National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hg 5-ton rps

  1. Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Facility Johnston LFG (MA RPS Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  2. RPS Group Plc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4RY Product: RPS is a Planning and Environmental Consultancy, with Scottish offices in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Thurso. Coordinates: 36.71049, -81.975194 Show Map...

  3. Webinar Presentation - Energy Storage in State RPS - Dec. 19...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation - Energy Storage in State RPS - Dec. 19, 2011 Webinar Presentation - Energy Storage in State RPS - Dec. 19, 2011 Dr. Imre Gyuk of the Office of Electricity Delivery...

  4. Webinar Presentation - Energy Storage in State RPS - Dec. 19, 2011 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Presentation - Energy Storage in State RPS - Dec. 19, 2011 Webinar Presentation - Energy Storage in State RPS - Dec. 19, 2011 Dr. Imre Gyuk of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability presented "Grid Energy Storage: The Big Picture" as one of four guest speakers for a webinar on energy storage and renewable portfolio standards (RPS). The webinar was hosted by the State-Federal RPS Collaborative and the Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) to

  5. Regional REC and RPS Best Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer Alvarado

    2009-09-30

    The Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association conducted a program to explore the development of Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards and Renewable Energy Certificate Markets in the Midwest. The initiative represented the collaboration between the four state energy offices of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio, the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association (GLREA) and the Clean Energy State Alliance (CESA). The multi-state project explored the opportunities in the Midwest to expand the renewable energy market through Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards (RPS) and the trading of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs).

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - wiser naruc rps final 304.ppt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Energy Technologies Division * Energy Analysis Department Design Requirements For An Effective RPS Strong political support and regulatory commitment that is expected ...

  7. RPS JDC Inc formerly JD Consulting L P | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RPS JDC Inc formerly JD Consulting L P Jump to: navigation, search Name: RPS JDC, Inc. (formerly JD Consulting L.P.) Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78746 Product: Austin-based...

  8. Implications of Scheduled ITC Reversion for RPS Compliance: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowder, Travis; Miller, John; O'Shaughnessy, Eric; Heeter, Jenny

    2015-09-14

    This poster presents DRAFT initial results of a forthcoming NREL analysis. The analysis investigates the impacts of the scheduled investment tax credit (ITC) reversion from 30 percent to 10 percent for certain solar photovoltaic projects. Specifically, it considers whether the reversion will result in increased use of alternative compliance payments (ACPs) in lieu of solar renewable energy credits (SRECs) for renewable portfolio standard (RPS) compliance. The analysis models the effect of a 10 percent ITC on power purchase agreement (PPA) prices for non-residential systems in the eight states with solar carve-outs and solar ACPs. Our preliminary results suggest that states will likely install sufficient capacity to meet long-term targets through SRECs rather than ACPs following the ITC reversion. However, the analysis shows that the ITC reversion could affect project economics such that capacity shortfalls in certain states could temporarily increase the use of ACPs. NREL anticipates publishing a full report of this analysis in fall 2015. credits (SRECs) for renewable portfolio standard (RPS) compliance. The analysis models the effect of a 10 percent ITC on power purchase agreement (PPA) prices for non-residential systems in the eight states with solar carve-outs and solar ACPs. Our preliminary results suggest that states will likely install sufficient capacity to meet long-term targets through SRECs rather than ACPs following the ITC reversion. However, the analysis shows that the ITC reversion could affect project economics such that capacity shortfalls in certain states could temporarily increase the use of ACPs. NREL anticipates publishing a full report of this analysis in fall 2015.

  9. Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report explores the design and implementation of feed-in tariff policies, including a policy definition, various payment structures, and payment differentiation options. The report also discusses the interaction between FIT and RPS policies.

  10. NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Fuel Cells and Renewable Portfolio Standards, June 9, 2011. infocalljun911_larsen.pdf (150.61 KB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Cells at Supermarkets: NYSERDA's Perspective Fuel Cells and RPSs: An Introduction NYSERDA's CHP Program Guide, 2010

  11. Memorandum of Understanding between DOE and NASA concerning RPS for space

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    missions | Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between DOE and NASA concerning RPS for space missions Memorandum of Understanding between DOE and NASA concerning RPS for space missions The purpose of this agreement is to delineate the authorities and responsibilities of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (the parties) in the research, technology development, design, production, delivery, space vehicle integration, and

  12. Using Supercomputers to Speed Execution of the CAISO/PLEXOS 33% RPS Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, C; Streitz, F; Yao, Y; Smith, S; Lamont, A

    2011-09-19

    The study's official title is 'ISO Study of Operational Requirements and Market Impacts at 33% Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS).' The stated objectives are twofold: (1) identifying operational requirements and resource options to reliably operate the ISO-controlled grid under a 33% RPS in 2020; and (2) inform market, planning, and policy/regulatory decisions by the ISO, state agencies, market participants, and other stakeholders. The first of these objectives requires the hourly estimates of integration requirements, measured in terms of operational ramp, load following and regulation capacity and ramp rates, as well as additional capacity to resolve operational violations. It also involves consideration of other variables that affect the results, such as the impact of different mixes of renewable technologies, and the impact of forecasting error and variability. The second objective entails supporting the CPUC to identify long-term procurement planning needs, costs, and options, as well as informing other decisions made by the CPUC and state agencies. For the ISO itself this includes informing state-wide transmission planning needs for renewables up to a 33% RPS, and informing design of wholesale markets for energy and ancillary services to facilitate provision of integration capacities. The study is designed in two phases. The first (current) phase is focused on operational requirements and addressing these requirements with existing and new conventional fossil generation; for instance, gas turbines and/or combined cycle units. The second (planned) phase will address the same operational requirements with a combination of conventional fossil generation resources, new non-generation resources, and a renewable resource dispatch. There are seven different scenarios considered in the current phase: a 20% RPS reference case; four 33% RPS cases (a reference case, a high out-of-state case, a high distributed generation case, and a low load case); an alternative 27

  13. Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Couture, T.; Kreycik, C.

    2009-03-01

    Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies are implemented in more than 40 countries around the world and are cited as the primary reason for the success of the German and Spanish renewable energy markets. As a result of that success, FIT policy proposals are starting to gain traction in several U.S. states and municipalities. Experience from Europe is also beginning to demonstrate that properly designed FITs may be more cost-effective than renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which make use of competitive solicitations. This article explores the design and operation of feed-in tariff policies, including a FIT policy definition, payment-structure options, and payment differentiation. The article also touches on the potential interactions between FIT policies and RPS policies at the state level.

  14. Observations on the Optimality Tolerance in the CAISO 33% RPS Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Y; Meyers, C; Schmidt, A; Smith, S; Streitz, F

    2011-09-22

    In 2008 Governor Schwarzenegger of California issued an executive order requiring that 33 percent of all electricity in the state in the year 2020 should come from renewable resources such as wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, and small hydroelectric facilities. This 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) was further codified and signed into law by Governor Brown in 2011. To assess the market impacts of such a requirement, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) initiated a study to quantify the cost, risk, and timing of achieving a 33% RPS by 2020. The California Independent System Operator (CAISO) was contracted to manage this study. The production simulation model used in this study was developed using the PLEXOS software package, which allows energy planners to optimize long-term system planning decisions under a wide variety of system constraints. In this note we describe our observations on varying the optimality tolerance in the CAISO 33% RPS model. In particular, we observe that changing the optimality tolerance from .05% to .5% leads to solutions over 5 times faster, on average, producing very similar solutions with a negligible difference in overall distance from optimality.

  15. Using RPS Policies to Grow the Solar Market in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-11-20

    The market for photovoltaics in the United States remains small relative to the nation's solar resource potential. Nonetheless, annual grid-connected PV installations have grown from just 4 MW in 2000 to over 100 MW in 2006, fast enough to the catch the attention of the global solar industry. The state of California deserves much of the credit for this growth. The State's historical rebate programs resulted in roughly 75% of the nation's grid-connected PV additions from 2000 through 2006 being located in California, and the $3 billion California Solar Initiative will ensure that the State remains a mainstay of the US solar industry for years to come. But California is not the only market for solar in the US; other states have recently developed policies that may rival those of the western state in terms of future growth potential. In particular, 25 states, as well as Washington, D.C., have established renewables portfolio standards (RPS), sometimes called quota systems in Europe, requiring electricity suppliers in those states to source a minimum portion of their need from renewable electricity. (Because a national RPS is not yet in place, my focus here is on state policies). Under many of these state policies, solar is not expected to fare particularly well: PV installations simply cannot compete on cost or scale with large wind plants in the US, at least not yet. In response, an expanding list of states have established solar or distributed generation (DG) set-asides within their RPS policies, effectively requiring that some fraction of RPS-driven supply derive from solar energy. The popularity of set-asides for solar and/or DG has increased dramatically in recent years. Already, 11 states and D.C. have developed such RPS set-asides. These include states with outstanding solar resources, such as Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico, as well as areas where the solar resource is less robust, including North Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New

  16. Analysis of Strategies for Multiple Emissions from Electric Power SO2, NOX, CO2, Mercury and RPS

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the Subcommittee, the Energy Information Administration prepared an initial report that focused on the impacts of reducing power sector NOx, SO2, and CO2 emissions. The current report extends the earlier analysis to add the impacts of reducing power sector mercury emissions and introducing renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements.

  17. Dipole Bands in {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D.; Msezane, B.; Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P.; Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P.

    2011-10-28

    High spin states in {sup 196}Hg have been populated in the {sup 198}Pt({alpha},6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  18. Atmospheric mercury (Hg) in the Adirondacks: Concentrations and sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun-Deok Choi; Thomas M. Holsen; Philip K. Hopke

    2008-08-15

    Hourly averaged gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) concentrations and hourly integrated reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and particulate Hg (HgP) concentrations in the ambient air were measured at Huntington Forest in the Adirondacks, New York from June 2006 to May 2007. The average concentrations of GEM, RGM, and HgP were 1.4 {+-} 0.4 ng m{sup -3}, 1.8 {+-} 2.2 pg m{sup -3}, and 3.2 {+-} 3.7 pg m{sup -3}, respectively. RGM represents <3.5% of total atmospheric Hg or total gaseous Hg (TGM: GEM + RGM) and HgP represents <3.0% of the total atmospheric Hg. The highest mean concentrations of GEM, RGM, and HgP were measured during winter and summer whereas the lowest mean concentrations were measured during spring and fall. Significant diurnal patterns were apparent in warm seasons for all species whereas diurnal patterns were weak in cold seasons. RGM was better correlated with ozone concentration and temperature in both warm than the other species. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis was applied to identify possible Hg sources. This method identified areas in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, Indiana, and Missouri, which coincided well with sources reported in a 2002 U.S. mercury emissions inventory. 51 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Process of [sup 196]Hg enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Mellor, C.E.

    1993-04-27

    A simple rate equation model shows that by increasing the length of the photochemical reactor and/or by increasing the photon intensity in said reactor, the feedstock utilization of [sup 196]Hg will be increased. Two preferred embodiments of the present invention are described, namely (1) long reactors using long photochemical lamps and vapor filters; and (2) quartz reactors with external UV reflecting films. These embodiments have each been constructed and operated, demonstrating the enhanced utilization process dictated by the mathematical model (also provided).

  20. Process of .sup.196 Hg enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Mellor, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A simple rate equation model shows that by increasing the length of the photochemical reactor and/or by increasing the photon intensity in said reactor, the feedstock utilization of .sup.196 Hg will be increased. Two preferred embodiments of the present invention are described, namely (1) long reactors using long photochemical lamps and vapor filters; and (2) quartz reactors with external UV reflecting films. These embodiments have each been constructed and operated, demonstrating the enhanced utilization process dictated by the mathematical model (also provided).

  1. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  2. Lithography process for patterning HgI2 photonic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mescher, Mark J.; James, Ralph B.; Hermon, Haim

    2004-11-23

    A photolithographic process forms patterns on HgI.sub.2 surfaces and defines metal sublimation masks and electrodes to substantially improve device performance by increasing the realizable design space. Techniques for smoothing HgI.sub.2 surfaces and for producing trenches in HgI.sub.2 are provided. A sublimation process is described which produces etched-trench devices with enhanced electron-transport-only behavior.

  3. Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is not possible. Hg anomaly patterns yield information on the presence as well as the geometry of shallow geothermal circulation patterns. In conjunction with structural geologic...

  4. NNMCAB Correspondence 2013-01 (Hg SEIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 (Hg SEIS) NNMCAB Correspondence 2013-01 (Hg SEIS) The NNMCAB submitted comments on the mercury SEIS on June 13, 2013. The comments were provided to the Department of Energy in regards to proposed sites for interim storage of excess mercury. Correspondence 2013-01 - Mercury SEIS - June 13, 2013 (34.7 KB)

  5. Two-dimensional topological insulators with tunable band gaps: Single-layer HgTe and HgSe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Jin; He, Chaoyu; Meng, Lijun; Xiao, Huaping; Tang, Chao; Wei, Xiaolin; Kim, Jinwoong; Kioussis, Nicholas; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Zhong, Jianxin

    2015-09-14

    Here, we report that two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) with large band gaps are of great importance for the future applications of quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect. Employing ab initio electronic calculations we propose a novel type of 2D topological insulators, the monolayer (ML) low-buckled (LB) mercury telluride (HgTe) and mercury selenide (HgSe), with tunable band gap. We demonstrate that LB HgTe (HgSe) monolayers undergo a trivial insulator to topological insulator transition under in-plane tensile strain of 2.6% (3.1%) due to the combination of the strain and the spin orbital coupling (SOC) effects. Furthermore, the band gaps can be tunedmore » up to large values (0.2 eV for HgTe and 0.05 eV for HgSe) by tensile strain, which far exceed those of current experimentally realized 2D quantum spin Hall insulators. Our results suggest a new type of material suitable for practical applications of 2D TI at room-temperature.« less

  6. Purification of HgI.sub.2 for nuclear detector fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schieber, Michael M.

    1978-01-01

    A process for purification of mercuric iodide (HgI.sub.2) to be used as a source material for the growth of detector quality crystals. The high purity HgI.sub.2 raw material is produced by a combination of three stages: synthesis of HgI.sub.2 from Hg and I.sub.2, repeated sublimation, and zone refining.

  7. On-line method of determining utilization factor in Hg-196 photochemical separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Moskowitz, Philip E.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining the utilization factor [U] in a photochemical mercury enrichment process (.sup.196 Hg) by measuring relative .sup.196 Hg densities using absorption spectroscopy.

  8. NNMCAB Correspondence 2013-05 (Response Hg SEIS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 (Response Hg SEIS) NNMCAB Correspondence 2013-05 (Response Hg SEIS) Response to NNMCAB Correspondence 2013-01. DOE provided comment responses on the Mercury Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement comments that were submitted by the NNMCAB. Correspondence 2013-05 - Response Hg Letter (713.92

  9. Manila clams from Hg polluted sediments of Marano and Grado lagoons (Italy) harbor detoxifying Hg resistant bacteria in soft tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldi, Franco; Gallo, Michele; Marchetto, Davide; Faleri, Claudia; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato

    2013-08-15

    A mechanism of mercury detoxification has been suggested by a previous study on Hg bioaccumulation in Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) in the polluted Marano and Grado lagoons and in this study we demonstrate that this event could be partly related to the detoxifying activities of Hg-resistant bacteria (MRB) harbored in clam soft tissues. Therefore, natural clams were collected in six stations during two different periods (winter and spring) from Marano and Grado Lagoons. Siphons, gills and hepatopancreas from acclimatized clams were sterile dissected to isolate MRB. These anatomical parts were glass homogenized or used for whole, and they were lying on a solid medium containing 5 mg l{sup −1} HgCl{sub 2} and incubated at 30 °C. A total of fourteen bacterial strains were isolated and were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and analysis, revealing that strains were representative of eight bacterial genera, four of which were Gram-positive (Enterococcus, Bacillus, Jeotgalicoccus and Staphylococcus) and other four were Gram-negative (Stenotrophomonas, Vibrio, Raoultella and Enterobacter). Plasmids and merA genes were found and their sequences determined. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique shows the presence of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria by using different molecular probes in siphon and gills. Bacterial clumps inside clam flesh were observed and even a Gram-negative endosymbiont was disclosed by transmission electronic microscope inside clam cells. Bacteria harbored in cavities of soft tissue have mercury detoxifying activity. This feature was confirmed by the determination of mercuric reductase in glass-homogenized siphons and gills. -- Highlights: ► We isolated Gram-positive and Gram-negative Hg resistant strains from soft tissues of Ruditapes philippinarum. ► We identify 14 mercury resistant strains by 16S rRNA gene sequences. ► Bacteria in siphon and gill tissues of clams were observed by TEM and identified

  10. Synthesis and growth of HgI{sub 2} nanocrystals in a glass matrix: Heat treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condeles, J. F. E-mail: ricssilva@yahoo.com.br; Silva, R. S. E-mail: ricssilva@yahoo.com.br; Silva, A. C. A.; Dantas, N. O.

    2014-08-14

    Mercury iodide (HgI{sub 2}) nanocrystals (NCs) were successfully grown in a barium phosphate glass matrix synthesized by fusion. Growth control of HgI{sub 2} NCs was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Optical Absorption (OA), Fluorescence (FL), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). AFM images reveal the formation of HgI{sub 2} nanocrystals in host glass matrix. HgI{sub 2} NCs growth was evidenced by an OA and FL band red-shift with increasing annealing time. XRD measurements revealed the β crystalline phase of the HgI{sub 2} nanocrystals.

  11. Apparatus for growing HgI.sub.2 crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schieber, Michael M.; Beinglass, Israel; Dishon, Giora

    1978-01-01

    A method and horizontal furnace for vapor phase growth of HgI.sub.2 crystals which utilizes controlled axial and radial airflow to maintain the desired temperature gradients. The ampoule containing the source material is rotated while axial and radial air tubes are moved in opposite directions during crystal growth to maintain a desired distance and associated temperature gradient with respect to the growing crystal, whereby the crystal interface can advance in all directions, i.e., radial and axial according to the crystallographic structure of the crystal. Crystals grown by this method are particularly applicable for use as room-temperature nuclear radiation detectors.

  12. Improved Limit on the Permanent Electric Dipole Moment of {sup 199}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, W. C.; Swallows, M. D.; Loftus, T. H.; Romalis, M. V.; Heckel, B. R.; Fortson, E. N.

    2009-03-13

    We report the results of a new experimental search for a permanent electric dipole moment of {sup 199}Hg utilizing a stack of four vapor cells. We find d({sup 199}Hg)=(0.49{+-}1.29{sub stat}{+-}0.76{sub syst})x10{sup -29} e cm, and interpret this as a new upper bound, |d({sup 199}Hg)|<3.1x10{sup -29} e cm (95% C.L.). This result improves our previous {sup 199}Hg limit by a factor of 7, and can be used to set new constraints on CP violation in physics beyond the standard model.

  13. Nested reactor chamber and operation for Hg-196 isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for use in .sup.196 Hg separation and its method of operation. Specifically, the present invention is directed to a nested reactor chamber useful for .sup.196 Hg isotope separation reactions avoiding the photon starved condition commonly encountered in coaxial reactor systems.

  14. Nested reactor chamber and operation for Hg-196 isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.

    1991-10-08

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for use in [sup 196]Hg separation and its method of operation. Specifically, the present invention is directed to a nested reactor chamber useful for [sup 196]Hg isotope separation reactions avoiding the photon starved condition commonly encountered in coaxial reactor systems. 6 figures.

  15. Effects of H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, and NO on homogeneous Hg oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of Hsub 2O, SOsub 2, and NO on homogeneous Hg oxidation by Clsub 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of Hsub 2O, SOsub 2, and NO on homogeneous Hg ...

  16. Examining Mechanisms of Groundwater Hg(II) Treatment by Reactive Materials: An EXAFS Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Blair D.; Ptacek, Carol J.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Blowes, David W.

    2012-02-07

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to examine mechanisms of Hg(II) removal by reactive materials proposed for groundwater treatment. These materials included granular iron filings (GIF), 1:1 (w/w) mixtures of metallurgical granular Fe powder + elemental S (MGI+S) and elemental Cu + elemental S (Cu+S), granular activated carbon (GAC), attapulgite clay (ATP), ATP treated with 2-amino-5-thiol-1,3,4-thiadiazole (ATP-a), and ATP treated with 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (ATP-d). Following treatment of simulated groundwater containing 4 mg L{sup -1} Hg for 8 or 16 days, the solution pH values ranged from 6.8 to 8.8 and Eh values ranged from +400 to -400 mV. Large decreases in aqueous Hg concentrations were observed for ATP-d (>99%), GIF (95%), MGI+S (94%), and Cu+S (90%). Treatment of Hg was less effective using ATP (29%), ATP-a (69%), and GAC (78%). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of Hg on GIF, MGI+S, and GAC indicated the presence of an Hg-O bond at 2.04-2.07 {angstrom}, suggesting that Hg was bound to GIF corrosion products or to oxygen complexes associated with water sorbed to activated carbon. In contrast, bond lengths ranging from 2.35 to 2.48 {angstrom} were observed for Hg in Cu+S, ATP-a, and ATP-d treatments, suggesting the formation of Hg-S bonds.

  17. Results of Hg speciation testing on tanks 30, 32, and 37 surface samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-11-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.

  18. Shape coexistence in {sup 180}Hg studied through the {beta} decay of {sup 180}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elseviers, J.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A.; Fedorov, D.; Cocolios, T. E.; Seliverstov, M.; Comas, V. F.; Heredia, J. A.; Fedosseyev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Franchoo, S.; Page, R. D.

    2011-09-15

    The {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of {sup 180}Tl and excited states in the daughter nucleus {sup 180}Hg have been investigated at the CERN On-Line Isotope Mass Separator (ISOLDE) facility. Many new low-lying energy levels were observed in {sup 180}Hg, of which the most significant are the 0{sub 2}{sup +} at 419.6 keV and the 2{sub 2}{sup +} at 601.3 keV. The former is the bandhead of an excited band in {sup 180}Hg assumed originally to be of prolate nature. From the {beta} feeding to the different states in {sup 180}Hg, the ground-state spin of {sup 180}Tl was deduced to be (4{sup -},5{sup -}).

  19. The new barium zinc mercurides Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} and BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} - Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Michael; Wendorff, Marco; Roehr, Caroline

    2012-12-15

    The title compounds Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} and BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} were synthesized from stoichiometric ratios of the elements in Ta crucibles. Their crystal structures, which both represent new structure types, have been determined using single crystal X-ray data. The structure of Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10} (orthorhombic, oP28, space group Pmmn, a=701.2(3), b=1706.9(8), c=627.3(3)pm, Z=2, R1=0.0657) contains folded 4{sup 4} Hg nets, where the meshes form the bases of flat rectangular pyramids resembling the structure of BaAl{sub 4}. The flat pyramids are connected via Hg-Zn/Hg bonds, leaving large channels at the folds, in which Ba(1) and Hg(2) atoms alternate. Whereas the remaining Hg/Zn atoms form a covalent 3D network of three- to five-bonded atoms with short M-M distances (273-301 pm; CN 9-11), the Hg(2) atoms in the channels adopt a comparatively large coordination number of 12 and increased distances (317-348 pm) to their Zn/Hg neighbours. In the structure of BaZn{sub 0.6}Hg{sub 3.4} (cubic, cI320, space group I4{sup Macron }3d, a=2025.50(7) pm, Z=64, R1=0.0440), with a chemical composition not much different from that of Ba{sub 3}ZnHg{sub 10}, the Zn/Hg atoms of the mixed positions M(1/2) are arranged in an slightly distorted primitive cubic lattice with a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 subcell relation to the unit cell. The 24 of the originating 64 cubes contain planar cis tetramers Hg(5,6){sub 4} with Hg in a nearly trigonal planar or tetrahedral coordination. In another 24 of the small cubes, two opposing faces are decorated by Hg(3,4){sub 2} dumbbells, two by Ba(2) atoms respectively. The third type of small cubes are centered by Ba(1) atoms only. The complex 3D polyanionic Hg/Zn network thus formed is compared with the Hg partial structure in Rb{sub 3}Hg{sub 20} applying a group-subgroup relation. Despite their different overall structures, the connectivity of the negatively charged Hg atoms, the rather metallic Zn bonding characteristic

  20. In-beam conversion-electron spectroscopy of {sup 180}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, R. D.; Wiseman, D. R.; Butler, P. A.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jones, G. D.; Joss, D. T.; Keenan, A.; Rainovski, G. I.; Andreyev, A. N.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kankaanpaeae, H.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikku, M.; Nieminen, P.

