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1

German Pebble Bed Research Reactor Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Acceptance and Disposition of German Pebble Bed Research Reactor Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Fuel Environmental Assessment Maxcine Maxted, DOE-SR Used Nuclear Fuel...

2

Examination of the conversion of the U.S. submarine fleet from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium ; Examination of the conversion of the United States submarine fleet from HEU to low LEU .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The nuclear reactors used by the U.S. Navy for submarine propulsion are currently fueled by highly enriched uranium (HEU), but HEU brings administrative and political… (more)

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Active Interrogation Observables for Enrichment Determination of DU Shielded HEU Metal Assemblies with Limited Geometrical Information  

SciTech Connect

Determining the enrichment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal assemblies shielded by depleted uranium (DU) proves a unique challenge to currently employed measurement techniques. Efforts to match time-correlated neutron distributions obtained through active interrogation to Monte Carlo simulations of the assemblies have shown promising results, given that the exact geometries of both the HEU metal assemblies and DU shields are known from imaging and fission site mapping. In certain situations, however, it is desirable to obtain enrichment with limited or no geometrical information of the assemblies being measured. This paper explores the possibility that the utilization of observables in the interrogation of assemblies by time-tagged D-T neutrons, including time-correlated distribution of neutrons and gammas using liquid scintillators operating on the fission chain time scale, can lead to enrichment determination without a complete set of geometrical information.

Pena, Kirsten E [ORNL] [ORNL; McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Crye, Jason Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Feasibility and options for purchasing nuclear weapons, highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium from the former Soviet Union (FSU)  

SciTech Connect

In response to a recent tasking from the National Security Council, this report seeks to analyze the possible options open to the US for purchasing, from the former Soviet Union (FSU) substantial quantities of plutonium and highly enriched uranium recovered from the accelerated weapons retirements and dismantlements that will soon be taking place. The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the implications of some of the options that now appear to be open to the United States, it being recognized that several issues might have to be addressed in further detail if the US Government, on its own, or acting with others seeks to negotiate any such purchases on an early basis. As an outgrowth of the dissolution of the Soviet Union three of the C.I.S. republics now possessing nuclear weapons, namely the Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, have stated that it is their goal, without undue delay, to become non-nuclear weapon states as defined in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Of overriding US concern is the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the Third World, and the significant opportunity that the availability of such a large quantity of surplus weapons grade material might present in this regard, especially to a cash-starved FSU Republic. Additionally, the US, in its endeavor to drawdown its own arsenal, needs to assure itself that these materials are not being reconfigured into more modern weapons within the CIS in a manner which would be inconsistent with the stated intentions and publicized activities. The direct purchase of these valuable materials by the US government or by interested US private enterprises could alleviate these security concerns in a straightforward and very expeditious manner, while at the same time pumping vitally needed hard currency into the struggling CIS economy. Such a purchase would seem to be entirely consistent with the Congressional mandate indicated by the Soviet Nuclear Threat Reduction Act of 1991.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Unattended Environmental Sampling and Laser-based Enrichment Assay for Detection of Undeclared HEU Production in Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward carbon neutral energy production. Accompanying the growth in nuclear power is the requirement for increased nuclear fuel production, including a significant expansion in uranium enrichment capacity. Essential to the success of the nuclear energy renaissance is the development and implementation of sustainable, proliferation-resistant nuclear power generation. Unauthorized production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains the primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). While to date there has been no indication of declared, safeguarded GCEPs producing HEU, the massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power of modern GCEPs presents a significant latent risk of nuclear breakout and suggests the need for more timely detection of potential facility misuse. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely HEU detection within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. We demonstrate enrichment assay, with relative isotope abundance uncertainty <5%, on individual micron-sized particles that are trace components within a mixture ‘background’ particles

Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders  

SciTech Connect

Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Examination of the conversion of the U.S. submarine fleet from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear reactors used by the U.S. Navy for submarine propulsion are currently fueled by highly enriched uranium (HEU), but HEU brings administrative and political challenges. This issue has been studied by the Navy ...

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Environmental monitoring for detection of uranium enrichment operations: Comparison of LEU and HEU facilities  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an ambitious program of worldwide field trials to evaluate the utility of environmental monitoring for safeguards. Part of this program involved two extensive United States field trials conducted at the large uranium enrichment facilities. The Paducah operation involves a large low-enriched uranium (LEU) gaseous diffusion plant while the Portsmouth facilities include a large gaseous diffusion plant that has produced both LEU and high-enriched uranium (HEU) as well as an LEU centrifuge facility. As a result of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, management of the uranium enrichment operations was assumed by the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The facilities are operated under contract by Martin Marietta Utility Services. Martin Marietta Energy Systems manages the environmental restoration and waste management programs at Portsmouth and Paducah for DOE. These field trials were conducted. Samples included swipes from inside and outside process buildings, vegetation and soil samples taken from locations up to 8 km from main sites, and hydrologic samples taken on the sites and at varying distances from the sites. Analytical results from bulk analysis were obtained using high abundance sensitivity thermal ionization mm spectrometers (TIMS). Uranium isotopics altered from the normal background percentages were found for all the sample types listed above, even on vegetation 5 km from one of the enrichment facilities. The results from these field trials demonstrate that dilution by natural background uranium does not remove from environmental samples the distinctive signatures that are characteristic of enrichment operations. Data from swipe samples taken within the enrichment facilities were particularly revealing. Particulate analysis of these swipes provided a detailed ``history`` of both facilities, including the assays of the end product and tails for both facilities.

Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Carter, J.A.; Ross, H.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Pulsed DD Neutron Generator Measurements for HEU Oxide Fuel Pins Using Liquid Scintillators with Pulse Shape Discrimination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements have been performed on high-enriched uranium (HEU) oxide fuel pins and depleted uranium metal

Pennycook, Steve

11

Disposition of excess highly enriched uranium status and update  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the status of the US DOE program charged with the disposition of excess highly enriched uranium (HEU). Approximately 174 metric tonnes of HEU, with varying assays above 20 percent, has been declared excess from US nuclear weapons. A progress report on the identification and characterization of specific batches of excess HEU is provided, and plans for processing it into commercial nuclear fuel or low-level radioactive waste are described. The resultant quantities of low enriched fuel material expected from processing are given, as well as the estimated schedule for introducing the material into the commercial reactor fuel market. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Williams, C.K. III; Arbital, J.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Accelerating the Reduction of Excess Russian Highly Enriched Uranium  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the latest information on one of the Accelerated Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Disposition initiatives that resulted from the May 2002 Summit meeting between Presidents George W. Bush and Vladimir V. Putin. These initiatives are meant to strengthen nuclear nonproliferation objectives by accelerating the disposition of nuclear weapons-useable materials. The HEU Transparency Implementation Program (TIP), within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is working to implement one of the selected initiatives that would purchase excess Russian HEU (93% 235U) for use as fuel in U.S. research reactors over the next ten years. This will parallel efforts to convert the reactors' fuel core from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) material, where feasible. The paper will examine important aspects associated with the U.S. research reactor HEU purchase. In particular: (1) the establishment of specifications for the Russian HEU, and (2) transportation safeguard considerations for moving the HEU from the Mayak Production Facility in Ozersk, Russia, to the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN.

Benton, J; Wall, D; Parker, E; Rutkowski, E

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

U.S. Transparency monitoring under the U.S./Russian HEU purchase agreement  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) metal to low enriched uranium (LEU) takes place at four Russian sites. HEU metal to oxide processing began in 1994 with shipments of HEU oxide from the Siberian Chemical Enterprise (SChE) to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) fluorination and blending facility. U.S. transparency monitoring at these facilities began in February 1996. In 1996, fluorination and blending operations began at the Electrochemical Plant (ECP). In 1997, additional HEU metal to oxide was added at the Mayak Production Association (MPA), and additional fluorination and blending operations have been performed at SChE. U.S. transparency monitoring at these facilities is intended to provide confidence that HEU weapons components are received, that the HEU metal is converted to HEU oxide, and that the HEU is blended to LEU prior to shipment to the U.S. Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The monitoring begins with observation of HEU weapon components in sealed containers, including confirmation of the {sup 235}U enrichment using U.S. nondestructive assay (NDA) equipment. The feeding of HEU metal shavings to the oxidation process and the subsequent packaging of the HEU oxide for shipment to the fluorination and blending facilities are then monitored. At those facilities, monitors are allowed to witness the fluorination and blending of the HEU into LEU. Monitors are allowed to use the NDA instrumentation to confirm that HEU is being processed. A series of process and material accountancy documents are provided to U.S. monitors.

