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1

HHS Developer Resources | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HHS Developer Resources HHS Developer Resources HHS Developer Resources Submitted by Anonymous on Thu, 05/16/2013 - 4:38pm Log in to vote 2 Want to place content from HHS websites on your own site? With the tools covered below, we enable you to share information and resources from across the Department. These tools allow you to add content from our websites while maintaining the look and feel of your own site. The best part about their use is that with each you do not need to manually update your site - the updates are all automatic. These resources highlighted below promote openness, which is one of the key principles of the Digital Government Strategy. With each HHS can disseminate up-to-date, accurate, and timely health information to our partners and the American public. This is an important part of HHS's

2

Laminar burning speed and flame structure of 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a)/air and difluoromethane (HFC-32)/air mixtures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Of recent importance is the laminar burning speed of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in the refrigerant industry. Since the adoption of the Montreal Protocol in 1989 (more)

Bennett, Casey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Atmospheric Fluoroform (CHF3, HFC-23) at Cape Grim, Tasmania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHF3, HFC-23 at Cape Grim, Tasmania CHF3, HFC-23 at Cape Grim, Tasmania Atmospheric Fluoroform (CHF3, HFC-23) at Cape Grim, Tasmania graphics Graphics data Data Authors D. E. Oram,1 W. T. Sturges,1 S. A. Penkett,1 A. McCulloch,2 and P. J. Fraser3 1School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, United Kingdom 2ICI Chemicals & Polymers Ltd., Safety and Environment Department, Runcorn, Cheshire, WA7 4QD, United Kingdom 3CRC for Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Division of Atmospheric Research, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Private Bag No. 1, Aspendale, Victoria 3195, Australia Period of Record 1978-1995 Methods The sampling and analytical methods are described more fully in Oram et al. (1998). In summary, air samples were taken from the archive of Cape Grim,

4

Project: Novel Working Fluids for High-Efficiency HVAC&R ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the best replacements for high-GWP hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants; and to demonstrate improved energy efficiency of chillers through ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

An Experimental Investigaton of the Effect of Oil on Convective Heat Trasfer and Pressure Drop of a HFC-32/HRC-125 Mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops of HCFC-22 and a 50% mass mixture of HFC-32/HFC-125 were experimentally measured under flow boiling conditions in a smooth tube. The refrigerants were flowed through an 8 mm diameter smooth tube at mass fluxes of 277, 434, 520 and 700 kg/sm^2. Heat fluxes were applied at values of 5100, 7100 and 11000 W/m^2. The heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops were measured at refrigerant qualities of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40 and 60 percent. The refrigerants were examined at temperatures near 4C. Oil was added to the HFC-32/HFC-125 mixture in concentrations of 2.6% and 5.4%. Experiments were repeated with the oil laden refrigerant. The heat transfer coefficients for HCFC-22 increased with quality, mass flux and heat flux. The heat transfer coefficients for HFC-32/HFC-125 often decreased at low qualities and increased with quality at high qualities. The pressure drop increased with quality and mass flux for both refrigerants. The heat transfer had a minimal effect upon pressure drop. HFC-32/HFC-125 had a lower pressure drop than HCFC-22 for all conditions. The addition of oil increased the pressure drop. A pressure drop correlation and heat transfer correlation were developed for HFC-32/HFC-125.

McJimsey, Bert Ashford

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Retrofitting an automotive air conditioner with HFC-134a, additive, and mineral oil. Final report, October 1992-May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper gives results of an evaluation of a lubricant additive developed for use in retrofitting motor vehicle air conditioners. The additive was designed to enable HFC-134a to be used as a retrofit refrigerant with the existing mineral oil in CFC-12 systems. The goal of the project was to provide preliminary feasibility testing of the additive. The cooling effect of the test system retrofitted with HFC-134a and the oil additive was nearly the same as that of the original system with CFC 12 refrigerant. If lubricant additives prove to be successful, miscible lubricants may not be needed for retrofitting some automotive systems. The retrofitting procedure might be simplified and the cost to consumers might be reduced. It has not been determined if retrofitting systems with HFC-134a and oil additives is feasible for a wider range of operating conditions and types of equipment, including the applicability of orifice tube/suction accumulator systems.

Jetter, J.J.; Delafield, F.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Energy and global warming impacts of HFC refrigerants and emerging technologies: TEWI-III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of hydrofluorocarbons (BFCs) which were developed as alternative refrigerants and insulating foam blowing agents to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) is now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants and blowing agents on global warming. A Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) assessment analyzes the environmental affects of these halogenated working fluids in energy consuming applications by combining a direct effect resulting from the inadvertent release of HFCs to the atmosphere with an indirect effect resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels needed to provide the energy to operate equipment using these compounds as working fluids. TEWI is a more balanced measure of environmental impact because it is not based solely on the global warming potential (GWP) of the working fluid. It also shows the environmental benefit of efficient technologies that result in less CO{sub 2} generation and eventual emission to the earth`s atmosphere. The goal of TEWI is to assess total global warming impact of all the gases released to the atmosphere, including CO{sub 2} emissions from energy conversion. Alternative chemicals and technologies have been proposed as substitutes for HFCs in the vapor-compression cycle for refrigeration and air conditioning and for polymer foams in appliance and building insulations which claim substantial environmental benefits. Among these alternatives are: (1) Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants and blowing agents which have zero ozone depleting potential and a negligible global warming potential, (2) CO{sub 2} as a refrigerant and blowing agent, (3) Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor compression systems, (4) Absorption chiller and heat pumping cycles using ammonia/water or lithium bromide/water, and (5) Evacuated panel insulations. This paper summarizes major results and conclusions of the detailed final report on the TEWI-111 study.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

SUBMISSION BY FINLAND ON BEHALF OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY AND ITS MEMBER STATES OF INFORMATION ON AVAILABLE AND POTENTIAL WAYS AND MEANS OF LIMITING HFC, PFC AND SF 6 EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6) are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from aerosol cans to industrial refrigeration and electrical systems which may contain thousands of kilograms of these substances. The paper at hand describes the uses and emission sources of these gases

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Heat transfer during condensation of HFC-134a and R-404A inside of a horizontal smooth and micro-fin tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent small and medium capacity refrigeration systems, the condenser tubes are provided with micro-fins from inside. The vapour refrigerant at the compressor outlet and the condenser inlet is in superheat state. As it advances in the condenser it is in two phases and at the outlet it is in sub cooled liquid. The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) during condensation of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth (8.56 mm ID) and micro-fin tubes (8.96 mm ID) are experimentally investigated. Different from previous studies, the present experiments are performed for various condensing temperatures, with superheating and sub cooling and using hermetically sealed compressor. The test runs are done at average saturated condensing temperatures ranging from 35 C to 60 C. The mass fluxes are between 90 and 800 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The experimental results indicate that the average HTC increases with mass flux but decreases with increasing condensing temperature for both smooth and micro-fin tubes. The average condensation HTCs of HFC-134a and R-404A for the micro-fin tubes were 1.5-2.5 and 1.3-2 times larger than that in smooth tube respectively. The HTCs for R-404A are less than that of HFC-134a. New correlations based on the data gathered during the experimentation for predicting condensation HTCs are proposed for wide range of operating conditions. (author)

Sapali, S.N. [Govt. College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shivaji Nagar, Pune, Maharashtra 411 005 (India); Patil, Pradeep A. [AISSMS College of Engineering, Pune University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Kennedy Road, Near R.T.O., Pune, Maharashtra 411 001 (India)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Condensation pressure drop of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth and micro-fin U-tube  

SciTech Connect

The frictional pressure drop during condensation of HFC-134a and R-404A in a smooth (8.56 mm ID) and micro-fin U-tubes (8.96 mm ID) are experimentally investigated. Different from previous studies, the present experiments are performed for various condensing temperatures. The test runs are done at average saturated condensing temperatures ranging from 35 C to 60 C. The mass fluxes are between 90 and 800 kg/m{sup 2}s. The experimental results indicate that the average frictional pressure drop increases with mass flux but decreases with increasing condensing temperature for both smooth and micro-fin-tubes. The average frictional pressure drops of HFC-134a and R-404A for the micro-fin-tubes were 1-1.7 and 1-2.1 times larger than that in smooth tube respectively. New correlations based on the data gathered during the experimentation for predicting frictional pressure drop are proposed for wide range of operating conditions. (author)

Patil, Pradeep A. [AISSMS College of Engineering, Pune University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Kennedy Road, near RTO, Pune 411 001, Maharashtra (India); Sapali, S.N. [Govt. College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shivaji Nagar, Pune 411 005, Maharashtra (India)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

HHS SMALL BUSINESS REVIEW FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Form 4220.2 (Revised March 14 2013) DOE Form 4220.2 (Revised March 14 2013) Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization DOE F 4220.2 - Small Business Review Form (03/14/2013) OSDBU Control Number: _______________________________________Date Received: ______________________________ A. Project Information 1. Requisition Number: ________________________ Acquisition Instrument Proposed/Contract Type: [ ] Contract No (Mod): ______________________ [ ] Departmental IDIQ No: ___________________ [ ] GSA Schedule: _________________________ [ ] GWAC Contract: ________________________ [ ] DOE BPA:_____________________________ 2. Acquisition Office and Program Element: CO/CS Name: Contact Information (Telephone and E-mail): 3. Description of services or supplies:

13

Final Technical Report HFC Concrete: A Low-???????­???¢???????Energy, Carbon-???????­Dioxide-???????­Negative Solution for reducing Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Solidia/CCSM received funding for further research and development of its Low Temperature Solidification Process (LTS), which is used to create hydrate-free concrete (HFC). LTS/HFC is a technology/materials platform that offers wide applicability in the built infrastructure. Most importantly, it provides a means of making concrete without Portland cement. Cement and concrete production is a major consumer of energy and source of industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The primary goal of this project was to develop and commercialize a novel material, HFC, which by replacing traditional concrete and cement, reduces both energy use and GHG emissions in the built infrastructure. Traditional concrete uses Portland Cement (PC) as a binder. PC production involves calcination of limestone at {approx}1450 C, which releases significant amounts of CO{sub 2} gas to the atmosphere and consumes a large amount of energy due to the high temperature required. In contrast, HFC is a carbonate-based hydrate-free concrete (HFC) that consumes CO{sub 2} gas in its production. HFC is made by reaction of silicate minerals with CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 C, more than an order-of-magnitude below the temperature required to make PC. Because of this significant difference in temperature, it is estimated that we will be able to reduce energy use in the cement and concrete industry by up to 30 trillion Btu by 2020. Because of the insulating properties of HFC, we believe we will also be able to significantly reduce energy use in the Building sector, though the extent of this saving is not yet quantified. It is estimated that production of a tonne of PC-based concrete requires about 6.2 million Btu of energy and produces over 1 tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions (Choate, 2003). These can be reduced to 1.9 million Btu and 0.025 tonnes of CO{sub 2} emissions per tonne of HFC (with overall CO{sub 2}-negativity possible by increasing carbonation yield). In this way, by replacing PC-based concrete with HFC in infrastructure we can reduce energy use in concrete production by 70%, and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 98%; thus the potential to reduce the impact of building materials on global warming and climate change is highly significant. Low Temperature Solidification (LTS) is a breakthrough technology that enables the densification of inorganic materials via a hydrothermal process. The resulting product exhibits excellent control of chemistry and microstructure, to provide durability and mechanical performance that exceeds that of concrete or natural stone. The technology can be used in a wide range of applications including facade panels, interior tiles, roof tiles, countertops, and pre-cast concrete. Replacing traditional building materials and concrete in these applications will result in significant reduction in both energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions.

Dr. Larry McCandlish, Principal Investigator; Dr. Richard Riman, Co-Principal Investigator

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Investigation of Chlorine-Free Refrigerants for Low-Temperature Supermarket Refrigeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the phaseout of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, supermarkets are seeking a replacement for R-502, the refrigerant of choice for low-temperature (frozen food) refrigeration. EPRI has conducted field testing to characterize the performance of the new hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) nonchlorinated refrigerants replacements for R-502. Results showed that energy and demand savings can be obtained using these alternative refrigerants with zero ozone-depleting potential.

