim, H.-Y. [Korea University; Kim, J. [Korea University; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Cao, Yu [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Ren, F. [University of Florida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Analysis of lateritic material from Cerro Impacto by instrumental neutron activation employing a low-energy photon semiconductor and a high-energy Ge(Li) detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nineteen elements were determined in four different grain size fractions of a bulk geological material from Cerro Impacto for a study of the physical (mechanical) concentration process of different elements based upon the hardness of the different minerals. The analysis was performed by excitation of the sample with a high, slow neutron flux followed by gamma-ray spectroscopy with both a conventional Ge(Li) high-energy detector and a low-energy photon detector (LEPD). The accuracy of this method was studied with the use of two standard reference materials, SY-2 and SY-3, which are similar to the real samples. The values determined were also compared with a secondary target x-ray fluorescence method for all the elements that were suitable to both methods. Actually, the x-ray fluorescence method was found to be more complementary than competitive. 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

LaBrecque, J.J.; Beusen, J.M.; Van Grieken, R.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

High flexibility, noncollapsing light weight hose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to a high-flexibility, light weight, noncollapsing hose and more particularly to such a hose having a large size and particularly useful as equipment draining a radioactively contaminated fluid through a noncontaiminated, isolated and restricted space with high confidence against kinking, collapse, or leaking even with large relative motion between the inlet and outlet ends of the hose. In the operation of nuclear facilities, such as nuclear reactors, processing plants for nuclear fuels and related materials, and chemical processing plants, for example, it is necessary to handle radioactively and/or chemically contaminated fluids which in many instances must be conducted, such as for draining purposes, through a noncontaminated, isolated area. Conduction of such contaminated fluids through uncontaminated environments in practice requires the highest confidence that the hose will not kink, collapse, break, or leak even though the hose may be subject to a large amount of motion relative to the inlet and outlet ends of the hose. Any such breaking, or leaking would result in undesirable contamination of the area through which the hose passes which could result in major damage and/or in the requirement to shut down the operation for cleanup and decontamination processing of the area. Additional problems are also encountered in processing plants for contaminated materials due to the fact that hoses conducting the contaminated liquids or gases pass through inaccessible, restricted spaces requiring extreme flexibility in the hose, but with the assurance that the hose will neither kink nor collapse to close off the flow.

Williams, D.A.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

Boehlecke, R. F.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

238

Sediment Routing in Channels Draining Disturbed Lands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1990), it may be possible to categorize armored andnot armored surfaces based on vlsual Inspectlon. Calculated

Dietrich, William E

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water...

240

Induction coil configurations, bottom drain assemblies, and ...  

Idaho National Laboratory - Visit the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Office Website: Abstract: Apparatus and methods of operation are ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Generating power with drained coal mine methane  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

NONE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Michael A. Pope

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

High Performance Networks for High Impact Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

244

Preparation of high specific activity technetium-96  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of producing Tc-96 from the proton irradiation of a rhodium target and a technique for isolating under remote hot cell conditions the Tc-96 from the proton irradiated target.

Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Prach, Thomas (Port Jefferson, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Preparation of high specific activity technetium-96  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of producing Tc-96 from the proton irradiation of a rhodium target and a technique for isolating under remote hot cell conditions the Tc-96 from the proton irradiated target.

Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.; Prach, T.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Some Investigations of the Reaction of Activated Charcoal with Fluorine and Uranium Hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969, when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N drain tanks at the reactor site. Over time, fluorine (F{sub 2}) and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) moved from the salt through the gas piping to a charcoal bed, where they reacted with the activated charcoal. Some of the immediate concerns related to the migration of F{sub 2} and UF{sub 6} to the charcoal bed were the possibility of explosive reactions between the charcoal and F{sub 2}, the existence of conditions that could induce a criticality accident, and the removal and recovery of the fissile uranium from the charcoal. This report addresses the reactions and reactivity of species produced by the reaction of fluorine and activated charcoal and between charcoal and F{sub 2}-UF{sub 6} gas mixtures in order to support remediation of the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) and the recovery of the fissile uranium. The chemical identity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and potential for explosive decomposition of the primary reaction product, fluorinated charcoal, was determined.

Del Cul, G.D.; Fiedor, J.N.; Simmons, D.W.; Toth, L.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Williams

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Activation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

248

LANL | Physics | Active Interrogation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics Division activities in standoff active-interrogation for detecting Physics Division activities in standoff active-interrogation for detecting terrorist nuclear devices, 2011 Detonation of a terrorist nuclear device in a major city would have severe economic, psychological and cultural consequences. To help prevent the fulfillment of such a threat, Physics Division has been exploring techniques by which highly-enriched uranium could be detected before reaching its intended target. We have focused on the use of high-energy protons and negative-muons because of their ability to probe deeply into structures and shielding that would surround the uranium, and their capability to stimulate radiation signatures indicating 235U. Our experimental studies for standoff active-interrogation are enabled by the 800-MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, which

249

Active security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce active security, a new methodology which introduces programmatic control within a novel feedback loop into the defense infrastructure. Active security implements a unified programming environment which provides interfaces ... Keywords: central management, digital forensics, network security

Ryan Hand, Michael Ton, Eric Keller

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

International fuel cycle and waste management technology exchange activities sponsored by the United States Department of Energy: FY 1982 evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1982, DOE and DOE contractor personnel attended 40 international symposia and conferences on fuel reprocessing and waste management subjects. The treatment of high-level waste was the topic most often covered in the visits, with geologic disposal and general waste management also being covered in numerous visits. Topics discussed less frequently inlcude TRU/LLW treatment, airborne waste treatment, D and D, spent fuel handling, and transportation. The benefits accuring to the US from technology exchange activities with other countries are both tangible, e.g., design of equipment, and intangible, e.g., improved foreign relations. New concepts initiated in other countries, particularly those with sizable nuclear programs, are beginning to appear in US efforts in growing numbers. The spent fuel dry storage concept originating in the FRG is being considered at numerous sites. Similarly, the German handling and draining concepts for the joule-heated ceramic melter used to vitrify wastes are being incorporated in US designs. Other foreigh technologies applicable in the US include the slagging incinerator (Belgium), the SYNROC waste form (Australia), the decontamination experience gained in decommissioning the Eurochemic reprocessing plant (Belgium), the engineered surface storage of low- and intermediate-level waste (Belgium, FRG, France), the air-cooled storage of vitrified high-level waste (France, UK), waste packaging (Canada, FRG, Sweden), disposal in salt (FRG), disposal in granite (Canada, Sweden), and sea dumping (UK, Belgium, The Netherlands, Switzerland). These technologies did not necessarily originated or have been tried in the US but for various reasons are now being applied and extended in other countries. This growing nuclear technological base in other countires reduces the number of technology avenues the US need follow to develop a solid nuclear power program.

Lakey, L.T.; Harmon, K.M.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Theoretical Insight into the Catalytic Effect of a Mixed-Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level: The Case of the Highly Active metal/CeOx/TiO2 (110) Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The structural and electronic properties of CeO{sub x} species supported on the rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) surface have been examined by means of periodic density-functional calculations that use a generalized gradient approximation functional including a Hubbard-like type correction. Deposition of Ce atoms leads in a first step to Ce{sup 3+} ions bound to the surface through bridge and in-plane oxygen atoms, the released electrons occupying the Ti 3d empty orbitals. Further addition of Ce and molecular oxygen gives place to Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} dimers diagonally arranged on the surface, in agreement with the spots observed in the scanning tunnel microscope images. The formation process of CeO{sub x} nanoparticles (NPs) on the TiO{sub 2} surface is highly exothermic and our calculations show that the redox properties of the Ce(III)-Ce(IV) couple are significantly altered when it is supported on TiO{sub 2}. In particular the reactivity against CO/O{sub 2} indicates that on the surface the presence of Ce(III) is favored over Ce(IV) species. Our results also indicate that the CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} interface should be seen like a real mixed-metal oxide rather than a supported NP of ceria. Finally, in the context of the high catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} (M = Au,Cu,Pt) systems in the water-gas shift reaction, we have examined the dissociation of water on the CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} surface and estimated a barrier as small as 0.04 eV, i.e. {approx}8 times smaller than that computed for a TiO{sub 2} oxygen vacancy. This result agrees with the experimental superior catalytic activity of the M/CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} systems over M/TiO{sub 2}.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Graciani, J.; Plata, J.J.; Sanz, J.F.; Liu, P.

2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

An economical route to high quality lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current rends in the automotive and industrial markets toward more efficient engines, longer drain intervals, and lower emissions all contribute to placing increasingly stringent performance requirements on lubricants. The demand for higher quality synthetic and non-conventional basestocks is expected to grow at a much faster rate than that of conventional lube basestocks to meet these higher performance standards. Yukong Limited has developed a novel technology (the Yukong UCO Lube Process) for the economic production of high quality, high-viscosity-index lube basestocks from a fuels hydrocracker unconverted oil stream. A pilot plant based on this process has been producing oils for testing purposes since May 1994. A commercial facility designed to produce 3,500 BPD of VHVI lube basestocks cane on-stream at Yukong`s Ulsan refinery in October 1995. The Badger Technology Center of Raytheon Engineers and Constructors assisted Yukong during the development of the technology and prepared the basic process design package for the commercial facility. This paper presents process aspects of the technology and comparative data on investment and operating costs. Yukong lube basestock product properties and performance data are compared to basestocks produced by conventional means and by lube hydrocracking.

Andre, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Hahn, S.K.; Kwon, S.H.; Min, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

High School  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High School Please click on the title for more information about each program. Nano*High Nano High Saturday presentations for Bay Area high school students Science Bowl Science...

254

Catalyst activator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

McAdon, Mark H. (Midland, MI); Nickias, Peter N. (Midland, MI); Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Schwartz, David J. (Lake Jackson, TX)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effects of proton irradiation on dc characteristics of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of proton irradiation on the dc characteristics of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors were investigated. In this study we used 5 MeV protons with doses varying from 21011 to 21015 cm2. The transfer resistance and contact resistivity suffered more degradation as compared to the sheet resistance. With irradiation at the highest dose of 21015 cm2, both forward- and reverse-bias gate currents were increased after proton irradiation. A negative threshold-shift and reduction of the saturation drain current were also observed as a result of radiation-induced carrier scattering and carrier removal. Devices irradiated with doses of 21011 to 21015 cm2 exhibited minimal degradation of the saturation drain current and extrinsic trans- conductance. These results show that InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors are attractive for space-based applications when high-energy proton fluxes are present. VC 2011 American Vacuum Society. [DOI: 10.1116/1.3644480

Lo, C. F. [University of Florida; Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Kim, H.-Y. [Korea University; Kim, J. [Korea University; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Cao, Yu [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Chemical Activation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Activation of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Adsorption Milton R. Smith, Jr., 1 Edward W. Bittner, 1 Wei Shi, 1, 2 J. Karl Johnson, 1, 2 and Bradley C....