Benton, J; Dougherth, D R; Glaser, J W; Thomas, D C

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

International Atomic Energy Agency support of research reactor highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium fuel conversion projects  

SciTech Connect

The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non- proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly assisted efforts to convert research reactors from HEU to LEU fuel. HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects differ significantly depending on several factors including the design of the reactor and fuel, technical needs of the member state, local nuclear infrastructure, and available resources. To support such diverse endeavours, the IAEA tailors each project to address the relevant constraints. This paper presents the different approaches taken by the IAEA to address the diverse challenges involved in research reactor HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects. Examples of conversion related projects in different Member States are fully detailed. (author)

Bradley, E.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N. [Research Reactors Unit, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Passive Time Coincidence Measurements with HEU Oxide Fuel Pins  

SciTech Connect

Passive time coincidence measurements have been performed on highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide fuel pins at the Idaho National Laboratory Power Burst Facility. These experiments evaluate HEU detection capability using passive coincidence counting when utilizing moderated 3He tubes. Data acquisition was performed with the Nuclear Material Identification System (NMIS) to calculate the neutron coincidence time distributions. The amounts of HEU measured were 1 kg, 4 kg, and 8 kg in sealed 55-gallon drums. Data collected with the 3He tubes also include passive measurement of 31 kg of depleted uranium (DU) in order to determine the ability to distinguish HEU from DU. This paper presents results from the measurements.

McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Hausladen, Paul [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density… (more)

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an important source of supply in meeting requirements for U.S. utility uranium, conversion, and

18

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an important source of supply in meeting requirements for U.S. utility uranium, conversion, and

19

Unallocated Off-Specification Highly Enriched Uranium: Recommendations for Disposition  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made significant progress with regard to disposition planning for 174 metric tons (MTU) of surplus Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). Approximately 55 MTU of this 174 MTU are ''offspec'' HEU. (''Off-spec'' signifies that the isotopic or chemical content of the material does not meet the American Society for Testing and Materials standards for commercial nuclear reactor fuel.) Approximately 33 of the 55 MTU have been allocated to off-spec commercial reactor fuel per an Interagency Agreement between DOE and the Tennessee Valley Authority (1). To determine disposition plans for the remaining {approx}22 MTU, the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) co-sponsored this technical study. This paper represents a synopsis of the formal technical report (NNSA/NN-0014). The {approx} 22 MTU of off-spec HEU inventory in this study were divided into two main groupings: one grouping with plutonium (Pu) contamination and one grouping without plutonium. This study identified and evaluated 26 potential paths for the disposition of this HEU using proven decision analysis tools. This selection process resulted in recommended and alternative disposition paths for each group of HEU. The evaluation and selection of these paths considered criteria such as technical maturity, programmatic issues, cost, schedule, and environment, safety and health compliance. The primary recommendations from the analysis are comprised of 7 different disposition paths. The study recommendations will serve as a technical basis for subsequent programmatic decisions as disposition of this HEU moves into the implementation phase.

Bridges, D. N.; Boeke, S. G.; Tousley, D. R.; Bickford, W.; Goergen, C.; Williams, W.; Hassler, M.; Nelson, T.; Keck, R.; Arbital, J.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the Government of the United States and the Government of the Russian Federation has on the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Operation of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant 2008 Information Date: December 31, 2008 1 Introduction The Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation Concerning the Disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium Extracted from Nuclear Weapons (HEU Agreement) was signed on February 18, 1993. The HEU Agreement provides for the purchase over a 20-year period (1994-2013) of 500 metric tons (MT) of weapons-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the Russian Federation

22

DOE/EIS-0240-SA-1: Supplement Analysis for the Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium (October 2007)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-SA1 0-SA1 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS DISPOSITION OF SURPLUS HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM October 2007 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Fissile Materials Disposition Washington, D.C. i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Introduction and Purpose .................................................................................................................1 2.0 Background......................................................................................................................................1 2.1 Scope of the HEU EIS............................................................................................................ 2 2.2 Status of Surplus HEU Disposition Activities .......................................................................

23

NNSA Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show NNSA Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show March 22, 2012 - 11:37am Addthis NNSA Administrator Thomas D’Agostino appeared live last night to break the news with Rachel Maddow that all remaining weapons-usable material has been successfully removed from Mexico. | Photo courtesy of the NNSA. NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino appeared live last night to break the news with Rachel Maddow that all remaining weapons-usable material has been successfully removed from Mexico. | Photo courtesy of the NNSA. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What's the difference between HEU and LEU? Highly enriched uranium (HEU) has a greater than 20 percent

24

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) ; Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned low enriched uranium conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part… (more)

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

TRANSPARENCY: Tracking Uranium under the U.S. / Russian HEU Purchase Agreement  

SciTech Connect

By the end of August, 2005, the Russia Federation delivered to the United States (U.S.) more than 7,000 metric tons (MT) of low enriched uranium (LEU) containing approximately 46 million SWU and 75,000 MT of natural uranium. This uranium was blended down from weapons-grade (nominally enriched to 90% {sup 235}U) highly enriched uranium (HEU) under the 1993 HEU Purchase Agreement that provides for the blend down of 500 MT HEU into LEU for use as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. The HEU Transparency Program, under the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), monitored the conversion and blending of the more than 250 MT HEU used to produce this LEU. The HEU represents more than half of the 500 MT HEU scheduled to be blended down through the year 2013 and is equivalent to the elimination of more than 10,000 nuclear devices. The HEU Transparency Program has made considerable progress in its mission to develop and implement transparency measures necessary to assure that Russian HEU extracted from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons is blended down into LEU for delivery to the United States. U.S. monitor observations include the inventory of in process containers, observation of plant operations, nondestructive assay measurements to determine {sup 235}U enrichment, as well as the examination of Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) documents. During 2005, HEU Transparency Program personnel will conduct 24 Special Monitoring Visits (SMVs) to four Russian uranium processing plants, in addition to staffing a Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) at one Russian site.

Benton, J B; Decman, D J; Leich, D A

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

28

High Accuracy U-235 Enrichment Verification Station for Low Enriched Uranium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 National Security Complex is playing a role in the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor (USHPRR) Conversion program sponsored by the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction. The USHPRR program has a goal of converting remaining U.S. reactors that continue to use highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The USHPRR program is currently developing a LEU Uranium-Molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel for use in the U.S. high performance research reactors.Y-12 is supporting both the fuel development and fuel fabrication efforts by fabricating low enriched U-Mo foils from its own source material for irradiation experiments and for optimizing the fabrication process in support of scaling up the process to a commercial production scale. Once the new fuel is qualified, Y-12 will produce and ship U-Mo coupons with verified 19.75% +0.2% - 0.3% U-235 enrichment to be fabricated into fuel elements for the USHPRRs. Considering this small enrichment tolerance and the transition into HEU being set strictly at 20% U-235, a characterization system with a measurement uncertainty of less than or equal to 0.1% in enrichment is desired to support customer requirements and minimize production costs. Typical uncertainty for most available characterization systems today is approximately 1-5%; therefore, a specialized system must be developed which results in a reduced measurement uncertainty. A potential system using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector has been procured, and tests have been conducted to verify its capabilities with regards to the requirements. Using four U-Mo enrichment standards fabricated with complete isotopic and chemical characterization, infinite thickness and peak-ratio enrichment measurement methods have been considered for use. As a result of inhomogeneity within the U-Mo samples, FRAM, an isotopic analysis software, has been selected for initial testing. A systematic approach towards observing effects on FRAM's enrichment analysis has been conducted with regards to count and dead time.