1996-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

RESULTS OF HALON 1301 AND HFC-125 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... bottles have an internal volume of 800 in3 and are pressurized to 825 psig at 70F. For cold discharges, the bottles are kept in a chiller for a ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

16

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Halocarbon Environmental Coefficients and Principal Uses 100-Year Global Ozone Depletion Warming Potential Potential (ODP) Compound (CO2 = 1) (Relative to CFC-11) Principal Uses Chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 1.00 Blowing Agent, Chillers CFC-12 (1) 1.00 Auto A/C, Chillers, & Blowing Agent CFC-113 0.80 Solvent CFC-114 1.00 Solvent CFC-115 (2) 0.60 Solvent, Refrigerant Hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-22 (2) 0.06 Residential A/C HCFC-123 0.02 Refrigerant HCFC-124 0.02 Sterilant HCFC-141b 0.11 CFC Replacement HCFC-142b 0.07 CFC Replacement Bromofluorocarbons Halon-1211 3.00 Fire Extinguishers Halon-1301 10.00 Fire Extinguishers Hydrofluorocarbons HFC-23 0.00 HCFC Byproduct HFC-125 0.00 CFC/HCFC Replacement HFC-134a 0.00 Auto A/C, Refrigeration HFC-152a (1) 0.00 Aerosol Propellant HFC-227ea 0.00 CFC Replacement

17

On The Design Of Environmentally Benign Refrigerant Mixtures: A Mathematical Programming Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based refrigerants (such as CFC12) have found widespread uses in home refrigerators and automotive air conditioners primarily due to their nontoxic, nonflammable nature and their high overall thermodynamic efficiency. However, CFC and hydrofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants with intermediate to high ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) will be banned during the next two decades. The outcome of replacing CFC's in the vapor recompression cycle and various other processes is vital to several industries. Feasible solutions appear to include mixtures of hydrofluorocarbons (HFC's) which have the potential for matching thermodynamic properties of current working fluids while meeting several criteria for ozone depletion potential, flammability, toxicity, materials compatibility and cost. In this paper, a proof of concept study is made to show that mathematical programming can effectively be used to identify a small set of alternative refrigerant mixtures which can then be...

Amit Duvedi; Luke E.K. Achenie; Copyright Luke Achenie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

HHS Publication No. (CDC) (99-xxxx) Biosafety in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (1983). Radiological assessment: A textbook on environmental dose analysis. NUREG/CR-3332, Washington, D

Thomas, David D.

19

HHS Publication No. (CDC) (99-xxxx) Biosafety in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activities Program Office o f Health a nd Safe ty National Institutes of He alth John Bennett, M.D. Chief of Recomm ended Biosafety Levels for Activities in Which Experimentally or Naturally Infected Vertebrate and activities, rather than used as a universal and generic code applicable to all situations. Since

Gauthier, Eric

20

Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Commercial Refrigeration Systems Using Life Cycle Climate Performance Analysis: From System Design to Refrigerant Options  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) analysis is used to estimate lifetime direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent gas emissions of various refrigerant options and commercial refrigeration system designs, including the multiplex DX system with various hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, the HFC/R744 cascade system incorporating a medium-temperature R744 secondary loop, and the transcritical R744 booster system. The results of the LCCP analysis are presented, including the direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions for each refrigeration system and refrigerant option. Based on the results of the LCCP analysis, recommendations are given for the selection of low GWP replacement refrigerants for use in existing commercial refrigeration systems, as well as for the selection of commercial refrigeration system designs with low carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, suitable for new installations.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hfc hydrofluorocarbon hhs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

THE INFLUENCE OF OXIDATION OF HFC'S AND FC'S ON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... m3). VS2 (energetic module): Boiler room (volume 645.0 m3, potentially explosive atmosphere (diesel fuel vapours)); Fuel ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

FLAMMABILITY OF HFC/HCFC -AIR MIXTURES AT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a hatch for inspection and cleaning, sockets for installation of pressure transducers, thermocouples and an igniter and a jacket for thermostat- ing. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

A Study of TCP Dynamics over HFC Networks 1 Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cornell.edu/skeshav/papers.html [17] V. Paxson, Measurements and Analysis of End-to-End Internet Dynamics, Ph.D. Thesis, LBNL-40319, UCB ...

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Voluntary Code of Practice for HFC and PFC Fire Protection ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... requirements or is required by regulation or the ... C. Review of relevant regulations or standards ... benchmarks, by providing the incentives to make ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

NIST ATM/HFC Simulator V4.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Name: Delay to process a cell (usec): 0 Slot time (Mbits/sec): 0 ... Name: Delay to process a cell (usec): 0 Slot time (Mbits/sec): 0 ...

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Study on the Interaction Coefficients in PR Equation with VdW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The values of ki for HFCs and HCs, including Propane, Isobutane, n-butane, HFC32, HFC125, HFC134a, HFC143a, HFC152a and HFC227ea ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Total environmental warming impact (TEWI) calculations for alternative automative air-conditioning systems  

SciTech Connect

The Montreal Protocol phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has required manufacturers to develop refrigeration and air-conditioning systems that use refrigerants that can not damage stratospheric ozone. Most refrigeration industries have adapted their designs to use hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) or hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants; new automobile air- conditioning systems use HFC-134a. These industries are now being affected by scientific investigations of greenhouse warming and questions about the effects of refrigerants on global warming. Automobile air-conditioning has three separate impacts on global warming; (1) the effects of refrigerant inadvertently released to the atmosphere from accidents, servicing, and leakage; (2) the efficiency of the cooling equipment (due to the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to power the system); and (3) the emission of C0{sub 2} from burning fuel to transport the system. The Total Equivalent Warming Impact (TEWI) is an index that should be used to compare the global warming effects of alternative air-conditioning systems because it includes these contributions from the refrigerant, cooling efficiency, and weight. This paper compares the TEWI of current air-conditioning systems using HFC-134a with that of transcritical vapor compression system using carbon dioxide and systems using flammable refrigerants with secondary heat transfer loops. Results are found to depend on both climate and projected efficiency of C0{sub 2}systems. Performance data on manufacturing prototype systems are needed to verify the potential reductions in TEWI. Extensive field testing is also required to determine the performance, reliability, and ``serviceability`` of each alternative to HFC-134a to establish whether the potential reduction of TEWI can be achieved in a viable consumer product.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project The Department of Energy is currently researching the development of building superinsulation through a carbon dioxide (CO2) foaming process. Project Description This project seeks to develop building super insulation through a carbon dioxide foaming process that does not use hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and which produces insulation with a high R-value. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and The Industrial Science & Technology Network. Project Goals The goal of this project is to develop advanced insulation without HFC, and to achieve a competitive processing cost for CO2 foaming technology.

29

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

30

Energy and global warming impacts of next generation refrigeration and air conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

Significant developments have occurred in hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and the application of ammonia and hydrocarbons as refrigerant working fluids since the original TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) report in 1991. System operating and performance data on alternative refrigerants and refrigeration technologies justify and updated evaluation of these new alternative refrigerants and competing technologies in well-characterized applications. Analytical and experimental results are used to show quantitative comparisons between HFCS, HFC blends, hydrocarbons, and ammonia, used as refrigerants. An objective evaluation is presented for commercial and near commercial non-CFC refrigerants/blowing agents and alternative refrigeration technologies. This information is needed for objective and quantitative decisions on policies addressing greenhouse gas emissions from refrigeration and air conditioning equipment. The evaluation assesses the energy use and global warming impacts of refrigeration and air conditioning technologies that could be commercialized during the phase out of HCFCS. Quantitative comparison TEWI for two application areas are presented. Opportunities for significant reductions in TEWI are seen with currently known refrigerants through improved maintenance and servicing practices and improved product designs.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

New concepts for refrigerant leak detection and mixture measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the discovery that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) destroy the ozone layer, the need to reduce the release of these refrigerants into the environment has become critical. A total ban of ozone-depleting CFCs is expected within a few years, and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and fluorocarbons (FCs) and their mixtures are expected to be used during a transition period. Several HFC and FC refrigerants are currently being considered as CFC substitutes. The electronic refrigerant leak detectors currently being considered as CFC substitutes. The electronic refrigerant leak detectors currently on the market were developed to detect CFCs and are not as sensitive to HFCs. Although incremental improvement can be made to these devices to detect HFCs, they often lead to increased false signals. Also, there is no simple device available to measure the composition of a refrigerant mixture. The authors present two new concepts to aid in the development of two portable instruments that can be used for HFC leak detection and for quantitative measurement of refrigerant mixture compositions. The development of simple, easy-to-use portable leak detectors and refrigerant mixture meters is essential to the wide use of alternative refrigerants in industry.

Chen, F.C.; Allman, S.L.; Chen, C.H.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Estimated U.S. Emissions of Halocarbons, 1987-2001 (MMT CO2 Equivalent) Gas 1987 1990 1992 1995 1998 2000 2001 Chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 391 246 207 167 115 105 105 CFC-12 1,166 1,194 853 549 223 182 226 CFC-113 498 158 103 52 0 0 0 CFC-114 N.A. 46 29 16 1 N.A. N.A. CFC-115 N.A. 30 27 22 19 N.A. N.A. Bromofluorocarbons Halon-1211 N.A. 1 1 1 1 N.A. N.A. Halon-1301 N.A. 12 12 12 13 N.A. N.A. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-22 116 136 135 123 128 134 137 HCFC-123 N.A. 0 0 0 0 N.A. N.A. HCFC-124 0 0 0 3 4 N.A. N.A. HCFC-141b N.A. 0 0 14 19 4 4 HCFC-142b N.A. 0 2 18 22 26 26 Hydrofluorocarbons HFC-23 48 36 36 28 41 31 22 HFC-125 N.A. 0 1 2 4 5 6 HFC-134a N.A. 1 1 19 35 44 41 Total 2,219 1,861 1,408 1,024 624 532 566 Source(s): Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change, Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis, Jan. 2001, Table 3, p. 47 for GWPs; EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2001, Dec. 2002, Table 29, p. 71 and Table D2, p. D-5 for 1990-2001 emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and

33

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HFC-161 (ethyl fluoride) HFC-227ea (heptafluoropropane) HFC-236cb (1,1,1,2,2,3-hexafluoropropane) HFC-236ea (1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane)

34

Broadband Cable Access Networks: The HFC Plant, 3rd Ed edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book focuses on broadband distribution and systems architecture and concentrates on practical concepts that will allow the reader to do their own design, improvement, and troubleshooting work. The objective is to enhance the skill sets of a large ... Keywords: Data Transmission Systems, Networking

David Large; James Farmer

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

005- Densification and Oxidation Behavior of HfC and TaC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

125- Influence of Gas Flow Rate Ratio on the Structural Properties of a-SiC:H Prepared by ... 145- The Synergy of XRD and XRF in a Shale and Slate Analysis.

36

Energy and Global Warming Impacts of HFC Refrigerants and Emerging Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEATING AND COOLING LOADS AND HEAT PUMP PERFORMANCE FACTORS FOR NEW SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES AND COMMERCIAL average). . . . . . . 37 8. TEWI for residential heating and cooling options in Miami (1996 efficiency in Miami (2005 efficiency levels). . . . . . . . . . . 48 13. TEWI for residential heating and cooling

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

37

HKUPHYS-HFC-03; quant-ph/9709053 Making An Empty Promise With A Quantum Computer ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alice has made a decision in her mind. While she does not want to reveal it to Bob at this moment, she would like to convince Bob that she is committed to this particular decision and that she cannot change it at a later time. Is there a way for Alice to get Bobs trust? Until recently, researchers had believed that the above task can be performed with the help of quantum mechanics. And the security of the quantum scheme lies on the uncertainty principle. Nevertheless, such optimism was recently shattered by Mayers and by us, who found that Alice can always change her mind if she has a quantum computer. Here, we survey this dramatic development and its implications on the security of other quantum cryptographic schemes.

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

HKUPHYS-HFC-03 Making An Empty Promise With A Quantum Computer ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alice has made a decision in her mind. While she does not want to reveal it to Bob at this moment, she would like to convince Bob that she is committed to this particular decision and that she cannot change it at a later time. Is there a way for Alice to get Bobs trust? Until recently, researchers had believed that the above task can be performed with the help of quantum mechanics. And the security of the quantum scheme lies on the uncertainty principle. Nevertheless, such optimism was recently shattered by Mayers and by us, who found that Alice can always change her mind if she has a quantum computer. Here, we survey this dramatic development and its implications on the security of other quantum cryptographic schemes.

H. F. Chau; Hoi-kwong Lo

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The F-Gas Regulation and HFC Usage in Fire Suppression ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of more than 1 ton per annum of fluorinated greenhouse gases must report quantities exported, and any quantities of gas exported for recycling ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hfc hydrofluorocarbon hhs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Global warming impacts of ozone-safe refrigerants and refrigeration, heating, and air-conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

International agreements mandate the phase-out of many chlorine containing compounds that are used as the working fluid in refrigeration, air-conditioning, and heating equipment. Many of the chemical compounds that have been proposed, and are being used in place of the class of refrigerants eliminated by the Montreal Protocol are now being questioned because of their possible contributions to global warming. Natural refrigerants are put forth as inherently superior to manufactured refrigerants because they have very low or zero global warming potentials (GWPs). Questions are being raised about whether or not these manufactured refrigerants, primarily hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), should be regulated and perhaps phased out in much the same manner as CFCs and HCFCs. Several of the major applications of refrigerants are examined in this paper and the results of an analysis of their contributions to greenhouse warming are presented. Supermarket refrigeration is shown to be an application where alternative technologies have the potential to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) significantly with no clear advantage to either natural or HFC refrigerants. Mixed results are presented for automobile air conditioners with opportunities to reduce GHG emissions dependent on climate and comfort criteria. GHG emissions for hermetic and factory built systems (i.e. household refrigerators/freezers, unitary equipment, chillers) are shown to be dominated by energy use with much greater potential for reduction through efficiency improvements than by selection of refrigerant. The results for refrigerators also illustrate that hydrocarbon and carbon dioxide blown foam insulation have lower overall effects on GHG emissions than HFC blown foams at the cost of increased energy use.