    2011-09-15

    Excited states in {sup 180}Hg were populated using the {sup 147}Sm({sup 36}Ar,3n){sup 180}Hg reaction and studied by in-beam conversion-electron spectroscopy. Conversion electrons emitted at the target position were measured using the Silicon Array for Conversion Electron Detection (SACRED) spectrometer and tagged through the characteristic {alpha} decays of {sup 180}Hg detected in a position-sensitive silicon strip detector located at the focal plane of the gas-filled recoil separator Recoil Ion Transport Unit (RITU). Electron conversion of transitions previously assigned to {sup 180}Hg through in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy studies was identified up to the 10{sup +}{yields}8{sup +} transition and the intensities of the conversion-electron transitions were found to be consistent with the previous multipolarity assignments. Evidence was also found for two highly converted transitions in {sup 180}Hg: a 167 keV transition is interpreted as the transition from the newly identified 2{sub 2}{sup +} state at 601 keV to the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state at 434 keV, while a 420 keV transition is assigned as the E0 decay from the 0{sup +} bandhead of the prolate-deformed configuration to the weakly deformed ground state.

  1. The new Hg-rich barium indium mercurides BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7−x} (x=3.1) and BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11−x} (x=0–2.8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendorff, Marco; Schwarz, Michael; Röhr, Caroline

    2013-07-15

    The title compounds BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7−x} (x=3.1(1)) and BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11−x} (x=0–2.8) were synthesized from stoichiometric ratios of the elements in Ta crucibles. Their crystal structures have been determined using single crystal X-ray data. BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 7−x} (x=3.1(1)) crystallizes in a new structure type (orthorhombic, oC16, space group Cmmm: a=512.02(1), b=1227.68(3), c=668.61(2) pm, Z=2, R1=0.0311). In the structure, the atoms of the three crystallographically different mixed In/Hg positions form planar nets of four-, six- and eight-membered rings. These nets are shifted against each other such that the four-membered rings form empty distorted cubes. The cubes are connected via common edges, corners and folded ladders, which are also found in BaIn{sub 2}/BaHg{sub 2} (KHg{sub 2} structure type) and BaIn (α-NaHg type). The Ba atoms are centered in the eight-membered rings and exhibit an overall coordination number of 20. The [BaM{sub 20}] polyhedra and twice as many distorted [M{sub 8}] cubes tesselate the space. BaIn{sub 2.8}Hg{sub 8.2} (cubic, cP36, space group Pm3{sup ¯}m, a=961.83(1) pm, Z=3, R1=0.0243) is the border compound of the phase width BaIn{sub x}Hg{sub 11−x} of the rare BaHg{sub 11} structure type. In the structure, ideal [M{sub 8}] cubes (at the corners of the unit cell) and BaM{sub 20} polyhedra (at the edges of the unit cell) represent the building blocks comparable to the other new In mercuride. In accordance with the increased In/Hg content, additional M-pure regions appear: the center of the unit cell contains a huge [Hg(1)M(2){sub 12}M(3,4){sub 32}] polyhedron, a Hg-centered cuboctahedron of In/Hg atoms surrounded by a capped cantellated cube of 32 additional M atoms. For both structure types, the bonding situation and the ‘coloring’, i.e. the In/Hg distribution of the polyanionic network, are discussed considering the different sizes of the atoms and the charge distribution (Bader AIM charges), which have been

  2. Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Evans, R.

    1991-11-26

    A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the [sup 196]Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of [+-]0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour. 8 figures.

  3. Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Evans, Roger

    1991-01-01

    A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the .sup.196 Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of .+-.0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour.

  4. Nonlinear terahertz response of HgTe/CdTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qinjun; Sanderson, Matthew; Zhang, Chao

    2015-08-24

    Without breaking the topological order, HgTe/CdTe quantum wells can have two types of bulk band structure: direct gap type (type I) and indirect gap type (type II). We report that the strong nonlinear optical responses exist in both types of bulk states under a moderate electric field in the terahertz regime. Interestingly, for the type II band structure, the third order conductivity changes sign when chemical potentials lies below 10 meV due to the significant response of the hole excitation close to the bottom of conduction band. Negative nonlinear conductivities suggest that HgTe/CdTe quantum wells can find application in the gain medium of a laser for terahertz radiation. The thermal influences on nonlinear optical responses of HgTe/CdTe quantum wells are also studied.

  5. H.G. Rickover, 1964 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H.G. Rickover, 1964 The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's 1950's Ceremony The Life of Enrico Fermi Contact Information The Enrico Fermi Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1960's H.G. Rickover, 1964 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Citation For engineering and demonstrative leadership in the

  6. Preliminary Inputs for Wisconsin RPS Analysis

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cashing in on Clean Energy: A National Renewable Electricity Standard will Benefit the Environment and the Economy Renewable Energy & Economic Development Session EIA 30 th Anniversary conference Washington DC April 7, 2008 Alan Nogee Director, Clean Energy Program Union of Concerned Scientists www.ucsusa.org Renewable electricity standards: a primary driver of new renewables Ø The #1 driver of renewable energy development. Goldman Sachs Ø"... the most important driver for new

  7. Axi-symmetrical flow reactor for [sup 196]Hg photochemical enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.

    1991-04-30

    The present invention is directed to an improved photochemical reactor useful for the isotopic enrichment of a predetermined isotope of mercury, especially, [sup 196]Hg. Specifically, two axi-symmetrical flow reactors were constructed according to the teachings of the present invention. These reactors improve the mixing of the reactants during the photochemical enrichment process, affording higher yields of the desired [sup 196]Hg product. Measurements of the variation of yield (Y) and enrichment factor (E) along the flow axis of these reactors indicates very substantial improvement in process uniformity compared to previously used photochemical reactor systems. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the photoreactor system was built such that the reactor chamber was removable from the system without disturbing the location of either the photochemical lamp or the filter employed therewith. 10 figures.

  8. Axi-symmetrical flow reactor for .sup.196 Hg photochemical enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved photochemical reactor useful for the isotopic enrichment of a predetermined isotope of mercury, especially, .sup.196 Hg. Specifically, two axi-symmetrical flow reactors were constructed according to the teachings of the present invention. These reactors improve the mixing of the reactants during the photochemical enrichment process, affording higher yields of the desired .sup.196 Hg product. Measurements of the variation of yield (Y) and enrichment factor (E) along the flow axis of these reactors indicates very substantial improvement in process uniformity compared to previously used photochemical reactor systems. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the photoreactor system was built such that the reactor chamber was removable from the system without disturbing the location of either the photochemical lamp or the filter employed therewith.

  9. Automated product recovery in a Hg-196 photochemical isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.

    1992-07-21

    A method of removing deposited product from a photochemical reactor used in the enrichment of [sup 196]Hg has been developed and shown to be effective for rapid re-cycling of the reactor system. Unlike previous methods relatively low temperatures are used in a gas and vapor phase process of removal. Importantly, the recovery process is understood in a quantitative manner so that scaling design to larger capacity systems can be easily carried out. 2 figs.

  10. Automated product recovery in a HG-196 photochemical isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard

    1992-01-01

    A method of removing deposited product from a photochemical reactor used in the enrichment of .sup.196 Hg has been developed and shown to be effective for rapid re-cycling of the reactor system. Unlike previous methods relatively low temperatures are used in a gas and vapor phase process of removal. Importantly, the recovery process is understood in a quantitative manner so that scaling design to larger capacity systems can be easily carried out.

  11. Background limited mid-infrared photodetection with photovoltaic HgTe colloidal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe Roberts, John Andris

    2015-12-21

    The photovoltaic response of thin films of HgTe colloidal quantum dots in the 3–5 μm range is observed. With no applied bias, internal quantum efficiency exceeding 40%, specific detectivity above 10{sup 10} Jones and microseconds response times are obtained at 140 K. The cooled devices detect the ambient thermal radiation. A detector with 5.25 μm cut-off achieves Background Limited Infrared Photodetection at 90 K.

  12. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reaction and Transformation of Hg and Trace Metals in Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Helble; Clara Smith; David Miller

    2009-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to produce a working dynamic model to predict the transformation and partitioning of trace metals resulting from combustion of a broad range of fuels. The information provided from this model will be instrumental in efforts to identify fuels and conditions that can be varied to reduce metal emissions. Through the course of this project, it was determined that mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) would be the focus of the experimental investigation. Experiments were therefore conducted to examine homogeneous and heterogeneous mercury oxidation pathways, and to assess potential interactions between arsenic and calcium. As described in this report, results indicated that the role of SO{sub 2} on Hg oxidation was complex and depended upon overall gas phase chemistry, that iron oxide (hematite) particles contributed directly to heterogeneous Hg oxidation, and that As-Ca interactions occurred through both gas-solid and within-char reaction pathways. Modeling based on this study indicated that, depending upon coal type and fly ash particle size, vaporization-condensation, vaporization-surface reaction, and As-CaO in-char reaction all play a role in arsenic transformations under combustion conditions.

  13. Evaluation of HgI[sub 2] detectors for lead detection in paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.J.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Graham, W.R. )

    1993-08-01

    The authors conducted a laboratory study of HgI[sub 2] spectrometers used for in-situ determination of lead on painted surfaces. [sup 109]Cd and [sup 57]Co isotopes have been used to excite lead characteristic x-rays from samples. The energy resolution of HgI[sub 2] detectors in the energy region corresponding to lead K x-rays has been measured. An energy resolution of 880 eV (FWHM) for the 60 keV line from an [sup 241]Am source has been obtained. Measurements using thin film standards ranging from 0.5 mg Pb/cm[sup 2] to 2 mg Pb/cm[sup 2] have been conducted. Detection limits, accuracy and precision of the measurements have been estimated. Based upon a comparison of the results that the authors have obtained with the performance of existing detector technology, the HgI[sub 2] detectors seem to be the best solution for handheld XRF lead analyzers.

  14. Ultrasensitive detection of Hg{sup 2+} using oligonucleotide-functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Junjie; Li, Jiadong; Miao, Bin; Wu, Dongmin; Wang, Jine; Pei, Renjun; Wu, Zhengyan

    2014-08-25

    An oligonucleotide-functionalized ion sensitive AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) was fabricated to detect trace amounts of Hg{sup 2+}. The advantages of ion sensitive AlGaN/GaN HEMT and highly specific binding interaction between Hg{sup 2+} and thymines were combined. The current response of this Hg{sup 2+} ultrasensitive transistor was characterized. The current increased due to the accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} ions on the surface by the highly specific thymine-Hg{sup 2+}-thymine recognition. The dynamic linear range for Hg{sup 2+} detection has been determined in the concentrations from 10{sup −14} to 10{sup −8} M and a detection limit below 10{sup −14} M level was estimated, which is the best result of AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensors for Hg{sup 2+} detection till now.

  15. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  16. Quantum Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells at nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, D. A. Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; Weishäupl, S.; Krupko, Y.; Portal, J.-C.

    2014-09-29

    We report on the observation of quantized Hall plateaus in a system of two-dimensional Dirac fermions, implemented in a 6.6 nm HgTe quantum well at magnetic fields up to 34 T at nitrogen temperatures. The activation energies determined from the temperature dependence of the longitudinal resistivity are found to be almost equal for the filling factors ν of 1 and 2. This indicates that the large values of the g-factor (about 30–40) remain unchanged at very strong magnetic fields.

  17. Temperature cycling vapor deposition HgI.sub.2 crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schieber, Michael M.; Beinglass, Israel; Dishon, Giora

    1977-01-01

    A method and horizontal furnace for vapor phase growth of HgI.sub.2 crystals which utilizes controlled axial and radial airflow to maintain the desired temperature gradients. The ampoule containing the source material is rotated while axial and radial air tubes are moved in opposite directions during crystal growth to maintain a desired distance and associated temperature gradient with respect to the growing crystal, whereby the crystal interface can advance in all directions, i.e., radial and axial according to the crystallographic structure of the crystal. Crystals grown by this method are particularly applicable for use as room-temperature nuclear radiation detectors.

  18. Report on International Collaboration Involving the FE Heater and HG-A Tests at Mont Terri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houseworth, Jim; Rutqvist, Jonny; Asahina, Daisuke; Chen, Fei; Vilarrasa, Victor; Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

    2013-11-06

    Nuclear waste programs outside of the US have focused on different host rock types for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Several countries, including France, Switzerland, Belgium, and Japan are exploring the possibility of waste disposal in shale and other clay-rich rock that fall within the general classification of argillaceous rock. This rock type is also of interest for the US program because the US has extensive sedimentary basins containing large deposits of argillaceous rock. LBNL, as part of the DOE-NE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, is collaborating on some of the underground research laboratory (URL) activities at the Mont Terri URL near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Mont Terri project, which began in 1995, has developed a URL at a depth of about 300 m in a stiff clay formation called the Opalinus Clay. Our current collaboration efforts include two test modeling activities for the FE heater test and the HG-A leak-off test. This report documents results concerning our current modeling of these field tests. The overall objectives of these activities include an improved understanding of and advanced relevant modeling capabilities for EDZ evolution in clay repositories and the associated coupled processes, and to develop a technical basis for the maximum allowable temperature for a clay repository. The R&D activities documented in this report are part of the work package of natural system evaluation and tool development that directly supports the following Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) objectives: ? Develop a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear-fuel-cycle alternatives through theory, simulation, testing, and experimentation. ? Develop a computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options for a range of fuel-cycle alternatives, evolving from generic models to more robust models of performance

  19. Temperature-sensitive junction transformations for mid-wavelength HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays by laser beam induced current microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Weicheng; Hu, Weida Lin, Tie; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei; Cheng, Xiang'ai Wang, Rui

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we report on the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect and the unusual temperature dependence of junction transformation for mid-wavelength, n-on-p HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays. The n-type region is formed by B{sup +} ion implantation on Hg-vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe. Junction transformations under different temperatures are visually captured by a laser beam induced current microscope. A physical model of temperature dependence on junction transformation is proposed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations. It is shown that Hg-interstitial diffusion and temperature activated defects jointly lead to the p-n junction transformation dependence on temperature, and the weaker mixed conduction compared with long-wavelength HgCdTe photodiode contributes to the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect in mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detector arrays.

  20. Fura-2 measurement of cytosolic calcium in HgCl/sub 2/-treated rabbit renal turbular cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trump, B.F.; Smith, M.W.

    1986-05-01

    This abstract reports the effect of HgCl/sub 2/ on cytosolic ionized calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/, measured by the fluorescent chelator Fura-2, in trypsinized rabbit renal tubular cells at 37/sup 0/C in Hanks salt solution, pH 7.2, containing 1.37 mM CaCl/sub 2/. Viability measured fluorometrically with propidium iodide correlated well with that determined using trypan blue. HgCl/sub 2/ (1-10 ..mu..M) induced rapid and dose-dependent increases up to 5-fold normal (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/. After 1-3 min the rate of increase slowed or stopped. At higher doses of HgCl/sub 2/ (20-100 ..mu..M) an unexpected pattern of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ changes occurred. After an initial 5-6-fold increase by 1 min, (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ decreased in the next 2-3 min to 2-3-fold normal levels. This change was followed by a second increase of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ at a much slower rate which did appear to be dose-related. Calcium channel blockers and calmodulin inhibitors had little or no effect. Inhibitors of mitochondrial function, antimycin and 2,4-dinitrophenol, interfered with the fluorescent assay; KCN totally inhibited HgCl/sub 2/-induced (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ changes while hypoxia had no apparent effect. The -SH group binding compound N-ethyl maleimide increased (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/ 4-5 fold; addition of 25 ..mu..M Hg caused faster peaking and recovery of (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub c/. The mechanism of Ca/sup 2 +/ buffering triggered by higher HgCl/sub 2/ concentrations is as yet unknown.

  1. Minority carrier lifetime in iodine-doped molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madni, I.; Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Lei, W.; Gu, R.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L.

    2015-11-02

    The minority carrier lifetime in molecular beam epitaxy grown layers of iodine-doped Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te (x ∼ 0.3) on CdZnTe substrates has been studied. The samples demonstrated extrinsic donor behavior for carrier concentrations in the range from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} without any post-growth annealing. At a temperature of 77 K, the electron mobility was found to vary from 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s to 7 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V s and minority carrier lifetime from 1.6 μs to 790 ns, respectively, as the carrier concentration was increased from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. The diffusion of iodine is much lower than that of indium and hence a better alternative in heterostructures such as nBn devices. The influence of carrier concentration and temperature on the minority carrier lifetime was studied in order to characterize the carrier recombination mechanisms. Measured lifetimes were also analyzed and compared with the theoretical models of the various recombination processes occurring in these materials, indicating that Auger-1 recombination was predominant at higher doping levels. An increase in deep-level generation-recombination centers was observed with increasing doping level, which suggests that the increase in deep-level trap density is associated with the incorporation of higher concentrations of iodine into the HgCdTe.

  2. Magneto-infrared study of electron-hole system in strained semimetallic HgTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilyev, Yu. B.; Greshnov, A. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Suchalkin, S. D.; Tung, L.-C.; Smirnov, D.; Gouider, F.; Nachtwei, G.

    2013-12-04

    Magneto infrared absorption measurements have been performed on HgTe/CdHgTe quantum wells with different thicknesses grown on (013) GaAs substrate. Cyclotron resonance effective masses, inter-Landau-level transition energies and their dependence on magnetic field are measured. The measured intersubband energies are in good agreement with the theoretically calculated values. Strong spin-orbit interaction is responsible for cyclotron resonance splitting in asymmetric quantum wells. We demonstrate that the increase of the quantum well thickness leads to a semimetallic state, allowing for simultaneous observation of holes and electron transitions.

  3. Memorandum, CH2M HG Idaho, LLC, Request for Variance to Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations part 851, "Worker Safety and Health"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CH2M HG Idaho, LLC, Request for Variance to Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations part 851, "Worker Safety and Health"

  4. Introduction of mercury resistant bacterial strains to Hg(II) amended soil microcosms increases the resilience of the natural microbial community to mercury stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Lipthay, Julia R.; Rasmussen, Lasse D.; Serensen, Soren J.

    2004-03-17

    Heavy metals are among the most important groups of pollutant compounds, and they are highly persistent in the soil environment. Techniques that can be used for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated environments thus need to be evolved. In the present study we evaluated the effect of introducing a Hg resistance plasmid in subsurface soil communities. This was done in microcosms with DOE subsurface soils amended with 5-10 ppm of HgCl2. Two microcosms were set up. In microcosm A we studied the effect of adding strain S03539 containing either the Hg resistance conjugative plasmid, pJORD 70, or the Hg resistance mobilizable plasmid, pPB117. In microcosm B we studied the effect of adding strain KT2442 with and without pJORD70. For both microcosms, the effect on the resilience of the indigenous bacterial community as well as the effect on the soil concentration of Hg was evaluated.

  5. Exchange enhancement of the electron g-factor in a two-dimensional semimetal in HgTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovkun, L. S. Krishtopenko, S. S.; Zholudev, M. S.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Spirin, K. E.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.; Gavrilenko, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    The exchange enhancement of the electron g-factor in perpendicular magnetic fields to 12 T in HgTe/CdHgTe quantum wells 20 nm wide with a semimetal band structure is studied. The electron effective mass and g-factor at the Fermi level are determined by analyzing the temperature dependence of the amplitude of Shubnikov–de Haas oscillation in weak fields and near odd Landau-level filling factors ν ≤ 9. The experimental values are compared with theoretical calculations performed in the one-electron approximation using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The found dependence of g-factor enhancement on the electron concentration is explained by changes in the contributions of hole- and electron-like states to exchange corrections to the Landau-level energies in the conduction band.

  6. Neurotoxicological effects of cinnabar (a Chinese mineral medicine, HgS) in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, C.-F.; Liu, S.-H.; Lin-Shiau, S.-Y.

    2007-10-15

    Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS), has long been used in combination with traditional Chinese medicine as a sedative for more than 2000 years. Up to date, its pharmacological and toxicological effects are still unclear, especially in clinical low-dose and long-term use. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the effects of cinnabar on the time course of changes in locomotor activities, pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, motor equilibrium performance and neurobiochemical activities in mice during 3- to 11-week administration at a clinical dose of 10 mg/kg/day. The results showed that cinnabar was significantly absorbed by gastrointestinal (G-I) tract and transported to brain tissues. The spontaneous locomotor activities of male mice but not female mice were preferentially suppressed. Moreover, frequencies of jump and stereotype-1 episodes were progressively decreased after 3-week oral administration in male and female mice. Pentobarbital-induced sleeping time was prolonged and the retention time on a rotating rod (60 rpm) was reduced after treatment with cinnabar for 6 weeks and then progressively to a greater extent until the 11-week experiment. In addition, the biochemical changes in blood and brain tissues were studied; the inhibition of Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activities, increased production of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were found with a greater extent in male mice than those in female mice, which were apparently correlated with their differences in the neurological responses observed. In conclusion, these findings, for the first time, provide evidence of the pharmacological and toxicological basis for understanding the sedative and neurotoxic effects of cinnabar used as a Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years.

  7. Results of Hg speciation testing on tanks 30, 32, and 37 depth samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-11-30

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team. The twelfth shipment of samples was designated to include 3H evaporator system Tank 30, 32, and 37 depth samples. The Tank 30 depth sample (HTF-30-15-70) was taken at 190 inches from the tank bottom and the Tank 32 depth sample (HTF-32-15-68) was taken at 89 inches from the tank bottom and both were shipped to SRNL on June 29, 2015 in an 80 mL stainless steel dip bottles. The Tank 37 surface sample (HTF-37-15-94) was taken around 253.4 inches from the tank bottom and shipped to SRNL on July 21, 2015 in an 80 mL stainless steel dip bottle. All samples were placed in the SRNL Shielded Cells and left unopened until intermediate dilutions were made on July 24, 2015 using 1.00 mL of sample diluted to 100.00 mL with deionized H2O. A 30 mL Teflon® bottle was rinsed twice with the diluted tank sample and then filled leaving as little headspace as possible. It was immediately removed from the Shielded Cells and transferred to refrigerated storage where it remained at 4 °C until final dilutions were made on October 20. A second portion of the cells diluted tank sample was poured into a shielded polyethylene bottle and transferred to Analytical Development for radiochemical analysis data needed for Hazardous Material Transportation calculations.

  8. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wright, C.; Gupta, C. N.; Chen, J.; Patel, V.; Calhoun, V. D.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, L.; Bustillo, J. R.; Perrone-Bizzozero, N. I.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137- regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of thesemore » four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Furthermore, given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.« less

  9. Temperature scaling in the quantum-Hall-effect regime in a HgTe quantum well with an inverted energy spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arapov, Yu. G.; Gudina, S. V.; Neverov, V. N.; Podgornykh, S. M.; Popov, M. R. Harus, G. I.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Yakunin, M. V.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2015-12-15

    The longitudinal and Hall magnetoresistances of HgTe/HgCdTe heterostructures with an inverted energy spectrum (the HgTe quantum well width is d = 20.3 nm) are measured in the quantum-Hall-effect regime at T = 2–50 K in magnetic fields up to B = 9 T. Analysis of the temperature dependences of conductivity in the transition region between the first and second plateaus of the quantum Hall effect shows the feasibility of the scaling regime for a plateau–plateau quantum phase transition in 2D-structures on the basis of mercury telluride.

  10. Nuclear structure ''southeast'' of {sup 208}Pb: Isomeric states in {sup 208}Hg and {sup 209}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Dahan, N.; Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Alkhomashi, N.; Deo, A. Y.; Farrelly, G.; Steer, S. J.; Cullen, I. J.; Gelletly, W.; Swan, T.; Thomas, J. S.; Walker, P. M.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Gerl, J.; Pietri, S. B.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Boutachkov, P.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Farinon, F.

    2009-12-15

    The nuclear structure of neutron-rich N>126 nuclei has been investigated following their production via relativistic projectile fragmentation of a E/A=1 GeV {sup 238}U beam. Metastable states in the N=128 isotones {sup 208}Hg and {sup 209}Tl have been identified. Delayed {gamma}-ray transitions are interpreted as arising from the decay of I{sup {pi}}=(8{sup +}) and (17/2{sup +}) isomers, respectively. The data allow for the so far most comprehensive verification of the shell-model approach in the region determined by magic numbers Z<82 and N>126.

  11. Defect study in molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe films with activated and unactivated arsenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izhnin, I. I.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Fitsych, O. I.; Pociask-Bialy, M.; Sheregii, E.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2014-04-28

    A defect study was performed on molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe films in situ doped with arsenic. Doping was performed from either effusion cell or cracker cell, and studied were both as-grown samples and samples subjected to arsenic activation annealing. Electrical properties of the films were investigated with the use of ion milling as a means of stirring defects in the material. As a result of the study, it was confirmed that the most efficient incorporation of electrically active arsenic occurs at the cracking zone temperature of 700?C. Interaction between arsenic and tellurium during the growth was observed and is discussed in the paper.