257

activity inserts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science Journal: Writing and Inquiry Development By Susan Dahl, Fermilab and Pat Franzen, Madison Junior High School, Naperville, IL District 203 BACKGROUND As science...

258

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Oxides within DOE-STD-3013-2000 Containers  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler (Canberra Model JCC-92) for accountability measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide and HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. In June 2002, at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Institute of Nuclear Material Management, LLNL reported on an extensive effort to calibrate this shuffler, based on standards measurements and extensive simulations, for HEU oxides and mixed U-Pu oxides in thin-walled primary and secondary containers. In August 2002, LLNL began to also use DOE-STD-3013-2000 containers for HEU oxide and mixed U-Pu oxide. These DOE-STD-3013-2000 containers are comprised of a stainless steel convenience can enclosed in welded stainless steel primary and secondary containers. Compared to the double thin-walled containers, the DOE-STD-3013-2000 containers have substantially thicker walls, and the density of materials in these containers was found to extend over a greater range (1.35 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.62 g/cm{sup 3}) than foreseen for the double thin-walled containers. Further, the DOE-STD-3013-2000 Standard allows for oxides containing at least 30 wt% Pu plus U whereas the calibration algorithms for thin-walled containers were derived for virtually pure HEU or mixed U-Pu oxides. An initial series of Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to given quantities of HEU oxide and mixed U-Pu oxide in DOE-STD-3013-2000 containers was generated and compared with the response predicted by the calibration algorithms for thin-walled containers. Results showed a decrease on the order of 10% in the count rate, and hence a decrease in the calculated U mass for measured unknowns, with some varying trends versus U mass. Therefore a decision was made to develop a calibration algorithm for the PAN shuffler unique to the DOE-STD-3013-2000 container. This paper describes that effort and selected unknown item measurement results.

Mount, M E; O' Connell, W J

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

259

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the application of high performance computing (HPC) to theacceleration and high performance computing. He was thelibraries, and high performance computing. Lee is an active

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Public Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publicactivities_header.jpg publicactivities_header.jpg Public Activities Citizens are encouraged to learn about the Department of Energy's programs through a variety of activities that are open to the public. Our goal is to educate citizens and seek their meaningful involvement. If you are visiting the area, the American Museum of Science and Energy in Oak Ridge is the best starting point for exhibits and information about DOE programs in science, environmental management, nuclear fuel supply, and national security. Tours are conducted of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Y-12 National Security Complex and East Tennessee Technology Park during the summer months departing from the Museum. For those with more specific interests in our programs, each month we publish a calendar of public involvement activities, which identifies announcements, comment periods and public meetings of potential interest. Our Environmental Management Program has a Site Specific Advisory Board composed of area citizens who meet the second Wednesday of each month.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

ANL Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities of the DOD Activities of the DOD Project Office focus today on the Navy's Free Electron Laser Program Argonne Accelerator Institute Meeting June 16, 2009 2 Several Beam Activities and Interests Ongoing  Terahertz sources and applications  Navy Free Electron Laser (Focus area today)  Free Electron Laser Applications  Electromagnetic Interference Technology Review Committees  Novel Fiber Optic Materials with Army Research Lab  Optical Diagnostics for next-generation light sources  Neutron detection schemes  NATO Sensors and Electronics Panel, international field tests of directed energy source applications  Controls  Radiation Oncology 3 Background, Naval Directed Energy History The U.S Navy has been investigating utility of lasers since the 1960's and the

262

Active Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Detect fault and ground movement, delineate faults, create high-resolution DEMS, quantify fault kinemaics, develop lineament maps, Geophysical Monitoring Hydrological: Can give indications about subsurface geothermal fluid flow Thermal: Dictionary.png Active Sensors: Sensors that emit their own source of energy then measure the

263

Activity report  

SciTech Connect

This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

Yu, S W

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fast History Matching of Time-Lapse Seismic and Production-Data for High Resolution Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic data have been established as a valuable source of information for the construction of reservoir simulation models, most commonly for determination of the modeled geologic structure, and also for population of static petrophysical properties (e.g. porosity, permeability). More recently, the availability of repeated seismic surveys over the time scale of years (i.e., 4D seismic) has shown promising results for the qualitative determination of changes in fluid phase distributions and pressure required for determination of areas of bypassed oil, swept volumes and pressure maintenance mechanisms. Quantitatively, and currently the state of the art in reservoir model characterization, 4D seismic data have proven distinctively useful for the calibration of geologic spatial variability which ultimately contributes to the improvement of reservoir development and management strategies. Among the limited variety of techniques for the integration of dynamic seismic data into reservoir models, streamline-based techniques have been demonstrated as one of the more efficient approaches as a result of their analytical sensitivity formulations. Although streamline techniques have been used in the past to integrate time-lapse seismic attributes, the applications were limited to the simplified modeling scenarios of two-phase fluid flow and invariant streamline geometry throughout the production schedule. This research builds upon and advances existing approaches to streamline-based seismic data integration for the inclusion of both production and seismic data under varying field conditions. The proposed approach integrates data from reservoirs under active reservoir management and the corresponding simulation models can be constrained using highly detailed or realistic schedules. Fundamentally, a new derivation of seismic sensitivities is proposed that is able to represent a complex reservoir evolution between consecutive seismic surveys. The approach is further extended to manage compositional reservoir simulation with dissolution effects and gravity-convective-driven flows which, in particular, are typical of CO2 transport behavior following injection into deep saline aquifers. As a final component of this research, the benefits of dynamic data integration on the determination of swept and drained volumes by injection and production, respectively, are investigated. Several synthetic and field reservoir modeling scenarios are used for an extensive demonstration of the efficacy and practical feasibility of the proposed developments.

Rey Amaya, Alvaro

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Laboratory Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

266

High PRF high current switch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

Moran, Stuart L. (Fredericksburg, VA); Hutcherson, R. Kenneth (College Park, MD)

1990-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) Activity and Electrochemical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of Light Weight Structure for Wind Turbine Tower by Using Nano- Materials Development of Highly Active Titania-Based Nanoparticles for Composite...

268

DNA Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Activity DNA Activity Name: Sara Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is DNA an anion or a cation? I thought since it was negatively charged it was an anion but mt teacher in class today said it was a cation because negatively charged molecules logically migrate to the positively charged plate of the cathode, ie molecules that migrate towards a cathode are cations. Where is the error in my logic or there error in my logic? Replies: DNA is negatively charged due to the phosphate ions present in the ribose-phosphate backbone. It moves towards the positive pole during electrophoresis. The definition kation/anion is confusing because: 1. a cation moves to the cathode 2. the cathode is negative, thus 3. a cation is positive DNA is an anion. The confusion is that a cathode is negative, but a cation is positively charged. For that reason these terms are not generally used in this context.

269

Transmission electron microscopy characterization of electrically stressed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor devices has been investigated using step-stress testing, and representative samples of undegraded, source-side-degraded, and drain-side-degraded devices were examined using electron microscopy and microanalysis. An unstressed reference sample was also examined. All tested devices and their corresponding transmission electron microscopy samples originated from the same wafer and thus received nominally identical processing. Step-stressing was performed on each device and the corresponding current voltage characteristics were generated. Degradation in electrical performance, specifically greatly increased gate leakage current, was shown to be correlated with the presence of crystal defects near the gate edges. However, the drain-side-degraded device showed a surface pit on the source side, and another region of the same device showed no evidence of damage. Moreover, significant metal diffusion into the barrier layer from the gate contacts was also observed, as well as thin amorphous oxide layers below the gate metal contacts, even in the unstressed sample. Overall, these observations emphasize that gate-edge defects provide only a partial explanation for device failure.

Johnson, Michael [Arizona State University; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Liu, Lu [University of Florida; Kang, Tsung Sheng [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Chang, C. Y. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Jang, Soohwan [University of Florida, Gainesville; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Smith, David J [Arizona State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Proton irradiation energy dependence of dc and rf characteristics on InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of proton irradiation energy on dc and rf characteristics of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were investigated. A fixed proton dose of 51015 cm2 with 5, 10, and 15 MeV irradiation energies was used in this study. For the dc characteristics, degradation was observed for sheet resistance, transfer resistance, contact resistivity, saturation drain current, maximum transconductance, reverse-bias gate leakage current, and sub-threshold drain leakage current for all the irradiated HEMTs; however, the degree of the degradation was decreased as the irradiation energy increased. Similar trends were obtained for the rf performance of the devices, with 10% degradation of the unity gain cut-off frequency (fT) and maximum oscillation frequency ( fmax) for the HEMTs irradiated with 15 MeV protons but 30% for 5 MeV proton irradiation. The carrier removal rate was in the range 0.66 1.24 cm1 over the range of proton energies investigated

Lo, C. F. [University of Florida; Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Gila, Brent P. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kim, H.-Y. [Korea University; Kim, J. [Korea University; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Cao, Yu [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

High output lamp with high brightness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Copsey, Jesse F. (Germantown, MD); Garber, Jr., William E. (Poolesville, MD); Kwong, Vincent H. (Vancouver, CA); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Steiner, Paul E. (Olney, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Microsoft PowerPoint - Mechanically Activated Combustion_Shafirovich  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanically activated SHS (MASHS) Adds a short-duration high-energy ball milling step before combustion The high-energy milling rapidly produces nanostructured...

273

The impact of individualised cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk estimates and lifestyle advice on physical activity in individuals at high risk of CVD. A Pilot 2x2 Factorial "Understanding Risk" Trial.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 1998, 30:777-781. 33. Ekelund U, man J, Yngve A, Renman C, Westerterp K, Sjstrm M: Physical activity but not energy expenditure is reduced in obese adolescents: a case-control study. American Journal of Clin- ical... and fatal CVD risk estimated using a modified version of the UKPDS Risk Engine[23]. This has an interface designed specifically for use in the study with the aim of achieving maximum comprehension by could achieve if they were to meet current targets[24...