Fischer, S.; Sand, J.; Baxter, V.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

California's new mandatory greenhouse gas reporting regulation  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in early 2009, approximately 1000 California businesses will begin reporting their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based on the requirements of a new regulation adopted by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) in December 2007. California's mandatory GHG reporting regulation is the first rule adopted as a requirement of the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, passed by the California Legislature as Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32; Nunez, Chapter 488, Statutes of 2006) and signed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger in September 2006. The regulation is the first of its kind in the United States to require facilities to report annual GHG emissions. In general, all facilities subject to reporting are required to report their on-site stationary source combustion emissions of CO{sub 2}, nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and methane (CH{sub 4}). Some industrial sectors, such as cement producers and oil refineries, also must report their process emissions, which occur from chemical or other noncombustion activities. Fugitive emissions from facilities are required to be reported when specified in the regulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) use is prevalent in electricity facilities and must be reported. CO{sub 2} emissions from biomass-derived fuels must be separately identified during reporting, and reporters must also provide their consumption of purchased or acquired electricity and thermal energy; these requirements will assist facilities in evaluating changes in their fossil fuel carbon footprints. 1 tab.

Patrick Gaffney; Doug Thompson; Richard Bode [California Air Resources Board, CA (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

SciTech Connect

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are used in a number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s. However, in the mid-1980s, it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of these alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects in the form of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential heating and cooling, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air-conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. The discussion in this paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to refrigeration and air-conditioning. In general the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), lifetime equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions. Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

TEWI Analysis: Its Utility, Its Shortcomings, and Its Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past decade has been a challenging time for the refrigeration and air conditioning industry worldwide. Provisions of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments require the phaseout of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) compounds that have been used extensively as insulating foam blowing agents and refrigerants in refrigeration systems, heat pumps, and air conditioners. In response, hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) compounds were proposed, developed, and are starting to be used as the primary alternatives to CFCs and HCFCs. However, in 1997 under the Kyoto Protocol, industrialized nations have agreed to roll back emissions of HCFCs, carbon dioxide (CO*), and four other greenhouse gases which threaten to cause excessive global warming. The US. Department of Energy and the Alternative Fluorocarbon Environmental Acceptability Study (AFEAS) jointly sponsored research projects to identify the major applications of CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs and to examine the impacts of these compounds and the energy use of applications employing these compounds on global warming. The five major uses of fluorocarbons based on sales were automobile air conditioning, supermarket refrigeration, unitary heat pumps and air conditioning, chillers for cooling large office buildings, and household refrigeration. Almost all of the refrigerants used in these applications are global warming gases, and if the refrigerant leaks out of the system during operation, is lost during maintenance or is not recovered when the system is scraped, it contributes to global warming. But, it is also true that the energy consumed by refrigeration and air conditioning systems, in the form of electricity or the direct combustion of fossil fuel, results in the release of CO*, the primary cause of atmospheric global warming.

Baxter, V.D.; Fischer, S.K.; Sand, J.R.

1999-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

2010 HIPAA Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safeguarding Health Information: Building Assurance through HIPAA Security. Purpose: The HHS Office for Civil Rights ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

For Refrigeration Problems, a Magnetically Attractive Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cycles use different physical effects to cool ... The effect can be used in a classic ... commonly use hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), greenhouse gases that ...

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 12.7 - Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (100-year time horizon) Gas GWP SAR 900 Carbon dioxide (CO2) 1 Methane (CH 4 ) 1 21 Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) 310 HFC-23 11,700 HFC-32 650...

51

Office of Facilities and Grounds Future Power Distribution Grid Requirements for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). · This will require the combination of alternate generation (PV, SNG, HFC, etc.), storage, Demand Response switchable circuits ­ Scalable power production (Diesel, SNG, HFC, Batteries) ­ Combine Thermal power

52

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Performance Evaluation of Two Azeotropic Refrigerant Mixtures of HFC-134a With R-290 (Propane) and R-600a (Isobutane). ...

53

NIST.gov - Computer Security Division - Computer Security ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Laboratory. Tips and Techniques for Conducting Risk Assessments Pat Toth NIST Marissa Gordon-Nguyen HHS/OCR. ...

54

NIST, Partners Develop Testing Infrastructure for Health IT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Health and Human Services (HHS) identified ... The health IT testing infrastructure does ... NIST's National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program ...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Health IT Workshop Notice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... among NVLAP, the NIST Information Technology Laboratory, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), laboratories interested in ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid number (TAN), which includes both mineral acids and organic acids, is therefore a useful indicator which can be used to monitor the condition of the system in order to perform remedial maintenance, when required, to prevent system failure. The critical TAN value is the acid level at which remedial action should be taken to prevent the onset of rapid acid formation which can result in system failure. The level of 0.05 mg KOH/g of oil was established for CFC/mineral oil systems based on analysis of 700 used lubricants from operating systems and failed units. There is no consensus within the refrigeration industry as to the critical TAN value for HFC/POE systems, however, the value will be higher than the CFC/mineral oil systems critical TAN value because of the much weaker organic acids produced from POE. A similar study of used POE lubricants should be performed to establish a critical TAN limit for POE systems. Titrimetric analysis per ASTM procedures is the most commonly used method to determine TAN values in lubricants in the refrigeration industry and other industries dealing with lubricating oils. For field measurements, acid test kits are often used since they provide rapid, semi-quantitative TAN results.

Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Section 5.2.3 Chillers: Greening Federal Facilities; Second Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleting HFC-134a refrigerant. Source: Carrier Corporation References Energy Management: A Program to Reduce Cost and Protect the Environment, Facility Management Divi-...

58

Intermediate Species Profiles in Low-Pressure Methane ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... inhibited by CHF3 at an equal loading of ffuo ... 10 using the experimental temperature profile as input ... HFC mechanism may be down- loaded from http ...

2012-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

59

EXTINGUISHMENT TESTS OF CONTINUOUSLY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 8. Table 2. Summary of Conductive Heating Tests with HFC-227ea. CONDOM CONDO06 CONDO07 CONDO13 CONDO 1 8 SAMPLE -=I=- ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605) GREENHOUSE GAS NAME GREENHOUSE GAS CODE FORMULA GWP TAR1 AR42 (1) Carbon Dioxide CO2 CO2 1 1 (2) Methane CH4 CH4 23 25 (3) Nitrous Oxide N2O N2O 296 298 (4) Hydroflourocarbons HFC-23 (trifluoromethane) 15 CHF3 12000 14800 HFC-32 (difluoromethane) 16 CH2F2 550 675 HFC-41 (monofluoromethane) 43 CH3F 97 -3 HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane) 17 CHF2CF3 3400 3500 HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) 44 CHF2CHF2 1100 -3 HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) 18 CH2FCF3 1300 1430 HFC-143 (1,1,2-trifluorethane) 45 CHF2CH2F 330 -3 HFC-143a (1,1,1-trifluoroethane) 46 CF3CH3 4300 4470 HFC-152 (1,2-difluorethane) 47 CH2FCH2F

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hfc hydrofluorocarbon hhs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation compared the performance of R22 to the performance of propane (R290) and zeotropic mixtures of HFC's and hydrocarbons in a ...

62

PROCESS FOR CONVERSION OF SURPLUS HALONS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... banned in 1996 and strict import-export and recycling ... of minor products during the gas-phase reaction of ... a) halogen in product HFC gases which is ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Table 1.13 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency and Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Agriculture: Defense: Energy: GSA 1: HHS 2: Interior: Justice: NASA 3: Postal Service: Trans-portation: Veterans Affairs: Other 4: Total: Coal : 2003 (s) 15.4 :

64

2009 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... that role falling to HHS and the Office of the ... Nanomaterial Environmental Health and Safety ... endorses the proposed top-level restructuring as well ...

2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

65

Science.gov | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

federal regulations, legislation, image search, photo search, science news, federated search, DOE, OSTI, EPA, NASA, USGS, NLM, NIH, FDA, DTIC, NAL, NSF, GPO, NARA, LC, HHS,...

66

FISSEA Newsletter - June 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Those that will be serving one-year terms will be Pauline Bowen, HHS, Vicki Jordan, NSA, Sharon Kavanaugh, HCFA, and Phil Sibert, DOE. ...

67

Full-Scale Fire Tests With Automatic Sprinklers in A Patient ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Fire Research National Engineering Laboratory National Bureau ... of Health and Human Services (HHS) are ... of health care facilities and in the test ...

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

68

Office of Health & Safety - Health Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search System Public Health Activities Agenda for Public Health Activities Access Handbook - Guidelines for Researchers Conducting Health Studies at DOE HHS Communication...

69

Slide09 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and Human Services (HHS): 13% Department of the Interior (DOI): 12% Government Printing Office (GPO): 2% Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): 7% National Aeronautics and Space...

70

www.defra.gov.uk SMALL BUSINESS USER GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is caused by the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. What are greenhouse gas emissions? The key greenhouse gas emissions are carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons gas emissions? Human activities release greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere ­ using

71

"GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" "(From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP" ,,,"TAR1","AR42" "(1) Carbon Dioxide","CO2","CO2",1,1 "(2) Methane","CH4","CH4",23,25 "(3) Nitrous Oxide","N2O","N2O",296,298 "(4) Hydroflourocarbons" "HFC-23 (trifluoromethane)",15,"CHF3",12000,14800 "HFC-32 (difluoromethane)",16,"CH2F2",550,675 "HFC-41 (monofluoromethane)",43,"CH3F",97,92 "HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane)",17,"CHF2CF3",3400,3500

72

ThermoML Data for IJT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Saturated Liquid Viscosity of Ethyl Fluoride (HFC161) from 233 K to 373 K. Pages: 2243-2250. DOI: 10.1007/s10765-012-1309-7. ...

73

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hfc hydrofluorocarbon hhs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An Exploration of Foster Youth Academic Performance Trajectories and Predictors of Group Membership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Children and Families [ACF] (2008). http://www.acf.hhs.gov/for Children and Families [ACF], 2008). For many of these63% of referrals nationwide (ACF, 2010). Neglect is also the

Frerer, Kristine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Bt vs. non-Bt corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids: effect on degradation of corn stover in soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A billion tons per year of genetically modified corn residues are soil incorporated having both direct and indirect effects on the belowground environment, soil carbon (C) sequestration, and nutrient cycling. If Bt genetic modification has non-target effects on corn stover structural/non-structural carbohydrate and nitrogen (N) concentrations, then the degradation rate of Bt-corn stover may be different than that of non-Bt isolines, possibly influencing soil C storage and N mineralization. Thus, this research focused primarily on the comparison of C and N mineralization of corn stover in soil as affected by Bt-trait, plant portion, water-availability and HFC-trait; and secondarily on the existence of Bt-related variations in the chemical structure of corn residues that might affect the degradation rate of stover in soil and consequently the soil C and N dynamics. A laboratory experiment was conducted under non-limiting N conditions with stover of Bt/non-Bt isogenic pairs of two varieties, a ?high fermentable corn? (HFC) line harvested at Snook, Texas and a non-HFC corn line harvested at the irrigated field of Snook and the non-irrigated field of College Station, Texas. The stover was partitioned into three plant portions, incorporated into a Weswood soil and incubated during 223 days. Results showed that the differences observed in the degradation in soil of Bt vs. non-Bt corn stover were dependent on environmental conditions (irrigated vs. non-irrigated settings) and hybrid variety (HFC vs. non-HFC hybrid lines). The structural composition of corn plants was affected by the Bt-trait, HFC-trait, irrigation and their interactions. Variations in the biomass fractions of the initial stover of Bt and non-Bt hybrids had minimum to non-impact on soil C and N concentrations measured at the end of the 223-day incubation period. Lignin concentration was affected by a Bt-trait*variety interaction. There were no significant differences in lignin concentration between non-Bt/Bt-corn derived stovers of the non-HFC variety irrespective of irrigation regime but Bt-hybrids of the HFC variety contained more than twice as much lignin as the non-Bt isogenic plants. The effects of higher lignin concentration on C mineralization rate appeared to be offset by an increased lignin degradability inherent in HFC-trait. Overall, results indicated that the cultivation of Bt-modified maize lines is not likely to have significant effects on soil C or N dynamics compared with the cropping of non-Bt hybrids.