  12. Calif. Utilities play catchup with Ever-Rising RPS targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-08-15

    The current status of attempts by California's three major utilities to meet mandated targets for producing power from renewable energy sources are sketched.

  13. RPS 11.1 ALARA Programs 12/31/99

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's implementation of a program to minimize doses to ionizing radiation As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)....

  14. NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services * Fire * Police * AmbulanceEmergency Medical Services * Health Care Services * ... PhD Project Manager, On-Site Power Team NYSERDA 17 Columbia Circle Albany, NY ...

  15. Memorandum of Understanding between DOE and NASA concerning RPS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (the parties) in the research, technology ... an agreement pursuant to which DOE and NASA will perform certain functions and provide ...

  16. Novel signal inversion of laser beam induced current for femtosecond-laser-drilling-induced junction on vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, W. C.; Wang, R.; Xu, Z. J.; Jiang, T.; Cheng, X. A.

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, experimental results of temperature-dependent signal inversion of laser beam induced current (LBIC) for femtosecond-laser-drilling-induced junction on vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe are reported. LBIC characterization shows that the traps induced by femtosecond laser drilling are sensitive to temperature. Theoretical models for trap-related p-n junction transformation are proposed and demonstrated using numerical simulations. The simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects of traps and mixed conduction are possibly the main reasons that result in the novel signal inversion of LBIC microscope at room temperature. The research results provide a theoretical guide for practical applications of large-scale array HgCdTe infrared photovoltaic detectors formed by femtosecond laser drilling, which may act as a potential new method for fabricating HgCdTe photodiodes.

  17. Identification and decay of the 0.48 ms 13/2{sup +} isomer in {sup 181}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Duppen, P. Van; Venhart, M.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.

    2009-10-15

    A new isomer with a half-life of 0.48(2) ms was identified in the nuclide {sup 181}Hg, which was produced in the complete fusion reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 184}Pb* at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt). The isomeric state was tentatively assigned a spin-parity of 13/2{sup +}. We propose that this isomer de-excites by a yet unobserved low-energy, strongly converted {gamma}-ray transition, followed by a newly identified cascade composed of a 90.3 keV M1 and a 71.4 keV E2 {gamma}-ray transition.

  18. Effects of embryonic pre-exposure to methylmercury and Hg/sup 2 +/ on larval tolerance in Fundulus heteroclitus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weis, P.; Weis, J.S.

    1983-11-01

    Many reports demonstrate enhanced metal tolerance as a result of previous exposure to low concentrations. Pretreatment of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) eggs with cadmium made the larvae more resistant to subsequent Cd treatment. Larvae of the flagfish, Jordanella floridae, initially exposed as embryos to Zn and to mixtures of Zn and Cd were much more tolerant than those not previously exposed, indicating acclimation during embryonic exposure. Acclimation to metals after pre-exposure was attributed to stimulation of the synthesis of metal-binding proteins, or metallothioneins, in the liver, which form a nontoxic complex with the metal. In this paper we report on the effects of embryonic pre-exposure to methylmercury(meHf) and Hg/sup 2 +/ on larval susceptibility to these toxicants in the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

  19. Dynamic conductivity of the bulk states of n-type HgTe/CdTe quantum well topological insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qinjun; Sanderson, Matthew; Cao, J. C.; Zhang, Chao

    2014-11-17

    We theoretically studied the frequency-dependent current response of the bulk state of topological insulator HgTe/CdTe quantum well. The optical conductivity is mainly due to the inter-band process at high frequencies. At low frequencies, intra-band process dominates with a dramatic drop to near zero before the inter-band contribution takes over. The conductivity decreases with temperature at low temperature and increases with temperature at high temperature. The transport scattering rate has an opposite frequency dependence in the low and high temperature regime. The different frequency dependence is due to the interplay of the carrier-impurity scattering and carrier population near the Fermi surface.

  20. Dielectric functions and carrier concentrations of Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Se films determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A. J.; Peiris, F. C.; Brill, G.; Doyle, K.; Myers, T. H.

    2015-08-17

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry, ranging from 35 meV to 6 eV, was used to determine the dielectric functions of a series of molecular beam epitaxy-grown Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Se thin films deposited on both ZnTe/Si(112) and GaSb(112) substrates. The fundamental band gap as well as two higher-order electronic transitions blue-shift with increasing Cd composition in Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Se, as expected. Representing the free carrier absorption with a Drude oscillator, we found that the effective masses of Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Se (grown on ZnTe/Si) vary between 0.028 and 0.050 times the free electron mass, calculated using the values of carrier concentration and the mobility obtained through Hall measurements. Using these effective masses, we determined the carrier concentrations of Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Se samples grown on GaSb, which is of significance as films grown on such doped-substrates posit ambiguous results when measured by conventional Hall experiments. These models can serve as a basis for monitoring Cd-composition during sample growth through in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry.

  1. Results of Hg speciation testing on 3Q15 tank 50, salt solution feed tank (SSFT), and solvent hold tank (SHT) materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2015-08-13

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team. The results are documented in this report.

  2. Synthesis, crystal structure and optical property of a novel metal chalcohalide: ZnHg{sub 3}Se{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guodong; Xiong, Wei-Wei; Nie, Lina; Zhang, Qichun

    2015-10-15

    A novel chalcohalide ZnHg{sub 3}Se{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} has been synthesized through a solid state method and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in the acentric space group Cmc2{sub 1} (No. 36) with cell parameters a=7.3262(8) Å, b=12.518(2) Å, c=11.3324(14) Å. The compound consists of 12-membered Hg{sub 6}Se{sub 6} rings edge-sharing with six neighbored rings to construct a 2D layered network and the ZnCl{sub 4} tetrahedra are sandwiched between layers. TG-DTA measurement shows that the compound is thermally stable up to 300 °C. The band gap of the crystal is about 2.23 eV, and the crystal exhibits a broad transparent range from 0.56 to 13.8 µm. - Highlights: • A novel chalcohalide ZnHg{sub 3}Se{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} was synthesized by a solid state method. • The structure contains 12-membered Hg{sub 6}Se{sub 6} rings and ZnCl{sub 4} tetrahedra. • The band gap of the as-prepared compound is about 2.23 eV.

  3. Results of Hg speciation testing on MCU strip effluent hold tank (SEHT) and decontaminated salt solution hold tank (DSSHT) materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-09-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The tenth shipment of samples was designated to include Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and MCU Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) materials from processing Salt Batch 7b. The MCU SEHT (MCU-15-722) and DSSHT (MCU-15-709) samples were pulled on June 15, 2015. All MCU samples were received at SRNL on June 16, 2015. The DSSHT sample was moved the same day to refrigeration, while the SEHT sample was placed in the Shielded Cells. On July 9, 2015 it was opened and an aliquot diluted 1:100 with Eurofins deionized water and a portion of the diluted sample transferred to a Teflon® bottle prior to moving it to refrigeration that same day. All samples were kept in the dark and refrigerated until final dilutions were prepared for shipment to Eurofins.

  4. Commensurate antiferromagnetic excitations as a signature of the pseudogap in the tetragonal high-Tc cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chan, M. K.; Dorow, C. J.; Mangin-Thro, L.; Tang, Y.; Ge, Y.; Veit, M. J.; Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Christianson, A. D.; Park, J. T.; et al

    2016-03-04

    We report that antiferromagnetic correlations have been argued to be the cause of the d-wave superconductivity and the pseudogap phenomena exhibited by the cuprates. Although the antiferromagnetic response in the pseudogap state has been reported for a number of compounds, there exists no information for structurally simple HgBa2CuO4+δ. We report neutron-scattering results for HgBa2CuO4+δ (superconducting transition temperature Tc≈71 K, pseudogap temperature T*≈305 K) that demonstrate the absence of the two most prominent features of the magnetic excitation spectrum of the cuprates: the X-shaped ‘hourglass’ response and the resonance mode in the superconducting state. Instead, the response is Y-shaped, gapped andmore » significantly enhanced below T*, and hence a prominent signature of the pseudogap state.« less

  5. Relationship between textural properties, fly ash carbons, and Hg capture in fly ashes derived from the combustion of anthracitic pulverized feed blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isabel Surez-Ruiz; Jose B. Parra

    2007-08-15

    In this work, the textural properties of a series of whole anthracitic-derived fly ashes sampled in eight hoppers from the electrostatic precipitators and their sized fractions (from {gt}150 to {lt}25 {mu}m) are investigated. Data from N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 77 K, helium density, and mercury porosimetry have contributed to establish a relationship between the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, VTOT, porosity, carbon content (the type of fly ash carbons), and Hg retention in these fly ashes. The unburned carbons in these ashes are macroporous materials, and they are different from the carbons in fly ashes from classes C and F (the latter derived from the combustion of bituminous coals) and show different textural properties. These ashes represent the end member of the fly ash classes C and F with respect to certain textural properties. Although the BET surface area and VTOT values for the studied samples are the lowest reported, they increase with the increase in carbon content, anisotropic carbon content, and particle size of the ashes. Thus, a positive relationship between all these parameters and Hg capture by the coarser ash fractions was found. The finest fraction of carbons ({lt}25 {mu}m) represented an exception. Although it makes a significant contribution to the total carbon of the whole fly ashes and shows relatively higher surface areas and VTOT values, its Hg concentration was found to be the lowest. This suggests that the type of unburned carbons in the finest fraction and/or other adsorption mechanisms may play a role in Hg concentration. Because the textural properties of anisotropic carbons depend on their subtype and on their origin, the need for its differentiation has been evidenced. 54 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of p-process isotopes. II. {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Pardo, C. Domingo; Kaeppeler, F.; Walter, S.

    2010-09-15

    The neutron-capture cross sections of {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg have been measured by means of the activation technique. The samples were irradiated in a quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV, which was produced at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Systematic uncertainties were investigated in repeated activations with different samples and by variation of the experimental parameters, that is, irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and {gamma}-ray counting conditions. The measured data were converted into Maxwellian-averaged cross sections at kT=30 keV, yielding 1214{+-}61, 624{+-}54, 590{+-}43, 511{+-}46, and 201{+-}11 mb for {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg, respectively. The present results either represent first experimental data ({sup 168}Yb, {sup 184}Os, and {sup 196}Hg) or could be determined with significantly reduced uncertainties ({sup 180}W and {sup 190}Pt). These measurements are part of a systematic study of stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of the stable p isotopes.

  7. Cationic coordination compound Cs{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}I{sub 8} for IR NLO material: Synthesis, crystal growth and characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathiskumar, S.; Kathiravan, P.; Balakrishnan, T.

    2015-06-24

    Single crystals Cs{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}I{sub 8} of dimensions 5 × 3 × 4   mm{sup 3} were grown by solution growth method at room temperature and structurally characterized by single crystal X – ray diffraction. Cs{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}I{sub 8} compound crystallizes in a noncentrosymmetric space group Cm with the crystal data of a = 7.4415 Å, b = 21.6629 Å, c = 7.6726 Å, α, β = 90°, γ = 108.05° and Z = 2. The grown crystals were characterized by powder X – ray diffraction analysis and the various diffraction planes are indexed. The presence of functional groups was identified qualitatively by Fourier transform infrared and FT – Raman spectral analyses. Ultraviolet – visible spectral analyses shows that the crystal has low UV cut off at 388 nm combined with very good transparency of 98 % in a wide range. The optical band gap was estimated to be 3 eV. Mechanical hardness of the grown crystal Cs{sub 2}Hg{sub 3}I{sub 8} was determined. The dielectric response of the crystal with varying frequencies was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis shows that the grown crystal has very good thermal stability up to 97.5°C.

  8. Crystal Growth And Characterization of the Model High-Temperature Superconductor HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+{delta}}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xudong; Yu, Guichuan; Cho, Yong-Chan; Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Barisic, Neven; Bourges, Philippe; Kaneko, Nobuhisa; Li, Yuan; Lu, Li; Motoyama, Eugene M.; Vajk, Owen P.; Greven, Martin; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Jilin U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Saclay /NIST, Wash., D.C.

    2007-03-16

    Since the discovery of high-transition-temperature (T{sub c}) superconductivity in La{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4} in 1986, the study of the lamellar copper oxides has remained at the forefront of condensed matter physics. Apart from their unusually high values of T{sub c}, these materials also exhibit a variety of complex phenomena and phases. This rich behavior is a consequence of the lamellar crystal structures, formed of copper-oxygen sheets separated by charge reservoir layers, and of the strong electron-electron correlations in the copper-oxygen sheets. After two decades of intensive research, which has stimulated many valuable new insights into correlated electron systems in general, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the correct theory for high-T{sub c} superconductivity. The ultimate technological goal of room-temperature superconductivity might only be attained after the development of a deeper understanding of the mercury-based compounds HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub n-1}Cu{sub n}OI{sub 2n+2+{delta}}, which currently exhibit the highest T{sub c}values. One very important issue in this regard is the role of electronic versus chemical and structural inhomogeneities in these materials, and the associated need to separate material-specific properties from those that are essential to superconductivity. Unfortunately, there has been remarkably little scientific work on the mercury-based compounds because sizable crystals have not been available; quantitative measurements of any kind would be invaluable benchmarks for testing the theories of high-T{sub c} superconductivity. The compounds HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub n-1}Cu{sub n}OI{sub 2n+2+{delta}} can be viewed as model systems not only because of their record high-T{sub c} values, but also because of their high-symmetry crystal structures. Of particular interest is the simplest member of this materials family, HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+{delta}} (Hg1201), which possesses only one copper-oxygen sheet per unit cell (n = 1), as

  9. Multi-Pollutant Emissions Control: Pilot Plant Study of Technologies for Reducing Hg, SO3, NOx and CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Fenger; Richard A. Winschel

    2005-08-31

    A slipstream pilot plant was built and operated to investigate technology to adsorb mercury (Hg) onto the existing particulate (i.e., fly ash) by cooling flue gas to 200-240 F with a Ljungstrom-type air heater or with water spray. The mercury on the fly ash was then captured in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). An alkaline material, magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}), is injected into flue gas upstream of the air heater to control sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), which prevents acid condensation and corrosion of the air heater and ductwork. The slipstream was taken from a bituminous coal-fired power plant. During this contract, Plant Design and Construction (Task 1), Start Up and Maintenance (Task 2), Baseline Testing (Task 3), Sorbent Testing (Task 4), Parametric Testing (Task 5), Humidification Tests (Task 6), Long-Term Testing (Task 7), and a Corrosion Study (Task 8) were completed. The Mercury Stability Study (Task 9), ESP Report (Task 11), Air Heater Report (Task 12) and Final Report (Task 14) were completed. These aspects of the project, as well as progress on Public Outreach (Task 15), are discussed in detail in this final report. Over 90% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 200-210 F at the ESP inlet; baseline conditions with 290 F flue gas gave about 26% removal. Mercury removal is sensitive to flue gas temperature and carbon content of fly ash. At 200-210 F, both elemental and oxidized mercury were effectively captured at the ESP. Mg(OH){sub 2} injection proved effective for removal of SO{sub 3} and eliminated rapid fouling of the air heater. The pilot ESP performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions. Mercury volatility and leaching tests did not show any stability problems. No significant corrosion was detected at the air heater or on corrosion coupons at the ESP. The results justify larger-scale testing/demonstration of the technology. These conclusions are presented and discussed in two presentations given in July and

  10. Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg.sup.196 enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg.sup.196 isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment.

  11. Method of controlling the mercury vapor pressure in a photo-chemical lamp or vapor filter used for Hg[sup 196] enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.

    1993-02-16

    The present invention is directed to a method of eliminating the cold spot zones presently used on Hg[sup 196] isotope separation lamps and filters by the use of a mercury amalgams, preferably mercury - indium amalgams. The use of an amalgam affords optimization of the mercury density in the lamp and filter of a mercury enrichment reactor, particularly multilamp enrichment reactors. Moreover, the use of an amalgam in such lamps and/or filters affords the ability to control the spectral line width of radiation emitted from lamps, a requirement for mercury enrichment.

  12. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing. During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.

  13. Atomic radii for atoms with the 6s shell outermost: The effective atomic radius and the van der Waals radius from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatewaki, Hiroshi; Hatano, Yasuyo; Noro, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2015-06-15

    We consider, for atoms from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg, the effective atomic radius (r{sub ear}), which is defined as the distance from the nucleus at which the magnitude of the electric field is equal to that in He at one half of the equilibrium bond length of He{sub 2}. The values of r{sub ear} are about 50% larger than the mean radius of the outermost occupied orbital of 6s, . The value of r{sub ear} decreases from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 56}Ba and undergoes increases and decreases with rising nuclear charge from {sub 57}La to {sub 70}Y b. In fact r{sub ear} is understood as comprising two interlaced sequences; one consists of {sub 57}La, {sub 58}Ce, and {sub 64}Gd, which have electronic configuration (4f{sup n−1})(5d{sup 1})(6s{sup 2}), and the remaining atoms have configuration (4f{sup n})(6s{sup 2}). The sphere defined by r{sub ear} contains 85%–90% of the 6s electrons. From {sub 71}Lu to {sub 80}Hg the radius r{sub ear} also involves two sequences, corresponding to the two configurations 5d{sup n+1}6s{sup 1} and 5d{sup n}6s{sup 2}. The radius r{sub ear} according to the present methodology is considerably larger than r{sub vdW} obtained by other investigators, some of who have found values of r{sub vdW} close to .

  14. Temperature dependence of the carrier lifetime in narrow-gap Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1–x}Te solid solutions: Radiative recombination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazhenov, N. L. Mynbaev, K. D.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2015-09-15

    The probability of the radiative recombination of carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors is analyzed for the example of Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1–x}Te solid solutions. Expressions are derived for the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity in terms of the three-band Kane’s model with consideration for the nonparabolic dependence of the carrier energy on the wave vector. It is shown that taking into account this nonparabolicity of the energy spectrum of carriers modifies the dependence of the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity on frequency. Expressions for the probability of radiative recombination, derived in terms of the simple parabolic model and Kane’s model with and without the nonparabolicity effect taken into account, are compared. It is shown that the contributions to recombination from electron transitions to heavy- and light-hole bands are close and the contribution from light holes cannot be neglected when calculating the radiative-recombination probability.

  15. Energy release, beam attenuation radiation damage, gas production and accumulation of long-lived activity in Pb, Pb-Bi and Hg targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shubin, Yu.N.

    1996-06-01

    The calculation and analysis of the nuclei concentrations and long-lived residual radioactivity accumulated in Pb, Pb-Bi and Hg targets irradiated by 800 MeV, 30 mA proton beam have been performed. The dominating components to the total radioactivity of radionuclides resulting from fission and spallation reactions and radiative capture by both target nuclei and accumulated radioactive nuclei for various irradiation and cooling times were analyzed. The estimations of spectral component contributions of neutron and proton fluxes to the accumulated activity were carried out. The contributions of fission products to the targets activity and partial activities of main long-lived fission products to the targets activity and partial activities of main long-lived fission products were evaluated. The accumulation of Po isotopes due to reactions induced by secondary alpha-particles were found to be important for the Pb target as compared with two-step radiative capture. The production of Tritium in the targets and its contribution to the total targets activity was considered in detail. It is found that total activities of both targets are close to one another.

  16. Electrical and optical properties of Mn-doped Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grushka, O. G. Chupyra, S. M.; Mysliuk, O. M.; Bilichuk, S. V.; Koziarskyi, D. P.

    2013-09-15

    The effect of Mn impurities on the properties of Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6} crystals is studied by electrical and optical measurements. It is shown that, despite the high dopant concentration (1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}), the electron concentration remains the same as that in an undoped crystal ({approx}10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} at 300 K). At the same time, narrowing of the band gap from 0.74 to 0.7 eV is observed. From an analysis of the absorption spectra, it is found that the absorption edge is formed by optical transitions involving density-of-states (DoS) tails and that two acceptor- and donor-type impurity bands are formed in the band gap. The two bands are described by a Gaussian distribution of the DoS, with an energy gap between the peaks of E{sub 0} = E{sub d}{sup 0} - E{sub a}{sup 0} = 0.4 eV. The total donor and acceptor concentration N{sub d} + N{sub a} and the degree of compensation K = N{sub a}/N{sub d} {yields} 1 are determined. Such compensation is responsible for pinning of the Fermi level near the middle of the band gap and for quasi-intrinsic conductivity at temperatures T {>=} 300 K.

  17. Microsoft Word - Hg.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim 1 , James J. Rytuba 2 , Gordon E. Brown, Jr. 3 1 Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman

  18. Energy and Economic Impacts of Implementing Both a 25% RPS and a 25% RFS by 2025

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This report responds to a request by Senator James Inhofe for analysis of a "25-by-25" proposal that combines a requirement that a 25% share of electricity sales be produced from renewable sources by 2025 with a requirement that a 25% share of liquid transportation fuel sales also be derived from renewable sources by 2025.

  19. Multi-Mission Capable, High g Load mW RPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John C. Bass; Nathan Hiller; Velimir Jovanovic; Norbert B. Elsner

    2007-05-23

    Over the past few years Hi-Z has been developing a wide range of mW generators and life testing thermoelectric modules for the Department of Energy (DOE) to fulfill requirements by NASA Ames and other agencies. The purpose of this report is to determine the capabilities of a wide range of mW generators for various missions. In the 1st quarterly report the power output of various mW generators was determined via thermal and mechanical modeling. The variable attributes of each generator modeled were: the number of RHUs (1-8), generator outer diameter (1.25-4 in.), and G-load (10, 500, or 2,000). The resultant power output was as high as 180 mW for the largest generator with the lowest Gload. Specifically, we looked at the design of a generator for high G loading that is insulated with Xenon gas and multifoil solid insulation. Because the design of this new generator varied considerably from the previous generator design, it was necessary to show in detail how it is to be assembled, calculate them as of the generator and determine the heat loss from the system. A new method of assembling the RHU was also included as part of the design. As a side issue we redesigned the test stations to provide better control of the cold sink temperature. This will help in reducing the test data by eliminating the need to 'normalize' the data to a specific temperature. In addition these new stations can be used to simulate the low ambient temperatures associated with Mars and other planets.

  20. Analysis of a 10% RPS - Response letter summarizing principal conclusions of supplement

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    Transmittal letter for the supplement to the Service Report 'Analysis of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard'.

  1. RPS Collaborative Webinar: Using AVERT to Estimate the Emissions Benefits of Clean Energy Policies and Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    State policymakers and various stakeholders frequently have need to estimate the emissions impacts of particular renewable energy and energy efficiency policies. However, it can be challenging and...

  2. RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices 3/9/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these practices protect the safety and health of the...

  3. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 3: SOx/NOx/Hg Removal for Low Sulfur Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanfir, Monica; Solunke, Rahul; Shah, Minish

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxycombustion technology. The objective of Task 3 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning low sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was to conduct an experimental investigation and to develop a novel process for simultaneously removal of SOx and NOx from power plants that would operate on low sulfur coal without the need for wet-FGD & SCRs. A novel purification process operating at high pressures and ambient temperatures was developed. Activated carbon's catalytic and adsorbent capabilities are used to oxidize the sulfur and nitrous oxides to SO{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} species, which are adsorbed on the activated carbon and removed from the gas phase. Activated carbon is regenerated by water wash followed by drying. The development effort commenced with the screening of commercially available activated carbon materials for their capability to remove SO{sub 2}. A bench-unit operating in batch mode was constructed to conduct an experimental investigation of simultaneous SOx and NOx removal from a simulated oxyfuel flue gas mixture. Optimal operating conditions and the capacity of the activated carbon to remove the contaminants were identified. The process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx. In the longevity tests performed on a batch unit, the retention capacity could be maintained at high level over 20 cycles. This process was able to effectively remove up to 4000 ppm SOx from the simulated feeds corresponding to oxyfuel flue gas from high sulfur coal plants. A dual bed continuous unit with five times the capacity of the batch unit was constructed to test continuous operation and longevity. Full

  4. Temperature dependence of the carrier lifetime in Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1−x}Te narrow-gap solid solutions with consideration for Auger processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazhenov, N. L. Mynbaev, K. D.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependence of the carrier lifetime in Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1−x}Te narrow-gap solid solutions in the temperature range 5 K < T < 300 K is analyzed within the scope of a microscopic model. Main attention is given to an analysis of the Auger recombination mechanism governing the carrier lifetime at high temperatures. The Auger-recombination rates are calculated with consideration for specific features of the band structure of the narrow-gap semiconductor in microscopic theory. It is shown that strict account of the non-parabolicity of the electronic structure in terms of Kane’s model leads to a substantially different temperature dependence of the Auger-recombination rates, compared with the approach in which nonparabolicity is disregarded.