Price, Hermione C; Tucker, Lynne; Griffin, Simon J; Holman, Rury R

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

New Innovations in Highly Ion Specific Media for Recalcitrant Waste stream Radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

Specialty ion specific media were examined and developed for, not only pre- and post-outage waste streams, but also for very difficult outage waste streams. This work was carried out on first surrogate waste streams, then laboratory samples of actual waste streams, and, finally, actual on-site waste streams. This study was particularly focused on PWR wastewaters such as Floor Drain Tank (FDT), Boron Waste Storage Tank (BWST), and Waste Treatment Tank (WTT, or discharge tank). Over the last half decade, or so, treatment technologies have so greatly improved and discharge levels have become so low, that certain particularly problematic isotopes, recalcitrant to current treatment skids, are all that remain prior to discharge. In reality, they have always been present, but overshadowed by the more prevalent and higher activity isotopes. Such recalcitrants include cobalt, especially Co 58 [both ionic/soluble (total dissolved solids, TDS) and colloidal (total suspended solids, TSS)] and antimony (Sb). The former is present in most FDT and BWST wastewaters, while the Sb is primarily present in BWST waste streams. The reasons Co 58 can be elusive to granulated activated carbon (GAC), ultrafiltration (UF) and ion exchange (IX) demineralizers is that it forms submicron colloids as well as has a tendency to form metal complexes with chelating agents (e.g., ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, or EDTA). Such colloids and non-charged complexes will pass through the entire treatment skid. Antimony (Sb) on the other hand, has little or no ionic charge, and will, likewise, pass through both the filtration and de-min skids into the discharge tanks. While the latter will sometimes (the anionic vs. the cationic or neutral species) be removed on the anion bed(s), it will slough off (snow-plow effect) when a higher affinity anion (iodine slugs, etc.) comes along; thus causing effluents not meeting discharge criteria. The answer to these problems found in this study, during an actual Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) outage cycle and recovery (four months), was the down-select and development of a number of highly ion specific media for the specific removal of such elusive isotopes. Over three dozen media including standard cation and anion ion exchangers, specialty IX, standard carbons, and, finally, chemically doped media (e.g., carbon and alumina substrates). The latter involved doping with iron, manganese, and even metals. The media down-select was carried out on actual plant waste streams so that all possible outage affects were accounted for, and distribution coefficients (Kd's) were determined (vs. decontamination factors, DF's, or percent removals). Such Kd's, in milliliters of solution per gram of media (mug), produce data indicative of the longevity of the media in that particular waste stream. Herein, the down-select is reported in Pareto (decreasing order) tables. Further affects such as the presence of high cobalt concentrations, high boron concentrations, the presence of hydrazine and chelating agents, and extreme pH conditions. Of particular importance here is to avoid the affinity of competing ions (e.g., a Sb specific media having more than a slight affinity for Co). The latter results in the snow-plow effect of sloughing off 3 to 4 times the cobalt into the effluent as was in the feed upon picking up the Sb. The study was quite successful and resulted in the development of and selection of a resin-type and two granular media for antimony removal, and two resin-types and a granular media for cobalt removal. The decontamination factors for both media were hundreds to thousands of times that of the full filtration and de-min. (authors)

Denton, M. S.; Wilson, J.; Ahrendt, M. [RWE NUKEM Corporation (RNC), 800 Oak Ridge Tnpk., Suite A701, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Bostick, W. D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory (MCL), Inc., East Tennessee Technology Park, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); DeSilva, F.; Meyers, P. [ResinTech, Inc., 1 ResinTech Plaza, 160 Cooper Road, West Berlin, NJ 08091 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evaluation of coagulant aids at high pH  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests was run on influent to the waste treatment facility, using various polyelectrolytes and organic polymeric coagulant aids. The influent wastewater originates in chemical process areas, janitorial sinks, process-area locker room showers, floor drains, and from the laundry. Previous tests on this waste had shown that Fe{sup +3} and Ca{sup +2} at pH 11.3 gave improved product quality. However, a suitable coagulant aid for use at high pH`s was needed to obtain a rapid settling rate in the flocculation/sedimentation process. Results of the tests showed that Nalco-C627 gave a good decontamination factor while yielding rapid settling rates. Betz-1175 gave the best decontamination factors; however, its settling rate needs to be improved. Test results revealed decontamination was greater at pH 11.3 than at pH 10.1. It is recommended at this time, that Nalco-C627 be used with the Fe{sup +3}, Ca{sup +2} high pH system, and that further tests be performed on the Betz-1175.

Koenst, J.W.; Blane, D.E.

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

KPA Activity Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

supports CMM-SW Level 2 supports CMM-SW Level 2 Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM- SW) level 2. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering group reviews the allocated requirements before they are incorporated in the software project. Chapter 3.0 * Develop High-Level Project Requirements Chapter 4.0 * Establish Functional Baseline * Project Plan * Requirements Specification Document * Requirements Management awareness * Defining Project Requirements RM-2 The software engineering group uses the allocated requirements as the basis for

277

Characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors with triple delta-doped sheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental and insightful characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs double channel pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (DCPHEMTs) with graded and uniform triple {delta}-doped sheets are coomprehensively studied and demonstrated. To gain physical insight, band diagrams, carrier densities, and direct current characteristics of devices are compared and investigated based on the 2D semiconductor simulator, Atlas. Due to uniform carrier distribution and high electron density in the double InGaAs channel, the DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped sheets exhibits better transport properties, higher and linear transconductance, and better drain current capability as compared with the uniformly triple {delta}-doped counterpart. The DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped structure is fabricated and tested, and the experimental data are found to be in good agreement with simulated results.

Chu, Kuei-Yi [National Cheng-Kung University, Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering (China); Chiang, Meng-Hsueh, E-mail: mhchiang@niu.edu.tw; Cheng, Shiou-Ying, E-mail: sycheng@niu.edu.tw [National II an University, Department of Electronic Engineering (China); Liu, Wen-Chau [National Cheng-Kung University, Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Vampire Attacks: Draining Life from Wireless Ad Hoc Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ad hoc low-power wireless networks are an exciting research direction in sensing and pervasive computing. Prior security work in this area has focused primarily on denial of communication at the routing or medium access control levels. This paper explores ... Keywords: Denial of service, security, routing, ad hoc networks, sensor networks, wireless networks

Eugene Y. Vasserman; Nicholas Hopper

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Guidelines on Optimizing Heat Recovery Steam Generator Drains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe thermal-mechanical fatigue damage to the superheaters (SHs), reheaters (RHs), and steam piping of horizontal-gas-path heat recovery steam generators due primarily to ineffective drainage of the condensate that is generated in superheaters and reheaters at every startup continues to be a significant industry problem that results in avoidable deterioration of unit reliability and significant unnecessary maintenance costs. This report will assist operators in guiding heat recovery steam generator (HR...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

280

Modern Observations of Interstellar Dust in Galaxies B. T. Draine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- phous silicates · 3.4 µm: C-H stretch in hydro- carbons · 0.2175 µm: "2200 °A bump". Probably electronic transition in sp2 -bonded car- bon (e.g., graphite or PAH) · > 4

Draine, Bruce T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B-Wing High Activity Drain Exhaust (HADE) filter housing is old, corroded and add leakpoints to the system, thus contributing to the less optimum B-Wing High Activity Drain Exhaust (HADE) filter housing is old, corroded and add leakpoints to the system, thus contributing to the less optimum operation of the system. The design configuration of the filter housing is obsolete, where inlet air flow from the top to bottom creates more condensation, which contributed to the corrosion of the housing. To improve the system, the old filter housing and related components such as moisture separator, valves, piping, instrumentation, and component structural supports will be D&R. A new replacement bag in/ bag out filter housing, complete with moisture separator,valves,piping and instrumentation will be installed. B-Wing High Activity Drain Exhaust (HADE) Filter Housing Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina

282

PHYSICS LAB: TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, "Technical Activities 1999" - NISTIR 6438. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1999. This report summarizes ...

283

PHYSICS LAB: TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998 - NISTIR NISTIR 6268. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998. ...

284

Advanced Metal-Hydrides-Based Thermal Battery: A New Generation of High Density Thermal Battery Based on Advanced Metal Hydrides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The University of Utah is developing a compact hot-and-cold thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides that could offer efficient climate control system for EVs. The teams innovative designs of heating and cooling systems for EVs with high energy density, low-cost thermal batteries could significantly reduce the weight and eliminate the space constraint in automobiles. The thermal battery can be charged by plugging it into an electrical outlet while charging the electric battery and it produces heat and cold through a heat exchanger when discharging. The ultimate goal of the project is a climate-controlling thermal battery that can last up to 5,000 charge and discharge cycles while substantially increasing the driving range of EVs, thus reducing the drain on electric batteries.

None

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo'' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Non-focusing active warhead  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal is disclosed. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught. 4 figs.

Hornig, H.C.

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

289

NSLS Activity Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activity Report Activity Report 2009 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2009 Periodic Table Dust Jacket 2008 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008 2007 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2006 - September 30, 2007 Science Highlights PDF Publications PDF 2006 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006 2005 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2004 - September 30, 2005 2004 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004 2003 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2002 - September 30, 2003 2002 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2001 - September 30, 2002 2001 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2000 - September 30, 2001 2000 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000 1999 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1998 - September 30, 1999

290

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets 5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 4, 2011 - 7:15am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Rational System Architect. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: IBM Rational System 11.4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect. reference LINKS: IBM Advisory: 21497689 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025464 CVE-2011-1207 Secunia Advisory: SA43399 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the

291

Geothermal materials development activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

423A HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING/NUMERICAL The International Journal of High Performance Computing Applications,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

423A HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING/NUMERICAL The International Journal of High Performance Computing and barriers in the development of high-performance computing (HPC) algorithms and software. The activity has computing, numerical analy- sis, roadmap, applications and algorithms, software 1 The High-performance

Higham, Nicholas J.

293

Comparative study of InGaP/GaAs high electron mobility transistors with upper and lower delta-doped supplied layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence corresponding to the position of {delta}-doped supplied layer on InGaP/GaAs high electron mobility transistors is comparatively studied by two-dimensional simulation analysis. The simulated results exhibit that the device with lower {delta}-doped supplied layer shows a higher gate potential barrier height, a higher saturation output current, a larger magnitude of negative threshold voltage, and broader gate voltage swing, as compared to the device with upper {delta}-doped supplied layer. Nevertheless, it has smaller transconductance and inferior high-frequency characteristics in the device with lower {delta}-doped supplied layer. Furthermore, a knee effect in current-voltage curves is observed at low drain-to-source voltage in the two devices, which is investigated in this article.