Salvatore, Herminia T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Final Rule for Nuclear Safety Management (10 CFR Part 830)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

717 717 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 74 / Tuesday, April 17, 2001 / Rules and Regulations engineering and cost analyses because the results showed that the two blowing agent alternatives can be used to achieve similar performance for similar costs to HFC-245fa. DOE estimates are reasonable and address the concern of the Department of Justice to provide more than one choice of insulation blowing agent with comparable performance and at approximately the same cost. Based on the analysis of the three different types of blowing agents, HFC- 245fa-, pentane/cyclopentane- and HFC-134a, DOE concluded that water heater manufacturers will have several choices to reach the standard, including blends of these blowing agents, and therefore, will not have to rely on a sole source supplier.

84

May 13, 1998 Gas Frac. Mol.Wt. Density Speci c Ht. Boil. Pt.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Argon 30 39.95 1.784 0.125 Butane 8 58.12 2.6 0.389 -0.5 HFC-134a 62 102.0 4.5 0.20 -26.3 Table 1-pressure for every 1 m height. Gas is non- ammable. Butane and HFC-134a must be heated during winter 1 #12;RPC drop across one layer less than 5 mmH2O at 10 cc=min ow rate. 2 #12;(Outside) Ar Butane Scale Thermal

Llope, William J.

85

Heliostat Stimulator operator's manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heliostat Stimulator is a portable test tool, housed in a suitcase, which can be used to perform the following functions: (1) acceptance testing of newly manufactured Heliostat Controllers (HC) and Heliostat Field Controllers (HFC); (2) aid in the installation and alignment of Heliostats; and (3) provide diagnostic troubleshooting capability in the event of Heliostat failure in the field.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

13 - Aging Effects on the ? and ?" Precipitates of Inconel 718 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finally a double-aging at 720 C, 8 h/FC at 57 C/h down to 620 C, 8 h/AC to precipitate both ? and ?"? phases. The precipitation of both ? and ?" phases were...

87

Molecular-level Monte Carlo simulation at fixed entropy William R. Smith a,*, Martin Lisal b,c  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be applied to the design of isentropic processes important in refrigeration and heat pump cycles for isentropic processes is an important consideration in the design of refrigeration and heat pump cycles its application for isentropic calculations involving compression of the alternative refrigerant HFC

Lisal, Martin

88

Proceedings of the 1993 non-fluorocarbon insulation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology workshop  

SciTech Connect

Sessions included: HFC blown polyurethanes, carbon dioxide blown foam and extruded polystyrenes, plastic foam insulations, evacuated panel insulation, refrigeration and air conditioning, absorption and adsorption and stirling cycle refrigeration, innovative cooling technologies, and natural refrigerants. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

UNIVERSIT PARIS XI UFR SCIENTIFIQUE D'ORSAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teaching and Research (APTR) with support from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS, minority health, public health leadership, and health services research, programs for health professionals in the directory is subject to revision and that, from time to time, changes in programs are made. For further

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

on Thu, 2013-08-22 06:58 FY2008-interlab Slide17 Science.gov Contributing Agencies USDA 16% DOC 10% DOD 3% DOE 24% DOI 10% ED 1% EPA 7% GPO 1% HHS 13% NASA 7% NSF 8% Based on...

91

The NIEHS supports a wide variety of research programs directed toward preventing health problems caused by our environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Unlike the other NIH institutes, the NIEHS is locatedThe NIEHS supports a wide variety of research programs directed toward preventing health problems that may affect human health. Current NTP initiatives are examining the effects of cell phone radiation

Bandettini, Peter A.

92

Fiscal Year Justification of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, epidemiology, laboratory services strengthen support for state, tribal, local, and territorial public healthDEPARTMENT of HEALTH and HUMAN SERVICES Fiscal Year 2012 Justification of Estimates Justification is one of several documents that fulfill the Department of Health and Human Services` (HHS

93

Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rule, were published by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) on February 20, 2003. PurposeApril 2005 Continued on page 2 IMPLEMENTING THE HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA) SECURITY RULE By Joan S. Hash, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory

94

Slide09 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide09 Slide09 DOE has largest share of Federal STI in Science.gov* DOC 10% DOD 3% DOE 24% DOI 10% ED 1% EPA 7% GPO 1% HHS 13% NASA 7% NSF 8% USDA 16% *Based on number of URLs in...

95

HOT WORK PERMIT STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Hot Work Permit Page 1 of 3 Adopted 11/22/2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Human Services Office of Inspector General, (HHS-OIG) Atlanta Region. "From Medicare fraud to theft of Investigation; the Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Inspector General; the U.S. Air Force of the Inspector General; the Department of Veterans Affairs-Office of Inspector General; the NASA Office

Papautsky, Ian

96

Pay Bands and Grade Pays for faculty and staff members of IIT Madras S.No. VI CPC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Human Services Office of Inspector General, (HHS-OIG) Atlanta Region. "From Medicare fraud to theft of Investigation; the Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Inspector General; the U.S. Air Force of the Inspector General; the Department of Veterans Affairs-Office of Inspector General; the NASA Office

Sivalingam, Krishna M.

97

Audit of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Fiscal Year 2012 Financial Statements (IG-13-003, November 15, 2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Human Services Office of Inspector General, (HHS-OIG) Atlanta Region. "From Medicare fraud to theft of Investigation; the Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Inspector General; the U.S. Air Force of the Inspector General; the Department of Veterans Affairs-Office of Inspector General; the NASA Office

98

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization Fluid Modeling Cycle Modeling Final Candidates Optimum Thermo Parameters 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: HFC refrigerants face restrictions: U.S./Canada/Mexico proposal to Montreal Protocol (85 % cut) EU regulations likely on all application areas (79 % cut)

99

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

table 1 \\p bub cf_co2c cf_stmt ec_c2f6 ec_cf4 ec_cfc113 ec_cfc114 ec_cfc115 ec_hfc23 ec_n2o_bus ec_n2o_heavytruck ec_n2o_motorcyc ef_n2o_coal ef_n2o_gas ef_n2o_oil

100

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermodynamic Evaluation of Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization Fluid Modeling Cycle Modeling Final Candidates Optimum Thermo Parameters 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: HFC refrigerants face restrictions: U.S./Canada/Mexico proposal to Montreal Protocol (85 % cut) EU regulations likely on all application areas (79 % cut)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hfc hydrofluorocarbon hhs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

BNL Refrigerant Overview Presentation to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.25 4700 Cold boxes, environmental chambers R-718 Water 212 0 N/A Steam-driven absorption chiller 4750 Older centrifugal chillers (>200 tons) R-12 CFC -20 1 10900 Old refrigerators and vehicle A/C R-13/C mach. R-123 HCFC 81 1.3 77 Newer centrifugal chillers (>200 tons) R-134a HFC -15 0 1430 Refrigerators

Homes, Christopher C.

102

International research into chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selected researchers from 21 countries were queried through questionnaires about their current and planned research activities. The results of the survey show that the majority of research being conducted by the respondents is devoted to investigating the hydrogenated fluorocarbon HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12 in refrigeration applications. The main issue with this alternative is identifying compatible lubricants that do not reduce its effectiveness.

Marseille, T.J.; Shankle, D.L.; Thurman, A.G.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Environmental Justice Links | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Links Links Environmental Justice Links Public Information Center DOE Library U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), National Health Information Center U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of Minority Health Resource Center U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Online Library U.S. Department of Interior Library U.S. Department of Labor Library U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Library U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Public Information Centers U.S. National Agricultural Library (USDA) Legal Resources Earthjustice (formerly: Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund) Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law New Mexico Environmental Law Center New York Lawyers for the Public Interest The Environmental Law Institute Environmental Law & Climate Change Center (from LexisNexis)

104

Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY I. INTRODUCTION This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICP A). EEOICP A provides for timely, uniform, and adequate compensation of covered employees and, where applicable, survivors of such employees suffering from illnesses incurred by such employees in the performance of duty. HHS and DOE will make every effort to ensure that activities conducted under this MOU, as

105

Low income energy assistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

States are limited in their ability to manage their heating assistance programs because they normally receive funds from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program after the heating season has begun and after they have decided on the benefits to be provided to eligible participants. In addition, the Department of Health and Human Services does not have enough flexibility to respond to unanticipated energy cost increases that can occur as a result of unusually severe weather or fuel price increases. HHS and the states could better manage the program if (1) it were forward funded so the states would know exactly how much federal assistance they would receive before they begin handling applications for heating assistance and (2) HHS had some discretion in how funds are allocated to the states to enable it to react to unanticipated energy-related circumstances.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Energy August 28, 2010 August 2010 Memorandum of Understanding between HHS and DOE regarding the authorities, responsibilities and procedures to conduc mandated activities relating to the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) serves to set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and procedures by which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct statutorily mandated activities required to assist with claims processing

107

Comparison of global warming impacts of automobile air-conditioning concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The global warming impacts of conventional vapor compression automobile air conditioning using HFC-134a are compared with the potential impacts of four alternative concepts. Comparisons are made on the basis of total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) which accounts for the effects of refrigerant emissions, energy use to provide comfort cooling, and fuel consumed to transport the weight of the air conditioning system. Under the most favorable assumptions on efficiency and weight, transcritical compression using CO{sub 2} as the refrigerant and adsorption cooling with water and zeolite beds could reduce TEWI by up to 18%rlative to HFC-134a compression air conditioning. Other assumptions on weight and efficiency lead to significant increases in TEWI relative to HFC-134a, and it is impossible to determine which set of assumptios is valid from existing data, Neither Stirling cycle or thermoelectric cooling will reduce TEWI relative to EFC-134a. Brief comments are also made concerning technical barriers that must be overcome for succesful development of the new technologies.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Insulation for High Performance Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into advanced insulation for high performance wall, roof, and foundation systems. Heat flows from hotter to colder spaces, and insulation is designed to resist this flow by keeping hot air out in the summer and in during the winter. Project Description This project seeks to develop high performing, durable, hydrofluorocarbon and hydrochlorofluorocarbons -free insulation with an R-value greater than 7.5-per-inch and a Class A fire performance. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between DOE and Dow Chemical.

109

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

110

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Note 1. Emissions of Carbon Dioxide and Other Green- Note 1. Emissions of Carbon Dioxide and Other Green- house Gases. Greenhouse gases are those gases-such as water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride-that are transparent to solar (short- wave) radiation but opaque to long-wave (infrared) radiation, thus preventing long-wave radiant energy from leaving Earth's atmosphere. The net effect is a trapping of absorbed radiation and a tendency to warm the planet's surface. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions account for about 98 percent of U.S. CO 2 emissions. The vast majority of CO 2 emissions come from fossil fuel combustion, with smaller amounts from the nonfuel use of fossil fuels, as well as from electricity generation using geothermal energy and non-

111

High temperature materials technology research for advanced thermionic systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tungsten and tungsten alloys are candidate materials for the thermionic emitter in the space nuclear power convertor. In this work, the creep behavior of HfC strengthened tungsten alloys was studied. An ultrahigh vacuum, high precision creep test system was constructed for this purpose so that the samples could be heated up to 3,000 K for heat treatment and creep strain could be measured from the creep sample inside the UHV chamber. To explain the creep behavior observed in this dispersion strengthened alloy, a creep model was proposed which accounted for the presence of HfC particles in the form of a back stress generated by these particles. This model was verified by the creep test data of W-0.37 HfC alloys tested under both extruded and recrystallized microstructural conditions. According to this model, the steady state creep of this type of alloys was expected to increase with time due to coarsening of HfC particle and recrystallization of the alloys under high temperatures. In contrast, conventional simple power law creep model only predicts a constant steady state creep for these materials, which does not represent the microstructural evolution of the materials. The creep of solid solution alloys such as W-Re, W-Nb and W-Hf and Mo-Nb was also studied. These materials are expected to be more stable in creep properties due to the absence of coarsening particles. These solid solution alloys, in their single crystalline state, are reported possessing better corrosion resistance over their polycrystalline counterparts. Existing creep data of both solid solution tungsten and molybdenum alloys were re-analyzed. The data of these alloys showed two distinct different creep mechanisms: Class I and Class II. The dominating creep mechanism at low stresses could be explained by the Takuchi-Argon model (Class I). At higher stresses, the data could not be explained by any of the existing creep models. A creep model was thus proposed that contained a shift factor due to the effect of the solute in these alloys. In this model, the Class II creep behavior of these solution alloys were found as a function of the alloy concentration and atomic size mismatch.