  5. Two-fermion-four-boson description of {sup 198}Hg within the U{sub {nu}}(6/12) x U{sub {pi}}(6/4) extended nuclear structure supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernards, C.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Fransen, C.; Linnemann, A.; Radeck, D.

    2009-05-15

    Using the U{sub {nu}}(6/12) x U{sub {pi}}(6/4) extended supersymmetry, we constructed the energy spectrum and electromagnetic transition properties of the supermultiplet member {sup 198}Hg with two proton fermions coupled to a neutron boson core. Consistency between the supersymmetric interacting boson fermion fermion approximation (IBFFA) description and the F-spin symmetric interacting boson approximation (IBA-2) description is shown for this two-fermion-N-boson multiplet member. The data of a {gamma}{gamma} angular correlation experiment using the HORUS cube {gamma}-ray spectrometer--determining new multipole mixing ratios, level spins, {gamma} transitions, and energy states--shows quite a good agreement, also for the low-energy part of the spectrum, when comparing theoretical predictions and experimental data. This is contrary to the usual assumption that a two-fermion-N-boson constellation should describe just the excited two-quasiparticle states.

  6. Effect of annealing on the kinetic properties and band parameters of Hg{sub 1?x?y}Cd{sub x}Eu{sub y}Se semiconductor crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovalyuk, T. T. Maistruk, E. V.; Maryanchuk, P. D.

    2014-12-15

    The results of studies of the kinetic properties of Hg{sub 1?x?y}Cd{sub x}Eu{sub y}Se semiconductor crystals in the ranges of temperatures T = 77300 K and magnetic fields H = 0.55 kOe before and after heat treatment of the samples in Se vapors are reported. It is established that annealing of the samples in Se vapors induces a decrease in the electron concentration. From the concentration dependence of the electron effective mass at the Fermi level, the band gap, the matrix element of interband interaction, and the electron effective mass at the bottom of the conduction band are determined.

  7. Energy recycling by co-combustion of coal and recovered paint solids from automobile paint operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achariya Suriyawong; Rogan Magee; Ken Peebles; Pratim Biswas

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of particulate emission and the fate of 13 trace elements (arsenic (As), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn)) during combustion tests of recovered paint solids (RPS) and coal. The emissions from combustions of coal or RPS alone were compared with those of co-combustion of RPS with subbituminous coal. The distribution/partitioning of these toxic elements between a coarse-mode ash (particle diameter (d{sub p}) > 0.5 {mu}m), a submicrometer-mode ash (d{sub p} < 0.5 {mu}m), and flue gases was also evaluated. Submicrometer particles generated by combustion of RPS alone were lower in concentration and smaller in size than that from combustion of coal. However, co-combustion of RPS and coal increased the formation of submicrometer-sized particles because of the higher reducing environment in the vicinity of burning particles and the higher volatile chlorine species. Hg was completely volatilized in all cases; however, the fraction in the oxidized state increased with co-combustion. Most trace elements, except Zn, were retained in ash during combustion of RPS alone. Mo was mostly retained in all samples. The behavior of elements, except Mn and Mo, varied depending on the fuel samples. As, Ba, Cr, Co, Cu, and Pb were vaporized to a greater extent from cocombustion of RPS and coal than from combustion of either fuel. Evidence of the enrichment of certain toxic elements in submicrometer particles has also been observed for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni during co-combustion. 27 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. DENSE PHASE REBURN COMBUSTION SYSTEM (DPRCS) DEMONSTRATION ON A 154 MWE TANGENTIAL FURNACE: ADDITIONAL AREA OF INTEREST-TO DEVELOP AND DEMONSTRATE AN IN-FURNACE MULTI-POLLUTANT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE NOx, SO2 & Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen C. Wiley; Steven Castagnero; Geoff Green; Kevin Davis; David White

    2004-03-01

    Semi-dense phase pneumatic delivery and injection of calcium and sodium sorbents, and microfine powdered coal, at various sidewall elevations of an online operating coal-fired power plant, was investigated for the express purpose of developing an in-furnace, economic multi-pollutant reduction methodology for NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} & Hg. The 154 MWe tangentially-fired furnace that was selected for a full-scale demonstration, was recently retrofitted for NO{sub x} reduction with a high velocity rotating-opposed over-fire air system. The ROFA system, a Mobotec USA technology, has a proven track record of breaking up laminar flow along furnace walls, thereby enhancing the mix of all constituents of combustion. The knowledge gained from injecting sorbents and micronized coal into well mixed combustion gases with significant improvement in particulate retention time, should serve well the goals of an in-furnace multi-pollutant reduction technology; that of reducing back-end cleanup costs on a wide variety of pollutants, on a cost per ton basis, by first accomplishing significant in-furnace reductions of all pollutants.

  9. EIS-0299: Proposed Production of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) for Use in Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for Space Missions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for the proposed production of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) using one or more DOE research reactors and facilities.

  10. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of organic–inorganic hybrid compound: (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}N{sub 2}){sub 2}(Hg{sub 0.75}Cd{sub 0.25})Cl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elwej, R. Hamdi, M.; Hannachi, N.; Hlel, F.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We have synthesized a new hybrid compound of composition (C6H9N2)2(Hg0.75Cd0.25)Cl4. • The Ac conductivity of the title material was studied as a function of frequency and temperature. • The dielectric data have been analyzed in modulus formalism using KWW. - Abstract: The bis-2-amino-4-picolinium tetrachloromercurate-cadmate compound (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}N{sub 2}){sub 2}(Hg{sub 0.75}Cd{sub 0.25})Cl{sub 4} was prepared by hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The electrical properties of the compound were studied using impedance spectroscopy in the frequency and temperature range of 200 Hz–5 MHz and 308–403 K, respectively. The equivalent circuit is modeled by a combination of a parallel Rp//CPE circuit to explain the impedance results. The dielectric data were analyzed using complex electrical modulus M* at various temperatures. The activation energy responsible for the relaxation calculated from the modulus spectra is found to be almost the same as the value obtained from the temperature variation of dc conductivity. The electrical modulus and its scaling behavior are also investigated.

  11. Technology could deliver 90% Hg reduction from coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maize, K.

    2009-07-15

    Reducing mercury emissions at coal-fired power plants by 90% has been considered the holy grail of mercury control. A new technology promises to get used there, but at a price. This is a mixture of chemical approaches, including activated carbon injection into the gases coming off the combustor along with injection of trona or calcium carbonate to reduce sulfur trioxide in the exhaust gases. The trick according to Babcock and Wilcox's manager Sam Kumar, to 'capture the mercury as a particulate on the carbon and then capture the particulate' in an electrostatic precipitator or a fabric filter baghouse. 2 figs.

  12. Packed bed reactor for photochemical .sup.196 Hg isotope separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Straight tubes and randomly oriented pieces of tubing having been employed in a photochemical mercury enrichment reactor and have been found to improve the enrichment factor (E) and utilization (U) compared to a non-packed reactor. One preferred embodiment of this system uses a moving bed (via gravity) for random packing.

  13. Microsoft Word - Hg SEIS NNMCAB Member Comments Letter Rev 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries Inspection Report 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites DOE/IG-0806 November 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 25, 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "40 mm Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy and its

  14. Materials Data on Hg (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Hg (SG:191) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Microsoft Word - Hg SEIS NNMCAB Member Comments Letter Rev 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... of the chemistry of received mercury samples did not seem adequate to protect the ... It is obvious that the mercury arriving at the storage facility would originate from a ...

  17. Are renewables portfolio standards cost-effective emission abatement policy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katerina Dobesova; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave

    2005-11-15

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) could be an important policy instrument for 3P and 4P control. The authors examine the costs of renewable power, accounting for the federal production tax credit, the market value of a renewable credit, and the value of producing electricity without emissions of SO{sub 2}, NOx, mercury, and CO{sub 2}. The focus is on Texas, which has a large RPS and is the largest U.S. electricity producer and one of the largest emitters of pollutants and CO{sub 2}. The private and social costs of wind generation in an RPS is compared with the current cost of fossil generation, accounting for the pollution and CO{sub 2} emissions. It was found that society paid about 5.7 cents/kWh more for wind power, counting the additional generation, transmission, intermittency, and other costs. The higher cost includes credits amounting to 1.1 cents/kWh in reduced SO{sub 2}, NOx, and Hg emissions. These pollution reductions and lower CO{sub 2} emissions could be attained at about the same cost using pulverized coal (PC) or natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS); the reductions could be obtained more cheaply with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CCS. 35 refs., 7 tabs.

  18. Property:Incentive/Auth16Link | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Q Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Indiana) + http:en.openei.orgwikiAlternativeandRenewableEnergyPortfolioStandard%28WestVirginia%29 + Qualifying RPS State...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) without having restructured its electric utility industry. The RPS sets a total goal... Eligibility: Investor-Owned Utility, Municipal...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    enacted a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that applies to all retail electricity sales in the District. In October 2008 the RPS was amended by... Eligibility:...

  1. Property:Incentive/Auth10Link | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Illinois) + http:en.openei.orgwikiAlternativeEnergyPortfolioStandard + Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Indiana) +...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Columbia Council enacted a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that applies to all retail electricity sales in the District. In October 2008 the RPS was amended by... Eligibility:...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Delaware Electric Cooperative- Green Energy Fund Under the 2005 Delaware Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) legislation, electric cooperatives were allowed to opt out of the RPS...

  4. Property:Incentive/Auth13Link | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (New Jersey) + http:en.openei.orgwikiAlternativeandRenewableEnergyPortfolioStandard%28WestVirginia%29 + Qualifying RPS...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Council enacted a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that applies to all retail electricity sales in the District. In October 2008 the RPS was amended by... Eligibility:...

  6. SRNS Final VPP Report August 2010

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... for the new Hot Crane and 5-ton Maintenance Hoist-Wire Rope Inspection at H-Canyon. The maintenance was to be performed on the 5-ton crane in the H-Canyon crane maintenance room. ...

  7. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Portfolio Standards Costs and Benefits Energy Information Administration 2008 Energy Conference 30 years of Energy Information and Analysis Washington, DC April 7- 8, 2008 Chris Namovicz Operations Research Analyst Energy Information Administration EIA Analyses of RPS Policy * AEO 2008 - Includes state RPS program * Other scenarios are based on AEO 2007 - Bingaman RPS - 15 percent national RPS by 2020 - 25 X 25 Proposal - 25 percent national RPS by 2025 plus 25 percent biofuels * Other renewable

  8. Materials Data on K2Hg7 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on K5Hg7 (SG:57) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Cu2HgI4 (SG:121) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on HgPbF6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Si(Hg2S3)2 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Si(Hg2Se3)2 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-08

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. The Molecular Structure of Aqueous Hg(II)-EDTA As Determined...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: ENGLISH Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles DOI: 10.1021acs.jpca.5b00343 Select the DOI to obtain a copy of this ...

  15. Materials Data on Ag2HgO2 (SG:96) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ag2HgI4 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on HgRhF6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on HgP14Pb (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Rb2Hg(BSe)9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on AgHgSI (SG:19) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Hg5Pd2 (SG:127) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Cr2HgS4 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-08

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on HgSO4 (SG:31) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Hg3(SeBr)2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. sup 3 P Hg, Cd, and Zn photosensitized chemistry of vinyl halides in krypton matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartland, H.E.; Pimentel, G.C. )

    1990-01-25

    The reaction of group IIB metals in the {sup 3}P state with vinyl fluoride, chloride, and bromide is studied in krypton matrix. The primary process in all cases is hydrogen halide elimination to form a hydrogen halide/acetylene hydrogen-bonded complex. Insertion of metal atoms into C-Cl and C-Br bonds, but not into C-H and C-F bonds, is also observed. The insertion photochemistry can be explained by a mechanism which requires that the process occur on a triplet surface with the vinyl halide in the planar ground-state conformation.

  6. Materials Data on Al2Hg3Cl8 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on TiCuHg2 (SG:216) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on HfCuHg2 (SG:216) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Hg(AuF4)2 (SG:124) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on ScHg3 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on HgPS3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on HgSeO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on SnHgF6 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Hg2Mo2O7 (SG:13) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Cs2HgI4 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Mg2Hg (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on HgPd (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Hg2Rh (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Al2HgSe4 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on In2HgS4 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on HgB4O7 (SG:31) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Ga2HgSe4 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Hg3As2F12 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on CeHg2 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Hg3AsO4 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on HgO2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Hg2WO4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on HgBrO3 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Rb2Hg7 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Hg3(BO3)2 (SG:167) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Na2HgO2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on ZrCuHg2 (SG:216) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on HgS (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Mn2Hg5 (SG:127) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Hg2P2S7 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on HgSeO4 (SG:31) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ho2HgO4 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Hg3(TeI)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on BaHgS2 (SG:26) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Hg3(TeCl)2 (SG:199) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on CsHgBr3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on CsGdHgSe3 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on NiHg (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Hg4As2I3 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Hg2P2O7 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on RbHg11 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on BaHgO2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on TlHg5Cl11 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Na4HgP2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on BaHg (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Hg4OF6 (SG:186) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-16

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Tl4HgBr6 (SG:128) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Hg(IO3)2 (SG:4) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Hg3(SeCl)2 (SG:199) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Hg(Mo3Cl7)2 (SG:201) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on BaSnHg (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Hg(CO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Hg(AsO3)2 (SG:162) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ga2HgS4 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Rb5Hg19 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Nd2HgO4 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Hg2AsCl2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Cs3HgCl5 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Hg(PO3)2 (SG:61) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Sn(HgSe2)2 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Hg2GeSe4 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on HgTeO3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Ba(TlHg)2 (SG:136) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on ThHg3 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on ThHg2 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Hg2IO (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Tl4HgI6 (SG:128) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on NbHg3F6 (SG:162) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Hg3(TeBr)2 (SG:199) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Ag2SnHgSe4 (SG:31) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-08

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on HoHg (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ca5Hg3 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on CdHg2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Th2Hg (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Hg2H10C3NCl5 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on CaHg11 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on MnHg (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ca3Hg2 (SG:127) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Mg5Hg3 (SG:193) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Cu2HgGeS4 (SG:121) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on CaHg (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Ag2HgI4 (SG:0) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Hg3SO6 (SG:144) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Hg4As2O7 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on HgClO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on HgTe (SG:152) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Hg3TeO6 (SG:206) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on In2HgTe4 (SG:119) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-15

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-14-037.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to 5-Ton Mezzanine Crane A subcontractor would remove, modify, fabricateprocure, paint, deliver and install ladders, platforms, guardrails, swing gates, and ladder accessories. ...

  15. Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In October 1999, Wisconsin enacted Act 9, becoming the first state to enact a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) without having restructured its electric utility industry. The RPS sets a total goal...

  16. Delaware Electric Cooperative- Green Energy Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Under the 2005 Delaware Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) legislation, electric cooperatives were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirem...

  17. Renewables Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: SB 350, signed on October 7, 2015, made a number of changes to California's Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS). Most notably, SB 350 extended the timeline and requirements under the RPS to...

  18. Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SREC-I)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In April 2014, the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) issued final changes to its RPS Class I and RPS Solar Carve-Out programs. These changes resulted in the establishment of...

  19. Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2005, the District of Columbia Council enacted a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) that applies to all retail electricity sales in the District. In October 2008 the RPS was amended by...

  20. Renewables Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) was first adopted in 1999 and has been updated several times. The total RPS requirement in New Jersey including solar carve out is 24.39% by EY 2028....

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind (All), Biomass, Hydroelectric, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Renewables Portfolio Standard New Jersey's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) was first adopted...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuels, Other Distributed Generation Technologies Delaware Electric Cooperative- Green Energy Fund Under the 2005 Delaware Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) legislation,...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEEI USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) ... (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... Fernald Environmental Management Project, OH (United ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEEI USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) ... (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... Management-Consolidated Business Center Office of ...

  5. Renewable Portfolio Standards: Costs and Benefits (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Weaver, S.; Flores, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes state-level RPS costs to date, and considers how those costs may evolve going forward given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states and discusses key methodological considerations.

  6. Impacts of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This service report addresses the renewable portfolio standard provision of S. 1766. At Senator Murkowski's request it also includes an analysis of the impacts of a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) patterned after the one called for in S. 1766, but where the required share is based on a 20% RPS by 2020 rather than the 10% RPS called for in S. 1766.

  7. Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

    2007-12-31

    TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

  8. Materials Data on Ag2Hg7(As2I3)2 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Ecology Information Request HgC2H6 for 241-AW Tank Farm, 01/13/2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyekman, Dale L.; Greene, Michael R.

    2015-01-15

    This information was requested by Phil Gent of Ecology on 12/18/2014 and confirmed on 01/13/2015 to Dale Dyekman.

  10. Materials Data on CoHgC4(SeN)4 (SG:82) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Ba2Ca2Cu3HgO8 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the States: Balancing Goals and Implementation Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K. S.; Swezey, B. G.

    2007-12-01

    This paper reports on renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and how the RPS rules vary from state to state. This variation presents important challenges to successful implementation. Key issues are discussed in terms of resource availability, solar-specific provisions, and political and regulatory consistency, and their impacts on the ability to finance new renewable energy projects. This report emphasizes the fact that a successful RPS policy must balance a state's goals for fuel diversity, economic development, price effects, and environmental benefits.

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States) Denver Regional Office, Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute,...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the District. In October 2008 the RPS was amended by... Eligibility: Investor-Owned Utility, Retail Supplier Savings Category: Solar Water Heat, Solar Space Heat, Geothermal...

  15. Fuel Cells and Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Natural Gas or Renewable fuel Smart Grid Integration Power, Fuel and ... energy desires * Fuel cells on Natural Gas (LNG) are included * Base market RPS rate plus a technology ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, Nevada University, Reno, NV ...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Portfolio Standard NOTE: NYSERDA has issued an RFP to purchase renewable energy attributes for compliance with their RPS Main Tier program. Approximately 160 million is...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article ... (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... Library East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, ...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Delaware Electric Cooperative- Green Energy Fund Under the 2005 Delaware Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) legislation, electric...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter Results Filter by Subject renewable energy certificates (12) renewable energy (11) rps (9) rec (8) green power (7) recs (6) energy planning, policy, and economy (5) ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program ... Mound Plant, Miamisburg, OH (United States) NE-75, USDOE Office of Space and Defense Power ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office, Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, Nevada University, ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Denver Regional Office, Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, Nevada ...

  4. Delaware Municipal Electric Corporation- Green Energy Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Delaware Green Energy Fund was created in 1999 as the part of the deregulation of Delaware's electric utilities. Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation,...

  5. Biogas Markets and Federal Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... CEC proposed wholesale moratorium on biomethane projects Biomethane no longer would qualify for RPS; biogas to electricity unaffected Reason: CEC wants to stop new ...

  6. Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy efficiency technologies defined by the RPS include heat pump water heating, ice storage, ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs, and the use of rejected...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... OK (United States) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), ...

  8. Renewable Energy Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, Minnesota legislation modified the state's 2001 voluntary renewable energy objective to create a mandatory renewable portfolio standard (RPS). Public utilities (i.e., investor-owned...

  9. Seneca Nation of Indians - Strategic Energy Resource Plan: Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RPS Complete Energy Audit & Efficiency Recommendations Complete Infrastructure mapping (GIS) Renewable Resource Development Complete Anemometer StudyAssess Commercial Wind Project ...

  10. Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Massachusetts' 1997 electric-utility restructuring legislation created the framework for a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). In April 2002, the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER)...

  11. Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SREC-II)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Massachusetts' renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requires each regulated electricity supplier/provider serving retail customers in the state* to include in the electricity it sells 15% qualifying...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research ... of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) (United States) USDOE Office of ...

  13. On-Site Wind Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligibility This program is offered as part of the Customer-Sited Tier of the state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) program. Consequently, only customers of electricity distribution utilities...

  14. Large Customers Group Report-out Presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Nancy

    2011-10-25

    Targets for demand response load participation provide market certainty for sellers, CSPs, and investment in supporting technology. Bigger RPS and resulting variable resources lead to market demand.

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, ... Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, ...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Weather-stripping, Building Insulation, Windows Delaware Electric Cooperative- Green Energy Fund Under the 2005 Delaware Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) legislation,...

  17. Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    demand response, distributed generation, and universal deployment of smart grid advanced metering infrastructure. 5. "National Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS): Top Down ...

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) with a solar carve-out that applies to all retail electricity sales in the District. In... Eligibility: Commercial, Construction,...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Richland, WA (United States) Bechtel Nevada Corporation (BNC) (United States) Bettis ... (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States) EERE ...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a proposal to adopt a local renewable portfolio standard (RPS). (The state renewable electricity standard adopted by ballot initiative in... Eligibility: Local Government...

  1. Implications of the Scheduled Federal Investment Tax Credit Reversion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RPS renewable portfolio standard SACP solar alternative compliance payment SAM System Advisor Model SCCA Solar Credit Clearinghouse Auction (Massachusetts) SREC solar renewable...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research ... wherein the composition has an electrical conductivity of at least ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research ... Sturm, James C. Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton Institute ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research ... shows promising magnetic and electrical properties, but the doping ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, ... general physics (7) galaxies (7) nonlinear problems (7) simulation (7) matter (6) ...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, ... lasers (1) multi-photon processes (1) nonlinear problems (1) optical dispersion (1) ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, ... (8) materials science (7) nonlinear problems (7) classical and quantum ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, ... particles and fields (9) galaxies (7) nonlinear problems (7) matter (6) relict radiation ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, ... ferroelectric (2) ferroelectrics (2) nonlinear problems (2) polarization (2) amino ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, ... (3) microscopy (3) microstructure (3) nonlinear problems (3) nucleation (3) simulation ...

  11. Renewable Portfolio Standard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    electricity providers to obtain a certain percentage of their power from renewable energy sources by a specified date. U.S. State Programs The following table summarizes RPS...

  12. Space Power Systems Documents | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    August 5, 2015 Memorandum of Understanding between DOE and NASA concerning RPS for space ... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (the parties) in the research, technology ...

  13. What's A Watt Worth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... reserves, flexi-ramp RPS Procurement cost Societal public safety Qualitatively 18 Integrating DERs in planning processes Load Forecasting Distribution Planning Transmission ...

  14. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... have used different methods to estimate RPS ... to the cost of a new coal-fired facility, determined by ... potential future federal regulation of coal plants. ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... (with continuous spectrum) and the solar wind plasma has been investigated. ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... Filter Results Filter by Subject wind energy (1) Filter by Author Chilson, ...

  17. 2009 PowerPoint Template Presentation Title Style 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RPS Scenarios NEMS NESSIE NEMS Inputs * Energy System Characteristics * Fuel Cost Models * ...limitations (esp. biomass) * Energy storage, gas backup or integration issues? * ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous ... (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... that can observe dynamic processes in a bulk solution. ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United ... (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... from sensors, data storage devices, to control centers. ...

  20. City of Columbia- Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In November 2004, voters in Columbia, Missouri, approved* a proposal to adopt a local renewable portfolio standard (RPS). (The state renewable electricity standard adopted by ballot initiative in...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Regional Office, Golden, CO (United States) Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert Research Institute, Nevada...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program Desert ... (1) fluids (1) fossil fuels (1) france (1) fuel gas (1) fuels (1) gas ...

  3. Search for: kondo effect | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (ARM) Program (United States) DOEEI USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) Dallas ... Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) ...

  4. GRR Status Update - given 2013-06-26.pptx

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RPS. Federal BLM Regional BLM Renewable Energy Offices Varies by office Renewable Energy Policy Documents Office is established and implemented individually by each BLM...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Delaware Electric Cooperative- Green Energy Fund Under the 2005 Delaware Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) legislation, electric cooperatives were allowed to opt out of the...

  6. Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-05-01

    Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (ARM) Program (United States) DOEEI USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) Dallas ... Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy (NE) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) ...

  8. Renewable Energy used in State Renewable Portfolio Standards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from reduced greenhouse gas emissions and 5.2 billion from reductions in other air pollution, in mid-range estimates, for state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies ...

  9. Shutdown 2013 Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "cold heads" cool the 1.5-ton superbends to an operating temperature of 4K, pumping in liquid phase nitrogen and helium. To replace the cold heads, each must first be warmed up...

  10. SECTION C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... tons (2,100 metric tons) of spent nuclear fuel, 11.5 tons (10.5 metric tons) of ... and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. ...

