Sample records for hfcs perfluorocarbons pfcs

  1. The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs Danish consumption and emissions, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6 Danish consumption and emissions, 2007 Tomas Sander Poulsen AND EMISSION OF F-GASES 7 1.1.1 Consumption 7 1.1.2 Emission 7 1.1.3 Trends in total GWP contribution from F 21 4 EMISSION OF F-GASES 23 4.1.1 Emissions of HFCs from refrigerants 23 4.1.2 Emissions of HFCs from

  2. Ozone-depleting substances and the greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozone-depleting substances and the greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6 Danish consumption contribution to the debate on environmental policy in Denmark. #12;3 Contents 1 SUMMARY 5 1.1 OZONE OZONE-DEPLETING SUBSTANCES 19 3.1 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 19 3.1.1 CFCs 19 3.1.2 Tetrachloromethane 19 3

  3. Ozone-depleting substances and the greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozone-depleting substances and the greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6 Danish consumption contribution to the debate on environmental policy in Denmark. #12;3 Contents 1 SUMMARY 5 1.1 OZONE OZONE-DEPLETING SUBSTANCES 18 3.1 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 18 3.1.1 CFCs 18 3.1.2 Tetrachloromethane 19 3

  4. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turick, Charles E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases.

  5. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turick, C.E.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

  6. Perfluorocarbons in the global atmosphere: tetrafluoromethane, hexafluoroethane, and octafluoropropane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhle, J.

    We present atmospheric baseline growth rates from the 1970s to the present for the long-lived, strongly infrared-absorbing perfluorocarbons (PFCs) tetrafluoromethane (CF4), hexafluoroethane (C2F6), and octafluoropropane ...

  7. Trends and inferred emissions of atmospheric high molecular weight perfluorocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivy, Diane Jean

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric observations and atmospheric observation-based global emission estimates are presented for the five high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C 4 F 1 0 ), dodecafluoropentane (C5 F1 2 ), ...

  8. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Harris, B.R. Jr. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); DeRose, W.E. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Ottaviani, W.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  9. Perfluorocarbon tracer method for air-infiltration measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, R.N.

    1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring air infiltration rates suitable for use in rooms of homes and buildings comprises the steps of emitting perfluorocarbons in the room to be measured, sampling the air containing the emitted perfluorocarbons over a period of time, and analyzing the samples at a laboratory or other facility.

  10. Informal Report USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL-66726 Informal Report USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER and concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected

  11. Trends and Inferred Emissions of Atmospheric High Molecular Weight Perfluorocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , with estimated ac- curacies of 6.8 % for C4F10, 7.8 % for C5F12, 4.0 % for C6F14, 6.6 % for C7F16 and 7.9 % for C molecular weight PFCs are: 0.17 parts-per-trillion (ppt, i.e., parts per 1012 ) for C4F10, 0.12 ppt for C5F for C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16 and C8F18 were estimated from the observations using a 3-dimensional

  12. Development of a perfluorocarbon liquid immersed prototype large power transformer with compressed SF sub 6 insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukaryama, Y.; Nonaka, F.; Takagi, I. (Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Nagoya (Japan)); Higaki, M.; Endoo, K.; Sakamoto, T.; Hiraishi, K.; Kawashima, K. (Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi (JP))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a prototype of three phase non-flammable, large power transformer that has been developed. It uses non-flammable perfluorocarbon liquid as both a coolant and an insulating material for windings, and compressed SF{sub 6} gas as the insulation from the outer windings to the tank. Using cooling and insulation models, the cooling and insulation characteristics of the disc windings were clarified. Stress analyses and the pressure tests of the transformer tank were carried out, to evaluate its mechanical characteristics. Finally, a prototype of 275kV 100MVA three phase transformer was developed, and its excellent performance was confirmed.

  13. Velocity of sound measurements in gaseous per-fluorocarbons and their custom mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vacek, V; Lindsay, S

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inexpensive sonar instrument was prepared for measurements of sound velocity in two fluorocarbon vapors; per-fluoro-n-propane (C3F8), per-fluoro-n-butane (C4F10), and their custom mixtures. The apparatus, measurement principle and instrument software are described. All sound velocity measurements in per-fluorocarbons were made in the low pressure range between 0.01 and 0.4 MPa, and at temperatures between 253 and 303 K. The purity of the C3F8 and C4F10 samples was checked using gas chromatography. Uncertainties in the speed of sound measurements were better than ± 0.1 %. Comparisons were made with theoretical predictions of sound velocity for the two individual components. The instrument was then used for concentration monitoring of custom C3F8/C4F10 mixtures.

  14. PERFLUOROCARBON GAS TRACER STUDIES TO SUPPORT RISK ASSESSMENT MODELING OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SUBJECTED TO TERRORIST ATTACKS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; HEISER, J.; WATSON, T.; ALLWINE, K.J.; FLAHERTY, J.E.

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of real-time predictive modeling to identify the dispersion and/or source(s) of airborne weapons of mass destruction including chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear material in urban environments is needed to improve response to potential releases of these materials via either terrorist or accidental means. These models will also prove useful in defining airborne pollution dispersion in urban environments for pollution management/abatement programs. Predicting gas flow in an urban setting on a scale of less than a few kilometers is a complicated and challenging task due to the irregular flow paths that occur along streets and alleys and around buildings of different sizes and shapes, i.e., ''urban canyons''. In addition, air exchange between the outside and buildings and subway areas further complicate the situation. Transport models that are used to predict dispersion of WMD/CBRN materials or to back track the source of the release require high-density data and need defensible parameterizations of urban processes. Errors in the data or any of the parameter inputs or assumptions will lead to misidentification of the airborne spread or source release location(s). The need for these models to provide output in a real-time fashion if they are to be useful for emergency response provides another challenge. To improve the ability of New York City's (NYC's) emergency management teams and first response personnel to protect the public during releases of hazardous materials, the New York City Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) has been initiated. This is a four year research program being conducted from 2004 through 2007. This paper will discuss ground level and subway Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) release studies conducted in New York City. The studies released multiple tracers to study ground level and vertical transport of contaminants. This paper will discuss the results from these tests and how these results can be used for improving transport models needed for risk assessment.

  15. Measurement of HVAC system performance and local ventilation using passive perfluorocarbon tracer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April of 1993, two (2) perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) ventilation/indoor air quality assessment tests were performed in the Gleeson Hall building of the SUNY Farmingdale campus. The building was being modified, in part, as a result of significant occupant complaints of perceived poor air quality. The four story building had a basement first floor with air supplied normally by an HVAC system labelled as AC1. During this study, AC1 was inoperational and the basement interior rooms (walls) were primarily gone; the other three floors were still being used for classes. It is possible that a sense of poor air quality may have been perceived by first-floor occupants because they were working in the basement, but this issue could not be addressed. The second floor had two (2) lecture halls--Rm 202 (handled by AC4) and Rm 204 (handled by AC5); the balance of the second floor interior rooms and corridors was split between two other air handling systems, AC2 for the west side of the building and AC3 for the east side. The remaining 3rd and 4th floors were also split about evenly between AC2 and AC3. The perimeter rooms, equipped with wall units having their own outside air (OA) source plus centralized return air (RA) bypasses, were not included in this testing which was restricted to the basement floor (1st floor) and the four operating air handling systems, AC2 to AC5, during Test 1 and only AC2 to AC5 during Test 2. Two types of tests were performed using the full suite of 5 PFT types available. The first test was designed to measure the infiltration, exfiltration, and air exchange between the 5 AC zones above and the second test used the 5th tracer, which had been in the basement, as a distributed source throughout the four other zones to act as a surrogate pollutant source. This report provides final conclusions of both tests and suggestions regarding its usefulness in similar building ventilation and indoor air quality assessments.

  16. USING PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS FOR VERIFICATION OF CAP AND COVER SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) office has committed itself to an accelerated cleanup of its national facilities. The goal is to have much of the DOE legacy waste sites remediated by 2006. This includes closure of several sites (e.g., Rocky Flats and Fernald). With the increased focus on accelerated cleanup, there has been considerable concern about long-term stewardship issues in general, and verification and long-term monitoring (LTM) of caps and covers, in particular. Cap and cover systems (covers) are vital remedial options that will be extensively used in meeting these 2006 cleanup goals. Every buried waste site within the DOE complex will require some form of cover system. These covers are expected to last from 100 to 1000 years or more. The stakeholders can be expected to focus on system durability and sustained performance. DOE EM has set up a national committee of experts to develop a long-term capping (LTC) guidance document. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, desiccation, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. Very little is available in terms of long-term monitoring other than downstream groundwater or surface water monitoring. By its very nature, this can only indicate that failure of the cover system has already occurred and contaminants have been transported away from the site. This is unacceptable. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict approaching cover failure are needed. The LTC committee has identified predictive monitoring technologies as a high priority need for DOE, both for new covers as well as existing covers. The same committee identified a Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technology as one approach that may be capable of meeting the requirements for LTM. The Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD) at BNL developed a novel methodology for verifying and monitoring subsurface barriers (1,2). The technology uses perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) to determine flaws (e.g., holes or cracks) and high permeability areas in subsurface barriers. Gaseous tracers are injected on one side of the barrier and searched for on the opposite side of the barrier. The sampling grid, concentration, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) on the opposite side are used to determine the size and location of flaws and relative permeability of the barrier. In addition, there are multiple tracers available, which allows different tracers to be injected in different quadrants of the barrier. This yields additional information on transport phenomena of the barrier.

  17. Using CO2 Lidar for Standoff Detection of a Perfluorocarbon Tracer in Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser,J.H.; Smith, S.; Sedlacek, A.

    2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tag, Track and Location System Program (TTL) is investigating the use of PFTs as tracers for tagging and tracking items of interest or fallen soldiers. In order for the tagging and tracking to be valuable there must be a location system that can detect the PFTs. This report details the development of an infrared lidar platform for standoff detection of PFTs released into the air from a tagged object or person. Furthering work performed using a table top lidar system in an indoor environment; a mobile mini lidar platform was assembled using an existing Raman lidar platform, a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was then successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The lidar system was able to detect PFTs released into a vehicle from a distance of 100 meters. In its final, fully optimized configuration the lidar was capable of repeatedly detecting PFTs in the air released from tagged vehicles. Responses were immediate and clear. This report details the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration for standoff detection of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) using infrared lidar. The project is part of the Tag, Track and Location System Program and was performed under a contract with Tracer Detection Technology Corp. with funding from the Office of Naval Research. A lidar capable of detecting PFT releases at distance was assembled by modifying an existing Raman lidar platform by incorporating a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The demonstration test (scripted by the sponsor) consisted of three parked cars, two of which were tagged with the PFT. The cars were located 70 (closest) to 100 meters (farthest) from the lidar (the lidar beam path was limited by site constraints and was {approx}100 meters). When one door of each of the cars was opened (sequentially), the lidar was clearly able to determine which vehicles had been tagged and which one was not. The lidar is probably capable of greater than 0.5 kilometer standoff distances based on the extreme amount of signal return achieved (so much that the system had to be de-tuned). The BNL lidar system, while optimized to the extent possible with available parts and budget, was not as sensitive as it could be. Steps to improve the lidar are detailed in this report and include using a better laser system (for more stable power output), dual wavelengths (to improve the sensitivity and allow common mode noise reduction and to allow the use of the lidar in a scanning configuration), heterodyning (for range resolved PFT detection) and an off-axis optical configuration (for improved near field sensitivity).