Tsai, Jung-Hui, E-mail: jhtsai@nknucc.nknu.edu.tw; Ye, Sheng-Shiun [National Kaohsiung Normal University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Taiwan (China); Guo, Der-Feng [Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung, Department of Electronic Engineering, Taiwan (China); Lour, Wen-Shiung [National Taiwan Ocean University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Taiwan (China)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

PDSF Network Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistics Network Activity Network Activity PDSF Network Uplinks to NERSC (dual 10 Gbps) NERSC Uplink to ESnet Last edited: 2011-03-31 22:20:59...

295

Active dc filter for HVDC systems  

SciTech Connect

This article is a case history of the installation of active dc filters for high-performance, low-cost harmonics filtering at the Lindome converter station in the Konti-Skan 2 HVDC transmission link between Denmark and Sweden. The topics of the article include harmonics, interference, and filters, Lindome active dc filter, active dc filter design, digital signal processor, control scheme, protection and fault monitoring, and future applications.

Zhang, W. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)); Asplund, G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to explore the secondary dehydration of methanol over [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] support and over bimetallic Rh-Mo/[gamma]- Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], a new series of K-doped Rh-Mo/[gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts was synthesized. Work on synthesis of bimetallic Rh-Mo clusters is reported.

Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

1992-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

Highly Active and Lower Cost Nanoparticle Catalyst for Producing ...  

stock chemical for conversion into biofuels and other value-added chemicals. While HMF synthesis from cellulose has already been realized at laboratory scale,

298

Activities of the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-4, 2008 Livermore, CA on behalf of the HEDLP FESAC subpanel #12;"joint HEDLP program [OFES+NNSA and 28 contributed talks M. Donovan (NNSA) NNSA perspective G. Nardella (OFES) OFES perspective HEDLP #12;IFE HEDLP science: conventional and alternative concepts · Conventional ICF (NNSA funded

299

High Activity catalysts for Polyols Production From C-6 Sugars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the course of this project, many significant discoveries have been made in the process for the conversion of sorbitol to value added products. The object was developing a process for the production of propylene glycol (PG), ethylene glycol (EG), and glycerol from sorbitol.

Todd Werpy; Alan Zacher; John Frye; Keith Peterson; Gary Neuenschwander; Eric Alderson; Daniel Muzatko; Jim White

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Frederick T. Wagner (Primary Contact), Anusorn Kongkanand General Motors, LLC (GM) 10 Carriage St. Honeoye...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Highly Active and Lower Cost Nanoparticle Catalyst for ...  

Biofuels such as ethanol are already in use as alternatives to fossil fuels. These man-made fuels help to offset carbon dioxide emissions and are a sustainable source ...

302

Numerical simulation of the active magnetic regenerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent one-dimensional model of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) that takes into account most of the physical and practical design problems for the AMR is developed as a highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations. The adequateness ... Keywords: Active magnetic regenerator, Magnetic refrigerator, Modeling and numerical scheme, Numerical simulation, Passive regenerator

B. M. Siddikov; B. A. Wade; D. H. Schultz

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

February 28, 2006, Department letter reporting completion of NNSA portion of Commitment 23 in the 2004-1 implementation plan, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations, which requires the development of site office action plans to improve the consistency and reliability of work planning and work control at the activity level, including the incorporation of Integrated Safety Management core functions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Washington, DC 20585 Washington, DC 20585 February 28, 2006 OFFICE O F THE ADMINISTRATOR The Honorable A. J. Eggenberger Ch a i rm an Defensc Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW., Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20004-2901 Dear Mr. Chairman: On Julie 10, 2005, Secretary Bodnian submitted the Department's Iiizplenzentution Plun to Itizpt-ove Oversight qf'Nucleur Operutions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2004- I , Oversight qf Complex, High-Hrrzurd Nucleur Openrtiotzs. Section 5.3 of the Implementation Plan (IP) addresses Revitalizing Integruted SU/i-'ty Munagernent Implementution, and Subsection 5.3.2 addresses Work Plunning mil Work Control ut the Activity Level. Commitment 23 of the 1P requires development of site office action plans to improve the consistency and reliability of work

304

Method of making a high performance ultracapacitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

Farahmandi, C. Joseph (Auburn, AL); Dispennette, John M. (Auburn, AL)

2000-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

High Performance Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Performance Computing. Summary: High Performance Computing (HPC) enables work on challenging problems that ...

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

306

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

307

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in yield and 4 cP in viscosity in comparison to high AA pulp for the oxygen delignification. This difference is also seen for high-kappa SW kraft pulps with an average improvement of {approx}3% in yield and 3 cP in viscosity for low AA high kappa number 50 pulp. Low AA hardwood kappa number 20 pulp had an average improvement of {approx}4% in yield and 6-12 cP in viscosity as compared to high AA pulp. Lower kraft cooking temperature (160 vs. 170 C) in combination with the medium AA provides a practical approach for integrating high kappa pulping of hardwoods (i.e., low rejects) with an advanced extended oxygen delignification stage. ECF pulp bleaching of low and high kappa kraft SW and HW pulps exhibit comparable optical and physical strength properties when bleached D(EPO)D.

Arthur J. Ragauskas

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

EXPERIMENTS with PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS for high school science students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTS with PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS for high school science students By Dick Erickson ­ Pleasant Activity ­ Testing Photovoltaic Cells ..........................5 Expected Observations: ........................................................................................................8 II. LAB ACTIVITY - TESTING PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS ..................................9 BEFORE YOU START

Oregon, University of

309

High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Home Standards DOE Workshops Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference Proceedings Qualified Filter List News Items Related Sites HEPA Related Lessons Learned Contact Us HSS Logo High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters The HEPA Filter web site provides a forum for informing and reporting department-wide activities related to filtration and ventilation issues with special reference to the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters' use, inspection, and testing. This site contains essentials of DOE HEPA filter test program, procedures, requirements and quality assurance aspects applicable to HEPA filters used in DOE facilities. This site contains information about the DOE-accepted Filter Test Facility and its management, operation and quality assuranceprogram.

310

Active magnetic regenerator  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Incident Handling Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] Incident Handling Activities. Since 1989 the National Institute of Standards ...

312

Science Activities in Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in Biomass Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, genetics, distillation, agriculture, chemicalcarbon cycles, climatology, plants and energy resources...

313

Activity Book TA Orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activity Book TA Orientation School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota Fall, 2004 Student Laboratory Reports 195 Homework #8. Judging Problems 211 #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 1: UMn: _______________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 1 (continued) Page 2 University of Minnesota Model for Teaching

Minnesota, University of

314

Activity Book TA Orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activity Book TA Orientation School of Physics and Astronomy University of Minnesota Fall, 2005 #12 of Example Student Laboratory Reports 181 #12;#12;TA Orientation 2005 Activity 1: UMn Model for Introductory: _______________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ #12;TA Orientation 2005 Activity 1 (continued) Page 2 Notes

Minnesota, University of

315

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction: This waste sorting game was originally designed to be one have completed the waste sorting activity quickly, no team was able to complete the waste sorting task who were unfamiliar with Dalhousie's waste management system. Goals: The primary goal of the activity

Beaumont, Christopher

316

Windows activation Sergei Striganov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windows activation Sergei Striganov Fermilab July 25, 2007 #12;Beam windows residual activity of irradiated object should be much larger than -ray interaction length (3.7 cm in windows). In such model activation is proportional to star density. For beam size much smaller windows transverse dimension

McDonald, Kirk

317

High Temperature Optical Gas Sensing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Gas Sensing Optical Gas Sensing Opportunity Research is active on optical sensors integrated with advanced sensing materials for high temperature embedded gas sensing applications. Patent applications have been filed for two inventions in this area and several other methods are currently under development. These technologies are available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Organizations or individuals with capabilities in optical sensor packaging for harsh environment and high temperature applications are encouraged to contact NETL to explore potential collaborative opportunities. Overview Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov

318

High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFMRF Overview HFMRF Overview Section 2-3-1 High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility The High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility (HFMRF) focuses a significant portion of its research on developing a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of biochemical and biological systems and their response to environmental effects. A secondary focus is materials science, including catalysis and chemical mechanisms and processes. Staff and science consultants within this facility offer expertise in the areas of structural biology, solid-state materials characterization, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Research activities in the HFMRF include: * structure determination of large molecular assemblies such as protein-DNA (normal and damaged DNA) and protein-RNA complexes

319

Evaluation of a New Remote Handling Design for High Throughput Annular Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced designs of nuclear fuel recycling plants are expected to include more ambitious goals for aqueous based separations including; higher separations efficiency, high-level waste minimization, and a greater focus on continuous processes to minimize cost and footprint. Therefore, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACCs) are destined to play a more important role for such future processing schemes. Previous efforts defined and characterized the performance of commercial 5 cm and 12.5 cm single-stage ACCs in a cold environment. The next logical step, the design and evaluation of remote capable pilot scale ACCs in a hot or radioactive environment was reported earlier. This report includes the development of remote designs for ACCs that can process the large throughput rates needed in future nuclear fuel recycling plants. Novel designs were developed for the remote interconnection of contactor units, clean-in-place and drain connections, and a new solids removal collection chamber. A three stage, 12.5 cm diameter rotor module has been constructed and evaluated for operational function and remote handling in highly radioactive environments. This design is scalable to commercial CINC ACC models from V-05 to V-20 with total throughput rates ranging from 20 to 650 liters per minute. The V-05R three stage prototype was manufactured by the commercial vendor for ACCs in the U.S., CINC mfg. It employs three standard V-05 clean-in-place (CIP) units modified for remote service and replacement via new methods of connection for solution inlets, outlets, drain and CIP. Hydraulic testing and functional checks were successfully conducted and then the prototype was evaluated for remote handling and maintenance suitability. Removal and replacement of the center position V-05R ACC unit in the three stage prototype was demonstrated using an overhead rail mounted PaR manipulator. This evaluation confirmed the efficacy of this innovative design for interconnecting and cleaning individual stages while retaining the benefits of commercially reliable ACC equipment for remote applications in the nuclear industry. Minor modifications and suggestions for improved manual remote servicing by the remote handling specialists were provided but successful removal and replacement was demonstrated in the first prototype.