Zee, R.H.; Rose, M.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

National Test Facility civilian agency use of supercomputers not feasible  

SciTech Connect

Based on interviews with civilian agencies cited in the House report (DOE, DoEd, HHS, FEMA, NOAA), none would be able to make effective use of NTF`s excess supercomputing capabilities. These agencies stated they could not use the resources primarily because (1) NTF`s supercomputers are older machines whose performance and costs cannot match those of more advanced computers available from other sources and (2) some agencies have not yet developed applications requiring supercomputer capabilities or do not have funding to support such activities. In addition, future support for the hardware and software at NTF is uncertain, making any investment by an outside user risky.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 18 Number 1 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dzogs., Chen. sPrul.sKu.Chos.Kyi.rDo.rJe, head of the famous rNying.Ma Monastery of rDzogs.Chen. Acting on !;lis advice, the mother had given birth in the nearby cave of Padmasambhava, called the "Lion Sky Castle". 6 Before the child's birth He disappeared... ' project and also gave their full rccognition and co.operations. While in France, His Holiness received an invitation from Pope John the XXIIIrd to visit Rome. His Holiness visited H.H.'s visit to Vatican the Vatican, staying for several days, during...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Life Story of His Holiness the XVI Gyalwa Karmapa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Padmasambhava, called the "Lion Sky Castle". 6 Before the child's birth He disappeared entirely from the womb for one whole day, and then returned the next. On the actual night of His birth, the atmosphere was charged with p1rtents, which everybody... ~pect to His Holiness' project and also gave their full rccognition and co.operations. While in France, His Holiness received an invitation from Pope John the XXIIIrd to visit Rome. His Holiness visited H.H.'s visit to Vatican the Vatican, staying...

Rinpoche, Jamgon Kongtrul

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The LiveWire Project final report  

SciTech Connect

Utilities across the US have begun pilot testing a variety of hardware and software products to develop a two-way communications system between themselves and their customers. Their purpose is to reduce utility operating costs and to provide new and improved services for customers in light of pending changes in the electric industry being brought about by deregulation. A consortium including utilities, national labs, consultants, and contractors, with the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), initiated a project that utilized a hybrid fiber-coax (HFC) wide-area network integrated with a CEBus based local area network within the customers home. The system combined energy consumption data taken within the home, and home automation features to provide a suite of energy management services for residential customers. The information was transferred via the Internet through the HFC network, and presented to the customer on their personal computer. This final project report discusses the design, prototype testing, and system deployment planning of the energy management system.

Brown, C.D.; Nelson, T.T. [Enova Technology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kelly, J.C.; Dominguez, H.A. [Paragon Consulting Services, La Verne, CA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Thermodynamic Prediction of Compositional Phases Confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy on Tantalum-Based Alloy Weldments  

SciTech Connect

Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for radioisotope based thermal to electrical power systems since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. Tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive prolonged exposure to the radioisotope power-system working environment. Typically, the fabrication of power systems requires the welding of various components including the structural members made of tantalum alloys. Issues such as thermodynamics, lattice structure, weld pool dynamics, material purity and contamination, and welding atmosphere purity all potentially confound the understanding of the differences between the weldment properties of the different tantalum-based alloys. The objective of this paper is to outline the thermodynamically favorable material phases in tantalum alloys, with and without small amounts of hafnium, during and following solidification, based on the results derived from the FactSage(c) Integrated Thermodynamic Databank. In addition, Transition Electron Microscopy (TEM) data will show for the first time, the changes occurring in the HfC before and after welding, and the data will elucidate the role HfC plays in pinning grain boundaries.

Moddeman, William E.; Birkbeck, Janine C. [BWXT Pantex, Amarillo, Texas 79120-0020 (United States); Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P. [University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton OH 45469-0102 (United States); Miller, Roger G.; Allard, Lawrence F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

DOE/ORNL heat pump design model, overview and application to R-22 alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This computer program is a public-domain system design tool for application to air-to-air heat pumps. The main aspects of the program are reviewed with emphasis on the newest features of the current fifth-generation version (Mark V) and an upcoming more fully HFC-capable release (Mark VI). Current model predictions are compared to test data for a leading HFC alternative to HCFC-22 in heat pumps. Examples are shown of some user interfaces that have been recently developed for the program. To demonstrate the design capabilities of the model for R-22 alternatives, a refrigerant-side optimization was conducted to find the best balance of heat transfer versus pressure drop for HCFC R-22, HFCs R-134a and R-410A, and the natural refrigerant propane. COP was maximized while refrigerant charge and tube size were minimized. Independent design parameters were fraction of total area in the outdoor coil, tube diameter and number of circuits for each heat exchanger, and condenser subcooling. Heat exchanger design tradeoffs are discussed for a heat pump relative to air conditioners and heating-only units. A design optimized for heating-only operation is presented.

Rice, C.K.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Climate Change 2001: Climate Change 2001: Working Group I: The Scientific Basis Get Javascript Other reports in this collection 4. Atmospheric Chemistry and Greenhouse Gases Contents Executive Summary 4.1 Introduction 4.1.1 Sources of Greenhouse Gases 4.1.2 Atmospheric Chemistry and Feedbacks 4.1.3 Trace Gas Budgets and Trends 4.1.4 Atmospheric Lifetimes and Time-Scales 4.2 Trace Gases: Current Observations, Trends and Budgets 4.2.1 Non-CO2 Kyoto Gases 4.2.1.1 Methane (CH4) 4.2.1.2 Nitrous oxide (N2O) 4.2.1.3 Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 4.2.1.4 Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) 4.2.2 Montreal Protocol Gases and Stratospheric Ozone (O3) 4.2.3 Reactive Gases 4.2.3.1 Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) 4.2.3.2 Volatile organic compounds (VOC) 4.2.3.3 Nitrogen oxides (NOx)

119

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.1 National Legislation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Phase Out Schedule of Halocarbons in the U.S. (1) Gas % By % By Chlorofluorocarbons 75% 1994 75% 1994 (CFCs) 100% 1996 (4) 100% 1996 Bromofluorocarbons 100% 1994 (4) 100% 1994 (Halons) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons 35.0% 2004 35% 2003 (HCFCs) 75.0% 2010 75% 2010 90.0% 2015 90% 2015 99.5% 2020 99.5% 2020 100% 2030 (4) 100% 2030 Hydrofluorocarbons N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. (HFCs) Note(s): Source(s): 1989 HCFC consumption + 2.8 % of 1989 CFC consumption 1996 N.A. N.A. 1) The phase out of halocarbons is consistent with Title VI of the Clean Air Act and is in accordance with the Montreal Protocol and Amendments. 2) The amount of gas produced and consumed in this year is established and defined as the base level. To meet basic domestic needs, levels of production are allowed to exceed the base level by up to 10%. 3) After this year, levels of production are no longer

120

Midwestern efforts to address climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six Midwestern governors and a Canadian premier signed the Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord in November 2007. The governors agreed to begin the process of developing a market-based cap-and-trade program that would reduce GHG emissions (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydro-fluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride) to meet reduction targets. Member jurisdictions include Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Manitoba, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Observer jurisdictions - those who are participating in the program design, but will decide later whether to be full members-include Indiana, Ohio, Ontario, and South Dakota. To date, the advisory group has proposed target ranges for GHG emissions reductions of 15-25% below 2005 levels by 2020 and 60-80% by 2050. The following sectors are currently being considered for the cap-and-trade program: electricity generation and imports (power plants); industrial combustion sources (factories and other industrial facilities); and industrial process sources (to the extent credible measurement and monitoring protocols exist or can be developed prior to inclusion).

Daniel Stenberg [Midwestern Governors Association (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hfc hydrofluorocarbon hhs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Heat Pump Design Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Pump Design Model Heat Pump Design Model Heat Pump Design Model logo. Research tool for use in the steady-state simulation and design analysis of air-to-air heat pumps and air conditioners. The program can be used with most of the newer HFC refrigerants as well as with HCFCs and CFCs. The standard vapor-compression cycle is modeled with empirical representations for compressor performance and first-principle region-by-region modeling of the heat exchangers. An online Web version is available that can be used with default configurations or with user-specified component and operating parameters for analyzing the performance of single-speed, air-to-air equipment. User configurations can be saved for later use. Parametric analyses can be made and performance trends plotted online.

123

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioning and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioning and Emissions Conditioning and Emissions Air conditioning and indirect emissions go together in the sense that when a vehicle's air conditioning system is in use, fuel economy declines. When more petroleum fuel is burned, more pollution and greenhouse gases are emitted. An additional, "direct" source of greenhouse gas emissions is the refrigerant used in air conditioning. Called HFC-134a, this pressurized gas tends to seep through tiny openings and escapes into the atmosphere. It can also escape during routine service procedures such as system recharging. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction team applied its vehicle systems modeling expertise in a study to predict fuel consumption and indirect emissions resulting from the use of vehicle air conditioning. The analysis

124

News From the D.C. Office: Integrated Chiller Retrofits-Sharing Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. 3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Integrated Chiller Retrofits: Sharing Experience Makes "Cool Sense" A recent issue of the Center for Building Science News [Spring 1996, p.2] described the opportunities for significant energy savings from replacing older, inefficient chillers. These savings can be increased greatly if building owners and managers approach the chiller replacement not just as a requirement, but also as an opportunity-that of investing in other energy-saving measures that reduce cooling loads and lead to the downsizing of the chiller and related equipment. The Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute estimates that 80,000 existing chillers using CFC refrigerants need to be replaced or converted to use HCFC or HFC refrigerants. Of these, about 20,000 will be replaced or

125

The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance Title The Impact of Blowing Agents on Residential Water Heater Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47352 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., James D. Lutz, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL-47352 Date Published January 12 Abstract The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (NAECA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consider amendments to the energy conservation standards to increase energy efficiency in residential water heaters. A driving force affecting efficiency is the ozone-depletion regulation regarding blowing agents for insulation in all water heater fuel types. This paper presents results of cost and efficiency impacts of three potential blowing agents. Residential water heaters are typically insulated with polyurethane foam in the space between the tank and the jacket. Currently, water heater manufacturers use HCFC-141b, an ozone-depleting substance, as a blowing agent. After 2003, as a result of the Montreal Protocol (1993), manufacturers must use blowing agents that do not deplete the ozone layer. The analysis presented in this paper considers three replacement candidates, HFC-245fa, HFC-134a, and cyclopentane by comparing their efficiency and cost effectiveness when applied to water heater insulation. This analysis used computer simulation models and other analytical methods to investigate the efficiency improvements due to different design options, when alternative blowing agents are applied. The calculations were based on the DOE test procedure for residential water heaters. The analysis used average manufacturer, retailer, and installer costs to calculate the total consumer costs. Consumer operating expenses were calculated based on modeled energy consumption under test procedure conditions and U.S. average energy prices. With this information, a cost-efficiency relationship was developed to show the average manufacturer and consumer cost to achieve increased efficiency.

126

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide15 Submitted by gibsone on Thu, 2013-09-12 12:25 quicktabs-title FY2006-lowg Slide15 DOE has largest share of Federal STI in Science.gov* Department of Energy (DOE): 22% Department of Agriculture (USDA): 15% Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): 13% Department of the Interior (DOI): 12% Department of Commerce (DOC): 10% National Science Foundation (NSF): 8% Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): 7% National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA): 6% Department of Defense (DoD): 4% Government Printing Office (GPO): 2% Department of Education (ED): 1% *Based on number of URLs in Web site catalogue Note: DOE also contributes over 21 percent of the 50 million pages in Science.gov search Add new comment Original Thumbnail Mobile_320x340

127

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Weatherization Population Facts - Roughly 25% of Federally eligible households move in and out of poverty "classification" each year. - The average income of Federally eligible households in FY 2005 was $16,264, based on RECS and Bureau of the Census' Current Population Survey (CPS) data. - States target the neediest, especially the elderly, persons with disabilities, and families with children. - Since the inception of the Weatherization Assistance Program in 1976, over 6.3 million households have received weatherization services with DOE and leveraged funding. - In FY 2009, the energy burden on Federally eligible households was about four times the burden on Federally ineligible households (14% versus 4%). Source(s): ORNL, Weatherization Works: Final Report on the National Weatherization Evaluation, Sept. 1994, p. 1 for migrating poor; ORNL, 1996 for targeting; HHS,

128

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Weatherization Program Facts - PY 2010 weatherization funding breakdown: DOE 18.3%, LIHEAP 59.6%, others 22.1%.(1) - The Federal Government's outlay for fuel subsidies runs from $4.0 to 4.4 billion per year. The major two agencies dispensing fuel subsidies are HUD and HHS (through LIHEAP). - In 2006, HUD spent over $1.43 billion annually to pay all or part of the total utility bills (including water/sewer) for 1.2 million low-income units. Utilities (including water) made up approximately 23% of public housing authorities' expenditures. In addition, HUD estimates tenant expenditures on utilities (excluding water) at about $421 million in 2007. - LIHEAP spends 85% of its funding on direct fuel subsidies and weatherization. Up to 15% can be spent for weatherization

129

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Energy Burden Definitions Energy burden is an important statistic for policy makers who are considering the need for energy assistance. Energy burden can be defined broadly as the burden placed on household incomes by the cost of energy, or more simply, the ratio of energy expenditures to household income. However, there are different ways to compute energy burden, and different interpretations and uses of the energy burden statistics. DOE Weatherization primarily uses mean individual burden and mean group burden since these statistics provide data on how an "average" individual household fares against an "average" group of households (that is, how burdens are distributed for the population). DOE Weatherization (and HHS) also uses the median individual burden which shows

130

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Employees Occupational Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the EEOICPA is the responsibility of the Department of Labor (DOL). The DOL is supported in its role by the DOE, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Justice (DOJ). If you would like more information about the benefits available under the EEOICPA, please visit DOL's web page or see the EEOICPA pamphlet.