  18. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for CO2 , CH4 , N2 O, CO, NMVOC, SO2 , HFCs, PFCs and SF6 . Keywords: Emission Inventory; UNFCCC; IPCC; CO2 ; CH4 ; N2 O; HFCs; PFCs; SF6. ISSN (electronic): 1399-9346 Number of pages: 845 Internet version, Greenland and the Faroe Islands Appendix 2: Emission trends 1990-2001 adjusted for electricity exchange

  19. Basic cooling characteristics of perfluorocarbon liquid immersed windings for nonflammable transformers; Disk coil cooling for large-capacity forced circulating transformers. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamazaki, H.; Sakamoto, T. (Mechanical Engineering Research Lab., Hitachi, Ltd. (JP)); Takagi, I. (Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Keizaburo Hawashima (JP))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that to develop a new type of nonflammable large-power transformer which uses perfluorocarbon liquid as the cooling and insulation medium, the basic cooling characteristics of the liquid were investigated. Using a horizontal coil duct model, design data on heat-transfer characteristics of perfluorocarbon liquid were obtained by the computer program. Using a two-dimensional cooling model of nine coils per section, the velocity distribution in the coil ducts and the temperature rise distribution of the coils were clarified. Comparisons were made between experimental and calculated results and the developed computer program was found to be valid for the prediction of the velocity distribution in the coil ducts and of the temperature rise distribution of the coils.

  20. Development and practical operation of perfluorocarbon immersed 275kV transformers with compressed SF6 gas insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiraishi, K.; Uwano, Y.; Shirakura, K.; Gotanda, Y.; Endoo, K. [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan)] [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan); Higaki, M. [Kyushu Kyoritu Univ., Kitakyushu (Japan)] [Kyushu Kyoritu Univ., Kitakyushu (Japan); Horikoshi, M.; Mizuno, K.; Hora, H. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Nagoya (Japan)] [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A perfluorocarbon (PFC) immersed 275kV transformer with compressed SF6 gas insulation has been under development. This paper clarified the AC partial discharge inception voltage and time characteristics of PFC immersed insulation and also clarified that a prototype 275kV 100MVA three phase transformer could be worked without any trouble during the long-term over voltage test. This prototype proved that it had the AC partial discharge inception strength of higher than 1.5 times of the AC test voltage and the lightning impulse breakdown strength of 1.5 times of the test voltage. A 275kV 250MVA three phase transformer was developed and practically operated at the outdoor substation of Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. This transformer has been successfully operated until now and the detailed internal inspection of the transformer was carried out after one year and 9 months of the successful practical operation and no significant abnormal condition was recognized.

  1. People's Climate Stewardship / Carbon Fee and Dividend Act of 2010: Proposed Findings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    conventional (non-greenhouse-gas) pollutants emitted by fossil fuel burning which cause health, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) emitted as byproducts, perfluorocarbons and DOE shall annually review greenhouse gas emissions data and determine whether an increase larger than

  2. Primary aluminum production : climate policy, emissions and costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnisch, Jochen.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    Climate policy regarding perfluorocarbons (PFCs) may have a significant influence on investment decisions in the production of primary aluminum. This work demonstrates an integrated analysis of the effectiveness and likely ...

  3. Atmospheric histories and growth trends of C[subscript 4]F[subscript 10], C[subscript 5]F[subscript 12], C[subscript 6]F[subscript 14], C[subscript 7]F[subscript 16] and C[subscript 8]F[subscript 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivy, Diane J.

    Atmospheric observations and trends are presented for the high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C[subscript 4]F[subscript 10]), dodecafluoropentane (C[subscript 5]F[subscript 12]), tetradecafluorohexane ...

  4. Global emission estimates and radiative impact of C[subscript 4]F[subscript 10], C[subscript 5]F[subscript 12], C[subscript 6]F[subscript 14], C[subscript 7]F[subscript 16] and C[subscript 8]F[subscript 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivy, Diane J.

    Global emission estimates based on new atmospheric observations are presented for the acylic high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C[subscript 4]F[subscript 10]), dodecafluoropentane (C[subscript ...

  5. The State of the CDM & its Contribution to SD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution of CDM projects 2012 CER Total in the CDM Pipeline kCERs Population per cap. Latin America 609 23 category Renewables 61% Demand-side EE 5% Supply-side EE 11% Fuel sw itch 3% HFCs, PFCs & N2O reduction 2% Supply-side EE 10% CH4 reduction & Cement & Coal mine/bed 20% Renewables 28% HFCs, PFCs & N2O reduction

  6. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

  7. THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER TECHNOLOGY: A PROVEN AND COST EFFECTIVE METHOD TO VERIFY INTEGRITY AND MONITOR LONG TERM PERFORMANCE OF WALLS, FLOORS, CAPS, AND COVER SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER, J.; SULLIVAN, T.

    2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, containment system failures are detected by monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. Clearly this approach is inefficient, as the contaminants will have migrated from the disposal area before they are detected. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict impending cover failure are needed. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) technology can measure performance changes and integrity losses as the cover ages. This allows early detection of cover failure or pending failure so that repair or replacement can be made before contaminants leave the disposal cell. The PFT technology has been successfully applied to four subsurface barrier problems, one leak detection problem from underground ducts, and one surface cover problem. Testing has demonstrated that the PFTs are capable of accurately detecting and locating leaks down to fractions of an inch. The PFT technology has several advantages over competing approaches. The ability to simultaneously use multiple PFTs separates it from other gas tracer technologies. Using multiple tracers provides independent confirmation of flaw location, helps to clearly define transport pathways, and can be used for confirmatory testing (e.g., repeat the test using a new tracer). The PFT tests provide a direct measure of flaws in a barrier, whereas other measurements (pressure, moisture content, temperature, subsidence) provide indirect measures that need interpretation. The focus of the six PFT demonstrations has been on engineering aspects of the technology with the intent of finding if a flaw existed in the barrier. Work remains to be done on the scientific basis for this technology. This includes determining PFT diffusion rates through various materials (soils and barrier) as a function of moisture content, determining the effects of barometric pumping on PFT flow for cover systems, and determining wind effects on side slopes of cover systems and their impact on PFT performance. It also includes application of models to assist in the design of the monitoring system and the interpretation of the data. The set of demonstrations was performed on small sites (< 1/4 acre). Future work also needs to consider scaling issues to develop and design optimal techniques for delivery and monitoring of the PFTs.

  8. Greenhouse Gas Management Program Overview (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program fact sheet highlighting federal requirements for GHG emissions management, FEMP services to help agencies reduce emissions, and additional resources. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) assists Federal agencies with managing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. GHG management entails measuring emissions and understanding their sources, setting a goal for reducing emissions, developing a plan to meet this goal, and implementing the plan to achieve reductions in emissions. FEMP provides the following services to help Federal agencies meet the requirements of inventorying and reducing their GHG emissions: (1) FEMP offers one-on-one technical assistance to help agencies understand and implement the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance and fulfill their inventory reporting requirements. (2) FEMP provides training, tools, and resources on FedCenter to help agencies complete their annual inventories. (3) FEMP serves a leadership role in the interagency Federal Working Group on Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting that develops recommendations to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance. (4) As the focus continues to shift from measuring emissions (completing inventories) to mitigating emissions (achieving reductions), FEMP is developing a strategic planning framework and resources for agencies to prioritize among a variety of options for mitigating their GHG emissions, so that they achieve their reduction goals in the most cost-effective manner. These resources will help agencies analyze their high-quality inventories to make strategic decisions about where to use limited resources to have the greatest impact on reducing emissions. Greenhouse gases trap heat in the lower atmosphere, warming the earth's surface temperature in a natural process known as the 'greenhouse effect.' GHGs include carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}). Human activities have caused a rapid increase in GHG concentrations. This rising level contributes to global climate change, which contributes to environmental and public health problems.

  9. BNL-65897-AB NEW DETECTABILITY IN ATMOSPHERIC PERFLUOROCARBON TRACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Rappolt Tracer Environmental Sciences & Technologies, Inc. San Marcos, CA 92069. Presented.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886. #12;

  10. MAU 1 3/13/00 Disruption Effects on FIRE PFCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loads · Thermal Quench Phase ­ 33 MJ stored thermal energy ­ Loss time 0.2 ms ­ Heated area - Thermal Quench · Energy deposition on the divertor plates ­ Inner: 8.5 to 21.8 MJ/m2 or 42.5 to 109 GW/m2 Interface Fixed Brackets Engage Pins that Attach to Vessel Vacuum Port Envelope Radial Drive Shaft Locations

  11. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 76357645, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/7635/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and radiative impact of C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16 and C8F18 D. J. Ivy1, M. Rigby1,*, M. Baasandorj2,3, J. B for the acylic high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobu- tane (C4F10), dodecafluoropentane (C5 rates were largest in the 1980s and 1990s for C4F10 and C5F12, and in the 1990s for C6F14, C7F16 and C8F

  12. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 43134325, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/4313/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and growth trends of C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16 and C8F18 D. J. Ivy1, T. Arnold2, C. M. Harth2, L. P. Steele3 perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C4F10), dodecafluoropentane (C5F12), tetradecafluorohexane (C6F14 accuracies of 6.8 % for C4F10, 7.8 % for C5F12, 4.0 % for C6F14, 6.6 % for C7F16 and 7.9 % for C8F18. Based

  13. HDW Fuel Cell Systems GmbH HFCS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoodsGuangzhou,GuizhouGuyana: Energy ResourcesHAASEHDW

  14. Controlling the hydrogenic fuel inventory in plasma facing components (PFCs) will be necessary for the successful operation of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControlling Graphene's Electronicnew defect

  15. Controlling the hydrogenic fuel inventory in plasma facing components (PFCs) will be necessary for the successful operation of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControlling Graphene's Electronicnew defectDennis

  16. TOWARDS ELIMINATION OF THE ANODE EFFECT AND PERFLUOROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM HALL-HROULT CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    Hongmin Zhu and Donald R. Sadoway Department of Materials Science and Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, Massachusetts U.S.A. 02139-4307 ABSTRACT Cyclic voltammetry, stepped that the film can be formed and removed at will by regulation of applied potential. In harmony with this first

  17. Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

  18. Perfluorocarbons and their use in Cooling Systems for Semiconductor Particle Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vacek, V; Ilie, S; Lindsay, S

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the development of evaporative fluorocarbon cooling for the semiconductor pixel and micro-strip sensors of inner tracking detector of the ATLAS experiment at the future CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We proceeded with studies using perfluoro-n-propane (3M-"PFG 5030"; C3F8), perfluoro-n-butane (3M-"PFG 5040"; C4F10), trifluoro-iodo-methane (CF3I) and custom C3F8/C4F10 mixtures. Certain thermo-physical properties had to be verified for these fluids.