Lillard, C. R.; Hayward, J. P.; Williamson, M. R.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched Uranium to Low-Enriched Uranium Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched Uranium to Low-Enriched Uranium April 11, 2005 - 11:34am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - As part of the Bush administration's aggressive effort to reduce the amount of weapons-grade nuclear material worldwide, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun to convert research reactors from using highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium fuel (LEU) at the University of Florida and Texas A&M University. This effort, by DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, are the latest steps

31

Development of a low enrichment uranium core for the MIT reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation has been made into converting the MIT research reactor from using high enrichment uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) with a newly developed fuel material. The LEU fuel introduces negative ...

Newton, Thomas Henderson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU UNH for commercial use  

SciTech Connect

US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form that is more proliferation-resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UNH blending HEU disposition option. Process requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste/emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

35

RUSSIAN-ORIGIN HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL SHIPMENT FROM BULGARIA  

SciTech Connect

In July 2008, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the IRT 2000 research reactor in Sofia, Bulgaria, operated by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped 6.4 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to the Russian Federation. The shipment, which resulted in the removal of all HEU from Bulgaria, was conducted by truck, barge, and rail modes of transport across two transit countries before reaching the final destination at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. This paper describes the work, equipment, organizations, and approvals that were required to complete the spent fuel shipment and provides lessons learned that might assist other research reactor operators with their own spent nuclear fuel shipments.

Kelly Cummins; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Tihomir Apostolov; Ivaylo Dimitrov

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal  

SciTech Connect

US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Pulsed D-D Neutron Generator Measurements of HEU Oxide Fuel Pins  

SciTech Connect

Pulsed neutron interrogation measurements have been performed on highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide fuel pins and depleted uranium (DU) metal using a D-D neutron generator (2x10{sup 6} neutrons-s{sup -1}) and moderated {sup 3}He tubes at the Idaho National Laboratory Power Burst Facility. These measurements demonstrate the ability to distinguish HEU from DU by coincidence counting using a pulsed source. The amount of HEU measured was 8 kg in a sealed 55-gallon drum compared to 31 kg of DU. Neutron events were counted during and after the pulse with the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) and used to calculate the neutron coincidence time distributions. Passive measurements were also performed for comparison with the pulsed measurements. This paper presents the neutron coincidence time distribution and Feynman variance results from the measurements.

McConchie, Seth; Hausladen, Paul; Mihalczo, John [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Blackburn, Brandon; Chichester, David [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Pulsed D-D Neutron Generator Measurements of HEU Oxide Fuel Pins  

SciTech Connect

Pulsed neutron interrogation measurements have been performed on highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide fuel pins and depleted uranium (DU) metal using a D-D neutron generator (2 x 10{sup 6} neutrons-s{sup -1}) and moderated {sup 3}He tubes at the Idaho National Laboratory Power Burst Facility. These measurements demonstrate the ability to distinguish HEU from DU by coincidence counting using a pulsed source. The amount of HEU measured was 8 kg in a sealed 55-gallon drum compared to 31 kg of DU. Neutron events were counted during and after the pulse with the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) and used to calculate the neutron coincidence time distributions. Passive measurements were also performed for comparison with the pulsed measurements. This paper presents the neutron coincidence distribution and Feynman variance results from the measurements.

McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Hausladen, Paul [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL; Blackburn, Brandon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Chichester, David [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

42

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

DOE/EA-1471: Environmental Assessment for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex and Finding of No Significant Impact (January 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex EA for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex i FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM FROM THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION TO THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX ISSUED BY: United States Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to transport highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Russia to a secure storage facility in Oak Ridge, TN. This proposed action would allow the United States and Russia to accelerate the disposition of excess nuclear weapons materials in the interest of promoting nuclear disarmament, strengthening nonproliferation, and combating terrorism. The HEU

44

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2006  

SciTech Connect

Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics studies show that, for equivalent operating power [85 MW(t)], a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel cycle based on uranium-10 wt % molybdenum (U-10Mo) metal foil with radially, “continuously graded” fuel meat thickness results in a 15% reduction in peak thermal flux in the beryllium reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as compared to the current highly enriched uranium (HEU) cycle. The uranium-235 content of the LEU core is almost twice the amount of the HEU core when the length of the fuel cycle is kept the same for both fuels. Because the uranium-238 content of an LEU core is a factor of 4 greater than the uranium-235 content, the LEU HFIR core would weigh 30% more than the HEU core. A minimum U-10Mo foil thickness of 84 ?m is required to compensate for power peaking in the LEU core although this value could be increased significantly without much penalty. The maximum U-10Mo foil thickness is 457?m. Annual plutonium production from fueling the HFIR with LEU is predicted to be 2 kg. For dispersion fuels, the operating power for HFIR would be reduced considerably below 85 MW due to thermal considerations and due to the requirement of a 26-d fuel cycle. If an acceptable fuel can be developed, it is estimated that $140 M would be required to implement the conversion of the HFIR site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from an HEU fuel cycle to an LEU fuel cycle. To complete the conversion by fiscal year 2014 would require that all fuel development and qualification be completed by the end of fiscal year 2009. Technological development areas that could increase the operating power of HFIR are identified as areas for study in the future.

Primm, R. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Ellis, R. J. [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, J. C. [ORNL] [ORNL; Clarno, K. T. [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, K. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Moses, D. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This environmental assessment (EA) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to accept used nuclear fuel from the Federal Republic of Germany at DOE’s Savannah River Site (SRS) for processing and disposition. This used nuclear fuel is composed of kernels containing thorium and U.S.-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) embedded in small graphite spheres that were irradiated in nuclear reactors used for research and development purposes.

46

Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks  

SciTech Connect

A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ORSPHERE: CRITICAL, BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1970’s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950’s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” (Reference 1) While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0. 0001 in. for non-spherical parts), masses (±0.01 g), and material data The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. A three part sphere was initially assembled with an average radius of 3.4665 in. and was then machined down to an average radius of 3.4420 in. (3.4425 in. nominal). These two spherical configurations were evaluated and judged to be acceptable benchmark experiments; however, the two experiments are highly correlated.

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Planning the HEU to LEU Transition for the NBSR  

SciTech Connect

A study has been carried out to understand how the NIST research reactor (NBSR) might be converted from using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to using low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. An LEU fuel design had previously been determined which provides an equilibrium core with the desirable fuel cycle length—a very important parameter for maintaining the experimental, scientific program supported by the NBSR. In the present study two options for getting to the equilibrium state are considered. One option starts with the loading of an entire core of fresh fuel. This was determined to be unacceptable. The other option makes use of the current fuel management scheme wherein four fresh fuel elements are loaded at the beginning of each cycle. However, it is shown that without some alterations to the fuel cycle, none of the transition cores containing both HEU and LEU fuel have sufficient excess reactivity to enable reactor operation for the required amount of time. It was determined that operating the first mixed cycle for a sufficiently reduced length of time provides the excess reactivity which enables subsequent transition cycles to be run for the desired number of days.

Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

49

Planning the HEU to LEU Transition for the NBSR  

SciTech Connect

A study has been carried out to understand how the NIST research reactor (NBSR) might be converted from using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to using low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. An LEU fuel design had previously been determined which provides an equilibrium core with the desirable fuel cycle length - a very important parameter for maintaining the experimental, scientific program supported by the NBSR. In the present study two options for getting to the equilibrium state are considered. One option starts with the loading of an entire core of fresh fuel. This was determined to be unacceptable. The other option makes use of the current fuel management scheme wherein four fresh fuel elements are loaded at the beginning of each cycle. However, it is shown that without some alterations to the fuel cycle, none of the transition cores containing both HEU and LEU fuel have sufficient excess reactivity to operate the reactor for the optimum length. It was determined that operating the first mixed cycle for a sufficiently reduced length of time provides the excess reactivity which enables subsequent cycles to be run for the desired number of days.

Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Neutronic analysis of the conversion of HEU to LEU fuel for a 5-MW MTR core  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, due to cessation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel supply, practical steps have been taken to substitute HEU fuel in almost all research reactors by medium-enriched uranium or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. In this study, a neutronic calculation of a 5-MW research reactor core fueled with HEU (93% /sup 235/U) is presented. In order to assess the performance of the core with the LEU (< 20%) fuel replacement, while keeping fuel element geometry nearly unchanged, several different /sup 235/U loadings were examined. The core consists of 22 standard fuel elements (SFEs) and 6 control fuel elements (CFEs). Each fuel elements has 18 curved plates of which two end plates are dummies. Initial /sup 235/U content is 195 g /sup 235/U/SFE and 9.7 g /sup 235/U/CFE or /PFE. In all calculations the permitted changes to the fuel elements are (a) 18 active plates per SFE, (b) fuel plates assumed to be flat, and (c) 8 or 9 active plates per CFE.

Pazirandeh, A.; Bartsch, G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Prompt Neutron Time Decay in Single HEU and DU Metal Annular Storage Castings  

SciTech Connect

Previous measurements of highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage castings performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the Y-12 National Security Complex showed a prompt neutron time decay that is not exponential. These measurements showed that multiple time constants originating from multiplication, time-of-flight, scattering in the assembly and room return could be associated with this prompt neutron decay. In this work, the contribution not associated with neutron multiplication was investigated via measurements with a depleted uranium (DU) casting. The measurements at ORNL used an annular (5.0-in OD, 3.5-in ID, 6.0-in H) DU casting with a time-tagged 252Cf source, centered vertically on the axis, and four closely coupled 1 1 6-in.-long plastic scintillators with -in.- thick lead shielding adjacent to the outer surface of the casting. This setup was identical to the configuration used in the previously performed measurements with HEU castings at Y-12. The time correlation between fission events and detections in the plastic scintillators was measured, as well as the time distribution of coincidences between multiple detectors within a 512-ns time window. The measurement results were then compared to MCNP-PoliMi calculations and the previous HEU measurements. Time constants from decay fits to the HEU and DU data were compared to characterize the contributions resulting from multiplication, time-of-flight, and scattering.

Pena, Kirsten E [ORNL] [ORNL; McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Disposition of highly enriched uranium obtained from the Republic of Kazakhstan. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

This EA assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with DOE`s proposal to transport 600 kg of Kazakhstand-origin HEU from Y-12 to a blending site (B&W Lynchburg or NFS Erwin), transport low-enriched UF6 blending stock from a gaseous diffusion plant to GE Wilmington and U oxide blending stock to the blending site, blending the HEU and uranium oxide blending stock to produce LEU in the form of uranyl nitrate, and transport the uranyl nitrate from the blending site to USEC Portsmouth.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Shutdown mechanisms for a hypothetical criticality accident involving HEU powder: Preliminary results  

SciTech Connect

This work examines the physical processes that would cause an accidental criticality involving higly enriched uranium(HEU) powder to shut down naturally. The study analyses an excursion resulting from the continous poring of slightly damp HEU powder (either UO{sub 3} or UF{sub 4} containing 1.5% water) onto a concrete floor.

Bentley, C.; Basoglu, B.; Dunn, M.; Plaster, M.; Ruggles, A.; Wilkinson, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Releases NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium ... NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility at Y-12 applicationmsword icon R-10-01...

55

HEU to LEU Conversion and Blending Facility: UF{sub 6} blending alternative to produce LEU UF{sub 6} for commercial use  

SciTech Connect

US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials; the nuclear material will be converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. Five technologies for blending HEU will be assessed; blending as UF{sub 6} to produce a UF{sub 6} product for commercial use is one of them. This document provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the UF{sub 6} blending HEU disposition option. Resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards, accident scenarios, and intersite transportation are discussed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Disposition Program plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide upper level guidance for the program that will downblend surplus highly enriched uranium for use as commercial nuclear reactor fuel or low-level radioactive waste. The intent of this document is to outline the overall mission and program objectives. The document is also intended to provide a general basis for integration of disposition efforts among all applicable sites. This plan provides background information, establishes the scope of disposition activities, provides an approach to the mission and objectives, identifies programmatic assumptions, defines major roles, provides summary level schedules and milestones, and addresses budget requirements.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

US, Kazakhstan Cooperate to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

effort between the United States, Kazakhstan, Russia and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). "The removal of this HEU is yet another example of how the...

59

Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

@ @ Printed with soy ink on recycled paper. ,, ,, This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors horn the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; telephone (423) 576-8401 for prices, Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. Copies of this document are available (while supplies last) upon written request to: Office of Fissile Materials Disposition, MD-4 ' Forrestal Building United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 1996 Dear hterested Party: The Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Final Environmental Impact Statemnt is enclosed for your information. This document has been prepared in accordance

60

Feasibility study for early removal of HEU from CPP-651-Phase II  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase feasibility study was initiated in late 1996 to identify a way to expedite the removal of SNM from the CPP-651 vault. The first phase of this study provided preliminary information that appeared promising, but needed additional detailed planning and evaluate to validate the concepts and conclusions. The focus of Phase 2 was to provide the validation via resource-loaded schedules and more detailed cost estimates. Section 1 describes the purpose and objectives of the Phase 2 tasks and the programmatic drivers that influence related CPP-651 high-enriched uranium (HEU) management issues. Section 2 identifies the evaluation criteria and methodology and the transfer issues and barriers preventing shipment. Section 3 provides site-specific background information for the CPP-651 facility and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and describes the development of the basic material removal schedule, the proposed base case plan for removal of SNM, and the proposed HEU material management/shipping issues and strategies. Section 4 identifies the proposed options for accelerated removal of SNM and how they were evaluated via detailed scheduling, resource histograms, and cost analysis. Section 5 summarizes principal tasks for implementing this plan and other related HEU CPP-651 management issues that require continued planning efforts to assure successful implementation of this proposed early removal strategy.

Smith, C.V.; Henry, R.; Milligan, C.; Harmon, B.; Peterson, J.; Thom, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Hendrix, B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

Tehan, Terry

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Libya HEU Removal Libya HEU Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

63

Canada HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Canada HEU Removal Canada HEU Removal Location Canada United States 53 47' 24.972" N, 104 35' 23.4384" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

64

Israel HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Israel HEU Removal Israel HEU Removal Location Israel United States 30 53' 18.2328" N, 34 52' 14.178" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

65

Uzbekistan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Uzbekistan HEU Removal Uzbekistan HEU Removal Location Uzbekistan United States 42 6' 56.196" N, 63 22' 8.9076" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

66

France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Four-Year Plan France HEU Removal France HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

67

Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Four-Year Plan Chile HEU Removal Chile HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

68

Taiwan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Taiwan HEU Removal Taiwan HEU Removal Location Taiwan United States 24 35' 37.4964" N, 120 53' 36.798" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

69

Romania HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Romania HEU Removal Romania HEU Removal Location Romania United States 45 47' 1.932" N, 24 41' 50.1576" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

70

Serbia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Serbia HEU Removal Serbia HEU Removal Location Serbia United States 44 22' 45.7068" N, 20 26' 4.452" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

71

Poland HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Poland HEU Removal Poland HEU Removal Location Poland United States 53 23' 50.2872" N, 17 50' 30.4692" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

72

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Vietnam HEU Removal Vietnam HEU Removal Location Vietnam United States 13 12' 30.8628" N, 108 19' 30.702" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

73

Ukraine HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home content Four-Year Plan Ukraine HEU Removal Ukraine HEU Removal Location Ukraine United States 50 12' 24.8688" N,...

74

Japan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home content Four-Year Plan Japan HEU Removal Japan HEU Removal Location Japan United States 37 36' 59.5872" N, 140...

75

Alternative dispositioning methods for HEU spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The United States has a strong policy on prevention of the international spread of nuclear weapons. This policy was announced in Presidential Directive PDD-13 and summarized in a White House press release September 27, 1993. Two cornerstones of this policy are: seek to eliminate where possible the accumulation of stockpiles of highly- enriched uranium or plutonium; propose{hor_ellipsis}prohibiting the production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside international safeguards. The Department of Energy is currently struggling to devise techniques that safely and efficiently dispose of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) while satisfying national non-proliferation policies. SRS plans and proposals for disposing of their SNF are safe and cost effective, and fully satisfy non-proliferation objectives.