131

Established and Revised Federal Agency NEPA Procedures, 2000 - 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Revised Federal Agency NEPA Procedures, 2000 - 2011 and Revised Federal Agency NEPA Procedures, 2000 - 2011 ` Established and Revised Federal Agency NEPA Procedures Last Updated on January 11, 2013 Department/Agency Action Title/Citation Federal Register Notice(s) 2000 Department of Health and Human Services Revised NEPA Procedures Revised General Administration Manual, HHS Part 30, Environmental Protection Published for comment on January 11, 1999 (64 Federal Register [FR] 1655). Published as final procedures on February 25, 2000 (65 FR 10229). Bureau of Reclamation Department of the Interior Notice of Availability of a Draft Agency Handbook on the National Environmental Policy Act Department Manual (DM) Part 516, Chapter 6: Managing the NEPA Process (Appendix 7) Published on April 20, 2000 (65 FR 21210) with

132

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide09 Submitted by gibsone on Thu, 2013-09-12 12:11 quicktabs-title FY2005-stip Slide09 Science.gov Alliance DOE has largest share of Federal STI in Science.gov. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): 13% Department of the Interior (DOI): 12% Government Printing Office (GPO): 2% Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): 7% National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA): 6% National Science Foundation (NSF): 8% Department of Agriculture (USDA): 15% Department of Commerce (DOC): 10% Department of Defense (DoD): 4% Department of Education (ED): 1% Department of Energy (DOE): 22% Note: DOE also contributes over 21% of total pages in Science.gov. Add new comment Original Thumbnail Mobile_320x340 Icon_64x64 Reply (If you're a human, don't change the following field)

133

Other Resources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Other Resources Other Resources Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) SBIR/STTR Home About Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Applicant and Awardee Resources Commercialization Assistance Other Resources Awards SBIR/STTR Highlights Reporting Fraud Contact Information Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer U.S. Department of Energy SC-29/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5707 F: (301) 903-5488 E: sbir-sttr@science.doe.gov More Information » Other Resources Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Department of Energy ARPA-E SBIR & STTR Programs DOE Horizontal Logo EPSCoR Program SBIR/STTR Programs at Other Federal Agencies DOD NSF NASA HHS DHS

134

Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 123 / Tuesday, June 28, 2005 / Rules and Regulations § 5502.105 Agency procedures. (a) The designated agency ethics official or, with the concurrence of the designated agency ethics official, each of the separate agency components of HHS listed in § 5501.102(a) of this chapter may prescribe procedures for the submission and review of each report filed under this part. These procedures may provide for filing extensions, for good cause shown, totaling not more than 90 days. (b) For good cause, the designated agency ethics official may extend the reporting deadlines for reports required under this part during the initial implementation phase for any reporting requirement, without regard to the 90 day maximum specified in paragraph (a)

135

Effects of Water in Synthetic Lubricant Systems and Clathrate Formation: A Literature Search and Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive literature search and a confidential survey were critically analyzed to determine the effects of water on the stability of hydrofluorocarbon/synthetic lubricant systems and to identify key areas requiring further investigation. Following are highlights from the analysis: Clathrate hydrates are solid solutions formed when water molecules are linked through hydrogen bonding creating cavities that can enclose various guest molecules from hydrate formers, such as hydrofluorocarbons R-32, R-125, R-134a, R-407C and R-410A. The four methods for preventing clathrate formation were drying the gas, heating it, reducing its pressure, or using inhibitors. The hydrolysis of polyolester lubricants was mostly acid-catalyzed and its reaction rate constant typically followed the Arrhenius equation of an activated process. Hydrolytic stability improved with hindered molecular structures, and with the presence of acid catcher additives and desiccants. Water vapor can effect the adsorption of long-chain fatty acids and the chemistry of formation of protective oxide film. However, these effects on lubrication can be either positive or negative. Fifty to sixty percent of the moisture injected into an air-conditioning system remained in the refrigerant and the rest mixed with the compressor oil. In an automotive air-conditioning system using R-134a, ice would form at 0 C evaporating temperature when the water content in the vapor refrigerant on the low-pressure side was more than 350 ppm. Moisture would cause the embrittlement of polyethylene terephthalate and the hydrolysis of polyesters, but would reduce the effect of amine additives on fluoroelastomer rubbers. The reactions of water with refrigerants and lubricants would cause formicary and large-pit corrosion in copper tubes, as well as copper plating and sludge formation. Moreover, blockage of capillary tubes increased rapidly in the presence of water. Twenty-four companies responded to the survey. From the responses, the water concentrations specified and expected for different refrigerant/lubricant systems varied depending on the products, their capacities and applications, and also on the companies. Among the problems associated with high moisture level, lubricant breakdown was of greatest concern, followed by acid formation, compressor failure and expansion valve sticking. The following research topics are suggested: 1. The air-conditioning and refrigeration industry needs to measure and record the water content and total acid number of the lubricant of newly installed systems as well as operating systems that are shutdown for service or repair. The reason for the shutdown needs to be documented. A database can then be established to correlate water content with type and cause of breakdown. 2. Detailed studies on the distribution of water in refrigeration and air-conditioning systems should be conducted to pinpoint problem areas associated with free water. 3. Research is needed to validate the current theories and mechanisms of formicary corrosion. Corrosion inhibitors need to be developed. 4. The conditions for clathrate formation and decomposition of other alternative refrigerants, such as R-23, R-41, R-116, R-125, R-143a, R-404A and R-507C, and water should be determined to avoid possible problems associated with tube plugging. The mechanism by which water facilitates or hinders lubrication needs to be studied.

Rohatgi, Ngoc Dung T.

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global Warming and Methane--Global warming, an increase in Earth's near-surface temperature, is believed to result from the buildup of what scientists refer to as ''greenhouse gases.'' These gases include water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluoro-carbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Greenhouse gases can absorb outgoing infrared (heat) radiation and re-emit it back to Earth, warming the surface. Thus, these gases act like the glass of a greenhouse enclosure, trapping infrared radiation inside and warming the space. One of the more important greenhouse gases is the naturally occurring hydrocarbon methane. Methane, a primary component of natural gas, is the second most important contributor to the greenhouse effect (after carbon dioxide). Natural sources of methane include wetlands, fossil sources, termites, oceans, fresh-waters, and non-wetland soils. Methane is also produced by human-related (or anthropogenic) activities such as fossil fuel production, coal mining, rice cultivation, biomass burning, water treatment facilities, waste management operations and landfills, and domesticated livestock operations (Figure 1). These anthropogenic activities account for approximately 70% of the methane emissions to the atmosphere. Methane is removed naturally from the atmosphere in three ways. These methods, commonly referred to as sinks, are oxidation by chemical reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl ion, oxidation within the stratosphere, and microbial uptake by soils. In spite of their important role in removing excess methane from the atmosphere, the sinks cannot keep up with global methane production. Methane concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by 145% since 1800. Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world population growth, pointing to anthropogenic sources as the cause (Figure 2). Increases in the methane concentration reduce Earth's natural cooling efficiency by trapping more of the outgoing terrestrial infrared radiation, increasing the near-surface temperature.

Holdridge, D. J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Demonstration of High Efficiency Elastocaloric Cooling with Large Delta- T Using NiTi Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vapor compression (VC) is by far the most dominant technology for meeting all cooling and refrigeration needs around the world. It is a mature technology with the efficiency of modern compressors approaching the theoretical limit, but its envi-ronmental footprint remains a global problem. VC refrigerants such as hydrochlo-roflurocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are a significant source of green house gas (GHG) emissions, and their global warming potential (GWP) is as high as 1000 times that of CO2. It is expected that building space cooling and re-frigeration alone will amount to {approx} 5% of primary energy consumption and {approx}5% of all CO2 emission in U.S. in 2030 . As such, there is an urgent need to develop an al-ternative high-efficiency cooling technology that is affordable and environmentally friendly. Among the proposed candidates, magnetocaloric cooling (MC) is currently received a lot of attention because of its high efficiency. However, MC is inherently expensive because of the requirement of large magnetic field and rare earth materi-als. Here, we demonstrate an entirely new type of solid-state cooling mechanism based on the latent heat of reversible martensitic transformation. We call it elasto-caloric cooling (EC) after the superelastic transformation of austenite it utilizes. The solid-state refrigerant of EC is cost-effective, and it completely eliminates the use of any refrigerants including HCFCs/HFCs. We show that the COP (coefficient of per-formance) of a jugular EC with optimized materials can be as high as > 10 with measured {Delta}T of 17 C.

Cui, Jun; Wu, Yiming; Muehlbauer, Jan; Hwang, Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard; Fackler, Sean; Wuttig, Manfred; Takeuchi, Ichiro

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Global warming and end-use efficiency implications of replacing CFCs  

SciTech Connect

The direct contribution of CFCs to calculated global warming has been recognized for some time. As a result of the international agreement to phase out CFCs due to stratospheric ozone and the ensuing search for suitable alternatives, there has recently been increased attention on the DIRECT global warming potential (GWP) of the fluorocarbon alternatives as greenhouse gases. However, to date there has been little focus on the INDIRECT global warming effect arising from end-use efficiency changes and associated CO{sub 2} emissions. A study being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) addresses this combined or total global warming impact of viable options to replace CFCs in their major energy-related applications. This paper reviews selected results for air-conditioning, refrigeration, and heat pump applications. The analysis indicates that the CFC user industries have made substantial progress in approaching near-equal energy efficiency with the HCFC/HFC alternative refrigerants. The findings also bring into question the relative importance of the DIRECT (chemical-related) effect in many applications. Replacing CFCs is an important step in reducing the total global warming impact, and at present the HCFC and HFCS appear to offer the best efficiency and lowest total impact of options available in the relatively short time period required for the transition away from CFCs.

Fairchild, P.D.; Fischer, S.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

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141

An evaluation on the environmental consequences of residual CFCs from obsolete household refrigerators in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contained in household refrigerators consist mainly of CFC-11 and CFC-12, which will be eventually released into the environment. Consequentially, environmental releases of these refrigerants will lead to ozone depletion and contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect, if waste refrigerators are not disposed of properly. In the present paper, the potential release of residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China is examined, and their contributions to ozone depletion and greenhouse effect are compared with those of other recognized ozone-depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The results imply that annual potential amounts of released residual CFC-11 and CFC-12 will reach their maximums at 4600 and 2300 tons, respectively in 2011, and then decrease gradually to zero until 2020. Meanwhile, the amounts of their most widely used substitutes HCFC-141b and HFC-134a will keep increasing. Subsequently, the contribution ratio of these CFCs and their substitutes to ozone depletion will remain at 25% through 2011, and reach its peak value of 34% by 2018. The contribution to greenhouse effect will reach its peak value of 0.57% by 2010. Moreover, the contribution ratio of these CFCs to the total global release of CFCs will steadily increase, reaching its peak of 15% by 2018. Thus, this period from 2010 to 2018 is a crucial time during which residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China will contribute significantly to ozone depletion.