  19. Feasibility of a Perfluorocarbon tracer based network to support Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of Sequestered CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    , New York, 11073-5000 *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS emissions from fossil fuel based energy production through carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). CCS energy based economy. The Department of Energy (DOE) target leak rate for sequestration reservoirs is 1

  20. Millenium Science Complex New clean room: 10,000 sq. ft. class 100/1000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ring outgassing · All high temperature O-rings made of fluorocarbon or perfluorocarbon materials have this issue

  1. Life-cycle assessment of NAND flash memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Sarah; Horvath, A; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    global warming potential (GWP) of ?ash memory are abatement of per?uorinated compounds (PFCs) and reduction of electricity-

  2. 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Vilamoura, Portugal, 1 -6, November 2004 Overview of Steady-State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surface temperatures on PFCs. Under such conditions, toroidal distribution of heat load and recycling flux on PFCs are measured. In connection with wall pumping rate, in situ measurement of Mo dep is carried out surface temperatures on PFCs. Under such conditions, toroidal distribution of heat load and recycling flux

  3. Supplement 1. PFC emissions from UNFCCC data1086 Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emission are reported to UNFCCC by 34 Annex I countries as part of their obligations as signatories to the1087

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    (UNFCCC, 2009). Emissions are reported for CF4, C2F6, C3F8, c-C4F8, C4F10, C5F12 and C6F14 in Gg) 6500 (CF4), 9200 (C2F6), 7000 (C3F8), 8700 (c-1089 C4F8), 7000 (C4F10), 7500 (C5F12), and 7400 (C6F14

  4. Demonstration of high efficiency elastocaloric cooling with large DT using Jun Cui,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    of modern compressors approaching the theoretical limit, but its environmental footprint remains a global problem. VC refrigerants such as hydrochloroflurocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs

  5. acid gas emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCs 26 INTRODUCTION Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Urban Environment Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: INTRODUCTION Greenhouse Gas...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - armoured actively cooled Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor... of the actively cooled component itself. These have...

  7. Update in Fluoroelastomers : fromPerfluoroelastomers to Fluorosilicones and Fluorophosphazenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of the fluoroelastomers, ranging from (per)fluorocarbon elastomers to fluorophosphazenes, and fluorosilicones. 2 to be crosslinked and those are do not 2-1 Fluorocarbon elastomers. Usually, fluorocarbon elastomers are synthesised

  8. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of perfluorocarbons: Comparison. (1995) and combined with atmospheric lifetimes from the literature to determine global warming

  9. Reliability of Heat Pumps Containing R410-A Refrigerant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McJimsey, B. A.; Cawley, D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on alternate refrigerants. One major manufacturer announced a formation of black smudge on internal surfaces of field trial units using HFCs. Several causes were suggested but none were published. Reports of capillary tube plugging were wide spread. Polyol...

  10. Only CryoguardTM Thermal Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haskel, Daniel

    potential for environmentally friendly magnetic refrigera- tion systems. Magnetic refrigeration is a clean. Magnetic refrigeration does not rely on hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in conventional refrigeration.. CCoollllaabboorraattiioonn wwiitthh AAmmeess LLaabboorraattoorryy Materials that change temperature in magnetic fields could

  11. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  12. Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary: The California Climate Action Registry, which was initially established in 2000 and began operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for recording annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the Registry is to assist California businesses and organizations in their efforts to inventory and document emissions in order to establish a baseline and to document early actions to increase energy efficiency and decrease GHG emissions. The State of California has committed to use its ''best efforts'' to ensure that entities that establish GHG emissions baselines and register their emissions will receive ''appropriate consideration under any future international, federal, or state regulatory scheme relating to greenhouse gas emissions.'' Reporting of GHG emissions involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and indirect emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is consider ed to be an indirect GHG emission and is required to be included in the entity's report. Registry participants include businesses, non-profit organizations, municipalities, state agencies, and other entities. Participants are required to register the GHG emissions of all operations in California, and are encouraged to report nationwide. For the first three years of participation, the Registry only requires the reporting of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, although participants are encouraged to report the remaining five Kyoto Protocol GHGs (CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, and SF6). After three years, reporting of all six Kyoto GHG emissions is required. The enabling legislation for the Registry (SB 527) requires total GHG emissions to be registered and requires reporting of ''industry-specific metrics'' once such metrics have been adopted by the Registry. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) was asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) related to the Registry in three areas: (1) assessing the availability and usefulness of industry-specific metrics, (2) evaluating various methods for establishing baselines for calculating GHG emissions reductions related to specific actions taken by Registry participants, and (3) establishing methods for calculating electricity CO2 emission factors. The third area of research was completed in 2002 and is documented in Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the California Electric Power Sector (Marnay et al., 2002). This report documents our findings related to the first areas of research. For the first area of research, the overall objective was to evaluate the metrics, such as emissions per economic unit or emissions per unit of production that can be used to report GHG emissions trends for potential Registry participants. This research began with an effort to identify methodologies, benchmarking programs, inventories, protocols, and registries that u se industry-specific metrics to track trends in energy use or GHG emissions in order to determine what types of metrics have already been developed. The next step in developing industry-specific metrics was to assess the availability of data needed to determine metric development priorities. Berkeley Lab also determined the relative importance of different potential Registry participant categories in order to asses s the availability of sectoral or industry-specific metrics and then identified industry-specific metrics in use around the world. While a plethora of metrics was identified, no one metric that adequately tracks trends in GHG emissions while maintaining confidentiality of data was identified. As a result of this review, Berkeley Lab recommends the development of a GHG intensity index as a new metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends.Such an index could provide an industry-specific metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends to accurately reflect year to year changes while protecting proprietary data. This GHG intensity index changes

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Information The primary aluminum industry emits PFCs and CO2 directly from the production process and indirectly emits CO2 from its energy consumption. In 2001, the U.S....

  14. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Construction, Commissioning, and Initial Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supplies, and RF sources, cooling water systems, etc., is made to minimize the overall cost 350 C PFCs, 150C VV PROGRESS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Tremendous progress was made during the past year

  15. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Construction, Commissioning, and Initial Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    magnet power supplies, and RF sources, cooling water systems, etc., is made to minimize the overall cost 350 C PFCs, 150C VV PROGRESS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Tremendous progress was made during the past year

  16. Comparison of H-Mode Plasmas Diverted to Solid and Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Kaita, et. al.

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) in NSTX. Among the goals was to use lithium recoating to sustain deuterium (D) retention by a static liquid lithium surface, approximating the ability of flowing liquid lithium to maintain chemical reactivity. Lithium evaporators were used to deposit lithium on the LLD surface. Improvements in plasma edge conditions were similar to those with lithiated graphite plasma-facing components (PFCs), including an increase in confinement over discharges without lithiumcoated PFCs and ELM reduction during H-modes. With the outer strike point on the LLD, the D retention in the LLD was about the same as that for solid lithium coatings on graphite, or about two times that achieved without lithium PFC coatings. There were also indications of contamination of the LLD surface, possibly due erosion and redeposition of carbon from PFCs. Flowing lithium may thus be needed for chemically active PFCs during long-pulse operation.

  17. MULTISCALE MODELAND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF DAMAGE IN PIEZOELECTRIC FIBER-BASED COMPOSITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Materials, the British University in Egypt, El-Shorouk City, Egypt tmhatem@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT The ability of Piezoelectric Fiber Composites (PFCs) in SHM applications as well as energy harvesting applications [10, 11

  18. Philosophical Magazine Letters, Vol. 86, No. 2, February 2006, 123136

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Qinghua

    ) fibre-reinforced composites (FRCs), although the interfacial load transfer mechanism in PFCs is similar and sensing, the ability to overcome low fracture strength and conform to curved surfaces, among others [2, 3

  19. Evaluation of unsaturated fluorocarbons for dielectric Etch applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Ritwik, 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The semiconductor industry is currently faced with the problem of the use and emissions of strong global warming compounds, known as perfluorocompounds (PFCs) for dielectric etch applications. The release of global warming ...

  20. Addressing the challenges of plasma-surface interactions in NSTX-U*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaita, Robert; Abrams, Tyler; Jaworski, Michael; Lucia, Matthew; Nichols, Jacob H.; Skinner, Charles H.; Stotler, Daren; Allain, Jean Paul; Bedoya, Felipe

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of conditioning plasma-facing components (PFCs) has long been recognized as a critical element in obtaining high-performance plasmas in magnetic confinement devices. Lithium coatings, for example, have been used for decades for conditioning PFCs. Since the initial studies on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, experiments on devices with different aspect ratios and magnetic geometries like the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) continue to show the relationship between lithium PFCs and good confinement and stability. While such results are promising, their empirical nature do not reflect the detailed relationship between PFCs and the dynamic conditions that occur in the tokamakmore »environment. A first step developing an understanding such complexity will be taken in the upgrade to NSTX (NSTX-U) that is nearing completion. New measurement capabilities include the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) for in situ surface analysis of samples exposed to tokamak plasmas. The OEDGE suite of codes, for example, will provide a new way to model the underlying mechanisms for such material migration in NSTX-U. This will lead to a better understanding of how plasma-facing surfaces evolve during a shot, and how the composition of the plasma facing surface influences the discharge performance we observe. This paper will provide an overview of these capabilities, and highlight their importance for NSTX-U plans to transition from carbon to high-Z PFCs.« less

  1. Addressing the challenges of plasma-surface interactions in NSTX-U*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaita, Robert [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Abrams, Tyler [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Jaworski, Michael [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lucia, Matthew [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nichols, Jacob H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Skinner, Charles H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Stotler, Daren [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Allain, Jean Paul [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Bedoya, Felipe [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of conditioning plasma-facing components (PFCs) has long been recognized as a critical element in obtaining high-performance plasmas in magnetic confinement devices. Lithium coatings, for example, have been used for decades for conditioning PFCs. Since the initial studies on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, experiments on devices with different aspect ratios and magnetic geometries like the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) continue to show the relationship between lithium PFCs and good confinement and stability. While such results are promising, their empirical nature do not reflect the detailed relationship between PFCs and the dynamic conditions that occur in the tokamak environment. A first step developing an understanding such complexity will be taken in the upgrade to NSTX (NSTX-U) that is nearing completion. New measurement capabilities include the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) for in situ surface analysis of samples exposed to tokamak plasmas. The OEDGE suite of codes, for example, will provide a new way to model the underlying mechanisms for such material migration in NSTX-U. This will lead to a better understanding of how plasma-facing surfaces evolve during a shot, and how the composition of the plasma facing surface influences the discharge performance we observe. This paper will provide an overview of these capabilities, and highlight their importance for NSTX-U plans to transition from carbon to high-Z PFCs.