Krupa, J.F.; McKibben, J.M.; Parks, P.B.; DuPont, M.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

ORSPHERE: PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files” (Reference 1). While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0.0001 inches), masses (±0.01 g), and material data. The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. Two, correlated spheres were evaluated and judged to be acceptable as criticality benchmark experiments. This evaluation is given in HEU-MET-FAST-100. The second, smaller sphere was used for additional reactor physics measurements. Worth measurements (Reference 1, 2, 3 and 4), the delayed neutron fraction (Reference 3, 4 and 5) and surface material worth coefficient (Reference 1 and 2) are all measured and judged to be acceptable as benchmark data. The prompt neutron decay (Reference 6), relative fission density (Reference 7) and relative neutron importance (Reference 7) were measured, but are not evaluated. Information for the evaluation was compiled from References 1 through 7, the experimental logbooks 8 and 9 ; additional drawings and notes provided by the experimenter; and communication with the lead experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Benchmark Specifications and Results for ßeff in a HEU Metal System Using ORSphere  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments[1]. Part of the experimental series was the measurement of the delayed neutron fraction, ßeff, using time correlation measurements and using the central void reactivity measurement. The time correlations measurements were rejected by the experimenter. The measurements using the central void reactivity measurement yielded a ßeff value of 0.00657, which agrees well with the value measured with GODIVA I (0.0066). This measurement is evaluated, found to be acceptable, and discussed in extensive detail in “ORSphere: Physics Measurements for Bare, HEU(93.2) Metal Sphere”[2]. In order to determine the delayed neutron fraction using the central void reactivity delayed neutron parameters must be used. The experimenter utilized the delayed neutron parameters set forth by Keepin, Wimment, and Zeigler[3]. If the derivation of the ßeff is repeated with different delayed neutron parameters from various modern nuclear data sets the resulting values vary greatly from the expected results.

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess; Yevgeniy Rozhikhin

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NNSA helps eliminate highly enriched uranium from Kazakhstan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kazakhstan. The HEU was transported via two air shipments to a secure facility in Russia for permanent disposition. This complex operation was the culmination of a multi-year...

79

High-purity, isotopically enriched bulk silicon  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis and characterization of dislocation-free, undoped, single crystals of Si enriched in all 3 stable isotopes is reported: {sup 28}Si (99.92%), {sup 29}Si (91.37%), and {sup 30}Si (89.8%). A silane-based process compatible with the relatively small amounts of isotopically enriched precursors that are practically available was used. The silane is decomposed to silicon on a graphite starter rod heated to 700-750 C in a recirculating flow reactor. A typical run produces 35 gm of polycrystalline Si at a growth rates of 5 {micro}m/min and conversion efficiency >95%. Single crystals are grown by the floating zone method and characterized by electrical and optical measurements. Concentrations of shallow dopants (P and B) are as low as mid-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Concentrations of C and O lie below 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, respectively.

Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.; Sharp, I.D.; Liao, C.; Yang, A.; Thewalt, M.L.W.; Riemann, H.

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

80

Prompt Neutron Decay for Delayed Critical Bare and Natural-Uranium-Reflected Metal Spheres of Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium  

SciTech Connect

Prompt neutron decay at delayed criticality was measured by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for uranium-reflected highly enriched uranium (HEU) and Pu metal spheres (FLATTOP), for an unreflected Pu metal (4.5% {sup 240}Pu) sphere (JEZEBEL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and for an unreflected HEU metal sphere at Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility. The average prompt neutron decay constants from hundreds of Rossi-{alpha} and randomly pulsed neutron measurements with {sup 252}Cf at delayed criticality are as follows: 3.8458 {+-} 0.0016 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}, 2.2139 {+-} 0.0022 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}, 6.3126 {+-} 0.0100 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}, and 1.1061 {+-} 0.0009 x 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}, respectively. These values agree with previous measurements by LANL for FLATTOP, JEZEBEL, and GODIVA I as follows: 3.82 {+-} 0.02 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1} for a uranium core; 2.14 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1} and 2.29 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1} (uncertainty not reported) for a plutonium core; 6.4 {+-} 0.1 x 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}, and 1.1 {+-} 0.1 x 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}, respectively, but have smaller uncertainties because of the larger number of measurements. For the FLATTOP and JEZEBEL assemblies, the measurements agree with calculations. Traditionally, the calculated decay constants for the bare uranium metal sphere GODIVA I and the Oak Ridge Uranium Metal Sphere were higher than experimental by {approx}10%. Other energy-dependent quantities for the bare uranium sphere agree within 1%.

Mihalczo, John T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents  

SciTech Connect

The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

82

Australia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Australia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

83

Argentina HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Argentina HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

84

GTRI's Convert Program: Minimizing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Program: Minimizing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium | Program: Minimizing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI's Convert Program: Minimizing the Use of ... Fact Sheet GTRI's Convert Program: Minimizing the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium Apr 12, 2013

85

Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material characterization %3CU%2B2013%3E active stimulation of highly enriched uranium.  

SciTech Connect

A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Clarke, Shaun D. [University of Michigan; Monterial, Mateusz [University of Michigan; Paff, Marc [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara A. [University of Michigan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

John D. Bess; Keith C. Bledsoe; Bradley T. Rearden

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

Bess, John [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

heu  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

organizations and other attendees. It was moderated by Mr. Adam Scheinman, Senior Advisor for Nuclear Nonproliferation in the Bureau of International Security and...

89

Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Materials & Waste » Nuclear Materials & Waste » Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium and Uranium-233 Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium and Uranium-233 105-K building houses the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, designated for the consolidated storage of surplus plutonium at Savannah River Site pending disposition. The plutonium shipped to KAMS is sealed inside a welded 3013 containers that are nested in 9975 shipping containers. 105-K building houses the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, designated for the consolidated storage of surplus plutonium at Savannah River Site pending disposition. The plutonium shipped to KAMS is sealed inside a welded 3013 containers that are nested in 9975 shipping

90

Initial report on characterization of excess highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

DOE`s Office of Fissile Materials Disposition assigned to this Y-12 division the task of preparing a report on the 174.4 metric tons of excess highly enriched U. Characterization included identification by category, gathering existing data (assay), defining the likely needed processing steps for prepping for transfer to a blending site, and developing a range of preliminary cost estimates for those steps. Focus is on making commercial reactor fuel as a final disposition path.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Kazakhstan HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48° 59' 44.1492" N, 67° 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

92

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38° 26' 50.2044" N, 40° 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

93

EVALUATION OF FLOWSHEET CHANGES FOR THE HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BLENDDOWN PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

H Canyon is considering a flowsheet change for Plutonium (Pu) Contaminated Scrap (PuCS) material. The proposed change is to route dissolved PuCS material directly to a uranium (U) storage tank. As a result, the PuCS solution will bypass Head End and First U Cycle, and will be purified by solvent extraction in Second U Cycle. The PuCS solution contains appreciable amounts of boron (B) and fluoride (F{sup -}), which are currently at trace levels in the U storage tank. Though unlikely, if the B concentration in the U storage tank were to reach 1.8 g B/g U, the entire contents of the U storage tank would likely require a second pass through Second U Cycle to provide sufficient decontamination to meet the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Blend Grade Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) specification for B, which is 30 {micro}g/g U. In addition, Second U Cycle is expected to provide sufficient decontamination of F{sup -} and Pu regardless of the amount of PuCS solution sent to the storage tank. Though aluminum (Al) is not present in the PuCS solution, B can be credited as a complexant of F{sup -}. Both stability constants from the literature and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) corrosion studies were documented to demonstrate that B complexation of F{sup -} in nitric acid solutions is sufficient to prevent excessive corrosion. Though B and Al complex F{sup -} to a similar degree, neither completely eliminates the presence of free F{sup -} in solution. Therefore, a limited amount of corrosion is expected even with complexed F{sup -} solutions. Tanks maintained at ambient temperature are not expected to experience significant corrosion. However, the Low Activity Waste (LAW) evaporators may be subjected to a corrosion rate of about 25 mils per year (mpy) as they reach their highest F{sup -} concentrations. The feed adjustment evaporator would only be subjected to the corrosion rate of about 25 mpy in the latter stages of the PuCS campaign. An issue that must be addressed as part of the proposed PuCS flowsheet change is that B has limited solubility in concentrated nitric acid solutions. As the proposed PuCS campaign progresses, the B concentration will increase in the U storage tank, in Second U Cycle feed, and in the 1DW stream sent to the LAW evaporators. Limitations on the B concentration in the LAW evaporators will be needed to prevent formation of boron-containing solids.