David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law; Lawrence L. Macaluso

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

NIST Physics Laboratory: Technical Activities 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, Technical Activities 2000 - NISTIR 6590. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 2000. ... Most Recent Technical Activities ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Science, Computing, Applied Math High Performance Computing High Performance Computing Providing world-class high performance computing capability that enables...

322

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

323

All-solid-state Hybrid Batteries with High Capacity - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, High-performance thin film battery (TFB) has gained many attentions, as active RFID tags, and MEMS based electronic systems. Although the...

324

Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

Method for full dispersion of active metals into a high surface area of support to promote efficiency Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory have ...

325

Cost-Sensitive top-down/bottom-up inference for multiscale activity recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses a new problem, that of multiscale activity recognition. Our goal is to detect and localize a wide range of activities, including individual actions and group activities, which may simultaneously co-occur in high-resolution video. ...

Mohamed R. Amer; Dan Xie; Mingtian Zhao; Sinisa Todorovic; Song-Chun Zhu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Look at Global Tropical Cyclone Activity during 1995: Contrasting High Atlantic Activity with Low Activity in Other Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1995, there was a near-record number of named tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic basin. This unusual event fueled speculation that it marked a tangible signal of global climate change, or that it marked a return to a period of higher ...

Mark A. Lander; Charles P. Guard

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Educational Programs Learning Lab Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne offers a variety of field trips for middle school and high school students. Bring your students to Argonne and let them experience the excitement of science first-hand, with activities that will cement basic science and engineering concepts, and introduce them to new and exciting aspects of laboratory research! During the field trip, students rotate through various hands-on science experiments and learning lab activities to learn what Argonne scientists do. About Field Trips Field trips are free. Groups must arrange their own transportation. Group size: 40-60 students. Larger groups can be accommodated with additional planning time. Field trips start at 9:45 a.m. and end at 1:00 p.m. All participants MUST wear long pants and closed-toed shoes, regardless of the weather.

328

High Speed High Dynamic Range High Accuracy Measurement System  

Disclosure Number 201102747 Technology Summary The present invention measures a beam of protons that has a high dynamic range. Typically, one uses ...

329

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active.

Benedick, William B. (Albuquerque, NM); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Morosin, Bruno (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

activity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

activity activity Dataset Summary Description The Weekly Financial and Activity report section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major Activities" tab lists of the major actions taken to date and major planned actions of likely interest to senior government officials, Congress, and the public. File is in .xls format. Source DOE Date Released November 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords activity DOE financial Recovery Act report Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon DOE_Weekly_Financial_and_Activity_Report_20101119.xls (xls, 1.8 MiB)

333

Active interrogation using energetic protons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Milner, Edward C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waters, Laurie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

CX-006374: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Disposal of Liquid Residue from Analytical Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/14/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office To provide a consistent process of disposition of radioactive and non-radioactive residual samples and sample dissolutions to the High Activity Drain (HAD) and Low Activity Drain (LAD) systems that ensures compliance with L1, 6.01, Use of Drain Systems. To provide a consistent process of disposal of radioactive and non-radioactive solids residue generated when performing weight percent solids measurements. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006374.pdf More Documents & Publications

335

HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the sorbent and observed that it has both a good oxygen capacity and operates as a highly effective reforming catalyst. We conducted a long duration tests of the sorbent (1,500 hours of continuous operation in the HOP cycle). Although the sorbent lost some oxygen capacity with cycling, the sorbent oxygen capacity stabilized after 1,000 hours and remained constant to the end of the test, 1,500 hour. The activity of the catalyst to reform methane to a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture was unchanged through the oxidation/reduction cycling. Our cost and performance analyses indicated a significant reduction in the cost of GTL production when using the HOP process integrated into a GTL plant.

Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

TRC Bibliographies: Family Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science with your children. Doing science activities together develops both parenting skills and the child's learning, problem solving and scientific skills. Participating in...

337

Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Metamaterial structures are taught which provide for the modulation of terahertz frequency signals. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Active Terahertz Metamaterial Devices Metamaterial structures are taught which provide for the modulation of terahertz frequency signals. Each element within an array of metamaterial (MM) elements comprises multiple loops and at least one gap. The MM elements may comprise resonators with conductive loops and insulated gaps, or the inverse in which insulated loops are present with conductive gaps; each providing useful transmissive control properties. The metamaterial elements are fabricated on a semiconducting substrate configured with a

338

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

d022412A. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 18 Macroeconomic Activity Module To reflect uncertainty in the projection of...

339

NSLS Activity Report 1996  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submission System PDF Publishing: P. Sutherland (BNL Information Services Division) NSLS Home Page...BNL Home Page...Return to Activity Reports Page...

340

NETL: NATCARB - Current Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL, West Virginia University (WVU), the University of Kansas, and the Kansas Geologic Survey (KGS) to incorporate geologic site data from a number of activities occurring under...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA); Woolman, Joseph N. (Davis, CA); Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Development of novel active transport membrande devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

Laciak, D.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Commercial Building Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Activities Building Activities Commercial Building Activities The Building Technologies Office commercial buildings effort researches and deploys advanced technologies and systems to reduce energy consumption in commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions to accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's key projects. 179d Tax Calculator The 179d Calculator can help determine whether improvements qualify for a Federal tax deduction, and allows owners and managers to estimate energy cost savings of efficiency improvements. Advanced Energy Design Guides These recommendations can help designers achieve between 30% and 50% energy savings in a new commercial building.

344

Emerging Technologies Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies Activities Emerging Technologies Activities Emerging Technologies Activities The Emerging Technologies team focuses on the development and testing of next-generation technologies that can increase the energy efficiency of existing technologies and help support the goal of reducing energy consumption by at least 50%. By partnering with industry, researchers, and other stakeholders, the Department of Energy (DOE) acts as a catalyst in driving research in energy efficient technologies, including: Refrigerators, washers, dryers, and other appliances Parts of the building envelope, including insulation, roofing and attics, foundations, and walls Window, skylight, and door technologies, such as highly-insulating windows, glazings and films, window frames, and daylighting and shading

345

Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Integrated Geophysical Mapping Of The Magadi Fault System, Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Integrated Geophysical Mapping Of The Magadi Fault System, Southern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Southern Kenya Rift has been known as a region of high geodynamic activity expressed by recent volcanism, geothermal activity and high rate of seismicity. The active faults that host these activities have not been investigated to determine their subsurface geometry, faulting intensity and constituents (fluids, sediments) for proper characterization of tectonic

346

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

347

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Modelling geomagnetic activity data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong geomagnetic activity is a hazard to electronics and electric power facilities. Assessment of the actual geomagnetic activity level from local magnetometer monitoring therefore is of importance for risk assessment but also in earth sciences and ... Keywords: geomagnetism, neuro fuzzy modelling, self organizing map, signal processing, wavelets

Ernst D. Schmitter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Forecast of auroral activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique is developed to predict auroral activity based on a sample of over 9000 auroral sites identified in global auroral images obtained by an ultraviolet imager on the NASA Polar satellite during a 6-month period. Four attributes of auroral activity sites are utilized in forecasting

A. T. Y. Lui

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

CarbonNanotubeActive ...  

intensively explored for enabling new applications otherwise ... Of particular importance, a high mobility, such as those obtained here, ...

351

Effect of buffer structures on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with three different types of buffer layers, including a GaN/AlGaN composite layer, or 1 or 2 lm GaN thick layers, were fabricated and their reliability compared. The HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layer showed the lowest critical voltage (Vcri) during off-state drain step-stress, but this was increased by around 50% and 100% for devices with the composite AlGaN/GaN buffer layers or thinner GaN buffers, respectively. The Voff - state for HEMTs with thin GaN and composite buffers were 100 V, however, this degraded to 50 60V for devices with thick GaN buffers due to the difference in peak electric field near the gate edge. A similar trend was observed in the isolation breakdown voltage measurements, with the highest Viso achieved based on thin GaN or composite buffer designs (600 700 V), while a much smaller Viso of 200V was measured on HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layers. These results demonstrate the strong influence of buffer structure and defect density on AlGaN/GaN HEMT performance and reliability.

Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xi, Y. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Cao, Yu [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

An in depth examination of semi floating gate ultra low voltage flip-flops for high speed applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis 4 different ultra low voltage (ULV) flip-flops are presented. Floating gates has been exploited to significantly increase the drain-source current. This technique (more)

Simenstad, Erik Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

High Performance Rooftop Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentationname High Performance RTUs Life Cycle Cost Comparison Calculator * Web-based tool for comparing costs of standard and high performance RTUs. * Weather data for 237...

354

The Sun in Time: Activity and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) The Sun's magnetic activity has steadily declined during its main-sequence life. While the solar photospheric luminosity was about 30% lower 4.6 Gyr ago when the Sun arrived on the main sequence compared to present-day levels, its faster rotation generated enhanced magnetic activity; magnetic heating processes in the chromosphere, the transition region, and the corona induced ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray emission about 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively, the present-day levels, as inferred from young solar-analog stars. Also, the production rate of accelerated, high-energy particles was orders of magnitude higher than in present-day solar flares, and a much stronger wind escaped from the Sun, permeating the entire solar system. The consequences of the enhanced radiation and particle fluxes from the young Sun were potentially severe for the evolution of solar-system planets and moons. Interactions of high-energy radiation and the solar wind with upper planetary atmospheres may have led to the escape of important amounts of atmospheric constituents. The present dry atmosphere of Venus and the thin atmosphere of Mars may be a product of early irradiation and heating by solar high-energy radiation. High levels of magnetic activity are also inferred for the pre-main sequence Sun. At those stages, interactions of high-energy radiation and particles with the circumsolar disk in which planets eventually formed were important. Traces left in meteorites by energetic particles and anomalous isotopic abundance ratios in meteoritic inclusions may provide evidence for a highly active pre-main sequence Sun. The present article reviews these various issues related to the magnetic activity of the young Sun and the consequent interactions with its environment.