  2. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and implementingfield programs consistingof tracer studies, including SF6 and perfluorocarbons. · Applying urban models quarter of the year, beginning in March 2005. The results of the Midtown Manhattan fugitive SF6 survey. Conclusions of this study were: · Electrical substations in the city release SF6 that impact the target test

  3. MS ID#: CIRCULATIONAHA/2011/039388-Accepted version Ultra-fast and whole body cooling with total liquid ventilation induces favourable3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with total liquid ventilation induces favourable3 neurological and cardiac outcomes following cardiac arrest in rabbits4 5 Short title: Liquid ventilation, hypothermia and cardiac arrest6 7 Chenoune M1,2,3 , DVM, MSc liquid ventilation (TLV) with temperature controlled perfluorocarbons induces a very rapid35

  4. BNL-73106-2004-IR Research by BNL investigators was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALKENE EMISSIONS FROM PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS WITH PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS Gunnar I. Senum and Russell N (1). Petrochemical plants located in and around the Houston area emit atmospheric alkenes their effects. Even though the petrochemical industry reports that fugitive emissions of alkenes have been

  5. Innovative bioreactors Marc A Deshusses*t, Wilfred Chen*, Ashok Mulchandani* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    -sensitive cultures, such as mammalian or plant cells, bubble bursting at the surface is sometimes sufficient to generate high stresses that kill the cultures [3]. The development of bubble-free bioreactor systems to the culture medium and to remove carbon dioxide in a dissolved form [4,.5]. A commercial perfluorocarbon

  6. Except for a few changes at the copyediting, this is the version that was published. Deshusses, M.A., W. Chen, A. Mulchandani, and I.J. Dunn. 1997. Innovative bioreactors. Current Opinion in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -sensitive cultures such as mammalian or plant cells, bubble bursting at the surface is sometimes sufficient to generate high stresses which kill the cultures [3]. Development of bubble free bioreactor systems without medium and to remove carbon dioxide in a dissolved form [4-5]. A commercial perfluorocarbon, Foralkyl

  7. Fracture Model, Ground Displacements and Tracer Observations: Fruitland Coals, San Juan Basin, New Mexico,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    that the coal reservoirs consist of six separate coal beds rather than three. Perfluorocarbon tracer monitoring the site consist of two coal beds, each separated by a shale parting. This observation indicates will improve our understanding of Fruitland coal reservoirs; help develop more effective strategies to enhance

  8. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report January 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . SURFRAD/ISIS 9. DHS Model Evaluation Planning 10. U.S. Climate Reference 11. Community Multiscale Air. Tracer Analysis Facility (TAF) Adaptation for Perfluorocarbon Tracer Analysis 19. Smart Balloon" Method for DCNet added to READY. A routine that inserts DCNet tower observations into the Eta gridded

  9. Environment International, Vol. 8, pp. 419-433, 1982 0160-4120/82/070419-15503.00/0 Printed in the USA. All rights reserved. Copyright 1982 Pergamon Press Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) sources and miniature passive samplers, both about the size of a cigarette, tests of passive adsorption tube samplers performed reproducibly and identically (to within + 2%-3%) in laboratory-story house. Multiple location sampling, as well as sampling in rooms with and without a miniature source

  10. Investigation of Perflourinated Compounds as Physical Solvents for Selective CO2 Capture at Elevated Pressures and Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heintz, Y.J.; Lemoine, R.O.; Sehabiague, L.; Morsi, B.I.; Jones, K.L.; Pennline, H.W.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potential use of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) as physical solvents for selective CO2 capture from post water-gas-shift reactor streams under elevated pressures and temperatures. A comprehensive literature review to select potential PFCs was conducted, and the equilibrium gas solubility, and the hydrodynamic and mass transfer parameters (gas holdup, Sauter mean bubble diameter, and volumetric mass transfer coefficient) for CO2 and N2 in three different PFCs, namely Perfluoro-perhydrofluorene (C13F22), Perfluoro-perhydrophenanthrene (C14F24), and Perfluoro-cyclohexylmethyldecalin (C17F30), known as PP10, PP11, and PP25, respectively, were measured in a 4-liter gas-inducing agitated reactor.

  11. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugel, H W; Bell, M G; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Zakharov, L

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium coatings on the graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX are being investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower Single Null Ohmic Helium Discharges were used to coat graphite surfaces that had been pre-conditioned with Ohmic Helium Discharges of the same shape to reduce their contribution to hydrogen isotope recycling. The following deuterium NBI reference discharges exhibited a reduction in density by a factor of about 3 for limited and 2 for diverted plasmas respectively, and peaked density profiles. Recently, a lithium evaporator has been used to apply thin coatings on conditioned and unconditioned PFCs. Effects on the plasma density and the impurities were obtained by pre-conditioning the PFCs with ohmic helium discharges, and performing the first deuterium NBI discharge as soon as possible after applying the lithium coating.

  12. INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES The French APACHE project aims at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    commercially available fuel cell vehicles [1­4]. Several projects of fuel cell aircrafts intend to demonstrate at demonstrating the feasibility of using a Hybrid Fuel Cell System (HFCS) as the power generator for all electric Fuel Cells (PEMFC), their hybridization with Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) batteries and systems' integration

  13. Nutrition Research and Practice (Nutr Res Pract) 2011;5(3):253-259 DOI: 10.4162/nrp.2011.5.3.253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledo, University of

    intake and consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) did not correlate with rising obesity trends did not correlate with obesity trends. However, our results surprisingly revealed that consumption epidemic of obesity has been attributed to heuristic observations of an increase in the consumption of high-energy

  14. Atmospheric histories and global emissions of the anthropogenic hydrofluorocarbons HFC-365mfc, HFC-245fa, HFC-227ea, and HFC-236fa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigby, Matthew

    We report on ground-based atmospheric measurements and emission estimates of the four anthropogenic hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) HFC-365mfc (CH[subscript 3]CF[subscript 2]CH[subscript 2]CF[subscript 3], 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane), ...

  15. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. CO2 emissions sources. U.S. CO2 transportation emissions sources by mode. #12;Center% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCsTransportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge

  16. 71-980301-CLN-01 TO: DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    as the Dowtherm progresses through the cooling circuits, and since there will be temperature gradients across is the interface between the Heating/Cooling System and the PFCs? It was agree that the PFC scope (WBS 11) would the Bakeout Heating/Cooling System (WBS 33) would make its connection. Interface connection shall be either

  17. A COMPARISON OF LIQUID AND SOLID SURFACE OPTIONS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fast Breeder Fission Reactor Fusion First Wall Fusion Disruption Fusion ELM Rocket Nozzle #12;MAU 4 3 · Disruption mitigation using massive gas puff is demonstrated on some machines · Reduced current decay rate PFM and heat sink ­ Coolant compatibility ­ Most likely He gas cooled ­ Liquid metal PFCs are high

  18. GENERAL DYNAMICS Space Systems Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "fusion nuclear engineering problems will be pushed past the retirement and even lifetimes of the individualsnow and other "in-vessel"components such as PFCs. Successin obtainingreactor- grade plasmas and their control can build a much smallerdriven tokamak for the essential and parallel development and testing

  19. Laboratories to Explore, Explain VLBACHANDRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Issues Divertor and PFCs Disruptions Vac Vessel Nuclear Heating Remote Handling Incorporate with some new methods of remote participation to improve future workshops. Remote particpants, please send as next step. · NRC Interim Report identified "integrated physics of a self-heated plasma" as one

  20. Vessel thermal map real-time system for the JET tokamak R. Felton,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature than the formerly installed carbon fiber composite tiles, imposes strict thermal restrictions of the tritium retention levels when compared with the previous carbon fiber composite (CFC)-based wall [1]. JET of international thermonuclear experimental reactor-relevant materials for the plasma facing components (PFCs

  1. Edge-Localized-Mode Suppression through Density-Profile Modification with Lithium-Wall Coatings in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    a pulsed power load that would limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) unless the energyEdge-Localized-Mode Suppression through Density-Profile Modification with Lithium-Wall Coatings to low-n peeling or ballooning modes, while broader pressure profiles stabilized the post-Li discharges

  2. Power Handling in ITER: Divertor and Blanket Design and R&D M. Merola 1), D. Loesser 2), R. Raffray 1) on behalf of the ITER Organization, ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    the thermonuclear plasma and cover an area of about 850 m2 . The main function of the divertor is minimizing the thermonuclear plasma. One of the most technically challenging components of the ITER machine are plasma-facing components (PFCs), which directly face the thermonuclear plasma and cover an area of about 850 m2

  3. Tritium behavior in eroded dust and debris of plasma-facing A. Hassanein a,*, B. Wiechers b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Tritium behavior in eroded dust and debris of plasma-facing materials A. Hassanein a,*, B. Wiechers, Russian Federation Abstract Tritium behavior in plasma-facing components (PFCs) of future tokamak reactors important parameter that in¯uences tritium buildup and release in candidate materials is the eect

  4. Primary Aluminum Production: Climate Policy, Emissions and Costs Jochen Harnisch, Ian Sue Wing, Henry D. Jacoby and Ronald G. Prinn*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primary Aluminum Production: Climate Policy, Emissions and Costs Jochen Harnisch, Ian Sue Wing a significant influence on investment decisions in the production of primary aluminum. This work demonstrates for the baseline years 1990 and 1995. We then present projections for regional emissions of PFCs from the aluminum

  5. A continuous fast-response dual-tracer analyzer for halogenated atmospheric tracer studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rydock, J.P.; Lamb, B.K. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)] [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the simultaneous measurement of two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and a perfluorocarbon compound, is introduced. The new instrument is a modification of a commercially available fast-response, continuous analyzer for single halogenated atmospheric tracer studies. A two-channel flow system was implemented consisting of an alumina cartridge in one channel and a glass beads cartridge of equal flow resistance in the second channel. The alumina passes only sulfur hexafluoride, while the glass beads pass both SF6 and the perfluoroarbon tracer. The SF6 is quantified directly from the electron capture detector (ECD) signal in the alumina channel, and the perfluorocarbon concentration is obtained from the difference of the ECD responses in the two channels. The dual-tracer analyzer is field portable for mobile operations or fixed-location monitoring, has a response time of 1.2 s, and has limits of detection of about 15 pptv for SF6 and 10 pptv for perfluoro-methylcyclohexane, which was the principal perfluorocarbon tracer used in this study. The present instrument configuration, which requires periodic purging of the adsorbent trap, can obtain continuous measurements for a 10-15-min segment in every half hour of operation. Dual-tracer data from a field demonstration test are presented.

  6. Microscopic Motion of Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Components In A Diverted Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaworski, M A; Morley, N B; Abrams, T; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; Majeski, R

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) have been identified as an alternative material for fusion plasma experiments. The use of a liquid conductor where significant magnetic fields are present is considered risky, with the possibility of macroscopic fluid motion and possible ejection into the plasma core. Analysis is carried out on thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) forces caused by temperature gradients in the liquid-container system itself in addition to scrape-off-layer currents interacting with the PFC from a diverted plasma. Capillary effects at the liquid-container interface will be examined which govern droplet ejection criteria. Stability of the interface is determined using linear stability methods. In addition to application to liquidmetal PFCs, thin film liquidmetal effects have application to current and future devices where off-normal events may liquefy portions of the first wall and other plasma facing components.

  7. Liquid Metal Walls, Lithium, And Low Recycling Boundary Conditions In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, the only solid material believed to be a viable option for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a fusion reactor is tungsten. Operated at the lower temperatures typical of present-day fusion experiments, tungsten is known to suffer from surface degradation during long-term exposure to helium-containing plasmas, leading to reduced thermal conduction to the bulk, and enhanced erosion. Existing alloys are also quite brittle at temperatures under 700 deg. C. However, at a sufficiently high operating temperature (700 - 1000 deg. C), tungsten is self-annealing and it is expected that surface damage will be reduced to the point where tungsten PFCs will have an acceptable lifetime in a reactor environment.The existence of only one potentially viable option for solid PFCs, though, constitutes one of the most significant restrictions on design space for DEMO and follow-on fusion reactors. In contrast, there are several candidates for liquid metal-based PFCs, including gallium, tin, lithium, and tin-lithium eutectics. We will discuss options for liquid metal walls in tokamaks, looking at both high and low recycling materials. We will then focus in particular on one of the candidate liquids, lithium.Lithium is known to have a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, and has been shown in test stands and fusion experiments to produce a low recycling surface, especially when liquid. Because it is also low-Z and is usable in a tokamak over a reasonable temperature range (200 - 400 deg. C), it has been now been used as a PFC in several confinement experiments (TFTR, T11-M, CDX-U, NSTX, FTU, and TJ-II), with favorable results. The consequences of substituting low recycling walls for the traditional high recycling variety on tokamak equilibria are very extensive. We will discuss some of the expected modifications, briefly reviewing experimental results, and comparing the results to expectations.