  11. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-065.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 5-ton gantry crane, chain hoists, and other miscellaneous equipment would also be transferred from CWI and used within the tent. The tent is equipped with ceiling lights, floor ...

  12. New Camera Sheds Light on Dark Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    lies about 17,000 light years from Earth. | Photo by Dark Energy Survey Collaboration. ... Among the camera's jaw-dropping statistics, it has a weight of 4 to 5 tons and contains ...

  13. DOE STTR Phase I Final Technical Report For Agri-Tech Producers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Product Output: .5 Tons per Hour Torrefied Product * Energy Content-lO,OOO BTUlb 5,500 kCalkg ( 10%) * Moisture Content < 10% * Input to Output Ratio: Approx. 3 tons of "green...

  14. Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Factual Introduction toExperience from the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Namovicz, C.; Gielecki, M.; Smith, R.

    2007-05-09

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have--since the late 1990s--proliferated at the state level in the United States. What began as a policy idea minted in California and first described in detail in the pages of the 'Electricity Journal' FPT has emerged as an important driver for renewable energy capacity additions in the United States. Over the years, articles in the 'Electricity Journal' have explored the RPS in more detail, identifying both its strengths and weaknesses. The present article provides an introduction to the history, concept, and design of the RPS, reviews early experience with the policy as applied at the state level, and provides a brief overview of Federal RPS proposals to date and the possible relationship between Federal and state RPS policies. Our purpose is to offer a factual introduction to the RPS, as applied and considered in the U.S. Though elements of state RPS design are summarized here, other publications provide a more thorough review of design lessons that emerge from that experience. In addition, the present article does not describe the results of economic analyses of Federal RPS proposals, though we do cite many of the analyses conducted by the U.S. DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA).

  15. Renewable Energy Financing: The Role of Policy and Economics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.

    2008-03-27

    Renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have rapidly developed momentum in certain sections of the United States and throughout the world, primarily in response to climate and energy security concerns. This presentation at the RPS Symposium, sponsored by the Electric Utility Consultants Inc., will discuss renewable energy financing and the economics of such policies.

  16. Summary of Recommendations: Legislative and Regulatory Actions to Consider for Ensuring the Long-Term Effectiveness of the Nevada Renewable Portfolio Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Kevin; Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

    2004-10-29

    In 2001, the Nevada Legislature passed an aggressive renewable portfolio standard (Nevada RPS) that called for 5% of each major utility's resource mix to come from eligible renewable energy by 2003, rising by 2% every two years to 15% by 2013. Of the RPS standard, 5% per year must come from solar energy. The early performance of the Nevada RPS is generally considered to be disappointing. So far, only a small quantity of electricity state wide has been generated by new renewable energy systems. The utilities and many other stakeholders appear to agree that the utilities, which were unable to fully comply with the RPS in 2003, will continue to have difficulty complying in 2004 and 2005, and perhaps beyond. To date, there have been several efforts to improve compliance with the RPS (such as California and New Mexico). Other states in the region are also motivated to develop their renewable resources, and some have adopted RPS policies. A workshop as held on November 4, 2004 in Reno in order to address additional measures available to strengthen the Nevada RPS, and to consider the implications and potential interaction with RPS policies in nearby states. The purpose of this report is to identify and summarize the top policy priorities, from among those identified and discussed at the November 4, 2004 Reno Workshop, to be considered by the Nevada Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Task Force for implementation.

  17. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Holt, Edward

    2010-10-01

    Among the available options for encouraging the increased deployment of renewable electricity, renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have become increasingly popular. The RPS is a relatively new policy mechanism, however, and experience with its use is only beginning to emerge. One key concern that has been voiced is whether RPS policies will offer adequate support to a wide range of renewable energy technologies and applications or whether, alternatively, RPS programs will favor a small number of the currently least-cost forms of renewable energy. This report documents the design of and early experience with state-level RPS programs in the United States that have been specifically tailored to encourage a wider diversity of renewable energy technologies, and solar energy in particular. As shown here, state-level RPS programs specifically designed to support solar have already proven to be an important, albeit somewhat modest, driver for solar energy deployment, and those impacts are projected to continue to build in the coming years. State experience in supporting solar energy with RPS programs is mixed, however, and full compliance with existing requirements has not been achieved. The comparative experiences described herein highlight the opportunities and challenges of applying an RPS to specifically support solar energy, as well as the importance of policy design details to ensuring that program goals are achieved.

  18. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Churchill, Susannah; Deyette, Jeff; Holt, Ed

    2008-04-09

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have proliferated at the state level in the United States since the late 1990s. In combination with Federal tax incentives, state RPS requirements have emerged as one of the most important drivers of renewable energy capacity additions. The focus of most RPS activity in the U.S. has been within the states. Nonetheless, the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate have, at different times, each passed versions of a Federal RPS; a Federal RPS, however, has not yet been signed into law. The design of an RPS can and does vary, but at its heart an RPS simply requires retail electricity suppliers (also called load-serving entities, or LSEs) to procure a certain minimum quantity of eligible renewable energy. An RPS establishes numeric targets for renewable energy supply, applies those targets to retail electricity suppliers, and seeks to encourage competition among renewable developers to meet the targets in a least-cost fashion. RPS purchase obligations generally increase over time, and retail suppliers typically must demonstrate compliance on an annual basis. Mandatory RPS policies are backed by various types of compliance enforcement mechanisms, and many--but not all--such policies include the trading of renewable energy certificates (RECs). Renewables portfolio standards are a relatively recent addition to the renewable energy policy landscape, and these policies continue to evolve. Keeping up with the design, early experience, and projected impacts of these programs is a challenge. This report seeks to fill this need by providing basic, factual information on RPS policies in the United States. It focuses on state-level initiatives, though a later section briefly discusses Federal developments as well. The report does not cover municipal-level renewable energy goals, unless required by state law. Similarly, this report focuses on mandatory state RPS requirements, though it also touches on non-binding renewable energy goals

  19. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-07

    State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

  20. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, EmissionsAllowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables PortfolioStandards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-04-17

    Twenty-one states and the District of Columbia have adopted mandatory renewables portfolio standards (RPS) over the last ten years. Renewable energy attributes-such as the energy source, conversion technology, plant location and vintage, and emissions-are usually required to verify compliance with these policies, sometimes through attributes bundled with electricity, and sometimes with the attributes unbundled from electricity and traded separately as renewable energy certificates (RECs). This report summarizes the treatment of renewable energy attributes in state RPS rules. Its purpose is to provide a source of information for states considering RPS policies, and also to draw attention to certain policy issues that arise when renewable attributes and RECs are used for RPS compliance. Three specific issues are addressed: (1) the degree to which unbundled RECs are allowed under existing state RPS programs and the status of systems to track RECs and renewable energy attributes; (2) definitions of the renewable energy attributes that must be included in order to meet state RPS obligations, including the treatment of available emissions allowances; and (3) state policies on whether renewable energy or RECs sold through voluntary green power transactions may count towards RPS obligations.

  1. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, Jenny; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Weaver, Samantha; Flores, Francisco; Kuskova-Burns, Ksenia; Wiser, Ryan

    2014-03-12

    More than half of U.S. states have renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in place and have collectively deployed approximately 46,000 MW of new renewable energy capacity through year-end 2012. Most of these policies have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS benefits and costs is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. A key aspect of this study is the comprehensive review of existing RPS cost and benefit estimates, in addition to an examination of the variety of methods used to calculate such estimates. Based on available data and estimates reported by utilities and regulators, this study summarizes RPS costs to date. The study considers how those costs may evolve going forward, given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms incorporated into existing policies. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states, and discusses key methodological considerations.

  2. Treatment Guidelines for Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma: Preliminary Consensus of an International Expert Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Wang, Dian; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Kirsch, David G.; Roberge, David; Salerno, Kilian; Deville, Curtiland; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; O'Sullivan, Brian; Petersen, Ivy A.; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Abrams, Ross A.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Evidence for external beam radiation therapy (RT) as part of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) is limited. Preoperative RT is the subject of a current randomized trial, but the results will not be available for many years. In the meantime, many practitioners use preoperative RT for RPS, and although this approach is used in practice, there are no radiation treatment guidelines. An international expert panel was convened to develop consensus treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 15 academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of sarcoma was assembled. A systematic review of reports related to RT for RPS, RT for extremity sarcoma, and RT-related toxicities for organs at risk was performed. Due to the paucity of high-quality published data on the subject of RT for RPS, consensus recommendations were based largely on expert opinion derived from clinical experience and extrapolation of relevant published reports. It is intended that these clinical practice guidelines be updated as pertinent data become available. Results: Treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS are presented. Conclusions: An international panel of radiation oncologists who specialize in sarcoma reached consensus guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Many of the recommendations are based on expert opinion because of the absence of higher level evidence and, thus, are best regarded as preliminary. We emphasize that the role of preoperative RT for RPS has not been proven, and we await data from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study of preoperative radiotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with RPS. Further data are also anticipated pertaining to normal tissue dose constraints, particularly for bowel tolerance. Nonetheless, as we await these data, the guidelines herein can be used to establish treatment uniformity to aid future assessments of efficacy

  3. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This analysis provides first-ever assessment of the extent to which renewable energy is crossing state borders to be used to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. Two primary methods for data collection are Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) tracking and power flow estimates. Data from regional REC tracking systems, state agencies, and utility compliance reports help understand how cross-state transactions have been used to meet RPS compliance. Data on regional renewable energy flow use generator-specific information primarily sourced from EIA, SNL Energy, and FERC Form 1 filings. The renewable energy examined through this method may or may not have actually been used to meet RPS compliance.

  4. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report surveys and summarizes existing state-level RPS cost and benefit estimates and examines the various methods used to calculate such estimates. The report relies largely upon data or results reported directly by electric utilities and state regulators. As such, the estimated costs and benefits itemized in this document do not result from the application of a standardized approach or the use of a consistent set of underlying assumptions. Because the reported values may differ from those derived through a more consistent analytical treatment, we do not provide an aggregate national estimate of RPS costs and benefits, nor do we attempt to quantify net RPS benefits at national or state levels.

  5. Technical evaluation report on the monitoring of electric power to the reactor-protection system for the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selan, J.C.

    1982-04-26

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the monitoring of electric power to the reactor protection system (RPS) at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant, Units 1 and 2. The evaluation is to determine if the proposed design modification will protect the RPS from abnormal voltage and frequency conditions which could be supplied from the power supplies and will meet certain requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed design modifications with time delays verified by GE, will protect the RPS from sustained abnormal voltage and frequency conditions from the supplying sources.

  6. Multi-Year Analysis Examines Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    As states consider revising renewable portfolio standard (RPS) programs or developing new ones, careful assessments of the costs, benefits, and other impacts of existing policies will be critical. RPS programs currently exist in 29 states and Washington, D.C. Many of these policies, which were enacted largely during the late 1990s and 2000s, will reach their terminal targets by the end of this decade. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) are engaged in a multi-year project to examine the costs, benefits, and other impacts of state RPS polices both retrospectively and prospectively. This fact sheet overviews this work.

  7. A Retrospective Analysis of the Benefits and Impacts of U.S. Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the second in a series of reports exploring the costs, benefits, and other impacts of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS), both retrospectively and prospectively. This report focuses on the benefits and impacts of all state RPS programs, in aggregate, for the year 2013 (the most-recent year for which the requisite data were available). Relying on a well-vetted set of methods, the study evaluates a number of important benefits and impacts in both physical and monetary terms, where possible, and characterizes key uncertainties. The prior study in this series focused on historical RPS compliance costs, and future work will evaluate costs, benefits, and other impacts of RPS policies prospectively.

  8. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Tribal lands contain about 4% of total U.S. RE potential * 4% of utility scale PV * 5% of solar CSP * 3% ... www.dsireusa.org 12 New Mexico RPS details o 20% by 2020 ...

  9. Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SRECs) Registration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) includes a carve-out for solar, requiring the each electricity Load Serving Entities (LSEs) to provide at least 4.1% of the electricity through in...

  10. Solar Renewable Energy Credits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     In January 2005, the District of Columbia (D.C.) Council enacted a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) with a solar carve-out that applies to all retail electricity sales in the District. In...

  11. Property:Incentive/Auth14Link | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ConservedEnergyObjective%28SouthDakota%29 + Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (New York) + http:en.openei.orgwikiRenewableEnergyStandard%28RhodeIsland%29 +...

  12. Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 2015, the NY PSC issued an order extending the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) and Customer-Sited Tier (CST) of the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) till Feb 29, 2016...

  13. All chapters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2030 MW High RPS: Capacity Additions by Type Wind Solar Thermal Photovoltaics Hydropower Geothermal Biomass 2.4.5 Hydro Variability BPA and the region can experience a wide...

  14. The RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The broader goal of the RPS is to achieve various benefits associated with renewable energy. These benefits relate to the environment, resource diversity, technology advancement, and in-state...

  15. Property:Incentive/Auth8Link | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (New York) + http:assembly.state.ny.usleg?defaultfld&bnA09560&term2011&SummaryY&ActionsY&TextY + Q Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Connecticut) + http:...

  16. Impacts of a 15% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This analysis responds to a request from Senator Jeff Bingaman that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring that 15% of U.S. electricity sales be derived from qualifying renewable energy resources.

  17. QER Stakeholder Meeting No. 6 Written Comments of SMUD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In this context, SMUD along with the other 4 large utilities in California funded modeling by Environment + Energy Economics (E3) to examine the impacts of a 50% RPS on the ...

  18. QER Public Meeting No. 5 Written Comments of SMUD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 2030. In this context, SMUD along with the other 4 large utilities in California funded modeling by E3 to examine the impacts of a 50% RPS on the electricity system in 2030 1 . ...

  19. Multi-Year Analysis Examines Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of Renewable Portfolio Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    states consider revising renewable portfolio standard (RPS) programs or developing new ones, careful assessments of the costs, benefits, and other impacts of existing policies will be critical. RPS programs currently exist in 29 states and Washington, D.C. Many of these policies, which were enacted largely during the late 1990s and 2000s, will reach their terminal targets by the end of this decade. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

  20. Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 2007 | Department of Energy CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007 Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007 The recent development of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS) has helped spur the growth of renewable energy projects, including solar, wind, and biomass power. This report aims to determine the barriers to CHP that exist within state RPS programs, and suggest ways to minimize or remove such

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - CPUC01-#335899-v1-DOE_Congestion_Study_Workshop_-_rev_1.PPT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiatives To Be Considered in DOE's 2009 Congestion Study Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich California Public Utilities Commission DOE Congestion Workshop - San Francisco June 11, 2008 2 CPUC Initiatives - Overview Significant increases in Energy Efficiency New Demand Response programs - AMI & Dynamic Pricing Renewable Portfolio Standard - 20% by 2010 Green House Gas Emission Reduction Goals California will need more EE, DR, and RPS 33% RPS by 2020 requires significant transmission investment

  2. NREL: State and Local Governments - Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portfolio Standards Map of the United States showing 16 states with solar RPS provisions in red, 2 states with solar or DG goals in orange, and 6 states with solar water heating provisions marked with a water drop. Enlarge image States with renewable portfolio standardpolicies that include solar or distributed generation provisions, as of March 2013. Map from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE) A renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is a regulatory mandate to

  3. Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Energy Storage Home/Tag:Energy Storage Energy Storage The contemporary grid limits renewable energy and other distributed energy sources from being economically and reliably integrated into the grid. While a national renewable energy portfolio standard (RPS) has yet to be established, 35 states have forged ahead with their own RPS programs and policies. As this generation becomes a larger portion of a utility's [...] By Tara Camacho-Lopez|

  4. Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The contemporary grid limits renewable energy and other distributed energy sources from being economically and reliably integrated into the grid. While a national renewable energy portfolio standard (RPS) has yet to be established, 35 states have forged ahead with their own RPS programs and policies. As this generation becomes a larger portion of a utility's portfolio, it may decrease its ability to provide dispatchable energy and maintain grid frequency, voltage, and interia, which could

  5. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-16

    State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

  6. Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projectionsfor State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-06-05

    State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to almost 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of twenty-six distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998 (see Figure 1 and Appendix for a complete list of the studies). Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in seventeen different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

  7. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2008-07-15

    Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over the past decade has been propelled by a number of forces, including rising fossil fuel prices, environmental concerns, and policy support at the state and federal levels. In this article, we review and discuss what are arguably the two most important types of state policies for supporting electricity generation from geothermal and other forms of renewable energy: renewables portfolio standards and utility integrated resource planning requirements. Within the Western U.S., where the vast majority of the nation's readily-accessible geothermal resource potential resides, these two types of state policies have been critical to the growth of renewable energy, and both promise to continue to play a fundamental role for the foreseeable future. In its essence, a renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requires utilities and other retail electricity suppliers to produce or purchase a minimum quantity or percentage of their generation supply from renewable resources. RPS purchase obligations generally increase over time, and retail suppliers typically must demonstrate compliance on an annual basis. Mandatory RPS policies are backed by various types of compliance enforcement mechanisms, although most states have incorporated some type of cost-containment provision, such as a cost cap or a cap on retail rate impacts, which could conceivably allow utilities to avoid (full) compliance with their RPS target. Currently, 27 states and the District of Columbia have mandatory RPS requirements. Within the eleven states of the contiguous Western U.S., all but three (Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming) now have a mandatory RPS legislation (Utah has a more-voluntary renewable energy goal), covering almost 80% of retail electricity sales in the region. Although many of these state policies have only recently been established, their impact is already evident: almost 1800 MW of new renewable capacity has been installed in Western states following the

  8. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the Adorer cranes in the device assembly facility using actual, rather than conservative, stress-components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalder, E.N.C.

    1996-12-26

    Fracture mechanics analyses were done on 3 critical locations on the lower flange of the load beam of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes in the D.A.F. Facility. This was done to determine appropriate flaw sizes for NDE detection during periodic inspection, and appropriate inspection intervals.

  9. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Multifamily Central Heat Pump Water Heaters (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To evaluate the performance of central heat pump water heaters for multifamily applications, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California, for 16 months.

  10. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2014-06-01

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of solar energy in that its output can be shifted over time. The ability of CSP-TES to be a flexible source of generation may be particularly valuable in regions with high overall penetration of solar energy, such as the state of California. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires the state to increase generation from eligible renewable energy resources to reach 33% of retail electricity sales by 2020. Beyond 2020, California targets a further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. To help reach this goal, current California governor Jerry Brown has stated that a higher 40% RPS might be reachable in the near term. The levelized cost of energy is generally emphasized when assessing the economic viability of renewable energy systems implemented to achieve the RPS. However, the operational and capacity benefits of such systems are often ignored, which can lead to incorrect economic comparisons between CSP-TES and variable renewable generation technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV). Here we evaluate a 40% RPS scenario in a California grid model with PV or CSP-TES providing the last 1% of RPS energy. We compare the technical and economic implications of integrating either solar technology under several sensitivities, finding that the ability to displace new conventional thermal generation capacity may be the largest source of value of CSP-TES compared to PV at high solar penetrations.

  11. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2014-05-01

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of solar energy in that its output can be shifted over time. The ability of CSP-TES to be a flexible source of generation may be particularly valuable in regions with high overall penetration of solar energy, such as the state of California. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires the state to increase generation from eligible renewable energy resources to reach 33% of retail electricity sales by 2020. Beyond 2020, California targets a further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. To help reach this goal, current California governor Jerry Brown has stated that a higher 40% RPS might be reachable in the near term. The levelized cost of energy is generally emphasized when assessing the economic viability of renewable energy systems implemented to achieve the RPS. However, the operational and capacity benefits of such systems are often ignored, which can lead to incorrect economic comparisons between CSP-TES and variable renewable generation technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV). Here we evaluate a 40% RPS scenario in a California grid model with PV or CSP-TES providing the last 1% of RPS energy. We compare the technical and economic implications of integrating either solar technology under several sensitivities, finding that the ability to displace new conventional thermal generation capacity may be the largest source of value of CSP-TES compared to PV at high solar penetrations.

  12. Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Interim Report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Key, Thomas S

    2009-03-01

    The power transfer potential for bringing renewable energy into the Southeast in response to a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) will depend not only on available transmission capacity but also on electricity supply and demand factors. This interim report examines how the commonly used EIA NEMS and EPRI NESSIE energy equilibrium models are considering such power transfers. Using regional estimates of capacity expansion and demand, a base case for 2008, 2020 and 2030 are compared relative to generation mix, renewable deployments, planned power transfers, and meeting RPS goals. The needed amounts of regional renewable energy to comply with possible RPS levels are compared to inter-regional transmission capacities to establish a baseline available for import into the Southeast and other regions. Gaps in the renewable generation available to meet RPS requirements are calculated. The initial finding is that the physical capability for transferring renewable energy into the SE is only about 10% of what would be required to meet a 20% RPS. Issues that need to be addressed in future tasks with respect to modeling are the current limitations for expanding renewable capacity and generation in one region to meet the demand in another and the details on transmission corridors required to deliver the power.

  13. SREL Reprint #3050

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Pandion haliaetus) primarily from coastal counties of South Carolina, USA, to describe tissue distribution of Hg and to determine whether age or sex influenced Hg accumulation. ...

  14. Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... or greater, although a few samples with Hg concentrations below 100 ppm were also successfully analyzed using EXAFS spectroscopy. Effect of Geological Background on Hg Speciation ...

  15. Final Project Report: "??Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury"?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    This is the final project report for award DE-SC0005351, which supported the research project "??Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury."? This exploratory project investigated the use of mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements as a new approach to study how Hg moves and changes its chemical form in environmental systems, with particular focus on the East Fork of Poplar Creek (EFPC) near the DOE Y-12 plant (a Hg contamination source). This study developed analytical methods and collected pilot data that have set the stage for more detailed studies and have begun to provide insights into Hg movement and chemical changes. The overall Hg stable isotope approach was effective. The Hg isotope analysis methods yielded high-precision measurements of the sediment, water, and fish samples analyzed; quality control measures demonstrated the precision. The pilot data show that the 202Hg/198Hg, 199Hg/198Hg, and 201Hg/198Hg isotope ratios vary in this system. 202Hg/198Hg ratios of the Hg released from the Y-12 plant are relatively high, and those of the regional Hg background in soils and river sediments are significantly lower. Unfortunately, 202Hg/198Hg differences that might have been useful to distinguish early Hg releases from later releases were not observed. However, 202Hg/198Hg ratios in sediments do provide insights into chemical transformations that may occur as Hg moves through the system. Furthermore, 199Hg/198Hg and 201Hg/198Hg ratio analyses of fish tissues indicate that the effects of sunlight-driven chemical reactions on the Hg that eventually ends up in EFPC fish are measureable, but small. These results provide a starting point for a more detailed study (already begun at Univ. of Michigan) that will continue Hg isotope ratio work aimed at improving understanding of how Hg moves, changes chemically, and does or does not take on more highly toxic forms in the Oak Ridge area. This work also

  16. Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

  17. California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    A spate of recently enacted energy legislation and associated program changes is providing numerous opportunities to help California federal energy managers cut costs and meet their renewables, energy efficiency and GHG emissions goals. In April 2011, Governor Jerry Brown approved the nation’s most ambitious renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires 33% of the state’s electricity to come from renewable energy sources by 2020. Policy changes that will support the RPS include expanded eligibility rules that fill previous gaps in incentives for certain sizes of on-site renewable energy systems. Program updates described in this document include: $200 million more in funding for California Solar Initiative rebates to commercial and industrial customers; an increase in the eligible system size for the Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) from 1.5MW to 3MW; and pending changes that may allow customer-side systems to sell tradable renewable energy credits (TRECs) to entities with RPS compliance obligations in California.

  18. Biomass cofiring: another way to clean your coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenstat, L.; Weinstein, A.; Wellner, S.

    2009-07-15

    Demand for renewable power is burgeoning as state government impose increasingly rigorous environmental and procurement standards on the energy industry. Surprisingly, biomass cofiring has yet to attract much attention, even though it could help many utilities meet their renewable portfolio requirements, reduce carbon emissions, and solve other regional environmental problems. US developers, investors, and regulators should consider including cofiring as part of the energy mix going forward. This is the message of the article. Currently 28 US states and the District of Columbia have mandatory renewable portfolio standard (RPS) regimes and congress has both federal RPS and a national carbon regulation regime as top priority this session. Henry Waxman's RPS proposal, how HR 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 includes cofiring as a renewable energy source. These options for cofiring biomass with a coal-fired power plant - direct, indirect and paralled cofiring are outlined. 2 figs., 1 photo.