M. Guedel

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

DISCLOSURE OF LOBBYING ACTIVITIES  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OF LOBBYING ACTIVITIES OF LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Approved by OMB Complete this form to disclose lobbying activities pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 1352 0348-0046 (See reverse for public burden disclosure.) 1. Type of Federal Action: 2. Status of Federal Action: 3. Report Type: a. contract a. bid/offer/application a. initial filing b. grant b. initial award b. material change c. cooperative agreement c. post-award For Material Change Only: d. loan year _________ quarter _________ e. loan guarantee date of last report ______________ f. loan insurance 4. Name and Address of Reporting Entity: 5. If Reporting Entity in No. 4 is a Subawardee, Enter Name

356

Active imaging system with Faraday filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

Snyder, J.J.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Expressing graph algorithms using generalized active messages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, graph computation has emerged as an important class of high-performance computing application whose characteristics differ markedly from those of traditional, compute-bound, kernels. Libraries such as BLAS, LAPACK, and others have been successful ... Keywords: active messages, parallel graph algorithms, parallel programming models

Nick Edmonds; Jeremiah Willcock; Andrew Lumsdaine

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

U-148: ActiveScriptRuby GRScript18.dll ActiveX Control Ruby Code Execution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48: ActiveScriptRuby GRScript18.dll ActiveX Control Ruby Code 48: ActiveScriptRuby GRScript18.dll ActiveX Control Ruby Code Execution Vulnerability U-148: ActiveScriptRuby GRScript18.dll ActiveX Control Ruby Code Execution Vulnerability April 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in ActiveScriptRuby, which can be exploited by malicious people to potentially compromise a user's system. PLATFORM: Version(s): 1.2.2.0 and prior ABSTRACT: The vulnerability is caused due to an error in GRScript18.dll and can be exploited to execute arbitrary Ruby commands. reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory 48811 CVE-2012-1241 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: ActiveScriptRuby is a software to implement Ruby into a Windows environment. ActiveScriptRuby contains a vulnerability where an arbitrary Ruby script may be executed on the web browser that can execute ActiveX

359

National Service Activation Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Service Activation Checklist Service Activation Checklist You have just received information that you are being activated for national service. Covered or Not Covered If you have received notice to report for active duty - Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, Public Health Service, or Coast Guard and you are a Federal employee, you have employment and reemployment rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Act of 1994 (USERRA). Basics - Telling People What is Happening 1. Have you told your spouse, family, best friend, or someone else who is important to you? Point of Contact for Department of Energy Use: Name: Telephone Number: E-mail: 2. Go to Employee Self-Service and make sure your personal information is up to date.

360

2012 AOCS Active Membership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experience the member advantage. Members receive discounts on books, meetings, journals and lab services. 2012 AOCS Active Membership Membership Merchandise Membership Merchandise AOCS Membership Applications Please allow up to 2 business days t

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Solar Thermal Manufacturing Activities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities, providesan overview and tables with historical data spanning 2000-2009. These tables willcorrespond to similar tables to be presented in the Renewable Energy Annual 2009 andare numbered accordingly.

Michele Simmons

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NSLS Weekly Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weekly Activities There are a variety of weekly meetings for NSLS staff and users. These are posted regularly on the TV monitors (User Information Channel 22), along with any time...

363

PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

Michael A. Romano

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities Activities FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM HTAC Meeting Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager February 17, 2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov * Overview - EERE Priorities * FY12 Budget * Examples of Collaboration & Leveraging Activities - Office of Science, DOD, DOT, SBIRs, International - Conferences and Workshops * Analysis Update * Recent HTAC Input & Future Needs Agenda 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov High Impact Innovation Examples of Innovative Applied R&D Developed high surface area nanostructures for fuel cell electrodes that helped increase fuel cell power density and reduce fuel cell system cost by >45%

365

Low activation ferritic alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

1985-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Low activation ferritic alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

NSLS 2009 Activity Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

2009 was an incredibly exciting year for light sources at Brookhaven. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) hosted more than 2,200 visiting researchers, who, along with the about 50 members of our scientific staff, produced a total of 957 publications - about 20 percent of which appeared in premier journals. Covering topics ranging from Alzheimer's disease detection to ethanol-powered fuel cells, a sampling of these findings can be found in this Activity Report. We've also seen the resurfacing of some of our long-time users hard work. I was very proud to hear that two of the three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have ties to the NSLS. Venki Ramakrishnan, a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department and long-time user of the NSLS, now at Cambridge University, and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for their work on the structure and function of the ribosome. In the late 1990s, Ramakrishnan and Steitz used protein crystallography at the NSLS to gather atomic-level images of two ribosome subunits: 30S (Ramakrishnan) and 50S (Steitz). Both laureates solved the high-resolution structures for these subunits based on this data. After struggling with a rough budget for several years, we received excellent funding, and then some, this year. In addition to NSLS operations funding, we received $3 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). We used that additional money for two exciting projects: construction of a full-field x-ray microscope and acquisition of several advanced x-ray detectors. The x-ray microscope will be able to image objects with a targeted spatial resolution of 30 nanometers. This capability will be particularly important for new initiatives in energy research and will prepare our users for the projected 1-nanometer resolution benchmark at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The detectors project is expected to increase the throughput of several high-demand beamlines by an order of magnitude as well as enable new classes of experiments. In addition, a huge chunk of ARRA money - $150 million - was put toward accelerating the construction of NSLS-II, which is now taking shape across the street. Now physically much more than just a pile of dirt, NSLS-II was granted Critical Decision 3 status by the Department of Energy (DOE) early last year, giving the official go-ahead for construction. In July, construction began, marked by a groundbreaking ceremony that attracted elected officials, media, and DOE, Battelle, and Stony Brook University representatives from across the state and the country. As progress on NSLS-II continues, we're working with Stony Brook University to identify ways to capitalize on the facility's unique capabilities through the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). Included in this effort is a series of workshops to encourage the development and application of the photon sciences with collaborative research between industries, universities, and national laboratories. We helped host three of these workshops this year, focusing on microelectronics, energy storage, and materials in next-generation energy systems. The conversation and ideas generated at these meetings has been fresh and valuable and we hope to use this model to organize research opportunities in other scientific fields. Also this year: Brookhaven was deemed the lead institution for one of DOE's 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, focused on understanding the underlying nature of superconductivity in complex materials by using techniques at the NSLS and CFN; DOE awarded a $100,000 supplemental grant to our detector program to continue the development of a new generation of x-ray detectors that use germanium sensors, which, at high energies, are much more efficient than equivalent ones based on silicon; and funding for one of our largest consortia, Case Western Reserve University's Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), was renewed through the National Inst

Nasta K.; Mona R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hydrous oxide activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for preparing of an ion exchanger, comprising: treating an ionically inert activated charcoal porous support with an aqueous solution of metal oxychloride selected from the group consisting of zirconium and titanium oxychlorides so as to impregnate the pores of the support with the solution; separating the treated support from excess metal oxychloride solution; converting the metal oxychloride to a hydrous metal oxide precipitate in the pores of the support at a pH above 8 and above the pH whereat the hydrous metal oxide and activated charcoal support have opposite zeta potentials and sufficient to hydrolyze the metal oxychloride. It also describes a process for preparing an ion exchanger comprising: treating granulated activated charcoal with a concentrated solution of a metal oxychloride from the group consisting of zirconium and titanium oxychlorides, degassing the mixture; and treating the resultant mixture with a base selected from the group consisting of ammonium hydroxide and alkali metal hydroxides so as to precipitate the oxychloride within the pores of the activated carbon granules as hydrous metal oxide at a pH above 8 and above the pH whereat the hydrous metal oxide and activated charcoal have opposite zeta potentials.

Weller, J.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Solicitations to Active Solicitations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Active Solicitations on AddThis.com... Active Solicitations To explore current financial opportunity solicitations, click on the opportunity titles in the table below. To sort the list, click on the arrows in the column headings. Technology Solicitation Title Open Date Close Date Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research and Development for Hydrogen Storage

370

Work Force Restructuring Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Force Restructuring Activities Force Restructuring Activities December 10, 2008 Note: Current updates are in bold # Planned Site/Contractor HQ Approved Separations Status General * LM has finalized the compilation of contractor management team separation data for the end of FY07 actuals and end of FY08 and FY09 projections. LM has submitted to Congress the FY 2007 Annual Report on contractor work force restructuring activities. The report has been posted to the LM website. *LM conducted a DOE complex-wide data call to the Field and Operations offices for DOE Contractor Management teams to provide, by program, actual contractor separation data for the end of FY 2008 and projections for the end of FY 2009 and FY 2010. The data will be used to keep senior management informed of upcoming large WFR actions.

371

Active microchannel heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The active microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA); Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA); Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA); Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Active elastodynamic cloaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An active elastodynamic cloak destructively interferes with an incident time harmonic in-plane (coupled compressional/shear) elastic wave to produce zero total elastic field over a finite spatial region. A method is described which explicitly predicts the source amplitudes of the active field. For a given number of sources and their positions in two dimensions it is shown that the multipole amplitudes can be expressed as infinite sums of the coefficients of the incident wave decomposed into regular Bessel functions. Importantly, the active field generated by the sources vanishes in the far-field. In practice the infinite summations are clearly required to be truncated and the accuracy of cloaking is studied when the truncation parameter is modified.

Andrew N. Norris; Feruza A. Amirkulova; William J. Parnell

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 5 th International Conference on Polymer Batteries & Fuel Cells Argonne, Illinois Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager August 4, 2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cells: Benefits & Market Potential The Role of Fuel Cells Key Benefits Very High Efficiency Reduced CO 2 Emissions * 35-50%+ reductions for CHP systems (>80% with biogas) * 55-90% reductions for light- duty vehicles * up to 60% (electrical) * up to 70% (electrical, hybrid fuel cell / turbine) * up to 85% (with CHP) Reduced Oil Use * >95% reduction for FCEVs (vs. today's gasoline ICEVs)

374

Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - May 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2013 May 2013 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Pantex Plant [HIAR PTX-2013-05-20] This Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was an operational awareness site visit to discuss an upcoming July outage for replacing information systems, determine the status of the new High Explosives Pressing Facility (HEPF) under construction, review the master assessment schedule activities for the remainder of fiscal year 2013, and monitor other ongoing site activities. Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - May 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - October 2011 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - July 2012 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - November 2012

375

Activated carbon material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

Evans, A. Gary (North Augusta, SC)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Activities and Accomplishments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities and Accomplishments Denver * May 11, 2011 Working Groups * Financial Guidance * PSR Improvements * Notification * Communications Webinars * RFID Demonstration and TRANSCOM Enhancements - November 17, 2010 - ARG-US RFID/TRANSCOM Real-time Tracking System - TRANSCOM Enhancements * Communications for Waste Movements - February 24, 2011 - Mixed/LLW Forecast: Baseline Disposition Data and Waste Information Management System (WIMS) - Prospective Shipment Report Improvements Wiki Site * Resource for NTSF members - Information on NTSF meetings and webinars - Ad hoc working group call summaries and documents for review - Information on DOE and other federal agency activities (e.g., NRC rulemaking) * Private site that requires participants to "join" in

377

MCO Monitoring activity description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

SEXTON, R.A.