  8. Novel physical solvents for selective CO{sub 2} capture from fuel gas streams at elevated pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yannick J. Heintz; Laurent Sehabiague; Badie I. Morsi; Kenneth L. Jones; Henry W. Pennline [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Pittsburgh, PA (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), PP10, PP11, and PP25, manufactured by F2 Chemicals Ltd., U.K., were investigated as physical solvents for selective CO{sub 2} capture from synthesis gas or syngas streams at elevated pressures and temperatures. The equilibrium solubility, the hydrodynamic, and the mass-transfer parameters of CO{sub 2} in the solvents were measured in a 4-L ZipperClave agitated reactor under wide ranges of operating conditions: pressures (6-30 bar), temperatures (300-500 K), mixing speeds (10-20 Hz), and liquid heights (0.14-0.22 m). The CO{sub 2} solubilities in the three solvents decreased with an increasing temperature at constant pressure and followed Henry's law. The CO{sub 2} solubilities in PP25 were greater than those in PP10 and PP11. The volumetric liquid-side mass-transfer coefficients (k{sub La}) of CO{sub 2} in the PFCs increased with mixing speed, pressure, and temperature. Also, the gas-liquid interfacial areas of CO{sub 2} in the three PFCs appeared to control the behavior of k{sub La}. This study proved the thermal and chemical stability and the ability of the PFCs to selectively absorb CO{sub 2} at temperatures up to 500 K and pressures as high as 30 bar. A preliminary conceptual process design using PP25 for selective CO{sub 2} capture from hot-shifted gas with pressure-swing and pressure-temperature-swing regeneration options was devised. The pressure-temperature-swing option led to greater PP25 solvent loss but a more favorable (more negative) net enthalpy than the pressure-swing option. However, for either regeneration option to be economically viable, the PP25 solvent must be completely recovered from the process. 109 refs., 9 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Liquid Metal Walls, Lithium, And Low Recycling Boundary Conditions In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Majeski

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, the only solid material believed to be a viable option for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a fusion reactor is tungsten. Operated at the lower temperatures typical of present-day fusion experiments, tungsten is known to suffer from surface degradation during long-term exposure to helium-containing plasmas, leading to reduced thermal conduction to the bulk, and enhanced erosion. Existing alloys are also quite brittle at temperatures under 700oC. However, at a sufficiently high operating temperature (700 - 1000 oC), tungsten is selfannealing and it is expected that surface damage will be reduced to the point where tungsten PFCs will have an acceptable lifetime in a reactor environment. The existence of only one potentially viable option for solid PFCs, though, constitutes one of the most significant restrictions on design space for DEMO and follow-on fusion reactors. In contrast, there are several candidates for liquid metal-based PFCs, including gallium, tin, lithium, and tin-lithium eutectics. We will discuss options for liquid metal walls in tokamaks, looking at both high and low recycling materials. We will then focus in particular on one of the candidate liquids, lithium. Lithium is known to have a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, and has been shown in test stands1 and fusion experiments2,3 to produce a low recycling surface, especially when liquid. Because it is also low-Z and is usable in a tokamak over a reasonable temperature range (200 - 400 oC), it has been now been used as a PFC in several confinement experiments (TFTR, T11- M, CDX-U, NSTX, FTU, and TJ-II), with favorable results. The consequences of substituting low recycling walls for the traditional high recycling variety on tokamak equilibria are very extensive. We will discuss some of the expected modifications, briefly reviewing experimental results, and comparing the results to expectations.

  10. Plasma-materials interaction results at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causey, Rion A.; Wampler, William R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Whaley, Josh A.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of Plasma Materials Interaction (PMI) activities are: (1) Hydrogen diffusion and trapping in metals - (a) Growth of hydrogen precipitates in tungsten PFCs, (b) Temperature dependence of deuterium retention at displacement damage, (c) D retention in W at elevated temperatures; (2) Permeation - (a) Gas driven permeation results for W/Mo/SiC, (b) Plasma-driven permeation test stand for TPE; and (3) Surface studies - (a) H-sensor development, (b) Adsorption of oxygen and hydrogen on beryllium surfaces.

  11. Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

  12. Decomposition of Perfluorocompounds on Alumina-Based Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanno, Shuichi; Tamata, Shin; Kurokawa, Hideaki

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The control of the atmospheric release of PFCs (perfluorocompounds) is an important environmental problem worldwide. PFCs are powerful greenhouse gases used by the semiconductor and liquid crystal industries as etching and cleaning agents. We developed a catalyst that decomposes PFCs with only water. Al2O3 was selected from the survey of some single metal-oxide catalysts. Addition of another metal-oxide improved the decomposition ratio and durability. The Al2O3-based catalyst decomposed CF4, C2F6, C3F8, C4F8, NF3 and SF6 by more than 99% at 750 degrees Celsius. Furthermore, our catalyst retained a high decomposition ratio as demonstrated by a continuous run for about 4000 hours at 700-750 degrees Celsius. The influence of chlorine as an impurity with regard to the SF6 decomposition ratio on the catalyst was examined. SF6 was decomposed at more than 99% during 8 hours in the presence of 400 ppm chlorine. Chlorine concentration in the outlet gas was less than TLV. No chlorine compounds were found by X-ray diffraction analysis of the used catalyst. That is, the hydrogenation of chlorine did not inhibit the surface catalytic reaction for PFC. Also, CF4 was decomposed at the condition of 1.4% of high concentration. The conversion remained higher than 99% throughout during a durability test. Furthermore, we investigated a large-scale decomposition system in the paper.

  13. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F. [Aix-Marseille Univ, IUSTI, UMR CNRS 7343, F-13453 Marseille (France)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (? ? 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (? ? 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  14. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  15. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Lance B. (Chicago, IL); Hoek, Terry Vanden (Chicago, IL); Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  16. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Lance B. (Chicago, IL); Hoek, Terry Vanden (Chicago, IL); Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL)

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  17. Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttenlocher, D.F.

    1992-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a sealed tube stability study on twenty-one refrigerant-lubricant mixtures selected from the following groupings: HFCs R-32, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-143a, and R-152a with one or more lubricants selected from among three pentaerythritol esters and three polyalkylene glycols. All lubricants were carefully predried to 25 ppm or less moisture content. HCFCs R-22, R-123, R-124, and R-142b, as well as CFC R-11, with one or more lubricants selected from among two mineral oils and one alkylbenzene fluid. Bach test mixture was aged at three temperature levels.

  18. Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttenlocher, D.F.

    1992-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a sealed tube stability study on twenty-one refrigerant-lubricant mixtures selected from the following groupings: HFCs R-32, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-143a, and R-152a with one or more lubricants selected from among three pentaerythritol esters and three polyalkylene glycols. All lubricants were carefully predried to 25 ppm or less moisture content. HCFCs R-22, R-123, R-124, and R-142b, as well as CFC R-11, with one or more lubricants selected from among two mineral oils and one alkylbenzene fluid. Bach test mixture was aged at three temperature levels.

  19. First operation with the JET International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neu, R. [EFDA-CSU, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [EFDA-CSU, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Arnoux, G.; Beurskens, M.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Lomas, P.; Maddison, G.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A.; Rimini, F. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Dux, R.; Hobirk, J.; Lang, P.; Maggi, C.; Pütterich, T.; Sertoli, M.; Sieglin, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, Association EURATOM/Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich 52425 (Germany)] [IEK-4, Association EURATOM/Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich 52425 (Germany); and others

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To consolidate International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design choices and prepare for its operation, Joint European Torus (JET) has implemented ITER's plasma facing materials, namely, Be for the main wall and W in the divertor. In addition, protection systems, diagnostics, and the vertical stability control were upgraded and the heating capability of the neutral beams was increased to over 30 MW. First results confirm the expected benefits and the limitations of all metal plasma facing components (PFCs) but also yield understanding of operational issues directly relating to ITER. H-retention is lower by at least a factor of 10 in all operational scenarios compared to that with C PFCs. The lower C content (? factor 10) has led to much lower radiation during the plasma burn-through phase eliminating breakdown failures. Similarly, the intrinsic radiation observed during disruptions is very low, leading to high power loads and to a slow current quench. Massive gas injection using a D{sub 2}/Ar mixture restores levels of radiation and vessel forces similar to those of mitigated disruptions with the C wall. Dedicated L-H transition experiments indicate a 30% power threshold reduction, a distinct minimum density, and a pronounced shape dependence. The L-mode density limit was found to be up to 30% higher than for C allowing stable detached divertor operation over a larger density range. Stable H-modes as well as the hybrid scenario could be re-established only when using gas puff levels of a few 10{sup 21} es{sup ?1}. On average, the confinement is lower with the new PFCs, but nevertheless, H factors up to 1 (H-Mode) and 1.3 (at ?{sub N}?3, hybrids) have been achieved with W concentrations well below the maximum acceptable level.

  20. Diagnostic options for radiative divertor feedback control on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; McLean, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94550 (United States); Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Raman, R. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiative divertor technique is used in present tokamak experiments and planned for ITER to mitigate high heat loads on divertor plasma-facing components (PFCs) to prevent excessive material erosion and thermal damage. In NSTX, a large spherical tokamak with lithium-coated graphite PFCs and high divertor heat flux (q{sub peak} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 15 MW/m{sup 2}), radiative divertor experiments have demonstrated a significant reduction of divertor peak heat flux simultaneously with good core H-mode confinement using pre-programmed D{sub 2} or CD{sub 4} gas injections. In this work diagnostic options for a new real-time feedback control system for active radiative divertor detachment control in NSTX-U, where steady-state peak divertor heat fluxes are projected to reach 20-30 MW/m{sup 2}, are discussed. Based on the NSTX divertor detachment measurements and analysis, the control diagnostic signals available for NSTX-U include divertor radiated power, neutral pressure, spectroscopic deuterium recombination signatures, infrared thermography of PFC surfaces, and thermoelectric scrape-off layer current. In addition, spectroscopic 'security' monitoring of possible confinement or pedestal degradation is recommended. These signals would be implemented in a digital plasma control system to manage the divertor detachment process via an actuator (impurity gas seeding rate).

  1. Electrode assembly for use in a solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raistrick, Ian D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas reaction fuel cell may be provided with a solid polymer electrolyte membrane. Porous gas diffusion electrodes are formed of carbon particles supporting a catalyst which is effective to enhance the gas reactions. The carbon particles define interstitial spaces exposing the catalyst on a large surface area of the carbon particles. A proton conducting material, such as a perfluorocarbon copolymer or ruthenium dioxide contacts the surface areas of the carbon particles adjacent the interstitial spaces. The proton conducting material enables protons produced by the gas reactions adjacent the supported catalyst to have a conductive path with the electrolyte membrane. The carbon particles provide a conductive path for electrons. A suitable electrode may be formed by dispersing a solution containing a proton conducting material over the surface of the electrode in a manner effective to coat carbon surfaces adjacent the interstitial spaces without impeding gas flow into the interstitial spaces.