  19. Modulation of methylmercury uptake by methionine: Prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction in rat liver slices by a mimicry mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roos, Daniel Henrique; Puntel, Robson Luiz; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Bohrer, Denise; Rocha, Joao Batista T.; Vargas Barbosa, Nilda B. de

    2011-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an ubiquitous environmental pollutant which is transported into the mammalian cells when present as the methylmercury-cysteine conjugate (MeHg-Cys). With special emphasis on hepatic cells, due to their particular propensity to accumulate an appreciable amount of Hg after exposure to MeHg, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of methionine (Met) on Hg uptake, reactive species (RS) formation, oxygen consumption and mitochondrial function/cellular viability in both liver slices and mitochondria isolated from these slices, after exposure to MeHg or the MeHg-Cys complex. The liver slices were pre-treated with Met (250 {mu}M) 15 min before being exposed to MeHg (25 {mu}M) or MeHg-Cys (25 {mu}M each) for 30 min at 37 {sup o}C. The treatment with MeHg caused a significant increase in the Hg concentration in both liver slices and mitochondria isolated from liver slices. Moreover, the Hg uptake was higher in the group exposed to the MeHg-Cys complex. In the DCF (dichlorofluorescein) assay, the exposure to MeHg and MeHg-Cys produced a significant increase in DFC reactive species (DFC-RS) formation only in the mitochondria isolated from liver slices. As observed with Hg uptake, DFC-RS levels were significantly higher in the mitochondria treated with the MeHg-Cys complex compared to MeHg alone. MeHg exposure also caused a marked decrease in the oxygen consumption of liver slices when compared to the control group, and this effect was more pronounced in the liver slices treated with the MeHg-Cys complex. Similarly, the loss of mitochondrial activity/cell viability was greater in liver slices exposed to the MeHg-Cys complex when compared to slices treated only with MeHg. In all studied parameters, Met pre-treatment was effective in preventing the MeHg- and/or MeHg-Cys-induced toxicity in both liver slices and mitochondria. Part of the protection afforded by Met against MeHg may be related to a direct interaction with MeHg or to the competition

  20. Combined Modality Management of Retroperitoneal Sarcomas: A Single-Institution Series of 121 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Zagars, Gunar K.; Torres, Keila E.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Cormier, Janice N.; Feig, Barry W.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate local control, survival outcomes, and complication rates of patients treated with aggressive surgery and radiation therapy (RT) for retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 121 consecutive patients treated for RPS with surgery and RT between 1965 and 2012. The most common histology was liposarcoma (n=42; 35%). The median follow-up was 100 months (range: 20-467 months). Eighty-six patients (71%) were treated for initial presentation of RPS, and 35 patients (29%) presented with and were treated for RPS recurrence. RT was preoperative in 88 patients (73%; median dose: 50.4 Gy) and postoperative in 33 patients (27%; median dose: 55 Gy). Results: Five-year local control and overall survival rates were 56% and 57%, respectively. Two factors were associated with higher risk of any intra-abdominal recurrence at 5 years: positive or uncertain margins (58% vs 30% for negative margins, P<.001; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-4.8) and disease recurrence after previous resection (76% vs 31% for de novo RPS, P<.001; HR: 4.4; 95% CI: 2.5-7.5). The 10-year complication rate was 5%, and RT-related complications were associated with postoperative RT (P<.001) and RT dose of ≥60 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Intra-abdominal RPS recurrence continues to be a significant challenge despite the use of aggressive surgery and radiation therapy. Given the complications associated with postoperative radiation therapy, we recommend that preoperative radiation therapy is the preferred strategy when combined modality therapy is recommended.

  1. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update Through 2007 (Update) (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) has tracked the growing number of states that have adopted requirements or goals for renewable energy. While there is no federal renewable generation mandate, the states have been adopting such standards for some time. AEO2005 provided a summary of all existing programs in effect at that time, and subsequent AEOs have examined new policies or changes to existing ones. Since the publication of AEO2007, four states have enacted new renewable portfolio standards (RPS) legislation, and five others have strengthened their existing RPS programs. In total, 25 states and the District of Columbia.

  2. Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Lokey, Elizabeth

    2007-10-01

    In recent years, both compliance and voluntary markets have emerged to help support the development of renewable energy resources. Both of these markets are growing rapidly and today about half of U.S. states have RPS policies in place, with a number of these policies adopted in the last several years. In addition, many states have recently increased the stringency of their RPS policies. This paper examines key market interaction issues between compliance and voluntary renewable energy markets. It provides an overview of both the compliance and voluntary markets, addressing each market's history, purpose, size, scope, and benefits while addressing issues, including double counting.

  3. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 6: Wind Power Markets Summary Slides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Wind Power Markets Summary Slides California: 20% by 2017 State renewable energy incentives Illinois: 15% by 2012 New York: 25% by 2013 Renewable portfolio standards (RPS) * 25 states and the District of Columbia * Current RPS = 55 GW of new renewable energy capacity by 2020 Growth slowed during years when the production tax credit expired Wind power applications Utility-scale * Represents 90% of all wind power generated in the U.S. Community-owned * Typically 500 kW or greater * Strengthens

  4. Ukrainian mineral wax from brown coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabad, T.

    1986-07-01

    An unusual mineral enterprise is the mineral wax plant of Semenovskoye in the Aleksandriya brown coal basin of the Ukraine. The only plant of its kind in the Soviet Union, it has been in operation since 1959, extracting mineral wax from the local bitumen-rich brown coal. The plant yields about 7.5 tons of mineral wax a day (about 2700 tons a year), for use in a variety of applications.

  5. Defining the Molecular-Cellular-Field Continuum of Mercury Detoxification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Susan M.

    2014-09-04

    Hg is of special interest to DOE due to past use at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Its facile redox [Hg2+/0] chemistry, bonding to carbon [e.g. MeHg+] and unique physical properties [e.g., Hg0 volatility] underlie a complex global Hg cycle involving biotic and abiotic chemical and physical transport and transformations in soils, sediments, waterways and the atmosphere. Facultative and anaerobic bacteria make MeHg+, which is neurotoxic to wildlife and humans. Sustainable stewardship requires eliminating both MeHg+ and even more toxic Hg2+, which is also the substrate for methylation. The proteins encoded by the mer locus in aerobic and facultative mercury resistant (HgR) bacteria convert soil or waterborne Hg2+ or MeHg+ to less toxic, gaseous Hg0. HgR microbes live in highly Hg-contaminated sites and depress MeHg+ formation >500-fold in such zones. So, enhancing the capacity of natural HgR microbes to remove Hg2+/MeHg+ from wetlands and waterways is a logical component of contaminated site stewardship. To apply enhancement in the field requires knowing how the HgR pathway works including the metabolic demands it makes on the cell, i.e., the entire cell is the relevant catalytic unit. HgR loci occur in metabolically diverse bacteria and unique mer-host co-evolution has been found. In this project we extended our previous studies of mer enzymes in ?-proteobacteria, which are abundant in high Hg areas of the ORR to include studies of mer enzymes from HgR ?-proteobacteria and HgR actinobacteria, which also increase in the high Hg regions of the ORR. Specifically, we (1) examined interactions between structural compoenents of MerA and MerB enzymes from ?-proteobacteria, (2) investigated effects of mutations on kinetic efficiency of Hg2+ reduction by ?-proteobacterial MerA, (3) cloned and performed initital characterization of MerA and MerB enzymes from Streptomyces lividans, an actinobacterium, (4) cloned and performed initial characterization of a fused Mer

  6. EIS-0373: Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to the Production of Radioisotope Power Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: EIS-0373 has been cancelled. This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of consolidating nuclear activities related to production of radioisotope power systems (RPS) for space and national security missions at a single DOE site: the preferred alternative is the Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory.

  7. Evaluation of Storage for Transportation Equipment, Unfueled Convertors, and Fueled Convertors at the INL for the Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. G. Johnson; K. L. Lively

    2010-05-01

    This report contains an evaluation of the storage conditions required for several key components and/or systems of the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These components/systems (transportation equipment, i.e., type ‘B’ shipping casks and the radioisotope thermo-electric generator transportation systems (RTGTS), the unfueled convertors, i.e., multi-hundred watt (MHW) and general purpose heat source (GPHS) RTGs, and fueled convertors of several types) are currently stored in several facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site. For various reasons related to competing missions, inherent growth of the RPS mission at the INL and enhanced efficiency, it is necessary to evaluate their current storage situation and recommend the approach that should be pursued going forward for storage of these vital RPS components and systems. The reasons that drive this evaluation include, but are not limited to the following: 1) conflict with other missions at the INL of higher priority, 2) increasing demands from the INL RPS Program that exceed the physical capacity of the current storage areas and 3) the ability to enhance our current capability to care for our equipment, decrease maintenance costs and increase the readiness posture of the systems.

  8. REGULATORY PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT REGULATORY PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT RPS PDF.PDF (154.48 KB) More Documents & Publications REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL: Annual Workplan for Energy Efficiency Standards, July 2016 REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL: Annual Workplan for Energy Efficiency Standards REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT

  9. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Status Through 2003

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This report was assembled by the Energy Information Administration from a number of sources and in a series of steps, beginning with a review of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and other program summaries available on web sites, followed by a review of state laws and regulations, and then further clarified by direct contact with State public utility commissions, electric utilities, and others.

  10. New Study: Renewable Energy for State Renewable Portfolio Standards Yield Sizable Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new report from the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) finds that state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies reduced greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, while also reducing water use, creating renewable energy jobs and suppressing wholesale electricity and natural gas prices.

  11. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2007 Through September 30,2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, James F

    2009-04-01

    The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides RPS for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2008. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

  12. State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D.

    2008-07-01

    The State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project is supported by the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project seeks to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states. The goal is to assist states in determining which clean energy policies or policy portfolios will best accomplish their environmental, economic, and security goals. For example, a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) mandates an increase in the use of wind, solar, biomass, and other alternatives to fossil and nuclear electric generation. This paper provides a summary of the policy objectives that commonly drive the establishment of an RPS, the key issues that states have encountered in implementing an RPS, and the strategies that some of the leading states have followed to address implementation challenges. The factors that help an RPS function best generally have been explored in other analyses. This study complements others by comparing empirical outcomes, and identifying the policies that appear to have the greatest impact on results.

  13. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update Through 2003 (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    As of the end of 2003, 15 states had legislated programs to encourage the development of renewable energy for electricity generation. Of the 17 programs (two states have multiple programs), 9 are renewable portfolio standards (RPS), 4 are renewable energy mandates, and 4 are renewable energy goals.

  14. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Beiter, P.; Flores, F.; Hurlbut, D.; Liu, C.

    2015-02-01

    This presentation and associated spreadsheet examine the level of cross-state renewable energy transactions. Most state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies allow for out-of-state renewable energy or renewable energy certificates to count towards compliance. This analysis focuses on compliance for 2012 and provides stakeholders with an understanding of the extent to which RPSs are being met.

  15. Renewable Portfolio Standards Benefits and Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please join us for a free webinar summarizing key findings from a recent report published jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that evaluates the benefits and impacts of state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies.

  16. FirstEnergy RFP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy Ohio request for proposals (RFP) is seeking up to 233,000 Renewable Energy Certificates (REC) and 6,800 Solar RECs for its Ohio utilities— Ohio Edison, Cleveland Electric Illuminating, and Toledo Edison. Qualifying RECs and SRECs will be used by companies to meet the Ohio RPS requirements.

  17. X-ray fluorescence mapping of mercury on suspended mineral particles and diatoms in a contaminated freshwater system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, B.; Mishra, B.; Miller, C.; Wang, W.; Lai, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Kemner, K. M.; Liang, L.

    2014-05-23

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability and geochemical cycling is affected by its partitioning between the aqueous and particulate phases. We applied X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobes to directly visualize and quantify the spatial localization of Hg and its correlations with other elements of interest on suspended particles from a Hg contaminated freshwater system. Up to 175 μg g–1 Hg is found on suspended particles. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed among phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms) and mineral particles that are rich in iron oxides and natural organic matter (NOM), possibly as Hg-NOM-iron oxide ternary complexes. The diatom-bound Hg is mostly found on outer surfaces of themore » cells, suggesting passive sorption of inorganic Hg on diatoms. Our results indicate that localized sorption of Hg onto suspended particles, including diatoms and NOM-coated oxide minerals, is an important sink for Hg in natural aquatic environments.« less

  18. RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM CAPABILITIES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY (INL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Lively; Stephen Johnson; Eric Clarke

    2014-07-01

    --Idaho National Laboratory’s, Space Nuclear Systems and Technology Division established the resources, equipment and facilities required to provide nuclear-fueled, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) to Department of Energy (DOE) Customers. RPSs are designed to convert the heat generated by decay of iridium clad, 238PuO2 fuel pellets into electricity that is used to power missions in remote, harsh environments. Utilization of nuclear fuel requires adherence to governing regulations and the INL provides unique capabilities to safely fuel, test, store, transport and integrate RPSs to supply power—supporting mission needs. Nuclear capabilities encompass RPS fueling, testing, handling, storing, transporting RPS nationally, and space vehicle integration. Activities are performed at the INL and in remote locations such as John F. Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station to support space missions. This paper will focus on the facility and equipment capabilities primarily offered at the INL, Material and Fuel Complex located in a security-protected, federally owned, industrial area on the remote desert site west of Idaho Falls, ID. Nuclear and non-nuclear facilities house equipment needed to perform required activities such as general purpose heat source (GPHS) module pre-assembly and module assembly using nuclear fuel; RPS receipt and baseline electrical testing, fueling, vibration testing to simulate the launch environment, mass properties testing to measure the mass and compute the moment of inertia, electro-magnetic characterizing to determine potential consequences to the operation of vehicle or scientific instrumentation, and thermal vacuum testing to verify RPS power performance in the vacuum and cold temperatures of space.

  19. Estimates of mercury flux into the United States from non-local and global sources : results from a 3-D CTM simulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Streets, D.; Kim, M.; Crist, K.; Ohio Univ.

    2008-11-01

    The sensitivity of Hg concentration and deposition in the United States to emissions in China was investigated by using a global chemical transport model: Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART). Two forms of gaseous Hg were included in the model: elemental Hg (HG(0)) and oxidized or reactive Hg (HGO). We simulated three different emission scenarios to evaluate the model's sensitivity. One scenario included no emissions from China, while the others were based on different estimates of Hg emissions in China. The results indicated, in general, that when Hg emissions were included, HG(0) concentrations increased both locally and globally. Increases in Hg concentrations in the United States were greatest during spring and summer, by as much as 7%. Ratios of calculated concentrations of Hg and CO near the source region in eastern Asia agreed well with ratios based on measurements. Increases similar to those observed for HG(0) were also calculated for deposition of HGO. Calculated increases in wet and dry deposition in the United States were 5-7% and 5-9%, respectively. The results indicate that long-range transcontinental transport of Hg has a non-negligible impact on Hg deposition levels in the United States.

  20. Trace Element Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    importance of aspect. The samples were analyzed for their Hg contents, as well as for pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, all of which are known to have influence on Hg...

  1. Mercury Vapor At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Klusman...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    importance of aspect. The samples were analyzed for their Hg contents, as well as for pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, all of which are known to have influence on Hg...

  2. Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Klusman...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    importance of aspect. The samples were analyzed for their Hg contents, as well as for pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, all of which are known to have influence on Hg...

  3. Electrolytic recovery of mercury enriched in isotopic abundance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of electrolytically extracting liquid mercury from HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. Additionally there are disclosed two related techniques associated with the present invention, namely (1) a technique for selectively removing product from different regions of a long photochemical reactor (photoreactor) and (2) a method of accurately measuring the total quantity of mercury formed as either HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2.

  4. Elimination of mercury and organomercurials by nitrogen-fixing bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, S.; Sadhukhan, P.C.; Ghosh, D.K.

    1997-06-01

    Bacteria isolated from mercury-polluted environments are often resistant to mercuric ions (Hg{sup 2+}) and organomercurials. Plasmids determining mercury resistance have been well characterized in gram-negative system. However, in Staphylococcus aureus mercury resistance has been found to be chromosomally determined. The known mechanism of bacterial Hg{sup 2+}-resistance is detoxification of the toxic Hg{sup 2+} by its enzymatic transformation by mercuric reductase to Hg (o). Organomercurial lyase mediates the degradation of organomercurial compounds to Hg{sup 2+}. Mercury and organomercurial resistances have been studied in different bacterial genera. There is little information on Hg-resistance in N{sub 2}-fixing soil bacteria, however, in many developing countries, including India, mercury pollution is still a problem because Hg-based pesticides and fungicides are still used routinely as seed-dressers in agriculture to control soil-borne and seed-borne fungal diseases. Volatilization of Hg from laboratory media by mercury-resistant bacteria containing low levels of mercury has been reported by several workers. It is interesting to note that N{sub 2}-fixing, Hg-resistant soil isolates could volatilize Hg from medium containing very high amounts of HgCl{sub 2}. In the present paper we report the volatilization patterns of five N{sub 2}-fixing bacterial strains, the effect of different inducers on mercuric reductase, and the pattern of substrate utilization by organomercurial lyase. In the presence of a low concentration of HgCl{sub 2}. enzymatic detoxification is sufficient to combat the adverse situation created by the presence of Hg{sup 2+} ions. In the presence of a high concentration of HgCl{sub 2}, intracellular sequestration by Hg{sup 2+} binding components may play an additional role in counteracting Hg-toxicity.

  5. Thiol-facilitated cell export and desorption of methylmercury by anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Hui; Lu, Xia; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2015-09-04

    Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg), formed by anaerobic bacteria, is shown to be rapidly excreted from the cell, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. Using both Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 strains, we investigated the factors affecting export and distribution of MeHg in mercury methylation and MeHg sorption-desorption assays. Thiols, such as cysteine, were found to greatly facilitate desorption and export of MeHg, particularly by PCA cells. However, in cysteine-free assays (4 h) >90% of the synthesized MeHg was associated with PCA, among which ~73% was sorbed on the cell surface and 19% remained inside the cells. In comparison, a majority of the MeHg (70%) was exported by ND132, leaving ~20% of the MeHg sorbed on the surface and 10% inside the cells. When MeHg was added directly to the cell suspensions, ND132 adsorbed much lower MeHg but took up more MeHg inside cells than PCA did. These results demonstrate that MeHg export is bacteria strain-specific, time dependent, and is influenced by thiols, implicating important roles of ligand complexation in facilitating MeHg production and mobilization in the environment.

  6. The effects of a stannous chloride-based remediation system in a mercury contaminated stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, Teresa J; Looney, Brian; BryanJr., Larry; Smith, John G; Miller, Carrie L; Peterson, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations in the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.

  7. Thiol-facilitated cell export and desorption of methylmercury by anaerobic bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Hui; Lu, Xia; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2015-09-04

    Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg), formed by anaerobic bacteria, is shown to be rapidly excreted from the cell, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. Using both Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 strains, we investigated the factors affecting export and distribution of MeHg in mercury methylation and MeHg sorption-desorption assays. Thiols, such as cysteine, were found to greatly facilitate desorption and export of MeHg, particularly by PCA cells. However, in cysteine-free assays (4 h) >90% of the synthesized MeHg was associated with PCA, among which ~73% was sorbed on the cell surface and 19% remained inside the cells. Inmore » comparison, a majority of the MeHg (70%) was exported by ND132, leaving ~20% of the MeHg sorbed on the surface and 10% inside the cells. When MeHg was added directly to the cell suspensions, ND132 adsorbed much lower MeHg but took up more MeHg inside cells than PCA did. These results demonstrate that MeHg export is bacteria strain-specific, time dependent, and is influenced by thiols, implicating important roles of ligand complexation in facilitating MeHg production and mobilization in the environment.« less

  8. Evaluation of Aqua-Ammonia Chiller Technologies and Field Site Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza

    2007-09-01

    The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) has sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to review, select, and evaluate advanced, gas-fired, 5-ton, aqua-ammonia, chiller technologies. The selection criteria was that units have COP values of 0.67 or better at Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) 95 F outdoor rating conditions, an active refrigerant flow control, and a variable-speed condenser fan. These features are expected to allow these units to operate at higher ambient temperatures (up to the maximum operating temperature of 110 F) with minimal degradation in performance. ORNL evaluated three potential manufacturers of advanced, gas-fired, 5-ton, aqua-ammonia chillers-Robur, Ambian, and Cooling Technologies. Unfortunately, Robur did not meet the COP requirements and Cooling Technologies could not deliver a unit to be tested at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-ORNL environmental chamber testing facility for thermally activated heat pumps. This eliminated these two technologies from further consideration, leaving only the Ambian chillers for evaluation. Two Ambian chillers were evaluated at the DOE-ORNL test facility. Overall these chillers operated well over a wide range of ambient conditions with minimal degradation in performance due to several control strategies used such as a variable speed condenser fan, a modulating burner, and active refrigerant flow control. These Ambian pre-commercial units were selected for installation and field testing at three federal facilities. NFESC worked with ORNL to assist with the site selection for installation and evaluation of these chillers. Two sites (ORNL and Naval Surface Warfare Center [NSWC] Corona) had a single chiller unit installed; and at one site (Naval Amphibious Base [NAB] Little Creek), two 5-ton chillers linked together were installed to provide 10 tons of cooling. A chiller link controller developed under this project was evaluated in the field test at Little Creek.

  9. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the ederer cranes in the device assembly facility using reduced static fracture-toughness values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalder, E. N. C.

    1996-11-01

    The effects of a decreased static fracture-toughness value from that used in the previous fracture-mechanics analyses of the Ederer cranes in the Device Assembly Facility were examined to see what effects, if any, would be exerted on the fatigue crack growth and fracture behavior of the cranes. In particular, the behavior of the same 3 critical locations on the lower flanges of the load beams of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes, were examined, with the reduced static fracture-toughness value.

  10. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the ederer cranes in the device assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalder, E.

    1996-08-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses were conducted on three critical locations on the lower flange of the load-beam of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes in the D.A.F. Facility. Based on these results, it appears that: 1. Propagation of a 5 mm long flaw, previously undetected by non-destructive examination (NDE), to a length sufficient to cause structural failure of either flange, should not occur in at least 100 times the postulated operating scenarios for each crane; 2. Should each crane undergo annual inspection, any surface flaw with a length greater that 20 mm should be removed and repaired by qualified and approved repair procedures.

  11. Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, C. E.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

    2011-12-01

    State renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies require utilities and load-serving entities (LSEs) to procure renewable energy generation. Utility procurement options may be a function of state policy and regulatory preferences, and in some cases, may be dictated by legislative authority. Utilities and LSEs commonly use competitive solicitations or bilateral contracting to procure renewable energy supply to meet RPS mandates. However, policymakers and regulators in several states are beginning to explore the use of alternatives, namely feed-in tariffs (FITs) and auctions to procure renewable energy supply. This report evaluates four procurement strategies (competitive solicitations, bilateral contracting, FITs, and auctions) against four main criteria: (1) pricing; (2) complexity and efficiency of the procurement process; (3) impacts on developers access to markets; and (4) ability to complement utility decision-making processes. These criteria were chosen because they take into account the perspective of each group of stakeholders: ratepayers, regulators, utilities, investors, and developers.

  12. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update through 2008 (Update) (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    State renewable portfolio standards (RPS) programs continue to play an important role in Annual Energy Outlook 2009, growing in number while existing programs are modified with more stringent targets. In total, 28 states and the District of Columbia now have mandatory RPS programs, and at least 4 other states have voluntary renewable energy programs. In the absence of a federal renewable electricity standard, each state determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. The growth in state renewable energy requirements has led to an expansion of renewable energy credit (REC) markets, which vary from state to state. Credit prices depend on the state renewable requirements and how easily they can be met.

  13. Renewable Electricity Benefits Quantification Methodology: A Request for Technical Assistance from the California Public Utilities Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-07-01

    The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) requested assistance in identifying methodological alternatives for quantifying the benefits of renewable electricity. The context is the CPUC's analysis of a 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in California--one element of California's Climate Change Scoping Plan. The information would be used to support development of an analytic plan to augment the cost analysis of this RPS (which recently was completed). NREL has responded to this request by developing a high-level survey of renewable electricity effects, quantification alternatives, and considerations for selection of analytic methods. This report addresses economic effects and health and environmental effects, and provides an overview of related analytic tools. Economic effects include jobs, earnings, gross state product, and electricity rate and fuel price hedging. Health and environmental effects include air quality and related public-health effects, solid and hazardous wastes, and effects on water resources.

  14. Evaluating a Proposed 20% National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Bird, L.; James, T. L.; Shah, M. R.