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Present and future high-energy accelerators for neutrino experiments  

SciTech Connect

There is an active neutrino program making use of the high-energy (larger than 50 GeV) accelerators both in USA at Fermilab with NuMI and at CERN in Europe with CNGS. In this paper we will review the prospects for high intensity high energy beams in those two locations during the next decade.

Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active...

380

High Speed Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Speed Electronics. ... optic sampling system provides traceability for our electrical waveform measurements ... Metrology for Electronic Packaging. ...

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, C.A.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, Carl A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

High performance systems  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

Vigil, M.B. [comp.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High Performance Computing in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Performance Computing in Bioinformatics Thomas Ludwig (t.ludwig@computer.org) Ruprecht PART I: High Performance Computing Thomas Ludwig PART II: HPC Computing in Bioinformatics Alexandros #12;© Thomas Ludwig, Alexandros Stamatakis, GCB'04 3 PART I High Performance Computing Introduction

Stamatakis, Alexandros

386

Spontaneous motion in hierarchically assembled active matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently non-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for developing biomimetic active materials from microscopic components that consume energy to generate continuous motion. Being actively driven, these materials are not constrained by the laws of equilibrium statistical mechanics and can thus exhibit highly sought-after properties such as autonomous motility, internally generated flows and self-organized beating. Starting from extensile microtubule bundles, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of conventional polymer gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubules form a percolating active network characterized by internally driven chaotic flows, hydrodynamic instabilities, enhanced transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, 3D networks spontaneously adsorb onto the droplet surfaces to produce highly active 2D nematic liquid crystals whose streaming flows are controlled by internally generated fractures and self-healing, as well as unbinding and annihilation of oppositely charged disclination defects. The resulting active emulsions exhibit unexpected properties, such as autonomous motility, which are not observed in their passive analogues. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblages of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are starkly different from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks, challenging us to develop a theoretical framework that would allow for a systematic engineering of their far-from-equilibrium material properties.

Tim Sanchez; Daniel T. N. Chen; Stephen J. DeCamp; Michael Heymann; Zvonimir Dogic

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

387

Robust regression for high throughput drug screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective analysis of high throughput screening (HTS) data requires automation of dose-response curve fitting for large numbers of datasets. Datasets with outliers are not handled well by standard non-linear least squares methods, and manual outlier ... Keywords: Agonist activity, Dose-response curve, HTS, IRLS, M-estimation, Robust regression

Igor Fomenko; Mark Durst; David Balaban

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A study of plasma etching for use on active metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active metals can be used as a getter pump, removing impurities in ultra-pure high vacuum environments. To relieve the difficulties involved with the transportation, storage and handling of these metals, a process is being ...

Nishimoto, Keane T. (Keane Takeshi), 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Reporting Unethical or Illegal Activity | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activity Doing What's Right How we work is as important at the work we do High standards are more than a slogan or catch phrase - they represent the way we do business....

390

Equatorial Wave Activity Derived from Fluctuations in Observed Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectrum of equatorial wave activity propagating vertically into the stratosphere is calculated from high-resolution imagery of the global convective pattern. Synoptic Global Cloud Imagery (GCI), constructed from six satellites simultaneously ...

John W. Bergman; Murry L. Salby

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Towards a semantics of activity diagrams with semantic variation points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UML activity diagrams have become an established notation to model control and data flow on various levels of abstraction, ranging from fine-grained descriptions of algorithms to high-level workflow models in business applications. A formal semantics ...

Hans Grnniger; Dirk Rei; Bernhard Rumpe

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Estimation of Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation from GOES Visible Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is an important parameter for terrestrial ecosystem models. Because of its high temporal resolution, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations are very suited to ...

Tao Zheng; Shunlin Liang; Kaicun Wang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook for 2013 (AEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Active-bridge oscillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Arsenic activation neutron detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

Jacobs, E.L.

1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Process for preparing active oxide powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for preparing active oxide powders in which cation hydroxide gels, prepared in the conventional manner are chemically dried by alternately washing the gels with a liquid organic compound having polar characteristics and a liquid organic compound having nonpolar characteristics until the mechanical water is removed from the gel. The water-free cation hydroxide is then contacted with a final liquid organic wash to remove the previous organic wash and speed drying. The dried hydroxide treated in the conventional manner will form a highly sinterable active oxide powder.

Berard, Michael F. (Ames, IA); Hunter, Jr., Orville (Ames, IA); Shiers, Loren E. (Ames, IA); Dole, Stephen L. (Burnt Hills, NY); Scheidecker, Ralph W. (Ames, IA)

1979-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

399

High-Dielectric Constant, High-Temperature Ceramic Capacitors for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth of Thick, On-Axis SiC Epitaxial Layers by High Temperature Halide CVD for High Voltage Power Devices High-Dielectric Constant, High-Temperature...

400

High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Science, Computing, Applied Math » Information Science, Computing, Applied Math » High Performance Computing High Performance Computing Providing world-class high performance computing capability that enables unsurpassed solutions to complex problems of strategic national interest Gary Grider High Performance Computing Division Leader Randal Rheinheimer High Performance Computing Deputy Division Leader Contact Us Carol Hogsett Student/Internship Opportunities Email Division Office Email Managing world-class supercomputing centers Powerall simulations modeling Read caption + The Powerwall is used by LANL scientists to view objects and processes in 3D. High Performance Computing video 13:01 Gary Grider, HPC Divison Leader The High Performance Computing (HPC) Division supports the Laboratory mission by managing world-class Supercomputing Centers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Brookhaven High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Energy Physics High-Energy Physics High-energy physicists probe the properties and behavior of the most elementary particles in the universe. At the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), they perform experiments of unique sensitivity using high-intensity, intermediate-energy beams. The AGS currently provides the world's most intense high-energy proton beam. It is also the world's most versatile accelerator, accelerating protons, polarized protons, and heavy ions to near the speed of light. Magnet system at Brookhaven used to measure the magnetic moment of the muon. Important discoveries in high-energy physics were made at the AGS within the last decade. An international collaboration, including key physicists from Brookhaven, performed a very high-precision measurement of a property

402

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Nonfarm labor productivity is expected to diminish from its current high level to a more sustainable level between 1.8 and 2.6 percent for the remainder of the forecast period...

403

TMS 2011: Student Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphics should be simple, colorful, well labeled and clear. The title should be written in letters 2- to 5-cm high (or approximately 1-2 inches), and all material...

404

Active learning for real-time motion controllers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an approach to building real-time highly-controllable characters. A kinematic character controller is built on-the-fly during a capture session, and updated after each new motion clip is acquired. Active learning is used to identify ... Keywords: active learning, human motion, motion capture

Seth Cooper; Aaron Hertzmann; Zoran Popovi?

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Segmenting sensor data for activity monitoring in smart environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within a smart environment, sensors have the ability to perceive changes of the environment itself and can therefore be used to infer high-level information such as activity behaviours. Sensor events collected over a period of time may contain several ... Keywords: Activity detection, Evidential modelling, Smart environments, Time series sensor segmentation

Xin Hong; Chris D. Nugent

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

High temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

HIGH VOLTAGE, HIGH CURRENT SPARK GAP SWITCH  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high voltage and current spark gap switch comprising two main electrodes insulatingly supported in opposed spaced relationship and a middle electrode supported medially between the main electrodes and symmetrically about the median line of the main electrodes is described. The middle electrode has a perforation aligned with the median line and an irradiation electrode insulatingly supported in the body of the middle electrode normal to the median line and protruding into the perforation. (AEC)

Dike, R.S.; Lier, D.W.; Schofield, A.E.; Tuck, J.L.

1962-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

408

High Tech and Industrial Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Tech and Industrial Systems Group High Tech and Industrial Systems Group Some of the largest energy users in today's economy are high tech buildings and industrial systems. They operate up to 24 hours per day with energy intensities much greater than typical commercial or residential buildings, and they are essential to the national economy. High-tech buildings, such as laboratories, cleanrooms, data centers, and hospitals, are characterized by large base-loads, continuous operation, and high energy-use intensities. These buildings crosscut many industries and institutions. Group activities and products include: benchmarking surveys and metrics, case study reports, technology development, technology demonstrations, assessment and profiling tools, best practice guides, workshops, training guides, and development of other strategies.

409

Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

Uribe, F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

2004 NSLS Activity Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NatioNal NatioNal SyNchrotroN light Source activity report 2004 BNL 73577 National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2004 BNL-73577-2005 UC400 (General Energy Research) DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commerical product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

411

Macroeconomic Activity Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 19 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook2011 Macroeconomic Activity Module The Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) represents the interaction between the U.S. economy as a whole and energy markets. The rate of growth of the economy, measured by the growth in gross domestic product (GDP) is a key determinant of the growth in demand for energy. Associated economic factors, such as interest rates and disposable income, strongly influence various elements of the supply and demand for energy. At the same time, reactions to energy markets by the aggregate economy, such as a slowdown in economic growth resulting from increasing energy prices, are also reflected in this module.

412

Active DOE Technical Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active DOE Technical Standards Active DOE Technical Standards Document Number Document Title Responsible SLM DOE-HDBK-1001-96 DOE-HDBK-1002-96 DOE-HDBK-1003-96 DOE-HDBK-1010-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/3-92 DOE-HDBK-1011/4-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1012/3-92 DOE-HDBK-1013/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1013/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1014/1-92 DOE-HDBK-1014/2-92 DOE-HDBK-1015/1-93

413

LANSCE Activity Report  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Preparation of activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell by air activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel, three-step process for the production of high-quality activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell charcoals is described. In this process the charcoal is (1) heated to a high temperature (carbonized), (2) oxidized in air following a stepwise heating program from low (ca. 450 K) to high (ca. 660 K) temperatures (oxygenated), and (3) heated again in an inert environment to a high temperature (activated). By use of this procedure, activated carbons with surface areas greater than 1,000 m{sub 2}/g are manufactured with an overall yield of 15% (based on the dry shell feed). Removal of carbon mass by the development of mesopores and macropores is largely responsible for increases in the surface area of the carbons above 600 m{sub 2}/g. Thus, the surface area per gram of activated carbon can be represented by an inverse function of the yield for burnoffs between 15 and 60%. These findings are supported by mass-transfer calculations and pore-size distribution measurements. A kinetic model for gasification of carbon by oxygen, which provides for an Eley-Rideal type reaction of a surface oxide with oxygen in air, fits the measured gasification rates reasonably well over the temperature range of 550--660 K.