  2. Measurement of large strains in ropes using plastic optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Jerry Gene; Smith, David Barton; Muhs, Jeffrey David

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the direct measurement of large strains in ropes in situ using a plastic optical fiber, for example, perfluorocarbon or polymethyl methacrylate and Optical Time-Domain Reflectometer or other light time-of-flight measurement instrumentation. Protective sheaths and guides are incorporated to protect the plastic optical fiber. In one embodiment, a small rope is braided around the plastic optical fiber to impose lateral compressive forces to restrain the plastic optical fiber from slipping and thus experience the same strain as the rope. Methods are described for making reflective interfaces along the length of the plastic optical fiber and to provide the capability to measure strain within discrete segments of the rope. Interpretation of the data allows one to calculate the accumulated strain at any point in time and to determine if the rope has experienced local damage.

  3. Demonstration of High Efficiency Elastocaloric Cooling with Large Delta- T Using NiTi Wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jun; Wu, Yiming; Muehlbauer, Jan; Hwang, Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard; Fackler, Sean; Wuttig, Manfred; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor compression (VC) is by far the most dominant technology for meeting all cooling and refrigeration needs around the world. It is a mature technology with the efficiency of modern compressors approaching the theoretical limit, but its envi-ronmental footprint remains a global problem. VC refrigerants such as hydrochlo-roflurocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are a significant source of green house gas (GHG) emissions, and their global warming potential (GWP) is as high as 1000 times that of CO2. It is expected that building space cooling and re-frigeration alone will amount to {approx} 5% of primary energy consumption and {approx}5% of all CO2 emission in U.S. in 2030 . As such, there is an urgent need to develop an al-ternative high-efficiency cooling technology that is affordable and environmentally friendly. Among the proposed candidates, magnetocaloric cooling (MC) is currently received a lot of attention because of its high efficiency. However, MC is inherently expensive because of the requirement of large magnetic field and rare earth materi-als. Here, we demonstrate an entirely new type of solid-state cooling mechanism based on the latent heat of reversible martensitic transformation. We call it elasto-caloric cooling (EC) after the superelastic transformation of austenite it utilizes. The solid-state refrigerant of EC is cost-effective, and it completely eliminates the use of any refrigerants including HCFCs/HFCs. We show that the COP (coefficient of per-formance) of a jugular EC with optimized materials can be as high as > 10 with measured {Delta}T of 17 C.

  4. Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

  5. Theory and models of material erosion and lifetime during plasma instabilities in a tokamak environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and structural damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) due to the frequent loss of plasma confinement remains a serious problem for the tokamak reactor concept. The deposited plasma energy causes significant surface erosion, possible structural failure, and frequent plasma contamination. Surface damage consists of vaporization, spallation, and liquid splatter of metallic materials. Structural damage includes large temperature increases in structural materials and at the interfaces between surface coatings and structural members. To evaluate the lifetimes of plasma-facing materials and nearby components and to predict the various forms of damage that they experience, comprehensive models (contained in the HEIGHTS computer simulation package) are developed, integrated self-consistently, and enhanced. Splashing mechanisms such as bubble boiling and various liquid magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and brittle destruction mechanisms of nonmelting materials are being examined. The design requirements and implications of plasma-facing and nearby components are discussed, along with recommendations to mitigate and reduce the effects of plasma instabilities on reactor components.

  6. Electrolytic production of neodymium without perfluorinated carbon compounds on the offgases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K.T.

    1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for producing neodymium in an electrolytic cell without formation of perfluorinated carbon gases (PFCs), the method comprising the steps of providing an electrolyte in the electrolytic cell and providing an anode in an anode region of the electrolyte and providing a cathode in a cathode region of the electrolytic cell. Dissolving an oxygen-containing neodymium compound in the electrolyte in the anode region and maintaining a more intense electrolyte circulation in the anode region than in the cathode region. Passing an electrolytic current between said anode and said cathode and depositing neodymium metal at the cathode, preventing the formation of perfluorinated carbon gases by limiting anode over voltage. 4 figs.

  7. Lithium Wall Conditioning And Surface Dust Detection On NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, C H; Bell, M G; Friesen, F.Q.L.; Heim, B; Jaworski, M A; Kugel, H; Maingi, R; Rais, B

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium evaporation onto NSTX plasma facing components (PFC) has resulted in improved energy confinement, and reductions in the number and amplitude of edge-localized modes (ELMs) up to the point of complete ELM suppression. The associated PFC surface chemistry has been investigated with a novel plasma material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface analysis station. Analysis has demonstrated that binding of D atoms to the polycrystalline graphite material of the PFCs is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular deuterium atoms become weakly bonded near lithium atoms themselves bound to either oxygen or the carbon from the underlying material. Surface dust inside NSTX has been detected in real-time using a highly sensitive electrostatic dust detector. In a separate experiment, electrostatic removal of dust via three concentric spiral-shaped electrodes covered by a dielectric and driven by a high voltage 3-phase waveform was evaluated for potential application to fusion reactors

  8. New field programmable gate array-based image-oriented acquisition and real-time processing applied to plasma facing component thermal monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, V. [Pulsar Team-Project, INRIA Sophia Antipolis, Sophia Antipolis F-06902 (France); Dunand, G.; Moncada, V. [Sophia Conseil Company, Sophia Antipolis F-06560 (France); Jouve, M.; Travere, J.-M. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance F-13108 (France)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During operation of present fusion devices, the plasma facing components (PFCs) are exposed to high heat fluxes. Understanding and preventing overheating of these components during long pulse discharges is a crucial safety issue for future devices like ITER. Infrared digital cameras interfaced with complex optical systems have become a routine diagnostic to measure surface temperatures in many magnetic fusion devices. Due to the complexity of the observed scenes and the large amount of data produced, the use of high computational performance hardware for real-time image processing is then mandatory to avoid PFC damages. At Tore Supra, we have recently made a major upgrade of our real-time infrared image acquisition and processing board by the use of a new field programmable gate array (FPGA) optimized for image processing. This paper describes the new possibilities offered by this board in terms of image calibration and image interpretation (abnormal thermal events detection) compared to the previous system.

  9. Plasma/liquid metal interactions during tokamak operation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Allain, J. P.; Insepov, Z.; Konkashbaev, I.; Energy Technology

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the critical technological challenges of future tokamak fusion devices is the ability for plasma-facing components to handle both normal and abnormal plasma/surface interaction events that compromise their lifetime and operation of the machine. Under normal operation plasma/surface interactions that are important include: sputtering, particle implantation and recycling, He pumping and ELM (edge localized modes)-induced erosion. In abnormal or off-normal operation: disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are important. To extend PFC lifetime under these conditions, liquid-metals have been considered as candidate PFCs (Plasma-Facing Components), including: liquid lithium, tin-lithium, gallium and tin. Liquid lithium has been measured to have nonlinear increase of physical sputtering with rise in temperature. Such increase can be a result of exposure to ELM-level particle fluxes. The significant increase in particle flux to the divertor and nearby PFCs can enhance sputtering erosion by an order of magnitude or more. In addition from the standpoint of hydrogen recycling and helium pumping liquid lithium appears to be a good candidate plasma-facing material (PFM). Advanced designs of first wall and divertor systems propose the application of liquid-metals as an alternate PFC to contend with high-heat flux constraints of large-scale tokamak devices. Additional issues include PFC operation under disruptions and long temporal instabilities such as VDEs. A comprehensive two-fluid model is developed to integrate core and SOL (scrape-off layer) parameters during ELMs with PFC surface evolution using the HEIGHTS package. Special emphasis is made on the application of lithium as a candidate plasma-facing liquid-metal.

  10. Plasma/Liquid-Metal Interactions During Tokamak Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, A.; Allain, J.P.; Insepov, Z.; Konkashbaev, I. [Argonne National Laboratory (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the critical technological challenges of future tokamak fusion devices is the ability for plasma-facing components to handle both normal and abnormal plasma/surface interaction events that compromise their lifetime and operation of the machine. Under normal operation plasma/surface interactions that are important include: sputtering, particle implantation and recycling, He pumping and ELM (edge localized modes)-induced erosion. In abnormal or off-normal operation: disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) are important. To extend PFC lifetime under these conditions, liquid-metals have been considered as candidate PFCs (Plasma-Facing Components), including: liquid lithium, tin-lithium, gallium and tin.Liquid lithium has been measured to have nonlinear increase of physical sputtering with rise in temperature. Such increase can be a result of exposure to ELM-level particle fluxes. The significant increase in particle flux to the divertor and nearby PFCs can enhance sputtering erosion by an order of magnitude or more. In addition from the standpoint of hydrogen recycling and helium pumping liquid lithium appears to be a good candidate plasma-facing material (PFM). Advanced designs of first wall and divertor systems propose the application of liquid-metals as an alternate PFC to contend with high-heat flux constraints of large-scale tokamak devices. Additional issues include PFC operation under disruptions and long temporal instabilities such as VDEs. A comprehensive two-fluid model is developed to integrate core and SOL (scrape-off layer) parameters during ELMs with PFC surface evolution using the HEIGHTS package. Special emphasis is made on the application of lithium as a candidate plasma-facing liquid-metal.

  11. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  12. THE MADISON SQUARE GARDEN DISPERSION STUDY (MSG05) METEOROLOGICAL DATA DESCRIPTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSG05 was a study of atmospheric transport and dispersion in the deep urban canyons of Midtown New York City, in the area of Madison Square Garden. This downtown area is considered to be a prime target for terrorist activities, and has one of the largest commuter populations in the world. Little is known about air flow and hazardous gas dispersion in such scenarios, since previous urban field experiments have focused on small to medium sized cities with much smaller street canyons. On March 10 and 14, 2005, a series of Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) tracers were released and tracked with about 30 sampling stations at radial distances of about 0.2 and 0.4 km, with vertical profiles near a 250 m tall building (One Penn Plaza). Meteorological stations collected wind data in the MSG vicinity, at street level and rooftop level. MSG05 is expected to provide useful information on rapid vertical dispersion will assist in planning for more extensive studies. This data release is being made available to a restricted group of key scientists who have worked on the project. Part of the QA program involves feedback from scientists and modelers who are working on this study. This document describes the meteorological component of the project. The file organization and metadata are detailed so that a researcher can work with the data sets.

  13. Taggants, method for forming a taggant, and a method for detecting an object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A taggant comprising at least one perfluorocarbon compound surrounded by a polyphosphazene compound. The polyphosphazene compound has the chemical structure: ##STR00001## wherein G.sub.1 and G.sub.2 are pendant groups having different polarities, m is an integer greater than or equal to 100, and each of A and B is independently selected from hydrogen, an alkyl, an alkene, an alkoxide, a polyether, a polythioether, a siloxane, and --X(CH.sub.2).sub.nY.sup.1(CH.sub.2)p.sub.1Y.sup.2(CH.sub.2)p.sub.2 . . . Y.sup.i(CH.sub.2)p.sub.iCH.sub.3, where n ranges from 1 to 6, X and Y are independently selected from oxygen, sulfur, selenium, tellurium, and polonium, and p.sub.1 through p.sub.i range from 1 to 6. Cyclic polyphosphazene compounds lacking the A and B groups are also disclosed, as are methods of forming the taggant and of detecting an object.