Zhao Xiangyang; Duan Huabo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evaporation heat transfer and friction characteristics of R-134a flowing downward in a vertical corrugated tube  

SciTech Connect

Differently from most previous studies, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the pure refrigerant HFC-134a during evaporation inside a vertical corrugated tube are experimentally investigated. The double tube test sections are 0.5 m long with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and heating water flowing in the annulus. The inner tubes are one smooth tube and two corrugated tubes, which are constructed from smooth copper tube of 8.7 mm inner diameter. The test runs are performed at evaporating temperatures of 10, 15, and 20 C, heat fluxes of 20, 25, and 30 kW/m{sup 2}, and mass fluxes of 200, 300, and 400 kg/m{sup 2} s. The quality of the refrigerant in the test section is calculated using the temperature and pressure obtained from the experiment. The pressure drop across the test section is measured directly by a differential pressure transducer. The effects of heat flux, mass flux, and evaporation temperature on the heat transfer coefficient and two-phase friction factor are also discussed. It is found that the percentage increases of the heat transfer coefficient and the two-phase friction factor of the corrugated tubes compared with those of the smooth tube are approximately 0-10% and 70-140%, respectively. (author)

Aroonrat, Kanit; Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab. (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel heat sink fed by a split flow system  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental campaign has been carried out for the measurement of saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel copper heat sink. The heat sink was formed by 29 parallel channels that were 199 {mu}m wide and 756 {mu}m deep. In order to increase the critical heat flux and reduce the two-phase pressure drop, a split flow system was implemented with one central inlet at the middle of the channels and two outlets at either end. The base critical heat flux was measured using three HFC Refrigerants (R134a, R236fa and R245fa) for mass fluxes ranging from 250 to 1500 kg/m{sup 2} s, inlet subcoolings from -25 to -5 K and saturation temperatures from 20 to 50 C. The parametric effects of mass velocity, saturation temperature and inlet subcooling were investigated. The analysis showed that significantly higher CHF was obtainable with the split flow system (one inlet-two outlets) compared to the single inlet-single outlet system, providing also a much lower pressure drop. Notably several existing predictive methods matched the experimental data quite well and quantitatively predicted the benefit of higher CHF of the split flow. (author)

Mauro, A.W.; Toto, D. [Department of Energetics, Applied Thermofluidynamics and Air Conditioning Systems, FEDERICO II University, p.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Thome, J.R. [Laboratory of Heat and Mass Transfer (LTCM), Faculty of Engineering (STI), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland); Vanoli, G.P. [Engineering Department, Sannio University, Corso Garibaldi 107, Palazzo dell'Aquila Bosco Lucarelli, 82100 Benevento (Italy)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

2007 NEPA Survey 7.17.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Navy 1 0 Adverse dispositions: 95 NRC 0 1 TRO 2 DOI - BLM 7 8 Preliminary Injunction 10 - FWS 3 1 Permanent Injunction 18 - BuRec 3 0 Remand 23 - NPS 2 1 Dismissal w/ settlement 15 - BIA/NIGC 2 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 27 - MMS 2 0 Case pending, NEPA 168 - OSM 1 0 USDA - FS 40 23 - APHIS 1 4 DOC - NOAA 2 2 Army - COE 1 3 Gov't Agency Army 0 2 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 3 DOT - FHWA 4 0 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 12 - FTA 2 0 NEPA - Not required 10 - FAA 5 1 NEPA - Is required 4 DOE 1 0 CE - Adequate 7 EPA 2 1 CE - Not Adequate 6 HUD 0 0 EA - Adequate* 14 Air Force 0 1 EA - Not Adequate* 15 TVA 1 1 EIS - Adequate* 29 FCC 0 0 EIS - Not Adequate* 35 GSA 0 0 SEIS - Needed* 9 Ex-Im Bank (OPEC) 0 0 SEIS -Not Needed* 6 USPS 1 0 HHS-FDA 1 0 -NIH 0 0 VA 0 0 DHS - CBP 1 0 - CG 1

145

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.13 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency and Source, Fiscal Years 2003, 2010, and 2011 (Trillion Btu) Resource and Fiscal Years Agriculture Defense Energy GSA 1 HHS 2 Interior Justice NASA 3 Postal Service Trans- portation Veterans Affairs Other 4 Total Coal 2003 ..................................... (s) 15.4 2.0 0.0 (s) (s) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 17.7 2010 ..................................... (s) 15.5 4.5 .0 0.0 0.0 .0 .0 (s) .0 .1 .0 20.1 2011 P .................................. 0.0 14.3 4.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 (s) .0 .1 .0 18.6 Natural Gas 5 2003 ..................................... 1.4 76.6 7.0 7.6 3.7 1.3 8.6 2.9 10.4 .7 15.6 4.2 139.7

146

2009 NEPA Lit Survey - In Progress - Master.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Judgment for defendant Judgment for defendant 76 ARMY-ELD 0 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 24 ARMY-USACE 5 4 Settlement 22 DHS 3 0 Adverse dispositions: 23 DOC 12 0 TRO 0 DOE 4 1 Preliminary Injunction 2 DOI-BIA 0 0 Permanent Injunction 15 DOI-BLM 2 2 Remand 6 DOI-BOR 3 1 Case pending, NEPA 271 DOI-FWS 0 0 DOI-MMS 0 0 DOI-NPS 0 0 DOI-OSM 0 0 DOI-SOL 0 0 DOS-L/OES 0 0 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 0 DOT-FAA 1 0 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 20 DOT-FHWA 12 2 NEPA - Not required 2 DOT-FTA 1 0 NEPA - Is required 2 DOT-MA 0 0 CE - Adequate 5 EPA 1 0 CE - Not Adequate 0 FCC 0 0 EA - Adequate* 23 FERC 2 0 EA - Not Adequate* 5 GSA 0 0 EIS - Adequate* 21 HHS/NIH 0 0 EIS - Not Adequate* 20 HUD 0 0 SEIS - Needed* 3 NAVY 1 0 SEIS -Not Needed* 3 NRC 4 0 TVA 0 1 USAF 1 0 USDA 43 12 VA 2 0 Total 97 23 2009 NEPA Case Dispositions NEPA Cases in 2009 Basis for NEPA Dispositions * More detailed info in tables below

147

Lead Defendant Cases Filed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 0 Judgment for defendant 77 Navy 1 3 Adverse dispositions: 73 NRC 3 0 TRO 0 DOI - BLM 14 3 Preliminary Injunction 6 - FWS 6 0 Permanent Injunction 10 - BuRec 1 0 Remand 19 - NPS 6 1 Dismissal w/ settlement 26 - BIA/NIGC 3 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 12 - MMS 0 2 Case pending, NEPA 233 - OSM 1 0 USDA - FS 46 13 - APHIS 3 5 DOC - NOAA 8 0 Army - COE 15 5 Gov't Agency Army 2 0 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 1 DOT - FHWA 9 1 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 27 - FTA 1 0 NEPA - Not required 3 - FAA 0 0 NEPA - Is required 0 DOE 6 0 CE - Adequate 5 EPA 1 0 CE - Not Adequate 3 HUD 1 0 EA - Adequate* 14 Air Force 0 0 EA - Not Adequate* 9 TVA 1 1 EIS - Adequate* 21 FCC 0 1 EIS - Not Adequate* 15 GSA 1 0 SEIS - Needed* 1 Ex-Im Bank (OPEC) 0 0 SEIS -Not Needed* 8 USPS 0 0 HHS-FDA 0 0 -NIH 0 0 VA Pending

148

Greenhouse Gas Management Program Overview (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program fact sheet highlighting federal requirements for GHG emissions management, FEMP services to help agencies reduce emissions, and additional resources. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) assists Federal agencies with managing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. GHG management entails measuring emissions and understanding their sources, setting a goal for reducing emissions, developing a plan to meet this goal, and implementing the plan to achieve reductions in emissions. FEMP provides the following services to help Federal agencies meet the requirements of inventorying and reducing their GHG emissions: (1) FEMP offers one-on-one technical assistance to help agencies understand and implement the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance and fulfill their inventory reporting requirements. (2) FEMP provides training, tools, and resources on FedCenter to help agencies complete their annual inventories. (3) FEMP serves a leadership role in the interagency Federal Working Group on Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting that develops recommendations to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance. (4) As the focus continues to shift from measuring emissions (completing inventories) to mitigating emissions (achieving reductions), FEMP is developing a strategic planning framework and resources for agencies to prioritize among a variety of options for mitigating their GHG emissions, so that they achieve their reduction goals in the most cost-effective manner. These resources will help agencies analyze their high-quality inventories to make strategic decisions about where to use limited resources to have the greatest impact on reducing emissions. Greenhouse gases trap heat in the lower atmosphere, warming the earth's surface temperature in a natural process known as the 'greenhouse effect.' GHGs include carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}). Human activities have caused a rapid increase in GHG concentrations. This rising level contributes to global climate change, which contributes to environmental and public health problems.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DOE Hanford Network Upgrades and Disaster Recovery Exercise Support the Cleanup Mission Now and into the Future - 14303  

SciTech Connect

In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Hanford Site, located in Washington State, funded an update to the critical network infrastructure supporting the Hanford Federal Cloud (HFC). The project, called ET-50, was the final step in a plan that was initiated five years ago called ?Hanford?s IT Vision, 2015 and Beyond.? The ET-50 project upgraded Hanford?s core data center switches and routers along with a majority of the distribution layer switches. The upgrades allowed HFC the network intelligence to provide Hanford with a more reliable and resilient network architecture. The culmination of the five year plan improved network intelligence and high performance computing as well as helped to provide 10Gbps capable links between core backbone devices (10 times the previous bandwidth). These improvements allow Hanford the ability to further support bandwidth intense applications, such as video teleconferencing. The ET-50 switch upgrade, along with other upgrades implemented from the five year plan, have prepared Hanford?s network for the next evolution of technology in voice, video, and data. Hand-in-hand with ET-50?s major data center outage, Mission Support Alliance?s (MSA) Information Management (IM) organization executed a disaster recovery (DR) exercise to perform a true integration test and capability study. The DR scope was planned within the constraints of ET-50?s 14 hour datacenter outage window. This DR exercise tested Hanford?s Continuity of Operations (COOP) capability and failover plans for safety and business critical Hanford Federal Cloud applications. The planned suite of services to be tested was identified prior to the outage and plans were prepared to test the services ability to failover from the primary Hanford datacenter to the backup datacenter. The services tested were: ? Core Network (backbone, firewall, load balancers) ? Voicemail, ? Voice over IP (VoIP) ? Emergency Notification ? Virtual desktops and; ? Select set of production applications and data. The primary objective of the exercise was to test COOP around the emergency operations at Hanford to provide information on capabilities and dependencies of the current system to insure improved focus of emergency, safety and security capacity in a disaster situation. The integration of the DR test into the ET-50 project allowed the testing of COOP at Hanford and allowed the lessons learned to be defined. These lessons learned have helped improve the understanding of Hanford?s COOP capabilities and will be critical for future planning. With the completion of the Hanford Federal Cloud network upgrades and the disaster recovery exercise, the MSA has a clearer path forward for future technology implementations as well as network improvements to help shape the usability and reliability of the Hanford network in support of the cleanup mission.

Eckman, Todd J.; Hertzel, Ali K.; Lane, James J.

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Evaluation of design options for improving the energy efficiency of an environmentally safe domestic refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect

In order to reduce greenhouse emissions from power plants and respond to regulatory actions arising from the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA), several design options were investigated for improving the energy efficiency of a conventionally designed, domestic refrigerator-freezer. The options, such as improved cabinet insulation and high-efficiency compressor and fans, were incorporated into a prototype refrigerator-freezer cabinet and refrigeration system to produce a unit that is superior from an environmental viewpoint due to its lower energy consumption and the use of refrigerant HFC-134a as a replacement for CFC-12. Baseline energy performance of the original 1993 production refrigerator-freezer, along with cabinet heat load and compressor calorimeter test results, were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. A detailed refrigerator system computer model was used to evaluate the energy savings for several design modifications that, collectively, could achieve a targeted energy consumption of 1.00 kWh/d for a 20 ft{sup 3} (570 l) top-mount, automatic-defrost, refrigerator-freezer. The energy consumption goal represents a 50% reduction in the 1993 NAECA standard for units of this size. Following the modeling simulation, laboratory prototypes were fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the analytical results and aid in improving the model in those areas where discrepancies occurred. While the 1.00 kWh/d goal was not achieved with the modifications, a substantial energy efficiency improvement of 22% (1.41 kWh/d) was demonstrated using near-term technologies. It is noted that each improvement exacts a penalty in terms of increased cost or system complexity/reliability. Further work on this project will analyze cost-effectiveness of the design changes and investigate alternative, more-elaborate, refrigeration system changes to further reduce energy consumption.

Vineyard, E.A.; Sand, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bohman, R.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Overview of CFC replacement issues for household refrigeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1974, the famous ozone depletion theory of Rowland and Molina claimed that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) diffuse into the stratosphere where they are broken down by photolysis to release chlorine atoms that catalytically destroy ozone. Although the understanding of the science is still imperfect, there is little doubt that CFCs play a major role in the Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon and the decline in ozone observed in the rest of the world. Another issue that has become increasingly important is the potential of CFCs to change the earth's temperature and to modify the climate. While the main impact in global warming is made by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide, CFCs and other trace gases also contribute to this effect. In an effort to respond to the global environmental threat, a CFC protocol was adopted during a diplomatic conference in Montreal. This document, known as the Montreal Protocol, was ratified in 1988 and put into effect on January 1, 1989. In accordance with Article 6 of the Montreal Protocol, the countries that signed the agreement shall periodically assess the control measures provided for in the Protocol. As part of that assessment process, household refrigeration was investigated to determine the status of CFC-12 replacements. The conclusion was that much progress has been made towards finding a suitable replacement. Compressors designed for HFC-134a have efficiencies comparable to those for CFC-12 and acceptable reliability tests have been obtained with ester lubricants. In addition, other replacements such as R-152a and refrigerant mixtures exist, but will require more study. Cycle options, such as the Stirling cycle, may be viable, but are further out in the future. The impact of new refrigerants is expected to result in elimination of CFC-12 consumption in developed countries by 1997 and in developing countries by 2005.