Crowder, M.; Rudisill, T.; Laurinat, J.; Mickalonis, J.

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

ZPR-3 Assembly 12 : A cylindrical assembly of highly enriched uranium, depleted uranium and graphite with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 21 atom %.  

SciTech Connect

Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 12 (ZPR-3/12) was designed as a fast reactor physics benchmark experiment with an average core {sup 235}U enrichment of approximately 21 at.%. Approximately 68.9% of the total fissions in this assembly occur above 100 keV, approximately 31.1% occur below 100 keV, and essentially none below 0.625 eV - thus the classification as a 'fast' assembly. This assembly is Fast Reactor Benchmark No. 9 in the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) Benchmark Specifications and has historically been used as a data validation benchmark assembly. Loading of ZPR-3 Assembly 12 began in late Jan. 1958, and the Assembly 12 program ended in Feb. 1958. The core consisted of highly enriched uranium (HEU) plates, depleted uranium plates and graphite plates loaded into stainless steel drawers which were inserted into the central square stainless steel tubes of a 31 x 31 matrix on a split table machine. The core unit cell consisted of two columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) HEU plates, seven columns of 0.125 in.-wide depleted uranium plates and seven columns of 0.125 in.-wide graphite plates. The length of each column was 9 in. (228.6 mm) in each half of the core. The graphite plates were included to produce a softer neutron spectrum that would be more characteristic of a large power reactor. The axial blanket consisted of 12 in. (304.8 mm) of depleted uranium behind the core. The thickness of the radial blanket was approximately 12 in. and the length of the radial blanket in each half of the matrix was 21 in. (533.4 mm). The assembly geometry approximated a right circular cylinder as closely as the square matrix tubes allowed. According to the logbook and loading records for ZPR-3/12, the reference critical configuration was loading 10 which was critical on Feb. 5, 1958. The subsequent loadings were very similar but less clean for criticality because there were modifications made to accommodate reactor physics measurements other than criticality. Accordingly, ZPR-3/12 loading 10 was selected as the only configuration for this benchmark. As documented below, it was determined to be acceptable as a criticality safety benchmark experiment. An accurate transformation to a simplified model is needed to make any ZPR assembly a practical criticality-safety benchmark. There is simply too much geometric detail in an exact (as-built) model of a ZPR assembly, even a clean core such as ZPR-3/12 loading 10. The transformation must reduce the detail to a practical level without masking any of the important features of the critical experiment. And it must d

Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Perel, R. L.; Wagschal, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Racah Inst. of Physics

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

United Kingdom HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal United Kingdom HEU Removal Location United Kingdom United States 52 24' 15.1416" N, 1 34' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

96

RERTR 2009 (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction in cooperation with the China Atomic Energy Authority and International Atomic Energy Agency hosted the 'RERTR 2009 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors.' The meeting was organized by Argonne National Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy and Idaho National Laboratory and was held in Beijing, China from November 1-5, 2009. This was the 31st annual meeting in a series on the same general subject regarding the conversion of reactors within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program develops technology necessary to enable the conversion of civilian facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets.

Totev, T.; Stevens, J.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Matos, J.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Dionne, B.; Olson, A.; Feldman, E.; Dunn, F.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Atomic Research Center; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; LLNL; INL; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Comisi?n Nacional de Energ?a At?mica; Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Inst. of Atomic Energy-Poland; AECL-Canada; Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Nuclear Power Inst. of China; Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Environmental assessment for the purchase of Russian low enriched uranium derived from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect

The United States is proposing to purchase from the Russian Federation low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union. The purchase would be accomplished through a proposed contract requiring the United States to purchase 15,250 metric tons (tonnes) of LEU (or 22,550 tonnes of UF{sub 6}) derived from blending 500 metric tones uranium (MTU) of HEU from nuclear warheads. The LEU would be in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and would be converted from HEU in Russia. The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) is the entity proposing to undertake the contract for purchase, sale, and delivery of the LEU from the Russian Federation. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is negotiating the procedure for gaining confidence that the LEU is derived from HEU that is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons (referred to as ``transparency),`` and would administer the transparency measures for the contract. There are six environments that could potentially be affected by the proposed action; marine (ocean); US ports of entry; truck or rail transportation corridors; the Portsmouth GDP; the electric power industry; and the nuclear fuel cycle industry. These environmental impacts are discussed.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effect of reduced enrichment on the fuel cycle for research reactors  

SciTech Connect

The new fuels developed by the RERTR Program and by other international programs for application in research reactors with reduced uranium enrichment (<20% EU) are discussed. It is shown that these fuels, combined with proper fuel-element design and fuel-management strategies, can provide at least the same core residence time as high-enrichment fuels in current use, and can frequently significantly extend it. The effect of enrichment reduction on other components of the research reactor fuel cycle, such as uranium and enrichment requirements, fuel fabrication, fuel shipment, and reprocessing are also briefly discussed with their economic implications. From a systematic comparison of HEU and LEU cores for the same reference research reactor, it is concluded that the new fuels have a potential for reducing the research reactor fuel cycle costs while reducing, at the same time, the uranium enrichment of the fuel.

Travelli, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

German HEU Project Documents German HEU Project Documents Potential Acceptance and Disposition of Gernam Pebble Bed Research Reactor Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

102

Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24° 24' 35.298" N, 102° 49' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

103

Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_GARY_LANGLIE_NMMSS 2014 NRC HEU Report...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

speech 91% of HEU exports occurred before 1990 Most HEU exported to France, Germany, and Canada HEU Imports - 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1958 1959 1960 1961...

104

Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel Production: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel ... Fact Sheet Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel

105

Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel Production: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel ... Fact Sheet Quadrilateral Cooperation on High-density Low-enriched Uranium Fuel

106

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 At the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit, the United States, Mexico and Canada announced the successful removal of HEU from Mexico and conversion of the

107

Pajarito Monitor: a high-sensitivity monitoring system for highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

The Pajarito Monitor for Special Nuclear Material is a high-sensitivity gamma-ray monitoring system for detecting small quantities of highly enriched uranium transported by pedestrians or motor vehicles. The monitor consists of two components: a walk-through personnel monitor and a vehicle monitor. The personnel monitor has a plastic-scintillator detector portal, a microwave occupancy monitor, and a microprocessor control unit that measures the radiation intensity during background and monitoring periods to detect transient diversion signals. The vehicle monitor examines stationary motor vehicles while the vehicle's occupants pass through the personnel portal to exchange their badges. The vehicle monitor has four groups of large plastic scintillators that scan the vehicle from above and below. Its microprocessor control unit measures separate radiation intensities in each detector group. Vehicle occupancy is sensed by a highway traffic detection system. Each monitor's controller is responsible for detecting diversion as well as serving as a calibration and trouble-shooting aid. Diversion signals are detected by a sequential probability ratio hypothesis test that minimizes the monitoring time in the vehicle monitor and adapts itself well to variations in individual passage speed in the personnel monitor. Designed to be highly sensitive to diverted enriched uranium, the monitoring system also exhibits exceptional sensitivity for plutonium. 6 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