  14. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  15. Lithium As Plasma Facing Component for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masayuki Ono

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of lithium in magnetic fusion confinement experiments started in the 1990's in order to improve tokamak plasma performance as a low-recycling plasma-facing component (PFC). Lithium is the lightest alkali metal and it is highly chemically reactive with relevant ion species in fusion plasmas including hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, carbon, and oxygen. Because of the reactive properties, lithium can provide strong pumping for those ions. It was indeed a spectacular success in TFTR where a very small amount (~ 0.02 gram) of lithium coating of the PFCs resulted in the fusion power output to improve by nearly a factor of two. The plasma confinement also improved by a factor of two. This success was attributed to the reduced recycling of cold gas surrounding the fusion plasma due to highly reactive lithium on the wall. The plasma confinement and performance improvements have since been confirmed in a large number of fusion devices with various magnetic configurations including CDX-U/LTX (US), CPD (Japan), HT-7 (China), EAST (China), FTU (Italy), NSTX (US), T-10, T-11M (Russia), TJ-II (Spain), and RFX (Italy). Additionally, lithium was shown to broaden the plasma pressure profile in NSTX, which is advantageous in achieving high performance H-mode operation for tokamak reactors. It is also noted that even with significant applications (up to 1,000 grams in NSTX) of lithium on PFCs, very little contamination (< 0.1%) of lithium fraction in main fusion plasma core was observed even during high confinement modes. The lithium therefore appears to be a highly desirable material to be used as a plasma PFC material from the magnetic fusion plasma performance and operational point of view. An exciting development in recent years is the growing realization of lithium as a potential solution to solve the exceptionally challenging need to handle the fusion reactor divertor heat flux, which could reach 60 MW/m2 . By placing the liquid lithium (LL) surface in the path of the main divertor heat flux (divertor strike point), the lithium is evaporated from the surface. The evaporated lithium is quickly ionized by the plasma and the ionized lithium ions can provide a strongly radiative layer of plasma ("radiative mantle"), thus could significantly reduce the heat flux to the divertor strike point surfaces, thus protecting the divertor surface. The protective effects of LL have been observed in many experiments and test stands. As a possible reactor divertor candidate, a closed LL divertor system is described. Finally, it is noted that the lithium applications as a PFC can be quite flexible and broad. The lithium application should be quite compatible with various divertor configurations, and it can be also applied to protecting the presently envisioned tungsten based solid PFC surfaces such as the ones for ITER. Lithium based PFCs therefore have the exciting prospect of providing a cost effective flexible means to improve the fusion reactor performance, while providing a practical solution to the highly challenging divertor heat handling issue confronting the steadystate magnetic fusion reactors.

  16. Final report on activities and findings under DOE grant “Interactive Photochemistry in Earth System Models to Assess Uncertainty in Ozone and Greenhouse Gases”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prather, Michael J. [UCI

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric chemistry controls the abundances and hence climate forcing of important greenhouse gases including N2O, CH4, HFCs, CFCs, and O3. Attributing climate change to human activities requires, at a minimum, accurate models of the chemistry and circulation of the atmosphere that relate emissions to abundances. This DOE-funded research provided realistic, yet computationally optimized and affordable, photochemical modules to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that augment the CESM capability to explore the uncertainty in future stratospheric-tropospheric ozone, stratospheric circulation, and thus the lifetimes of chemically controlled greenhouse gases from climate simulations. To this end, we have successfully implemented Fast-J (radiation algorithm determining key chemical photolysis rates) and Linoz v3.0 (linearized photochemistry for interactive O3, N2O, NOy and CH4) packages in LLNL-CESM and for the first time demonstrated how change in O2 photolysis rate within its uncertainty range can significantly impact on the stratospheric climate and ozone abundances. From the UCI side, this proposal also helped LLNL develop a CAM-Superfast Chemistry model that was implemented for the IPCC AR5 and contributed chemical-climate simulations to CMIP5.

  17. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing for the sample exposed to TPE at 500 °C. Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) analysis reveals that the detrapping energy decreases from 1.8 eV to 1.4 eV, indicating the changes in trapping mechanisms. This paper also summarizes deuterium behavior studies in HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten under US-Japan TITAN program.

  18. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Collaboration: Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%–30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed reduced with the FA antenna configuration, the mechanism determining the SOL plasma potential in the presence of ICRF and its impact on impurity contamination and sources remains to be understood.

  19. Influence of plasma surface interactions on tokamak startup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Rajiv [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The startup phase of a tokamak is a complex phenomenon involving burnthrough of the low-Z impurities and rampup of I{sub p}, the plasma current. The design considerations of a tokamak are closely connected with the startup modeling. Plasma evolution is analysed using a zero-dimensional model. The particle and energy balance is considered of two subclasses of plasmas which are penetrable by neutral gas, together with another component, neutrals trapped in the wall. The first subclass includes plasmas being penetrated by slow neutrals of (?few eV) temperature. The second includes plasmas being penetrated only by fast neutrals having a temperature comparable to that of the ions. The impact of impurities on energy balance is considered through their generation by ion induced desorption of adsorbed oxygen on the first wall and physical and chemical sputtering of carbon. The paper demonstrates self-consistently that the evolution of initial phase of the discharge is intimately linked to the condition of the plasma facing components (PFCs) and the resultant plasma surface interactions.

  20. Response of NSTX Liquid Lithium divertor to High Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrams, Tyler; Kallman, J; Kaitaa, R; Foley, E L; Grayd, T K; Kugel, H; Levinton, F; McLean, A G

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) with and without an evaporative Li coating were directly exposed to a neutral beam ex-situ at a power of ~1.5 MW/m2 for 1-3 seconds. Measurements of front face and bulk sample temperature were obtained. Predictions of temperature evolution were derived from a 1D heat flux model. No macroscopic damage occurred when the "bare" sample was exposed to the beam but microscopic changes to the surface were observed. The Li-coated sample developed a lithium hydroxide (LiOH) coating, which did not change even when the front face temperature exceeded the pure Li melting point. These results are consistent with the lack of damage to the LLD surface and imply that heating alone may not expose pure liquid Li if the melting point of surface impurities is not exceeded. This suggests that flow and heat are needed for future PFCs requiring a liquid Li surface. __________________________________________________

  1. The Impact Of Lithium Wall Coatings On NSTX Discharges And The Engineering Of The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Majeski, H. Kugel and R. Kaita

    2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown the benefits of solid lithium coatings on carbon PFC's to diverted plasma performance, in both Land H- mode confinement regimes. Better particle control, with decreased inductive flux consumption, and increased electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate were observed. Successive increases in lithium coverage resulted in the complete suppression of ELM activity in H-mode discharges. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD), which will employ the porous molybdenum surface developed for the LTX shell, is being installed on NSTX for the 2010 run period, and will provide comparisons between liquid walls in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) and liquid divertor targets in NSTX. LTX, which recently began operations at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is the world's first confinement experiment with full liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs). All materials and construction techniques in LTX are compatible with liquid lithium. LTX employs an inner, heated, stainless steel-faced liner or shell, which will be lithium-coated. In order to ensure that lithium adheres to the shell, it is designed to operate at up to 500 - 600 oC to promote wetting of the stainless by the lithium, providing the first hot wall in a tokamak to operate at reactor-relevant temperatures. The engineering of LTX will be discussed.

  2. Strike Point Control for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolemen, E.; Gates, D. A.; Rowley, C. W.; Kasdin, N. J.; Kallman, J.; Gerhardt, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mueller, D.

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the first control algorithm for the inner and outer strike point position for a Spherical Torus (ST) fusion experiment and the performance analysis of the controller. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD) will be installed on NSTX which is believed to provide better pumping than lithium coatings on carbon PFCs. The shape of the plasma dictates the pumping rate of the lithium by channeling the plasma to LLD, where strike point location is the most important shape parameter. Simulations show that the density reduction depends on the proximity of strike point to LLD. Experiments were performed to study the dynamics of the strike point, design a new controller to change the location of the strike point to desired location and stabilize it. The most effective PF coils in changing inner and outer strike points were identified using equilibrium code. The PF coil inputs were changed in a step fashion between various set points and the step response of the strike point position was obtained. From the analysis of the step responses, PID controllers for the strike points were obtained and the controller was tuned experimentally for better performance. The strike controller was extended to include the outer-strike point on the inner plate to accommodate the desired low outer-strike points for the experiment with the aim of achieving "snowflake" divertor configuration in NSTX.

  3. Characterization of local heat fluxes around ICRF antennas on JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campergue, A.-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Jacquet, P.; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    When using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating, enhanced power deposition on Plasma-Facing Components (PFCs) close to the antennas can occur. Experiments have recently been carried out on JET with the new ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) to characterize the heat fluxes on the protection of the JET ICRF antennas, using Infra-Red (IR) thermography measurement. The measured heat flux patterns along the poloidal limiters surrounding powered antennas were compared to predictions from a simple RF sheath rectification model. The RF electric field, parallel to the static magnetic field in front of the antenna, was evaluated using the TOPICA code, integrating a 3D flattened model of the JET A2 antennas. The poloidal density variation in front of the limiters was obtained from the mapping of the Li-beam or edge reflectometry measurements using the flux surface geometry provided by EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. In many cases, this simple model can well explain the position of the maximum heat flux on the different protection limiters and the heat-flux magnitude, confirming that the parallel RF electric field and the electron plasma density in front of the antenna are the main driving parameters for ICRF-induced local heat fluxes.

  4. CHALLENGES IN SOURCE TERM MODELING OF DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING WASTES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of real-time predictive modeling to identify the dispersion and/or source(s) of airborne weapons of mass destruction including chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear material in urban environments is needed to improve response to potential releases of these materials via either terrorist or accidental means. These models will also prove useful in defining airborne pollution dispersion in urban environments for pollution management/abatement programs. Predicting gas flow in an urban setting on a scale of less than a few kilometers is a complicated and challenging task due to the irregular flow paths that occur along streets and alleys and around buildings of different sizes and shapes, i.e., ''urban canyons''. In addition, air exchange between the outside and buildings and subway areas further complicate the situation. Transport models that are used to predict dispersion of WMD/CBRN materials or to back track the source of the release require high-density data and need defensible parameterizations of urban processes. Errors in the data or any of the parameter inputs or assumptions will lead to misidentification of the airborne spread or source release location(s). The need for these models to provide output in a real-time fashion if they are to be useful for emergency response provides another challenge. To improve the ability of New York City's (NYC's) emergency management teams and first response personnel to protect the public during releases of hazardous materials, the New York City Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) has been initiated. This is a four year research program being conducted from 2004 through 2007. This paper will discuss ground level and subway Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) release studies conducted in New York City. The studies released multiple tracers to study ground level and vertical transport of contaminants. This paper will discuss the results from these tests and how these results can be used for improving transport models needed for risk assessment.

  5. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  6. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  7. Side-by-side evaluation of a stressed-skin insulated-core panel house and a conventional stud-frame house. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Chandra, S.