    2009-02-01

    This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the impacts of a proposed 20% national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) by 2021, which has been advanced in the U.S. Congress by Senator Jeff Bingaman of New Mexico. The paper was prepared before the America Recovery and Reinvestment Act was signed into law by President Barack Obama on February 17, 2009, and thus does not consider important changes in renewable energy (RE) policy that need to be addressed in follow-on analysis. We use NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the RPS requirements on the energy sector and consider design issues associated with renewable energy certificate (REC) trading markets.

  15. Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Chapman, Caroline; Logan, Jeff; Sumner, Jenny; Short, Walter

    2010-05-01

    This report examines the impact of various renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and cap-and-trade policy options on the U.S. electricity sector, focusing mainly on renewable energy generation. The analysis uses the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model that simulates the least-cost expansion of electricity generation capacity and transmission in the United States to examine the impact of an emissions cap--similar to that proposed in the Waxman-Markey bill (H.R. 2454)--as well as lower and higher cap scenarios. It also examines the effects of combining various RPS targets with the emissions caps. The generation mix, carbon emissions, and electricity price are examined for various policy combinations to simulate the effect of implementing policies simultaneously.

  16. 340 waste handling complex: Deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stordeur, R.T.

    1998-06-25

    This document provides an overview of the strategy for deactivating the 340 Waste Handling Complex within Hanford`s 300 Area. The plan covers the period from the pending September 30, 1998 cessation of voluntary radioactive liquid waste (RLW) transfers to the 340 Complex, until such time that those portions of the 340 Complex that remain active beyond September 30, 1998, specifically, the Retention Process Sewer (RPS), can also be shut down and deactivated. Specific activities are detailed and divided into two phases. Phase 1 ends in 2001 after the core RLW systems have been deactivated. Phase 2 covers the subsequent interim surveillance of deactivated and stand-by components during the period of continued RPS operation, through the final transfer of the entire 340 Complex to the Environmental Restoration Contractor. One of several possible scenarios was postulated and developed as a budget and schedule planning case.

  17. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

    2013-08-01

    This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

  18. Final report - Reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments and its potential to mobilize mercury in its elemental form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakray, Tamar

    2013-06-13

    The goal of our project was to investigate Hg(II) reduction in the deep subsurface. We focused on microbial and abiotic pathways of reduction and explored how it affected the toxicity and mobility of Hg in this unique environment. The project’s tasks included: 1. Examining the role of mer activities in the reduction of Hg(II) in denitrifying enrichment cultures; 2. Investigating the biotic/abiotic reduction of Hg(II) under iron reducing conditions; 3. Examining Hg(II) redox transformations under anaerobic conditions in subsurface sediments from DOE sites.

  19. New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY This presentation on the NYSERDA Hydrogen Program was given on July 12, 2006. education_presentation_nyserda.pdf (2.64 MB) More Documents & Publications NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2014 State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2010

  20. Renewable Portfolio Standards Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Portfolio Standards Resources Renewable Portfolio Standards Resources An RPS is a regulatory method mandating utility companies operating within a certain jurisdiction to increase production of energy from renewable sources such as wind, solar, biomass and other alternatives to fossil and nuclear electric generation. It's also known as a renewable electricity standard. Find renewable portfolio standards resources below. DOE Resource Renewable Portfolio Standards: A Factual Introduction

  1. NYSERDA's CHP Program Guide, 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NYSERDA's CHP Program Guide, 2010 NYSERDA's CHP Program Guide, 2010 As one of the nation's leading CHP supporters, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) provides assistance to customers as well as CHP suppliers. This 2010 guide offers information on NYSERDA programs available for each stage of the project lifecycle. nyserda_chp_program_guide.pdf (2.32 MB) More Documents & Publications NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program Solar PV Incentive

  2. National Electric Transmission Study 2006 Western Interconnection Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Western Interconnection 2006 Congestion Assessment Study Prepared by the Western Congestion Analysis Task Force May 08, 2006 2 Western Interconnection 2006 Congestion Study - DOE Task 3 - 1. 2008 Modeling Study 2. 2015 Modeling Study - 2015 Planned Resource Development (IRPs and RPS) 3. W.I. Historical Path Usage Studies - 1999 thru 2005 - Physical congestion - Commercial congestion 3 WCATF Modeling Studies ABB Gridview Model * Model uses WECC 2005 L&R load forecast, modified with NPCC data

  3. Analysis of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard, Supplement to

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    On June 10, 2003, Senator Pete Domenici, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, requested additional analysis of a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), expected to be proposed as an amendment to energy legislation currently pending before the U.S. Senate. This request asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide additional results from two previously released EIA analyses of the proposed legislation, and to conduct further analyses with modified assumptions.

  4. STEAB Resolution 06-04

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STATE ENERGY ADVISORY BOARD Resolution 06-04 BACKGROUND The expansion of renewable electric supplies is being driven by consumer demand, competitive pricing, and state policies such as the Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) program. Political favor is being driven by heightened concerns in global climate change, escalating prices in traditional power generation and geopolitical energy security. The positions of traditional energy sector stakeholders continue to evolve to one of advocacy and

  5. Fuel Cells and RPSs: An Introduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    organized by: ◦ US Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program ◦ Clean Energy States Alliance ◦ Technology Transition Corporation  Also briefing papers and materials for state policymakers and others on the Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Project page at www.cleanenergystates.org  To get on the Hydrogen listserv, send an email with your contact info to Maria@cleanegroup.org with "Hydrogen Listserv" in the subject.  The State-Federal RPS Collaborative ◦ Webinars,

  6. Solar PV Incentive Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PV Incentive Programs Solar PV Incentive Programs This presentation summarizes the information discussed by NYSERDA during the Best Practices in the Design of Utility Solar Programs Webinar on September 27, 2012. utility_design_nyserda_mace.pdf (378.85 KB) More Documents & Publications Best Practices in the Design of Utility Solar Programs NYSERDA's CHP Program Guide, 2010 NYSERDA's RPS Customer Sited Tier Fuel Cell Program

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    John Nangle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Tribal Leader Forum, Phoenix, AZ - May 30 - 31, 2013 State Incentives and Project Impacts Main Points - Market Context * State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) - What are they? - How can they help your project? - Potential gap means more market demand for RE projects Starting a Renewable Energy Project * What renewable resources exist? * What sites with resources do you own? * To whom will you sell the electricity? * How will federal

  8. Overview of the CPUC's California Solar Initiative and DG Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of the CPUC's California Solar Initiative and DG Programs: James Loewen, Energy Division California Public Utilities Commission For NREL Incentive Program Webinar September 27, 2012 www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUC/energy/DistGen/ 2 DG and Renewables Policies and Programs DG Type Programs System-Side Generation or Utility-Side Procurement Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) Program  Feed-in Tariffs (Market Price Referent)  Renewable Auction Mechanism (RAM)  Utility Solar PV Programs 

  9. Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance This analysis provides first-ever assessment of the extent to which renewable energy is crossing state borders to be used to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. Two primary methods for data collection are Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) tracking and power flow estimates. Data from regional REC tracking systems, state agencies, and utility compliance reports help understand

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    John Nangle, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Tribal Leader Forum, Phoenix, AZ - May 30 - 31, 2013 State Incentives and Project Impacts Main Points - Market Context * State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) - What are they? - How can they help your project? - Potential gap means more market demand for RE projects Starting a Renewable Energy Project * What renewable resources exist? * What sites with resources do you own? * To whom will you sell the electricity? * How will federal

  11. Supply Forecast and Analysis (SFA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Matthew Langholtz Science Team Leader Oak Ridge National Laboratory DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Supply Forecast and Analysis (SFA) 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Goal Statement * Provide timely and credible estimates of feedstock supplies and prices to support - the development of a bioeconomy; feedstock demand analysis of EISA, RFS2, and RPS mandates - the data and analysis of other projects in Analysis and Sustainability, Feedstock Supply and Logistics,

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Issuestrends

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Current Issues & Trends Natural gas generation and electricity imports used to follow load in California natural gaselectricitynuclearCaliforniawindsolarCAISO 9/7/2016 California is using more renewables and less natural gas in its summer electricity mix electricitygenerationCaliforniaCAISO 9/6/2016 District of Columbia raises renewable portfolio standard target to 50% by 2032 electricityelectricity generating fuel mixRPS (Renewable Portfolio Standards)PJM 8/29/2016 Monthly U.S. renewable

  13. Report Reviews Estimates of Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portfolio Standards to Date - News Releases | NREL Report Reviews Estimates of Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards to Date May 30, 2014 A new report, prepared by analysts from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), reviews estimates of the costs and benefits of compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) in the United States and explores how costs and benefits may evolve

  14. So You Have Questions AboutƒRenewable Portfolio Standards: Resources & Technical Assistance (Postcard), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Portfolio Standards Resources & Technical Assistance Second in a series of Policy Basics NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. A renewable portfolio standard (RPS), sometimes called a renewable electricity standard, is a state-level requirement, typically established through legislation, to provide a minimum amount of energy from renewable resources.

  15. Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.

    2012-04-01

    Utility-scale solar projects have grown rapidly in number and size over the last few years, driven in part by strong renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and federal incentives designed to stimulate investment in renewable energy technologies. This report provides an overview of such policies, as well as the project financial structures they enable, based on industry literature, publicly available data, and questionnaires conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  16. Utility-Scale Financial Incentives and Programs Resources | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Utility-Scale Financial Incentives and Programs Resources Utility-Scale Financial Incentives and Programs Resources Incentive programs for utility-scale projects are highly individualized. The most effective states have coupled renewable portfolio standards (RPS) with financial mechanisms such as tax benefits, clean energy fund grants, etc. to encourage and support development of large-scale projects within their borders. Find financial incentives and programs resources below. Federal

  17. Tradable renewable energy credits in California: the struggle with implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilton, Seth D.; Marriott, Chad T.

    2010-07-15

    On Mar. 11, 2010, the California Public Utilities Commission authorized the use of tradable renewable energy credits to satisfy at least a portion of the obligations imposed by California's Renewables Portfolio Standard. The decision allows California's largest investor-owned utilities and other retail providers to purchase TRECs to meet up to 25 percent of their annual RPS compliance obligations, but implementation has raised a series of questions. (author)

  18. Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 For Renewable Electricity Working Group AEO2014 Second Meeting September 26, 2013 Christopher Namovicz and Gwen Bredehoeft, Renewable Electricity Analysis Team Agenda Renewable Electricity Analysis Team, September 26, 2013 2 * Status of AEO2014 and future development plans * Data and model updates - PTC expiration update - Capital costs - Transmission - 860 (planned capacity) data - Polysys integration - Spinning reserves - RPS updates * Preliminary Results for the AEO2014 Reference case

  19. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft White Paper Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards Prepared for: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN Prepared by: Resource Dynamics Corporation McLean, VA www.rdcnet.com September 2007 Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards The recent development of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS) has helped spur the growth of renewable energy projects, including solar, wind, and

  20. Decreasing aqueous mercury concentrations to achieve safe levels in fish: examining the water-fish relationship in two point-source contaminated streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, Teresa J; Southworth, George R; Peterson, Mark J; Roy, W Kelly; Ketelle, Richard H; Valentine, Charles S; Gregory, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) and White Oak Creek (WOC) are two mercury-contaminated streams located on the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. East Fork Poplar Creek is the larger and more contaminated of the two, with average aqueous mercury (Hg) concentrations exceeding those in reference streams by several hundred-fold. Remedial actions over the past 20 years have decreased aqueous Hg concentrations in EFPC by 85 %. Fish fillet concentrations, however, have not responded to this decrease in aqueous Hg and remain above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency s ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) of 0.3 mg/kg. The lack of correlation between aqueous and fish tissue Hg concentrations in this creek has led to questions regarding the usefulness of target aqueous Hg concentrations and strategies for future remediation efforts. White Oak Creek has a similar contamination history but aqueous Hg concentrations in WOC are an order of magnitude lower than in EFPC. Despite the lower aqueous Hg concentrations, fish fillet concentrations in WOC have also been above the AWQC, making the most recent aqueous Hg target of 200 ng/L in EFPC seem unlikely to result in an effective decrease in fillet Hg concentrations. Recent monitoring efforts in WOC, however, suggest an aqueous total Hg threshold above which Hg bioaccumulation in fish may not respond. This new information could be useful in guiding remedial actions in EFPC and in other point-source contaminated streams.

  1. Natural mercury isotope variation in coal deposits and organic soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abir, Biswas; Joel D. Blum; Bridget A. Bergquist; Gerald J. Keeler; Zhouqing Xie

    2008-11-15

    There is a need to distinguish among sources of Hg to the atmosphere in order to more fully understand global Hg pollution. In this study we investigate whether coal deposits within the United States, China, and Russia-Kazakhstan, which are three of the five greatest coal-producing regions, have diagnostic Hg isotopic fingerprints that can be used to discriminate among Hg sources. We also investigate the Hg isotopic composition of modern organic soil horizons developed in areas distant from point sources of Hg in North America. Mercury stored in coal deposits displays a wide range of both mass dependent fractionation and mass independent fractionation. {delta}{sup 202}Hg varies in coals by 3{per_thousand} and {Delta}{sup 201}Hg varies by 0.9{per_thousand}. Combining these two Hg isotope signals results in what may be a unique isotopic 'fingerprint' for many coal deposits. Mass independent fractionation of mercury has been demonstrated to occur during photochemical reactions of mercury. This suggests that Hg found in most coal deposits was subjected to photochemical reduction near the Earth's surface prior to deposition. The similarity in MDF and MIF of modern organic soils and coals from North America suggests that Hg deposition from coal may have imprinted an isotopic signature on soils. This research offers a new tool for characterizing mercury inputs from natural and anthropogenic sources to the atmosphere and provides new insights into the geochemistry of mercury in coal and soils. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Formation of soluble mercury oxide coatings: Transformation of elemental mercury in soils

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, Carrie L.; Watson, David B.; Lester, Brian P.; Howe, Jane Y.; Phillips, Debra H.; He, Feng; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M.

    2015-09-21

    In this study, the impact of mercury (Hg) on human and ecological health has been known for decades. Although a treaty signed in 2013 by 147 nations regulates future large-scale mercury emissions, legacy Hg contamination exists worldwide and small-scale releases will continue. The fate of elemental mercury, Hg(0), lost to the subsurface and its potential chemical transformation that can lead to changes in speciation and mobility are poorly understood. Here, we show that Hg(0) beads interact with soil or manganese oxide solids and X-ray spectroscopic analysis indicates that the soluble mercury coatings are HgO. Dissolution studies show that, after reactingmore » with a composite soil, >20 times more Hg is released into water from the coated beads than from a pure liquid mercury bead. An even larger, >700 times, release occurs from coated Hg(0) beads that have been reacted with manganese oxide, suggesting that manganese oxides are involved in the transformation of the Hg(0) beads and creation of the soluble mercury coatings. Although the coatings may inhibit Hg(0) evaporation, the high solubility of the coatings can enhance Hg(II) migration away from the Hg(0)-spill site and result in potential changes in mercury speciation in the soil and increased mercury mobility.« less

  3. Warming increases methylmercury production in an Arctic soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ziming; Fang, Wei; Lu, Xia; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Graham, David E.; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-04-29

    The rapid temperature rise in Arctic permafrost concerns not only the degradation of stored soil organic carbon (SOC) and climate feedback, but also the production and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) that may endanger humans, as well as wildlife in terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Decomposition of SOC provides an energy source for microbial methylation, although little is known how rapid permafrost thaw affects Hg methylation and how SOC degradation is coupled to MeHg biosynthesis. We describe rates of MeHg production in Arctic soils from an 8-month warming microcosm experiment under anoxic conditions. MeHg production increased >10 fold in both organic-more » and the mineral-rich soil layers at a warmer temperature (8 C) compared to a sub-zero temperature ( 2 C). MeHg production was positively correlated to methane and ferrous ion concentrations, suggesting that Hg methylation is coupled with methanogenesis and iron reduction. Labile SOC, such as reducing sugars and alcohol, were particularly effective in fueling the initial rapid biosynthesis of MeHg. In freshly amended Hg we found that there was more bioavailable than existing Hg in the mineral soil. Finally, the data indicate that climate warming and permafrost thaw could greatly enhance MeHg production, thereby impacting Arctic aquatic and marine ecosystems through biomagnification in the food web.« less

  4. Advanced radioisotope power source options for Pluto Express

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underwood, M.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the drive to reduce mass and cost, Pluto Express is investigating using an advanced power conversion technology in a small Radioisotope Power Source (RPS) to deliver the required mission power of 74 W(electric) at end of mission. Until this year the baseline power source under consideration has been a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). This RTG would be a scaled down GPHS RTG with an inventory of 6 General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) and a mass of 17.8 kg. High efficiency, advanced technology conversion options are being examined to lower the power source mass and to reduce the amount of radioisotope needed. Three technologies are being considered as the advanced converter technology: the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converters, and Stirling Engines. Conceptual designs for each of these options have been prepared. Each converter would require only 2 GPHSs to provide the mission power and would have a mass of 6.1, 7.2, and 12.4 kg for AMTEC, TPV, and Stirling Engines respectively. This paper reviews the status of each technology and the projected performance of an advanced RPS based on each technology. Based on the projected performance and spacecraft integration issues, Pluto Express would prefer to use the AMTEC based RPS. However, in addition to technical performance, selection of a power technology will be based on many other factors.

  5. Assembly and Testing of a Radioisotope Power System for the New Horizons Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth E. Rosenberg; Stephen G. Johnson

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently fueled and assembled a radioisotope power system (RPS) that was used upon the New Horizons spacecraft which was launched in January 2006. New Horizons is the first mission to the last planet - the initial reconnaissance of Pluto-Charon and the Kuiper Belt, exploring the mysterious worlds at the edge of our solar system. The RPS otherwise known as a "space battery" converts thermal heat into electrical energy. The thermal heat source contains plutonium dioxide in the form of ceramic pellets encapsulated in iridium metal. The space battery was assembled in a new facility at the Idaho National Laboratory site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The new facility has all the fueling and testing capabilities including the following: the ability to handle all the shipping containers currently certified to ship Pu-238, the ability to fuel a variety of RPS designs, the ability to perform vibrational testing to simulate transportation and launch environments, welding systems, a center of mass determination device, and various other support systems.

  6. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2011-10-01

    This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

  7. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  8. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2010 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, James F

    2012-05-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. These components were also produced for the Pluto New Horizons and Mars Science Lab missions launched in January 2006 and November 2011respectively. The ORNL has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for nearly four decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2011. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS. Work has also been initiated to establish fabrication capabilities for the Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units.

  9. Risk Estimation Methodology for Launch Accidents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Daniel James; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bechtel, Ryan D.

    2014-02-01

    As compact and light weight power sources with reliable, long lives, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) have made space missions to explore the solar system possible. Due to the hazardous material that can be released during a launch accident, the potential health risk of an accident must be quantified, so that appropriate launch approval decisions can be made. One part of the risk estimation involves modeling the response of the RPS to potential accident environments. Due to the complexity of modeling the full RPS response deterministically on dynamic variables, the evaluation is performed in a stochastic manner with a Monte Carlo simulation. The potential consequences can be determined by modeling the transport of the hazardous material in the environment and in human biological pathways. The consequence analysis results are summed and weighted by appropriate likelihood values to give a collection of probabilistic results for the estimation of the potential health risk. This information is used to guide RPS designs, spacecraft designs, mission architecture, or launch procedures to potentially reduce the risk, as well as to inform decision makers of the potential health risks resulting from the use of RPSs for space missions.

  10. Electrical resistivity change in Al:ZnO thin films dynamically deposited by bipolar pulsed direct-current sputtering and a remote plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Wonkyun; Joo, Junghoon

    2010-07-15

    The Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films for a transparent conducting oxide in solar cell devices were deposited by bipolar pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. This work was performed in an in-line type system and investigated AZO films in a static deposition mode and dynamic one, which is more important in the practical fields. Because of this dynamic deposition process, the zigzagged columnar structure was observed. This resulted in the decreasing electrical property, optical properties, and surface roughness. As a deposition in the dynamic mode, the resistivity increased from 1.64x10{sup -3} to 2.50x10{sup -3} {Omega} cm, as compared to that in the static mode, and the transmittance also decreased from 83.9% to 78.3%. To recover the disadvantage, a remote plasma source (RPS) was supported between the substrate and target for reducing zigzagged formation during the deposition. The deposition rate decreased by using RPS, but the electrical and optical properties of films got better than only dynamic mode. The resistivity and transmittance in the dynamic mode using RPS were 2.1x10{sup -3} {Omega} cm and 85.5%, respectively. In this study, the authors found the possibility to advance the electrical and optical properties of AZO thin films in the industry mode.

  11. PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Mike J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang; Jill M. Zola

    2004-02-01

    North Dakota lignite-fired power plants have shown a limited ability to control mercury emissions in currently installed electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), dry scrubbers, and wet scrubbers (1). This low level of control can be attributed to the high proportions of Hg{sup 0} present in the flue gas. Speciation of Hg in flue gases analyzed as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) information collection request (ICR) for Hg data showed that Hg{sup 0} ranged from 56% to 96% and oxidized mercury ranged from 4% to 44%. The Hg emitted from power plants firing North Dakota lignites ranged from 45% to 91% of the total Hg, with the emitted Hg being greater than 85% elemental. The higher levels of oxidized mercury were only found in a fluidized-bed combustion system. Typically, the form of Hg in the pulverized and cyclone-fired units was dominated by Hg{sup 0} at greater than 85%, and the average amount of Hg{sup 0} emitted from North Dakota power plants was 6.7 lb/TBtu (1, 2). The overall objective of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is to develop and evaluate advanced and innovative concepts for controlling Hg emissions from North Dakota lignite-fired power plants by 50%-90% at costs of one-half to three-fourths of current estimated costs. The specific objectives are focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in wet and dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in ESPs and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The scientific approach to solving the problems associated with controlling Hg emissions from lignite-fired power plants involves conducting testing of the following processes and technologies that have shown promise on a bench, pilot, or field scale: (1) activated carbon injection (ACI) upstream of an ESP

  12. Preliminary Field Evaluation of Mercury Control Using Combustion Modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Lissianski; P. Maly; T. Marquez

    2005-01-22

    In this project EER conducted a preliminary field evaluation of the integrated approach for mercury (Hg) and NO{sub x} control. The approach enhanced the 'naturally occurring' Hg capture by fly ash through combustion optimization, increasing carbon in ash content, and lowering ESP temperature. The evaluation took place in Green Station Units 1 and 2 located near Henderson, Kentucky and operated by Western Kentucky Energy. Units 1 and 2 are equipped with cold-side ESPs and wet scrubbers. Green Station Units 1 and 2 typically fire two types of fuel: a bituminous coal and a blend of bituminous coals based on availability. Testing of Hg emissions in Unit 2 without reburning system in operation and at minimum OFA demonstrated that efficiencies of Hg reduction downstream of the ESP were 30-40%. Testing also demonstrated that OFA system operation at 22% air resulted in 10% incremental increase in Hg removal efficiency at the ESP outlet. About 80% of Hg in flue gas at ESP outlet was present in the oxidized form. Testing of Hg emissions under reburning conditions showed that Hg emissions decreased with LOI increase and ESP temperature decrease. Testing demonstrated that maximum Hg reduction downstream of ESP was 40-45% at ESP temperatures higher than 300 F and 60-80% at ESP temperatures lower than 300 F. The program objective to demonstrate 80% Hg removal at the ESP outlet has been met.

  13. Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2, corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H.sub.2 O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered.

  14. Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1986-12-16

    This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2], corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H[sub 2]O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered. 1 fig.

  15. Apparatus for mercury refinement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-07-16

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

  16. Method for mercury refinement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard; George, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

  17. Apparatus for mercury refinement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard; George, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

  18. Method for mercury refinement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-04-09

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

  19. The effects of a stannous chloride-based remediation system in a mercury contaminated stream

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mathews, Teresa J; Looney, Brian; BryanJr., Larry; Smith, John G; Miller, Carrie L; Peterson, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations inmore » the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.« less

  20. Identifying Biomarkers and Mechanisms of Toxic Metal Stress with Global Proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Susan M.