Vineyard, E.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Roke, L. (Fisher and Paykel, Auckland (New Zealand)); Hallett, F. (Frigidaire, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Overview of CFC replacement issues for household refrigeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1974, the famous ozone depletion theory of Rowland and Molina claimed that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) diffuse into the stratosphere where they are broken down by photolysis to release chlorine atoms that catalytically destroy ozone. Although the understanding of the science is still imperfect, there is little doubt that CFCs play a major role in the Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon and the decline in ozone observed in the rest of the world. Another issue that has become increasingly important is the potential of CFCs to change the earth`s temperature and to modify the climate. While the main impact in global warming is made by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide, CFCs and other trace gases also contribute to this effect. In an effort to respond to the global environmental threat, a CFC protocol was adopted during a diplomatic conference in Montreal. This document, known as the Montreal Protocol, was ratified in 1988 and put into effect on January 1, 1989. In accordance with Article 6 of the Montreal Protocol, the countries that signed the agreement shall periodically assess the control measures provided for in the Protocol. As part of that assessment process, household refrigeration was investigated to determine the status of CFC-12 replacements. The conclusion was that much progress has been made towards finding a suitable replacement. Compressors designed for HFC-134a have efficiencies comparable to those for CFC-12 and acceptable reliability tests have been obtained with ester lubricants. In addition, other replacements such as R-152a and refrigerant mixtures exist, but will require more study. Cycle options, such as the Stirling cycle, may be viable, but are further out in the future. The impact of new refrigerants is expected to result in elimination of CFC-12 consumption in developed countries by 1997 and in developing countries by 2005.

Vineyard, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Roke, L. [Fisher and Paykel, Auckland (New Zealand); Hallett, F. [Frigidaire, Washington, DC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

Garabedian, Harold T.

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.5 Federal Government Water Usage  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 Federal Government Water Usage 5 Federal Government Water Usage March 2012 8.5.1 Federal Water Consumption Intensity and Costs (Millions of Gallons) Agency Total Source(s): 164,382.9 536,301.9 3,129,134.9 52.5 FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs FY 2007, Table 9, p. 26, Jan. 2010. HUD 21.8 139.1 1,432.0 15.2 RRB 5.5 19.5 346.9 15.9 SSA 125.0 617.1 9,262.0 13.5 Archives 107.9 552.9 4,062.0 26.6 State 169.0 762.2 4,476.7 37.8 EPA 168.1 1,196.0 3,723.3 45.2 Treasury 431.1 1,795.5 12,049.6 35.8 Commerce 352.1 1,571.2 13,627.9 25.8 TVA 733.0 2,248.2 27,969.8 26.2 DOT 464.1 3,002.8 25,722.1 18.0 DHS 1,522.8 12,442.9 45,556.7 33.4 Labor 1,029.0 4,816.3 20,335.8 50.6 NASA 2,036.5 5,085.8 38,896.2 52.4 HHS 1,799.7 11,814.7 31,338.4 57.4 GSA 2,651.2 18,104.9 176,414.5 15.0 USDA 2,150.9 4,876.0 57,480.9 37.4 USPS

155

Federal technology transfer requirements :a focused study of principal agencies approaches with implications for the Department of Homeland Security.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides relevant information and analysis to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that will assist DHS in determining how to meet the requirements of federal technology transfer legislation. These legal requirements are grouped into five categories: (1) establishing an Office of Research and Technology Applications, or providing the functions thereof; (2) information management; (3) enabling agreements with non-federal partners; (4) royalty sharing; and (5) invention ownership/obligations. These five categories provide the organizing framework for this study, which benchmarks other federal agencies/laboratories engaged in technology transfer/transition Four key agencies--the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DoD)--and several of their laboratories have been surveyed. An analysis of DHS's mission needs for commercializing R&D compared to those agencies/laboratories is presented with implications and next steps for DHS's consideration. Federal technology transfer legislation, requirements, and practices have evolved over the decades as agencies and laboratories have grown more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their efforts to conduct technology transfer and as needs and opinions in the federal sector have changed with regards to what is appropriate. The need to address requirements in a fairly thorough manner has, therefore, resulted in a lengthy paper. There are two ways to find summary information. Each chapter concludes with a summary, and there is an overall ''Summary and Next Steps'' chapter on pages 57-60. For those readers who are unable to read the entire document, we recommend referring to these pages.

Koker, Denise; Micheau, Jill M.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Federal technology transfer requirements :a focused study of principal agencies approaches with implications for the Department of Homeland Security.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides relevant information and analysis to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that will assist DHS in determining how to meet the requirements of federal technology transfer legislation. These legal requirements are grouped into five categories: (1) establishing an Office of Research and Technology Applications, or providing the functions thereof; (2) information management; (3) enabling agreements with non-federal partners; (4) royalty sharing; and (5) invention ownership/obligations. These five categories provide the organizing framework for this study, which benchmarks other federal agencies/laboratories engaged in technology transfer/transition Four key agencies--the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DoD)--and several of their laboratories have been surveyed. An analysis of DHS's mission needs for commercializing R&D compared to those agencies/laboratories is presented with implications and next steps for DHS's consideration. Federal technology transfer legislation, requirements, and practices have evolved over the decades as agencies and laboratories have grown more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their efforts to conduct technology transfer and as needs and opinions in the federal sector have changed with regards to what is appropriate. The need to address requirements in a fairly thorough manner has, therefore, resulted in a lengthy paper. There are two ways to find summary information. Each chapter concludes with a summary, and there is an overall ''Summary and Next Steps'' chapter on pages 57-60. For those readers who are unable to read the entire document, we recommend referring to these pages.

Koker, Denise; Micheau, Jill M.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The performance degradation of R410A at higher temperatures was greater than R22. However, the R22 and R410A systems both operated normally during all tests. Visual observations of the R410A system provided no indication of vibrations or TXV hunting at high ambient outdoor test conditions with the compressor operating in the transcritical regime.

Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

High Technology Centrifugal Compressor for Commercial Air Conditioning Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R&D Dynamics, Bloomfield, CT in partnership with the State of Connecticut has been developing a high technology, oil-free, energy-efficient centrifugal compressor called CENVA for commercial air conditioning systems under a program funded by the US Department of Energy. The CENVA compressor applies the foil bearing technology used in all modern aircraft, civil and military, air conditioning systems. The CENVA compressor will enhance the efficiency of water and air cooled chillers, packaged roof top units, and other air conditioning systems by providing an 18% reduction in energy consumption in the unit capacity range of 25 to 350 tons of refrigeration The technical approach for CENVA involved the design and development of a high-speed, oil-free foil gas bearing-supported two-stage centrifugal compressor, CENVA encompassed the following high technologies, which are not currently utilized in commercial air conditioning systems: Foil gas bearings operating in HFC-134a; Efficient centrifugal impellers and diffusers; High speed motors and drives; and System integration of above technologies. Extensive design, development and testing efforts were carried out. Significant accomplishments achieved under this program are: (1) A total of 26 builds and over 200 tests were successfully completed with successively improved designs; (2) Use of foil gas bearings in refrigerant R134a was successfully proven; (3) A high speed, high power permanent magnet motor was developed; (4) An encoder was used for signal feedback between motor and controller. Due to temperature limitations of the encoder, the compressor could not operate at higher speed and in turn at higher pressure. In order to alleviate this problem a unique sensorless controller was developed; (5) This controller has successfully been tested as stand alone; however, it has not yet been integrated and tested as a system; (6) The compressor successfully operated at water cooled condensing temperatures Due to temperature limitations of the encoder, it could not be operated at air cooled condensing temperatures. (7) The two-stage impellers/diffusers worked well separately but combined did not match well.

Ruckes, John

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The performance degradation of R410A at higher temperatures was greater than R22. However, the R22 and R410A systems both operated normally during all tests. Visual observations of the R410A system provided no indication of vibrations or TXV hunting at high ambient outdoor test conditions with the compressor operating in the transcritical regime.

Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Evolution of the Federal Monitoring and Assessment Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is a federal emergency response asset whose assistance may be requested by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies to respond to a nuclear or radiological incident. It is an interagency organization with representation from the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and other federal agencies. FRMAC, in its present form, was created in 1987 when the radiological support mission was assigned to the DOEs Nevada Operations Office by DOE Headquarters. The FRMAC asset, including its predecessor entities, was created, grew, and evolved to function as a response to radiological incidents. Radiological emergency response exercises showed the need for a coordinated approach to managing federal emergency monitoring and assessment activities. The mission of FRMAC is to coordinate and manage all federal radiological environmental monitoring and assessment activities during a nuclear or radiological incident within the United States in support of state,local, tribal governments, DHS, and the federal coordinating agency. Radiological emergency response professionals with the DOEs national laboratories support the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), the Aerial MeasuringSystem (AMS), and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS). These teams support the FRMAC to provide: ? Atmospheric transport modeling ? Radiation monitoring ? Radiological analysis and data assessments ? Medical advice for radiation injuries In support of field operations, the FRMAC provides geographic information systems, communications, mechanical, electrical, logistics, and administrative support. The size of the FRMAC is tailored to the incident and is comprised of emergency response professionals drawn from across the federal government. State and local emergency response teams may also integrate their operations with FRMAC, but are not required to.

NSTec Aerial Measurement System

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump for Near-Zero Energy Houses: Technology Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy service needs of a net-zero-energy house (ZEH) include space heating and cooling, water heating, ventilation, dehumidification, and humidification, depending on the requirements of the specific location. These requirements differ in significant ways from those of current housing. For instance, the most recent DOE buildings energy data (DOE/BED 2007) indicate that on average {approx}43% of residential buildings primary energy use is for space heating and cooling, vs. {approx}12% for water heating (about a 3.6:1 ratio). In contrast, for the particular prototype ZEH structures used in the analyses in this report, that ratio ranges from about 0.3:1 to 1.6:1 depending on location. The high-performance envelope of a ZEH results in much lower space heating and cooling loads relative to current housing and also makes the house sufficiently air-tight to require mechanical ventilation for indoor air quality. These envelope characteristics mean that the space conditioning load will be closer in size to the water heating load, which depends on occupant behavior and thus is not expected to drop by any significant amount because of an improved envelope. In some locations such as the Gulf Coast area, additional dehumidification will almost certainly be required during the shoulder and cooling seasons. In locales with heavy space heating needs, supplemental humidification may be needed because of health concerns or may be desired for improved occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that achieving their ZEH goal will require energy service equipment that can meet these needs while using 50% less energy than current equipment. One promising approach to meeting this requirement is through an integrated heat pump (IHP) - a single system based on heat pumping technology. The energy benefits of an IHP stem from the ability to utilize otherwise wasted energy; for example, heat rejected by the space cooling operation can be used for water heating. With the greater energy savings the cost of the more energy efficient components required for the IHP can be recovered more quickly than if they were applied to individual pieces of equipment to meet each individual energy service need. An IHP can be designed to use either outdoor air or geothermal resources (e.g., ground, ground water, surface water) as the environmental energy source/sink. Based on a scoping study of a wide variety of possible approaches to meeting the energy service needs for a ZEH, DOE selected the IHP concept as the most promising and has supported research directed toward the development of both air- and ground-source versions. This report describes the ground-source IHP (GS-IHP) design and includes the lessons learned and best practices revealed by the research and development (R&D) effort throughout. Salient features of the GS-IHP include a variable-speed rotary compressor incorporating a brushless direct current permanent magnet motor which provides all refrigerant compression, a variable-speed fan for the indoor section, a multiple-speed ground coil circuit pump, and a single-speed pump for water heating operation. Laboratory IHP testing has thus far used R-22 because of the availability of the needed components that use this refrigerant. It is expected that HFC R-410A will be used for any products arising from the IHP concept. Data for a variable-speed compressor that uses R-410A has been incorporated into the DOE/ORNL Mark VI Heat Pump Design Model (HPDM). HPDM was then linked to TRNSYS, a time-series-dependent simulation model capable of determining the energy use of building cooling and heating equipment as applied to a defined house on a sub-hourly basis. This provided a highly flexible design analysis capability for advanced heat pump equipment; however, the program also took a relatively long time to run. This approach was used with the initial prototype design reported in Murphy et al. (2007a) and in the business case analysis of Baxter (2007).

Murphy, Richard W [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Craddick, William G [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z