    1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Side-by-side energy testing and monitoring was conducted on two houses in Louisville, KY between January--March 1993. Both houses were identical except that one house was constructed with conventional US 2 by 4 studs and a truss roof while the other house was constructed with stress-skin insulated core panels for the walls and second floor ceiling. Air-tightness testing included fan pressurization by blower door, hour long tracer tests using sulphur hexafluoride, and two-week long time-averaged tests using perfluorocarbon tracers. An average of all the air-tightness test results showed the SSIC panel house to have 22 percent less air infiltration than the frame house. Air-tightness testing resulted in a recommendation that both houses have a fresh air ventilation system installed to provide 0.35 air changes per hour continuously. Thermal insulation quality testing was by infrared imaging. Pressure differential testing resulted in recommendations to use sealed combustion appliances, and to allow for more return air flow from closed rooms. This can be accomplished by separate return ducts or transfer ducts which simply connect closed rooms to the main body with a short duct. The SSIC house UA was lower in both cases. By measurement, co-heating tests showed the SSIC panel house total UA to be 12 percent lower than the frame house. Short-term energy monitoring was also conducted for the two houses. A 17 day period of electric heating and a 14 day period of gas furnace heating was evaluated. Monitoring results showed energy savings for the panel house to be 12 percent during electric heating and 15 percent during gas heating. A comparison of the two monitoring periods showed that the lumped efficiency of the gas furnace and air distribution system for both houses was close to 80 percent. Simple regression models using Typical Meteorological Year weather data gave a preliminary prediction of seasonal energy savings between 14 and 20 percent.

  8. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations show that R141b hydrate is stable at temperatures up to 265K, while the isomer hydrate is only stable up to 150K. Despite hydrogen bonding between guest and host, R141b molecules rotated freely within the water cage. The Raman spectrum of R141b in both the pure and hydrate phases was also compared with vibrational analysis from both computational methods. In particular, the frequency of the C-Cl stretch mode (585 cm{sup -1}) undergoes a shift to higher frequency in the hydrate phase. Raman spectra also indicate that this peak undergoes splitting and intensity variation as the temperature is decreased from 4 C to -4 C.

  9. Reduction of Carbon Footprint and Energy Efficiency Improvement in Aluminum Production by Use of Novel Wireless Instrumentation Integrated with Mathematical Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James W. Evans

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The work addressed the greenhouse gas emission and electrical energy consumption of the aluminum industry. The objective was to provide a means for reducing both through the application of wireless instrumentation, coupled to mathematical modeling. Worldwide the aluminum industry consumes more electrical energy than all activities in many major countries (e.g. the UK) and emits more greenhouse gasses (e.g. than France). Most of these excesses are in the 'primary production' of aluminum; that is the conversion of aluminum oxide to metal in large electrolytic cells operating at hundreds of thousands of amps. An industry-specific GHG emission has been the focus of the work. The electrolytic cells periodically, but at irregular intervals, experience an upset condition known as an 'anode effect'. During such anode effects the cells emit fluorinated hydrocarbons (PFCs, which have a high global warming potential) at a rate far greater than in normal operation. Therefore curbing anode effects will reduce GHG emissions. Prior work had indicated that the distribution of electrical current within the cell experiences significant shifts in the minutes before an anode effect. The thrust of the present work was to develop technology that could detect and report this early warning of an anode effect so that the control computer could minimize GHG emissions. A system was developed to achieve this goal and, in collaboration with Alcoa, was tested on two cells at an Alcoa plant in Malaga, Washington. The project has also pointed to the possibility of additional improvements that could result from the work. Notable among these is an improvement in efficiency that could result in an increase in cell output at little extra operating cost. Prospects for commercialization have emerged in the form of purchase orders for further installations. The work has demonstrated that a system for monitoring the current of individual anodes in an aluminum cell is practical. Furthermore the system has been installed twice on a smelter in the US without exposing workers to hazards usually associated with running signal wires in aluminum plants. The results display the early warning of an anode effect that potentially can be used to minimize such anode effects with their excessive GHG emissions. They also point to a possible, but substantial, economic benefit that could result in improved current efficiency by anode adjustment based on individual anode current measurements.

  10. Recent Progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U Lithium Program and Prospects for Reactor-Relevant Liquid-Lithium Based Divertor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono, et al.

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. While tungsten has been identified as the most attractive solid divertor material, the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium (Li) program is investigating the viability of liquid lithium (LL) as a potential reactor compatible divertor plasma facing component (PFC) . In the near term, operation in NSTX-U is projected to provide reactor-like divertor heat loads < 40 MW/m^2 for 5 s. During the most recent NSTX campaign, ~ 0.85 kg of Li was evaporated onto the NSTX PFCs where a ~50% reduction in heat load on the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) was observed, attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. This reduced divertor heat flux through radiation observed in the NSTX LLD experiment is consistent with the results from other lithium experiments and calculations. These results motivate an LL-based closed radiative divertor concept proposed here for NSTX-U and fusion reactors. With an LL coating, the Li is evaporated from the divertor strike point surface due to the intense heat. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energies, and the ionized Li ions can radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. Due to the rapid plasma transport in divertor plasma, the radiation values can be significantly enhanced up to ~ 11 MJ/cc of LL. This radiative process has the desired function of spreading the focused divertor heat load to the entire divertor chamber facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL divertor surface can also provide a "sacrificial" surface to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the ELMs. The closed radiative LLD concept has the advantages of providing some degree of partition in terms of plasma disruption forces on the LL, Li particle divertor retention, and strong divertor pumping action from the Li-coated divertor chamber wall. By operating at a lower temperature than the first wall, the LLD can serve to purify the entire reactor chamber, as impurities generally migrate toward lower temperature Li-condensed surfaces. To maintain the LL purity, a closed LL loop system with a modest capacity (e.g., ~ 1 Liter/sec for ~ 1% level "impurities") is envisioned for a steady-state 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant.

  11. PROOF OF CONCEPT TEST OF A UNIQUE GASEOUS PERFLUROCARBON TRACER SYSTEM FOR VERIFICATION AND LONG TERM MONITORING OF CAPS AND COVER SYSTEMS CONDUCTED AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BENTONITE MAT TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; SERRATO,M.

    2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineered covers have been placed on top of buried/subsurface wastes to minimize water infiltration and therefore, release of hazardous contaminants. In order for the cover to protect the environment it must remain free of holes and breaches throughout its service life. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program 2006 Accelerated Cleanup Plan is pushing for rapid closure of many of the DOE facilities. This will require a great number of new cover systems. Some of these new covers are expected to maintain their performance for periods of up to 1000 years. Long-term stewardship will require monitoring/verification of cover performance over the course of the designed lifetime. In addition, many existing covers are approaching the end of their design life and will need validation of current performance (if continued use is desired) or replacement (if degraded). The need for a reliable method of verification and long-term monitoring is readily apparent. Currently, failure is detected through monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. This is too late as the contaminants have already left the disposal area. The proposed approach is the use of gaseous Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) to verify and monitor cover performance. It is believed that PFTs will provide a technology that can verify a cover meets all performance objectives upon installation, be capable of predicting changes in cover performance and failure (defined as contaminants leaving the site) before it happens, and be cost-effective in supporting stewardship needs. The PFTs are injected beneath the cover and air samples taken above (either air samples or soil gas samples) at the top of the cover. The location, concentrations, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) provide a direct measure of cover performance. PFT technology can be used as a non-invasive method (if injection ports are emplaced prior to cover emplacement) on new covers or a minimally invasive method on existing covers. PFT verification will be useful at all buried waste sites using a cover system (e.g., treated or untreated chemical waste landfills) including DOE, commercial, and private sector sites. This paper discusses the initial field trial of the PFT cover monitoring system performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in FY01. The experiments provided a successful proof-of-principle test of the PFT technology in monitoring caps and covers. An injection and sampling array was installed in the Bentomat test cap at the SRS Caps Test Facility. This system contained 6 feet of sandy soil beneath a 1/2 inch geosynthetic clay liner covered by an HDPE liner which was covered by 2 feet of clayey top soil. PFTs were injected into the sandy soil though a pre-existing system of access pipes below the cap and soil gas samples were taken on top of the cap. Mid-way into the injection period a series of 1 1/2 inch holes were punched into the cap (through the geomembrane) to provide a positive breach in the cap. Data will be presented that shows the initial cap was fairly tight and leak free and that the artificially induced leaks were detectable within two hours of occurrence.

  12. The feasibility study of hot cell decontamination by the PFC spray method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui-Jun Won; Chong-Hun Jung; Jei-Kwon Moon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of per-fluorocarbon compounds (PFC) are colorless, non-toxic, easily vaporized and nonflammable. Also, some of them are liquids of a high density, low surface tension, low latent heat and low specific heat. These particular chemical and physical properties of fluoro-organic compounds permit their use in very different fields such as electronics, medicine, tribology, nuclear and material science. The Sonatol process was developed under a contract with the DOE. The Sonatol process uses an ultrasonic agitation in a PFC solution that contains a fluorinated surfactant to remove radioactive particles from surfaces. Filtering the suspended particles allows the solutions to be reused indefinitely. They applied the Sonatol process to the decontamination of a heterogeneous legacy Pu-238 waste that exhibited an excessive hydrogen gas generation, which prevents a transportation of such a waste to a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing dry decontamination technologies applicable to a decontamination of a highly radioactive area loosely contaminated with radioactive particles. This contamination has occurred as a result of an examination of a post-irradiated material or the development of the DUPIC process. The dry decontamination technologies developed are the carbon dioxide pellet spray method and the PFC spray method. As a part of the project, PFC ultrasonic decontamination technology was developed in 2004. The PFC spray decontamination method which is based on the test results of the PFC ultrasonic method has been under development since 2005. The developed PFC spray decontamination equipment consists of four modules (spray, collection, filtration and distillation). Vacuum cup of the collection module gathers the contaminated PFC solution, then the solution is moved to the filtration module and it is recycled. After a multiple recycling of the spent PFC solution, it is purified in the distillation module. A performance test on each module was executed and the results have been reported. A combined test of the four modules, however, has not been performed as yet. The main objective of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility of the full PFC spray decontamination process. Decontamination of the inside of the IMEF hot cell by the PFC spray method was also performed. PFC spray decontamination process was demonstrated by using a surrogate wall contaminated with Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The spray pressure was 41 kgf/cm{sup 2}, the orifice diameter was 0.2 mm and the spray velocity was 0.2 L/min. And, the decontaminated area was 100 cm{sup 2}. From previous test results, we found that the decontamination factor of the PFC spray method was in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. When the decontamination efficiency of Co-60 was high, then the decontamination efficiency of Cs-137 was also high. As the surface roughness of the specimen increased, the PFC spray decontamination efficiency decreased. Inferring from the previous results, the surface of the surrogate wall was cleaned by the PFC spray method. The vacuum cup of the collection module operated well and gathered more than 99 % of the PFC solution. Also, filtration and distillation modules operated well. All the filtered PFC solution flowed to the storage chamber where some of the PFC solution was distilled. The coolant of the distillation module was a dry ice. And, the recycled solution was transferred to the spray module by a high pressure pump. To evaluate the PFC spray decontamination efficiency, a smear device was fabricated and operated by a manipulator. Before and after decontamination, a smear test was performed. The tested area was 100 cm{sup 2} and the radioactivity was estimated indirectly by measuring the radioactivity of the filter paper. The average decontamination factor was in the range between 10 and 15. One application time was 2 minutes. The sprayed PFC solution was collected by the vacuum cup and it was stored in the collection equipment. After the termination of the decontamination test, th