    2012-04-16

    Hg is a wide-spread contaminant in the environment and is toxic in all of its various forms. Data suggest that RHg+ and Hg2+ are toxic in two ways. At low levels, Hg species appear to disrupt membrane-bound respiration causing a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that further damage the cell. At higher Hg concentrations, RHg+ and Hg2+ may form adducts with cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing proteins in all cellular compartments resulting in their inactivation. Although these mechansims for toxicity are generally accepted, the most sensitive targets associated with these mechanisms are not well understood. In this collaborative project involving three laboratories at three institutions, the overall goal was to develop of a mass spectrometry-based global proteomics methodology that could be used to identify Hg-adducted (and ideally, ROS-damaged) proteins in order to address these types of questions. The two objectives of this overall collaborative project were (1) to identify, quantify, and compare ROS- and Hg-damaged proteins in cells treated with various Hg species and concentrations to test this model for two mechanisms of Hg toxicity, and (2) to define the cellular roles of the ubiquitous bacterial mercury resistance (mer) locus with regards to how the proteins of this pathway interact to protect other cell proteins from Hg damage. The specific objectives and accomplishments of the Miller lab in this project included: (1) Development of algorithms for analysis of the Hg-proteomic mass spectrometry data to identify mercury adducted peptides and other trends in the data. (2) Investigation of the role of mer operon proteins in scavenging Hg(II) from other mer pathway proteins as a means of protecting cellular proteins from damage.

  1. Identification of multiple mercury sources to stream sediments near Oak Ridge, TN, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, Patrick M.; Blum, Joel D.; Demers, Jason D.; Gu, Baohua; Brooks, Scott C.; Peryam, John

    2014-03-03

    In this paper, sediments were analyzed for total Hg concentration (THg) and isotopic composition from streams and rivers in the vicinity of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y12) in Oak Ridge, TN (USA). In the stream directly draining Y12, where industrial releases of mercury (Hg) have been documented, high THg (3.26 to 60.1 μg/g) sediments had a distinct Hg isotopic composition (δ202Hg of 0.02 ± 0.15‰ and Δ199Hg of -0.07 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD, n=12) compared to sediments from relatively uncontaminated streams in the region (δ202Hg = -1.40 ± 0.06‰ and Δ199Hg of –0.26 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD, n=6). Additionally, several streams that are nearby but do not drain Y12 had sediments with intermediate THg (0.06 to 0.21 μg/g) and anomalous δ202Hg (as low as -5.07‰). We suggest that the low δ202Hg values in these sediments provide evidence for the contribution of an additional Hg source to sediments, possibly derived from atmospheric deposition. In sediments directly downstream of Y12 this third Hg source is not discernible and the Hg isotopic composition can be largely explained by the mixing of low THg sediments with high THg sediments contaminated by Y12 discharges.

  2. Trends in anthropogenic mercury emissions in China from 1995 to 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Wu; Shuxiao Wang; David G. Streets; Jiming Hao; Melissa Chan; Jingkun Jiang

    2006-09-01

    We have developed multiple-year inventories of anthropogenic mercury emissions in China for 1995 through 2003. It is estimated that total Hg emissions from all anthropogenic sources increased at an average annual rate of 2.9% during the period 1995-2003, reaching 696 ({+-}307) t in 2003, with a speciation split of 395 t of Hg{sup 0}, 230 t of Hg{sup 2+}, and 70 t of particulate mercury, Hg{sup p}. Nonferrous metals smelting and coal combustion continue to be the two leading mercury sources in China, as nonferrous metals production and coal consumption keep increasing. Nonferrous metals smelting and coal combustion together contributed {approximately}80% of total Hg emissions during the past decade. Hg emissions from coal combustion increased from 202 t in 1995 to 257 t in 2003 at an average annual rate of 3.0%. Among all of the coal consumption sectors, the power sector is the leading one in Hg emissions growth, up by 5.9% annually. Hg emissions from nonferrous metals smelting increased from 230 t in 1995 to 321 t in 2003 at an average annual rate of 4.2%. Although Hg emissions related to gold smelting decreased since 1996, other nonferrous metals such as zinc, lead, and copper contributed significant Hg growth at annual rates of 8.5%, 13.0%, and 6.9%, respectively. At provincial level, the trends of Hg emissions show significant variation. The uncertainty level decreased from {+-}78% (95% confidence interval) in the estimate of total emissions in 1995, to {+-}44% in 2003. This is primarily attributed to the decreased emissions from those Hg sources with the largest uncertainty in both activity levels and emission factors, such as artisanal gold smelting, mercury mining, and battery/fluorescent lamp production. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. The effects of a stannous chloride-based water treatment system in a mercury contaminated stream

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mathews, Teresa J.; Looney, Brian B.; Smith, John G.; Miller, Carrie L.; Peterson, Mark J.; Bryan, A. Lawrence; Southworth, George R.

    2015-06-09

    Remediation of mercury (Hg)-contaminated watersheds is often challenging because of the complex nature of Hg biogeochemistry. Stream ecosystems have been shown to be particularly susceptible to Hg contamination and bioaccumulation in fish. Decreasing total Hg loading to stream systems, however, has shown variable performance in decreasing Hg concentrations in fish tissues. In this study, we assess the impacts of an innovative treatment system in reducing releases of Hg to a small stream system in the southeastern United States. The treatment system, installed in 2007, removes Hg from water using tin (Sn) (II) chloride followed by air stripping. Mercury concentrations inmore » the receiving stream, Tims Branch, decreased from > 100 to ~10 ng/L in the four years following treatment, and Hg body burdens in redfin pickerel (Esox americanus) decreased by 70 % at the most contaminated site. Tin concentrations in water and fish increased significantly in the tributary leading to Tims Branch, but concentrations remain below levels of concern for human health or ecological risks. While other studies have shown that Sn may be environmentally methylated and methyltin can transfer its methyl group to Hg, results from our field studies and sediment incubation experiments suggest that the added Sn to the Tims Branch watershed is not contributing to MeHg production and bioaccumulation. The stannous chloride treatment system installed at Tims Branch was effective at removing Hg inputs and reducing Hg bioaccumulation in the stream with minimal impacts on the environment due to the increased Sn in the system.« less

  4. Identification of multiple mercury sources to stream sediments near Oak Ridge, TN, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Donovan, Patrick M.; Blum, Joel D.; Demers, Jason D.; Gu, Baohua; Brooks, Scott C.; Peryam, John

    2014-03-03

    In this paper, sediments were analyzed for total Hg concentration (THg) and isotopic composition from streams and rivers in the vicinity of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y12) in Oak Ridge, TN (USA). In the stream directly draining Y12, where industrial releases of mercury (Hg) have been documented, high THg (3.26 to 60.1 μg/g) sediments had a distinct Hg isotopic composition (δ202Hg of 0.02 ± 0.15‰ and Δ199Hg of -0.07 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD, n=12) compared to sediments from relatively uncontaminated streams in the region (δ202Hg = -1.40 ± 0.06‰ and Δ199Hg of –0.26 ± 0.03‰; mean ± 1SD,more » n=6). Additionally, several streams that are nearby but do not drain Y12 had sediments with intermediate THg (0.06 to 0.21 μg/g) and anomalous δ202Hg (as low as -5.07‰). We suggest that the low δ202Hg values in these sediments provide evidence for the contribution of an additional Hg source to sediments, possibly derived from atmospheric deposition. In sediments directly downstream of Y12 this third Hg source is not discernible and the Hg isotopic composition can be largely explained by the mixing of low THg sediments with high THg sediments contaminated by Y12 discharges.« less

  5. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  6. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  7. Obtaining accurate amounts of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1987-01-01

    A process for obtaining pre-determined, accurate rate amounts of mercury. In one embodiment, predetermined, precise amounts of Hg are separated from HgO and plated onto a cathode wire. The method for doing this involves dissolving a precise amount of HgO which corresponds to a pre-determined amount of Hg desired in an electrolyte solution comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. The mercuric ions are then electrolytically reduced and plated onto a cathode producing the required pre-determined quantity of Hg. In another embodiment, pre-determined, precise amounts of Hg are obtained from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The method for doing this involves dissolving a precise amount of Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 in an electrolyte solution comprised of concentrated HCl and H.sub.2 O. The mercurous ions in solution are then electrolytically reduced and plated onto a cathode wire producing the required, pre-determined quantity of Hg.

  8. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  9. Superdeformation in the mercury nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, R.V.F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fernandez, P.B.; Moore, E.F.; Ahmad, I.; Khoo, T.L.; Wolfs, F.L.H. ); Drigert, M.W. ); Ye, D.; Beard, K.B.; Garg, U.; Reviol, W. ); Bearden, I.G.; Benet, P.; Daly, P.J.; Grabowski, Z.W. )

    1990-01-01

    We shall first summarize the present experimental situation concerning {sup 192}Hg, the nucleus regarded as the analog of {sup 152}Dy for this superdeformation (SD) region in that gaps are calculated to occur at large deformation for Z = 80 and N = 112. Proton and neutron excitations out of the {sup 192}Hg core will then be reviewed with particular emphasis on {sup 191}Hg and {sup 193}Tl. The presentation will conclude with a brief discussion on limits of the SD region for neutron deficient Hg nuclei. 26 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United ... of the SOL plasma density was obtained. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. ...

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    ... (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United ... of the phase transformation behavior responsible for the rich new physical ...

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    ... (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United ... Kondo effect and non-Fermi-liquid behavior in Dirac and Weyl semimetals Principi, ...

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    ... Sandia Site Office Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL), Aiken, SC (United ... (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United ...

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    USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) (United States) USDOE Office of Hearings and Appeals (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United...

  15. DOE/SC0007014-Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Susan M.

    2014-09-14

    Hg is a wide-spread contaminant in the environment and is toxic in all of its various forms. Organomercurials (RHg+) and mercuric ion (Hg2+) directly inactivate proteins by binding to their cysteine or selenocysteine residues. In our previous collaborative project involving the Summers, Miller and Lipton laboratories, we developed a high-throughput, mass spectrometry-based global proteomics approach using the 7 stable isotopes of Hg to identify proteins from phenylmercury-exposed E. coli cells that form stable PhHg-adducts. The two overall objectives of this subsequent collaborative project were (1) to expand our novel organomercury-proteomics capability for use with inorganic ionic (HgX2) exposure and (2) to use this new capability to identify Hg-protein adducts in methylating and non-methylating Desulfovibrio exposed to inorganic ionic HgX2 and test whether those identified uniquely in methylating bacteria are involved in the methylation pathway. The specific objectives and accomplishments of the Miller lab in this project included: Development of algorithms for analysis of the Hg-proteomic mass spectrometry data to identify and quantify Hg-adducted peptides and other trends in the data.

  16. Dialight Lumidrives formerly Lumidrives Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lumidrives Ltd) Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: HG5 8LF Product: Manufacturers of LED technology for architectural and exterior lighting application. References:...

  17. ILC Treatment of JLab Cavity Garners Exciting Result | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgnewsarticlesilc-treatment-jlab-cavity-garners-exciting-result ILC Treatment of JLab Cavity Garners Exciting Result Accelerator cavity HG-6 was...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) (United States) USDOE Office of Hearings and Appeals (HG) (United...

  19. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-11-07

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

  20. Obtaining accurate amounts of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1987-07-07

    A process is described for obtaining pre-determined, accurate rate amounts of mercury. In one embodiment, predetermined, precise amounts of Hg are separated from HgO and plated onto a cathode wire. The method for doing this involves dissolving a precise amount of HgO which corresponds to a pre-determined amount of Hg desired in an electrolyte solution comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. The mercuric ions are then electrolytically reduced and plated onto a cathode producing the required pre-determined quantity of Hg. In another embodiment, pre-determined, precise amounts of Hg are obtained from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The method for doing this involves dissolving a precise amount of Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] in an electrolyte solution comprised of concentrated HCl and H[sub 2]O. The mercurous ions in solution are then electrolytically reduced and plated onto a cathode wire producing the required, pre-determined quantity of Hg. 1 fig.

  1. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1991-06-18

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program The Holyoke Gas & Electric (HG&E) Residential Energy Efficiency Program provides residential customers with loans to...

  3. Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References J. C. Varekamp, P. R. Buseck (1983) Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Additional...

  4. Mercury Vapor At Vale Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References J. C. Varekamp, P. R. Buseck (1983) Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Additional...

  5. Mercury Vapor At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References J. C. Varekamp, P. R. Buseck (1983) Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Additional...

  6. Mercury Vapor At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on air-dried ( < 80 mesh fraction) samples using the Jerome Instrument 301 Au-film Hg degrees detector. References Lawrence G. Kodosky (1989) Surface Mercury Geochemistry As...

  7. Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on air-dried ( < 80 mesh fraction) samples using the Jerome Instrument 301 Au-film Hg degrees detector. References Lawrence G. Kodosky (1989) Surface Mercury Geochemistry As...

  8. Mercury Vapor At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References J. C. Varekamp, P. R. Buseck (1983) Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Additional...

  9. Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References J. C. Varekamp, P. R. Buseck (1983) Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Additional...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Conservation Loan Program The Holyoke Gas & Electric (HG&E) Residential Energy Conservation Program provides residential customers with loans to...

  11. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Industrial Demand...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AEO2014. Pollutants covered by Boiler MACT include the hazardous air pollutants (HAP), hydrogen chloride (HCI), mercury (HG), dioxinfuran, carbon monoxide (CO),and particulate...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (United States) USDOE Office of Hearings and Appeals (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United States) USDOE Office of Indian Energy...

  13. Method for isotope enrichment of mercury-196 by selective photoionization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Crane, John K.

    1988-01-01

    A method is provided for selectively photoionizing .sup.196 Hg atoms in a vapor utilizing a three or four-step photoionization process.

  14. DOE/NETL-2010/???? DOE/NETL-341/013113

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gpm Gallons per minute Hg Mercury HGCU Hot-gas-cleanup unit HP High pressure HRSG Heat recovery steam generator IGCC Integrated gasification combined cycle ISO International...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United ... dispersion relations and a unitary isobar model, which give consistent results. ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United ... Phase relations in the Fe-FeSi system at high pressures and temperatures Fischer, Rebecca ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United ... such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the ...

  18. BOA-2012-00185-CResponse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a written appeal to the Director, Office of Hearings and Appeals, at HG-1IL'Enfant Plaza Building, Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC...

  19. Probing Mercury's Partnering Preferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of different atoms for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its toxicity, bioavailability, transport, and environmental fate. Key Challenges: The relative...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... States) USDOE Office of Hearings and Appeals (HG) (United States) USDOE Office of Human Resources and Administration (HR) (United States) USDOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and ...

  1. Holyoke Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Conservation Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Holyoke Gas & Electric (HG&E) Residential Energy Conservation Program provides residential customers with loans to help make energy saving improvements to eligible homes. The loan...

  2. PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Michael J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Jill M. Mackenzie; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang

    2005-02-01

    The overall objective of the project was to develop advanced innovative mercury control technologies to reduce mercury emissions by 50%-90% in flue gases typically found in North Dakota lignite-fired power plants at costs from one-half to three-quarters of current estimated costs. Power plants firing North Dakota lignite produce flue gases that contain >85% elemental mercury, which is difficult to collect. The specific objectives were focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The approach to developing Hg control technologies for North Dakota lignites involved examining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg capture upstream of an ESP using sorbent enhancement, Hg oxidation and control using dry scrubbers, enhanced oxidation at a full-scale power plant using tire-derived fuel and oxidizing catalysts, and testing of Hg control technologies in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter.

  3. Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake Kirkham; Amy Powell; Lucas Rich

    2011-02-01

    Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case Drake Kirkham1, Amy Powell2, Lucas Rich3 1Quality Manager, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 M/S 6122, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6122 2Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory 3Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory Contact: Voice: (208) 533-7550 Email: Drake.Kirkham@inl.gov Abstract. The Radioisotope Power Systems Program of the Idaho National Laboratory makes an empirical case for a highly integrated Quality Assurance function pertaining to the preparation, assembly, testing, storage and transportation of 238Pu fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Case data represents multiple campaigns including the Pluto/New Horizons mission, the Mars Science Laboratory mission in progress, and other related projects. Traditional Quality Assurance models would attempt to reduce cost by minimizing the role of dedicated Quality Assurance personnel in favor of either functional tasking or peer-based implementations. Highly integrated Quality Assurance adds value by placing trained quality inspectors on the production floor side-by-side with nuclear facility operators to enhance team dynamics, reduce inspection wait time, and provide for immediate, independent feedback. Value is also added by maintaining dedicated Quality Engineers to provide for rapid identification and resolution of corrective action, enhanced and expedited supply chain interfaces, improved bonded storage capabilities, and technical resources for requirements management including data package development and Certificates of Inspection. A broad examination of cost-benefit indicates highly integrated Quality Assurance can reduce cost through the mitigation of risk and reducing administrative burden thereby allowing engineers to be engineers, nuclear operators to be nuclear operators, and the cross-functional team to operate more efficiently. Applicability of this case

  4. Modeling CO{sub 2}-Brine-Rock Interaction Including Mercury and H{sub 2}S Impurities in the Context of CO{sub 2} Geologic Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spycher, N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses modeling and simulation approaches to investigate the impacts on injectivity of trace amounts of mercury (Hg) in a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stream injected for geologic carbon sequestration in a sandstone reservoir at ~2.5 km depth. At the range of Hg concentrations expected (7-190 ppbV, or ~ 0.06-1.6 mg/std.m{sup 3}CO{sub 2}), the total volumetric plugging that could occur due to complete condensation of Hg, or due to complete precipitation of Hg as cinnabar, results in a very small porosity change. In addition, Hg concentration much higher than the concentrations considered here would be required for Hg condensation to even occur. Concentration of aqueous Hg by water evaporation into CO{sub 2} is also unlikely because the higher volatility of Hg relative to H{sub 2}O at reservoir conditions prevents the Hg concentration from increasing in groundwater as dry CO{sub 2} sweeps through, volatilizing both H{sub 2}O and Hg. Using a model-derived aqueous solution to represent the formation water, batch reactive geochemical modeling show that the reaction of the formation water with the CO{sub 2}-Hg mixture causes the pH to drop to about 4.7 and then become buffered near 5.2 upon reaction with the sediments, with a negligible net volume change from mineral dissolution and precipitation. Cinnabar (HgS(s)) is found to be thermodynamically stable as soon as the Hg-bearing CO{sub 2} reacts with the formation water which contains small amounts of dissolved sulfide. Liquid mercury (Hg(l)) is not found to be thermodynamically stable at any point during the simulation. Two-dimensional radial reactive transport simulations of CO{sub 2} injection at a rate of 14.8 kg/s into a 400 m-thick formation at isothermal conditions of 106°C and average pressure near 215 bar, with varying amounts of Hg and H{sub 2}S trace gases, show generally that porosity changes only by about ±0.05% (absolute, i.e., new porosity = initial porosity ±0.0005) with Hg predicted to readily

  5. Clean Energy and Climate First Principles-How To Frame the Strategic Context?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in State RPSs State-Federal RPS Collaborative Webinar Hosted by Clean Energy States Alliance December 19, 2011 Housekeeping  All participants will be in listen-only mode throughout the broadcast.  You can connect to the audio portion of the webinar using your computer's speakers or a headset. You can also connect by telephone.  You can enter questions for today's event by typing them into the "Question Box" on the webinar console. We will pose your questions, as time allows,

  6. Richard Gerber! NERSC User Services NUG Teleconference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2013 --- 1 --- June 6 , 2 013 Connection Info --- 2 --- Connec*on I nfo Topic: N UG W eb C onference Date a nd T ime: Thursday, J une 6 , 2 013 1 1:00 a m, P acific D aylight T ime ( San F rancisco, G MT---07:00) Event n umber: 6 62 3 77 6 26 Event p assword: e dison hRps://nersc---training.webex.com/ a nd c hose f rom t he l ist o f e vents.

  7. Richard Gerber! Zhengji Zhao! NERSC User Services NUG Teleconference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 , 2 013 Connection Info --- 2 --- Connec*on I nfo Topic: N UG W eb C onference Date a nd T ime: Thursday, M arch 7 , 2 013 1 1:00 a m, P acific S tandard T ime ( San F rancisco, G MT---08:00) Event n umber: 6 61 8 98 9 53 Event p assword: e dison hRps://nersc---training.webex.com/ a nd c hose f rom t he l ist o f e vents. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  8. Richard Gerber! Zhengji Zhao! NERSC User Services NUG Teleconference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 , 2 013 Connection Info --- 2 --- Connec*on I nfo Topic: N UG W eb C onference Date a nd T ime: Thursday, M arch 7 , 2 013 1 1:00 a m, P acific S tandard T ime ( San F rancisco, G MT---08:00) Event n umber: 6 61 8 98 9 53 Event p assword: e dison hRps://nersc---training.webex.com/ a nd c hose f rom t he l ist o f e vents. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  9. Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

  10. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we introduce a new transparent regional capacity expansion model with high spatio-temporal resolution and detailed representation of dispatch. The development of this model, referred to as the Resource Planning Model (RPM), is motivated by the lack of a tool in the public domain that can be used to characterize optimal regional deployment of resources with detailed dispatch modeling. In particular, RPM is designed to evaluate scenarios of renewable technology deployment to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) and emission-reduction goals, and to project possible deployment levels for various projections of future technology and fuel prices.

  11. Analysis of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard, Addendum

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    On May 8, 2003, Senator Jeff Bingaman, the Ranking Minority Member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, requested an analysis of a nationwide Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) program proposed to be amended to energy legislation currently pending before the U.S. Senate. With his request Sen. Bingaman provided specific information on the program to be analyzed. This analysis was prepared in response to his request and projects the impact of the proposed program on energy supply, demand, prices, and emissions. The analysis is based on the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003) projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025, as updated in May 2003.

  12. Analysis of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    On May 8, 2003, Senator Jeff Bingaman, the Ranking Minority Member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, requested an analysis of a nationwide Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) program proposed to be amended to energy legislation currently pending before the U.S. Senate. With his request Sen. Bingaman provided specific information on the program to be analyzed. This analysis was prepared in response to his request and projects the impact of the proposed program on energy supply, demand, prices, and emissions. The analysis is based on the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003) projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025, as updated in May 2003.

  13. Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Interim Report 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Key, Thomas S; Deb, Rajat

    2009-05-01

    Electricity consumption in the Southeastern US, not including Florida, is approximately 24% of the total US. The availability of renewable resources for electricity production is relatively small compared to the high consumption. Therefore meeting a national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is particularly challenging in this region. Neighboring regions, particularly to the west, have significant wind resources and given sufficient long distant transmission these resources could serve energy markets in the SE. This report looks at renewable resource supply relative to demands and the potential for power transfer into the SE. It shows that development of wind resources will depend not only on available transmission capacity but also on electricity supply and demand factors.

  14. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update through 2009 (Update) (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    To the extent possible,Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO) incorporates the impacts of state laws requiring the addition of renewable generation or capacity by utilities doing business in the states. Currently, 30 states and the District of Columbia have enforceable renewable portfolio standards (RPS) or similar laws). Under such standards, each state determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. AEO2010 includes the impacts of all laws in effect as of September 2009 (with the exception of Hawaii, because the National Energy Modeling System provides electricity market projections for the continental United States only).

  15. Technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the reactor protection system for the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selan, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the noise and isolation testing of the reactor protection system (RPS) for the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The testing was performed in accordance to Section 4.6.11, Susceptibility, of MIL-N-19900B, and NRC approved plant test methods. Analysis of the test results shows that the reactor protection system did not degrade below acceptable levels when subjected to electromagnetic, electrostatic, isolation and noise level tests, nor was the system's ability to perform its Class 1E protective functions affected.

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - RJC-Alastair Gardiner PARC EFRC Research Highlight March 2013.ppt [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Crystallisation of Purple Bacterial LH Complexes S i tifi A hi t Scientific Achievement Good progress is being made in crystallising a range of integral membrane LH complexes 1. Significance and Impact The first requirement in understanding the detailed mechanisms of energy transfer in LH is 3-D structural information 3. information Research Details 1. Large, highly resolving crystals of LH2 from Rps acidophila have 2. 3 2. The crystal packing of core complexes from Alc. vinosum h b d t i d

  17. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

  18. Measured water heating performance of a vertical-bore water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for domestic water heating over twelve months under simulated occupancy loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents monthly performance metrics of a 5.275 kW (1.5 ton) WW-GSHP providing 227 L day-1 domestic hot water at 49 C. Daily water use is simulated as stipulated in the Building America Research Benchmark Definition capturing the living habits of the average U.S household. The 94.5m vertical-bore ground loop is shared with a separate GSHP for space conditioning the 251m2 residential home. Data on entering water temperatures, energy extracted from the ground, delivered energy, compressor electricity use, COP, WW-GSHP run times, and the impact of fan and pump energy consumption on efficiency are presented for each month. Factors influencing performance metrics are highlighted.

  19. Methods for dispensing mercury into devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1987-04-28

    A process for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury.

  20. Methods for dispensing mercury into devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1987-04-28

    A process is described for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury. 2 figs.