Fehlau, P.E.; Coop, K.; Garcia, C. Jr.; Martinez, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Purification Testing for HEU Blend Program  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is working to dispose of the inventory of enriched uranium (EU) formerly used to make fuel for production reactors. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has agreed to take the material after blending the EU with either natural or depleted uranium to give a {sup 235}U concentration of 4.8 percent low-enriched uranium will be fabricated by a vendor into reactor fuel for use in TVA reactors. SRS prefers to blend the EU with existing depleted uranium (DU) solutions, however, the impurity concentrations in the DU and EU are so high that the blended material may not meet specifications agreed to with TVA. The principal non-radioactive impurities of concern are carbon, iron, phosphorus and sulfur. Neptunium and plutonium contamination levels are about 40 times greater than the desired specification. Tests of solvent extraction and fuel preparation with solutions of SRS uranium demonstrate that the UO{sub 2} prepared from these solutions will meet specifications for Fe, P and S, but may not meet the specifications for carbon. The reasons for carbon remaining in the oxide at such high levels is not fully understood, but may be overcome either by treatment of the solutions with activated carbon or heating the UO{sub 3} in air for a longer time during the calcination step of fuel preparation.Calculations of the expected removal of Np and Pu from the solutions show that the specification cannot be met with a single cycle of solvent extraction. The only way to ensure meeting the specification is dilution with natural U which contains no Np or Pu. Estimations of the decontamination from fission products and daughter products in the decay chains for the U isotopes show that the specification of 110 MEV Bq/g U can be met as long as the activities of the daughters of U- 235 and U-238 are excluded from the specification.

Thompson, M.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Pierce, R.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of ... Fact Sheet HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear

110

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Czech Republic HEU Removal Czech Republic HEU Removal Location Czech Republic United States 49° 35' 23.3628" N, 15° 4' 23.6712" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

111

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > South Africa HEU Removal South Africa HEU Removal Location South Africa United States 30° 33' 35.0604" S, 22° 19' 27.1884" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

112

ZPR-3 Assembly 11 : A cylindrical sssembly of highly enriched uranium and depleted uranium with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 12 atom % and a depleted uranium reflector.  

SciTech Connect

Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 11 (ZPR-3/11) was designed as a fast reactor physics benchmark experiment with an average core {sup 235}U enrichment of approximately 12 at.% and a depleted uranium reflector. Approximately 79.7% of the total fissions in this assembly occur above 100 keV, approximately 20.3% occur below 100 keV, and essentially none below 0.625 eV - thus the classification as a 'fast' assembly. This assembly is Fast Reactor Benchmark No. 8 in the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) Benchmark Specificationsa and has historically been used as a data validation benchmark assembly. Loading of ZPR-3 Assembly 11 began in early January 1958, and the Assembly 11 program ended in late January 1958. The core consisted of highly enriched uranium (HEU) plates and depleted uranium plates loaded into stainless steel drawers, which were inserted into the central square stainless steel tubes of a 31 x 31 matrix on a split table machine. The core unit cell consisted of two columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) HEU plates, six columns of 0.125 in.-wide (3.175 mm) depleted uranium plates and one column of 1.0 in.-wide (25.4 mm) depleted uranium plates. The length of each column was 10 in. (254.0 mm) in each half of the core. The axial blanket consisted of 12 in. (304.8 mm) of depleted uranium behind the core. The thickness of the depleted uranium radial blanket was approximately 14 in. (355.6 mm), and the length of the radial blanket in each half of the matrix was 22 in. (558.8 mm). The assembly geometry approximated a right circular cylinder as closely as the square matrix tubes allowed. According to the logbook and loading records for ZPR-3/11, the reference critical configuration was loading 10 which was critical on January 21, 1958. Subsequent loadings were very similar but less clean for criticality because there were modifications made to accommodate reactor physics measurements other than criticality. Accordingly, ZPR-3/11 loading 10 was selected as the only configuration for this benchmark. As documented below, it was determined to be acceptable as a criticality safety benchmark experiment. A very accurate transformation to a simplified model is needed to make any ZPR assembly a practical criticality-safety benchmark. There is simply too much geometric detail in an exact (as-built) model of a ZPR assembly, even a clean core such as ZPR-3/11 loading 10. The transformation must reduce the detail to a practical level without masking any of the important features of the critical experiment. And it must do this without increasing the total uncertain

Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; National Security; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

SPERT Destructive Test - I on Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

SPERT - Special Power Excursion Reactor Tests Destructive Test number 1 On Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core. A test studying the behavior of the reactor under destructive conditions on a light water moderated pool-type reactor with a plate-type core.

None

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

John G. Hinchey Ke iko H. Hattori Magmatic mineralization and hydrothermal enrichment of the High Grade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE John G. Hinchey � Ke´ iko H. Hattori Magmatic mineralization and hydrothermal enrichment; millerite + siegenite ± chalcopyrite ± pyrite co-existing with hornblende + plagioclase ± quartz ± carbonate, and pyrite ± chalcopyrite with chlorite + actinolite ± albite ± quartz ± carbonate. The ore is high in Pd

115

A view from the top: US enrichment Corp. 's William H. Timbers, Jr  

SciTech Connect

Nick Timbers took over as the first Transition Manager of the US Enrichment Corporation upon its founding last July 1st. Although USEC is not involved in negotiating the HEU deal, the fledgling company will be in charge of actually buying and selling the resulting LEU. Whenever the deal is finally signed. After the politics and haggling are over, it will be up to Nick Timbers to make the deal work on the global uranium market. The view from USEC is resolute. No matter what shape the final HEU deal takes, Nick Timbers promises that USEC will remain a competitive supplier of enrichment services. Timbers pledges that any extra costs associated with the HEU deal will not be passed on to customers. He took time out from his recent busy schedule to share his thoughts on HEU and its aftermath.

Giltenan, E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

R and D of crystal scintillators from enriched isotopes for high sensitivity double ? decay experiments  

SciTech Connect

Experiments to search for neutrinoless double beta decay enters to a new phase when a sensitivity on the level of T{sub 1/2}?10{sup 26}?10{sup 28} yr is required. Scintillating low temperature detectors possess important properties required for high-sensitivity double beta decay experiments: presence of elements of interest, high energy resolution and detection efficiency, low level of background thanks to excellent particle discrimination ability. High concentration of isotope of interest and as low as possible radioactive contamination are important requirements to crystal scintillators. Other crucial issues are maximal output of detectors and minimal loss of enriched materials. Prospects of several scintillation materials, enriched in isotopes promising for double beta decay experiments, are discussed.

Danevich, F. A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Relative performance properties of the ORNL Advanced Neutron Source Reactor with reduced enrichment fuels  

SciTech Connect

Three cores for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor, differing in size, enrichment, and uranium density in the fuel meat, have been analyzed. Performance properties of the reduced enrichment cores are compared with those of the HEU reference configuration. Core lifetime estimates suggest that none of these configurations will operate for the design goal of 17 days at 330 MW. With modes increases in fuel density and/or enrichment, however, the operating lifetimes of the HEU and MEU designs can be extended to the desired length. Achieving this lifetime with LEU fuel in any of the three studies cores, however, will require the successful development of denser fuels and/or structural materials with thermal neutron absorption cross sections substantially less than that of Al-6061. Relative to the HEU reference case, the peak thermal neutron flux in cores with reduced enrichment will be diminished by about 25--30%.