Tam, M.S.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

THE ACTIVE ASTEROIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some asteroids eject dust, unexpectedly producing transient, comet-like comae and tails. First ascribed to the sublimation of near-surface water ice, mass-losing asteroids (also called 'main-belt comets') can in fact be driven by a surprising diversity of mechanisms. In this paper, we consider 11 dynamical asteroids losing mass, in nine of which the ejected material is spatially resolved. We address mechanisms for producing mass loss including rotational instability, impact ejection, electrostatic repulsion, radiation pressure sweeping, dehydration stresses, and thermal fracture, in addition to the sublimation of ice. In two objects (133P and 238P) the repetitive nature of the observed activity leaves ice sublimation as the only reasonable explanation, while in a third ((596) Scheila), a recent impact is the cause. Another impact may account for activity in P/2010 A2, but this tiny object can also be explained as having shed mass after reaching rotational instability. Mass loss from (3200) Phaethon is probably due to cracking or dehydration at extreme ({approx}1000 K) perihelion temperatures, perhaps aided by radiation pressure sweeping. For the other bodies, the mass-loss mechanisms remain unidentified, pending the acquisition of more and better data. While the active asteroid sample size remains small, the evidence for an astonishing diversity of mass-loss processes in these bodies is clear.

Jewitt, David, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

High temperature refrigerator  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

Steyert, Jr., William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

High temperature furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

Borkowski, Casimer J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

418

High-Dose Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... web page below. Service descriptions and price schedule for NIST high-dose services are found in this link. The intention ...

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

High-Tc Superconductor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 High-temperature superconductors (HTSC's), following their remarkable discovery in 1986, continue to be at...

420

.NET High Performance Computing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have been extensively applied in the High Performance Computing (HPC) community. HPC applications require additional special programming environments to improve (more)

Ou, Hsuan-Hsiu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

High Temperature Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2010 ... Protective Coatings for Corrosion Resistance at High Temperatures: Vilupanur Ravi1; Thuan Nguyen1; Alexander Ly1; Kameron Harmon1;...

422

High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untitled Document Argonne Logo DOE Logo High Energy Physics Division Home Division ES&H Personnel Publications HEP Awards HEP Computing HEP Committees Administration...

423

High Performance Tooling Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High performance tools are necessary for the successful manufacturing of every consumer product as well as oil drilling and mining operations. Increasing...

424

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Activities Building Activities The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. The U.S. DOE Solar Decathlon is a biennial contest which challenges college teams to design and build energy efficient houses powered by the sun. Each team competes in 10 contests designed to gauge the performance, livability and affordability of their house. The Building America program develops market-ready energy solutions that improve the efficiency of new and existing homes while increasing comfort, safety, and durability. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals foster the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

425

Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Portable active interrogation system.  

SciTech Connect

The system consists of a pulsed DT neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 7} n/s) and a portable but high intrinsic efficiency, custom-designed, polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He neutron detector. A multichannel scaler card in a ruggedized laptop computer acquires the data. A user-friendly LabVIEW program analyzes and displays the data. The program displays a warning message when highly enriched uranium or any other fissionable materials is detected at a specified number of sigmas above background in the delayed region between pulses. This report describes the system and gives examples of the response of the system to highly enriched uranium and some other fissionable materials, at several distances and with various shielding materials.

Moss, C. E. (Calvin E.); Brener, M. W. (Mathieu W.); Hollas, C. L. (Charles L.); Myers, W. L. (William L.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Superconducting active impedance converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Active imaging system with Faraday filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an active imaging system which has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and a receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination wile eliminating solar background.

Snyder, J.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

TALL : rethinking the systems of the contemporary high rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The life of modern work is complex. What once entailed simple activities encapsulated within simple and hierarchically designed spaces has evolved into a highly volatile and complex organism. Businesses and workers are ...

Namkung, Kenneth, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indicator for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed.

Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

High power, high frequency, vacuum flange  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

High density photovoltaic  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic technology can directly generate high voltages in a solid state material through the series interconnect of many photovoltaic diodes. We are investigating the feasibility of developing an electrically isolated, high-voltage power supply using miniature photovoltaic devices that convert optical energy to electrical energy.

Haigh, R.E.; Jacobson, G.F.; Wojtczuk, S. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electrolysis High Temperature Hydrogen  

INL has developed a high-temperature process the utilizes solid oxide fuel cells that are operated in the electrolytic mode. The first process includes combining a high-temperature heat source (e.g. nuclear reactor) with a hydrogen production facility ...

435

High temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

FY 1996 activity summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

U.S. Uranium Down-blending Activities: Fact Sheet | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Down-blending Activities: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 The permanent disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) permanently reduces nuclear security vulnerabilities. In 1996, the...

438

Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010,on Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status. The presentation provides a high-level overview of the Renewable...

439

Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Educational Activities on AddThis.com... Energy Policy Act (EPAct) Clean Cities Educational Activities Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Educational Activities EcoCAR 2: Plugging In to the Future EcoCAR 2: Plugging In to the Future is the successor to EcoCAR: The NeXt

440

Natural gas storage on activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is a good fuel for internal combustion engines, but its low energy density is a significant drawback. The energy density can be increased by adsorption on a high surface area activated carbon. But with usage, some of the constituents in the natural gas composition accumulate on the carbon and reduce its adsorptivity. The adsorption desorption of natural gas on 9LXC activated carbon was investigated to 100 cycles at 21/sup 0/C and pressures of up to 12 MPa. The decrease in the capacity, G, as a function of the number of cycles, N, was found to follow the empirical correlation: G/G /SUB o/ = 1 - 0.085Log(N). Analysis of the activated carbon after 100 cycles showed accumulation of C/sub 4/ and higher hydrocarbons but not of C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/. For automotive applications, activated carbon appears practical in a narrow pressure range, centering around 7 MPa (1000 psig). The preferred storage is at a pressure of 17 MPa or higher, without the use of activated carbons.

Golovoy, A.; Blais, E.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high activity drain" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Coloured Stochastic Activity Networks: Preliminary Definitions and Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several high-level extensions have been introduced for Petri nets (PNs). Coloured Petri nets (CPNs) are the most famous high-level extensions of PNs. Stochastic activity networks (SANs) are a stochastic generalization of PNs. These models have widely been used for dependability and performability evaluation purposes and are supported with a few powerful modeling tools. To provide some high-level facilities for SANs, we have defined coloured stochastic activity networks (CSANs). CSANs provide the possibility of data manipulation and hierarchical modeling. In this paper, we present the informal and formal definitions, some examples and an introduction to the analysis of these models. ______________________________________________________________________ 1

Mohammad Abdollahi Azgomi; Ali Movaghar

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Activized Learning: Transforming Passive to Active with Improved Label Complexity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the theoretical advantages of active learning over passive learning. Specifically, we prove that, in noise-free classifier learning for VC classes, any passive learning algorithm can be transformed into an active learning algorithm with asymptotically ...

Steve Hanneke

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Superconducting active impedance converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10--80 K temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

CDAC Activity Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have received CDAC allotments of beam time at HPCAT that were used to carryout investigations that included angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction of beryllium at high pressures and inelastic x-ray scattering (x-ray Raman) of high pressure phases of water. These CDAC beam time allotments have permitted us to broaden and supplement the scope of our research. The beam time has also been used in experiments that had graduate student participants (Z Jenei and A Lazicki) and thus the experiments also incorporated a component of training and education. Water (H{sub 2}O) is a major constituent of terrestrial systems, and furthering our understanding of this ubiquitous system and hydrogen bonding structures impacts a broad range of systems; including geophysics, life sciences, the environment and technology development. Our inelastic x-ray scattering studies (x-ray Raman spectroscopy) of high-pressure phases of water and ice are aimed at addressing controversies regarding the high-pressure structure of water. Using the inelastic x-ray scattering system at HPCAT we have measured x-ray Raman spectra of water at 1 and 17 GPa. X-Ray Raman is a relatively new technique that provides data that is equivalent to x-ray absorption, but utilizes a hard x-ray to avoid short absorption lengths and surface effects to achieve a truly bulk measurement. These are extremely challenging measurements that rely on optimized experimental systems and the brilliance of a 3rd generation synchrotron source. The figure shown demonstrates our specially designed diamond and the general operation of the x-ray scattering system.

Evans, W J

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

High Performance Sustainable Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

become a High Performance Sustainable Building in 2013. On the former County landfill, a photovoltaic array field uses solar energy to provide power for Los Alamos County and the...

446

Creating high performance enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How do enterprises successfully conceive, design, deliver, and operate large-scale, engineered systems? These large-scale projects often involve high complexity, significant technical challenges, a large number of diverse ...

Stanke, Alexis K. (Alexis Kristen), 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

Morris, D.E.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Computing Managing world-class supercomputing centers Read caption + The Powerwall is used by LANL scientists to view objects and processes in 3D. 13:01 Gary...

452

High Performance Window Attachments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Window High Performance Window Attachments D. Charlie Curcija Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory dccurcija@lbl.gov 510-495-2602 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Impact of Project: * Motivate manufacturers to make improvements in Window systems U-Factors, SHGC and daylighting utilization * Increase awareness of benefits from energy efficient window attachments Problem Statement: * A wide range of residential window attachments are available, but they have widely unknown

453

High-temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

454

High Burnup Effects Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report of the High Burnup Effects Program (HBEP). It has been prepared to present a summary, with conclusions, of the HBEP. The HBEP was an international, group-sponsored research program managed by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). The principal objective of the HBEP was to obtain well-characterized data related to fission gas release (FGR) for light water reactor (LWR) fuel irradiated to high burnup levels. The HBEP was organized into three tasks as follows: Task 1 -- high burnup effects evaluations; Task 2 -- fission gas sampling; and Task 3 -- parameter effects study. During the course of the HBEP, a program that extended over 10 years, 82 fuel rods from a variety of sources were characterized, irradiated, and then examined in detail after irradiation. The study of fission gas release at high burnup levels was the principal objective of the program and it may be concluded that no significant enhancement of fission gas release at high b