Bretscher, M.M.; Deen, J.R.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Pond, R.B.; Travelli, A.; Woodruff, W.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

PROBLEMES ENERGIES RENOVABLES. INTRODUCCIO Heu de fer servir estimacions raonables.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROBLEMES ENERGIES RENOVABLES. INTRODUCCI´O Heu de fer servir estimacions raonables. PROBLEAM 1 ­Exhauriment de recursos. Consum exponencial. Les reserves de Gas Natural s'han estimat en 6040 trillions de`olica ´es la que t´e un creixement m´es important de les renovables. Amb el ritme de creixement actual quan

Batiste, Oriol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Defining the needs for gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared UF{sub 6} containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. In verifying declared LEU production, the inspectors also take samples for off-site destructive assay (DA) which provide accurate data, with 0.1% to 0.5% measurement uncertainty, on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, taking samples of UF{sub 6} for off-site analysis is a much more labor and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of results and interruptions to the continuity of knowledge (CofK) of the samples during their storage and transit. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems such as process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements and provide more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also introduce examples advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlowe, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Returning HEU Fuel from the Czech Republic to Russia  

SciTech Connect

In December 1999, representatives from the United States, Russian Federation, and International Atomic Energy Agency began working on a program to return Russian supplied, highly enriched, uranium fuel stored at foreign research reactors to Russia. Now, under the Global Threat Reduction Initiative’s Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program, this effort has repatriated over 800 kg of highly enriched uranium to Russia from over 10 countries. In May 2004, the “Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation Concerning Cooperation for the Transfer of Russian Produced Research Reactor Nuclear Fuel to the Russian Federation” was signed. This agreement provides legal authority for the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program and establishes parameters whereby eligible countries may return highly enriched uranium spent and fresh fuel assemblies and other fissile materials to Russia. On December 8, 2007, one of the largest shipments of highly enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together. In February 2003, Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Rež, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their highly enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This article discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fusion solution to dispose of spent nuclear fuel, transuranic elements, and highly enriched uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The disposal of the nuclear spent fuel, the transuranic elements, and the highly enriched uranium represents a major problem under investigation by the international scientific community to identify the most promising solutions. The investigation of this paper focused on achieving the top rated solution for the problem, the elimination goal, which requires complete elimination for the transuranic elements or the highly enriched uranium, and the long-lived fission products. To achieve this goal, fusion blankets with liquid carrier, molten salts or liquid metal eutectics, for the transuranic elements and the uranium isotopes are utilized. The generated energy from the fusion blankets is used to provide revenue for the system. The long-lived fission products are fabricated into fission product targets for transmutation utilizing the neutron leakage from the fusion blankets. This paper investigated the fusion blanket designs for small fusion devices and the system requirements for such application. The results show that 334 MW of fusion power from D–T plasma for 30 years with an availability factor of 0.75 can dispose of the 70,000 tons of the U.S. inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. In addition, this fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future.

Yousry Gohar

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blending highly enriched uranium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gases into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gases from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gases into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell. 4 figs.

McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.; Horton, J.A.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

126

Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blanding highly enriched uranium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gasses into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gasses from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gasses into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell.

McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Miller, Philip E. (Livermore, CA); Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Analysis of the effectiveness of gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and 235U enrichment of declared UF6 containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive assay (DA) of samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements. These improvements could reduce the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also explore how a few advanced safeguards systems could be assembled for unattended operation. The analysis will focus on how unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections (IDS) can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear materials when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinjoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Proposed subcritical measurements for fresh and spent highly enriched plate type fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

A collaborative experimental research program has been established between industry and university partners to evaluate the subcritical behavior of fresh and spent highly enriched fuel assemblies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). This proposed program will involve a series of subcritical measurements using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed {sup 252}Cf source-driven noise technique. Measurements evaluating the subcritical behavior of simple arrays of fresh MURR assemblies will be performed for evaluating the spectral effects of materials typically found in shipping casks such as lead, steel, aluminum, and boron. Also, measurements will be performed on spent assemblies to characterize physics parameters which may be useful in determining the subcritical behavior of fuels for reactivity credit of actinide burnup and fission product poisoning.

Zino, J.F.; Williamson, T.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Mihalczo, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

HEU and LEU comparison in the production of Molybdenum-99  

SciTech Connect

Fission Molybdenum-99 from LEU targets is being produced in Argentina, at the Ezeiza Atomic Centre, since 2002. Before 2002, Argentina produced for more than 15 years fission molybdenum-99 from HEU targets. Both production procedures involve the irradiation of the targets composed by an Uranium-Aluminium compound 'meat' cladded with aluminum and a chemical processing of the targets. A statistic relative efficiency analysis of the production results, a brief description of the LEU method and quality control data of both procedures will be presented. (author)

Cestau, Daniel; Novello, Ariel; Cristini, Pablo; Bronca, Marcelo; Centurion, Roberto; Bavaro, Ricardo; Cestau, Julian; Carranza, Eduardo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza (Argentina)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video | National Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam ... Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video

131

Field Trial of LANL On-Line Advanced Enrichment Monitor for UF6 GCEP  

SciTech Connect

The outline of this presentation is: (1) Technology basis of on-line enrichment monitoring; (2) Timescale of trial; (3) Description of installed equipment; (4) Photographs; (5) Results; (6) Possible further development; and (7) Conclusions. Summary of the good things about the Advanced Enrichment Monitor (AEM) performance is: (1) High accuracy - normally better than 1% relative, (2) Active system as accurate as passive system, (3) Fast and accurate detection of enrichment changes, (4) Physics is well understood, (5) Elegant method for capturing pressure signal, and (6) Data capture is automatic, low cost and fast. A couple of negative things are: (1) Some jumps in measured passive enrichment - of around +2% relative (due to clock errors?); and (2) Data handling and evaluation is off-line, expensive and very slow. Conclusions are: (1) LANL AEM is being tested on E23 plant at Capenhurst; (2) The trial is going very well; (3) AEM could detect production of HEU at potentially much lower cost than existing CEMO; (4) AEM can measure {sup 235}U assay accurately; (5) Active system using X-Ray source would avoid need for pressure measurement; (6) Substantial work lies ahead to go from current prototype to a production instrument.

Ianakiev, Kiril D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lombardi, Marcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacArthur, Duncan W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Robert F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, Clifford [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friend, Peter [URENCO; Dunford, Andrew [URENCO

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

Consideration of critically when directly disposing highly enriched spent nuclear fuel in unsaturated tuff: Bounding estimates  

SciTech Connect

This report presents one of 2 approaches (bounding calculations) which were used in a 1994 study to examine the possibility of a criticality in a repository. Bounding probabilities, although rough, point to the difficulty of creating conditions under which a critical mass could be assembled (container corrosion, separation of neutron absorbers from fissile material, collapse or precipitation of fissile material) and how significant the geochemical and hydrologic phenomena are. The study could not conceive of a mechanism consistent with conditions under which an atomic explosion could occur. Should a criticality occur in or near a container in the future, boundary consequence calculations showed that fissions from one critical event (<10{sup 20} fissions, if similar to aqueous and metal accidents and experiments) are quite small compared to the amount of fissions represented by the spent fuel itself. If it is assumed that the containers necessary to hold the highly enriched spent fuel went critical once per day for 1 million years, creating an energy release of about 10{sup 20} fissions, the number of fissions equals about 10{sup 28}, which corresponds to only 1% of the fission inventory in a repository containing 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal, the expected size for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Rechard, R.P.; Tierney, M.S.; Sanchez, L.C.; Martell, M.-A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Transmutation Analysis of Enriched Uranium and Deep Burn High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been under consideration for production of electricity, process heat, and for destruction of transuranics for decades. As part of the transmutation analysis efforts within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) campaign, a need was identified for detailed discharge isotopics from HTRs for use in the VISION code. A conventional HTR using enriched uranium in UCO fuel was modeled having discharge burnup of 120 GWd/MTiHM. Also, a deep burn HTR (DB-HTR) was modeled burning transuranic (TRU)-only TRU-O2 fuel to a discharge burnup of 648 GWd/MTiHM. For each of these cases, unit cell depletion calculations were performed with SCALE/TRITON. Unit cells were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were first set by using Serpent calculations to match a spectral index between unit cell and whole core domains. In the case of the DB-HTR, the unit cell which was arrived at in this way conserved the ratio of fuel to moderator found in a single block of fuel. In the conventional HTR case, a larger moderator-to-fuel ratio than that of a single block was needed to simulate the whole core spectrum. Discharge isotopics (for 500 nuclides) and one-group cross-sections (for 1022 nuclides) were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations. In addition to the discharge isotopics, one-group cross-sections were provided for the full list of 1022 nuclides tracked in the transmutation library.

Michael A. Pope

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment  

SciTech Connect

Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

Heinonen, Olli [Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Impact of the HEU/LEU conversion on experimental facilities  

SciTech Connect

The LVR-15 reactor is a multipurpose research facility used for basic research on horizontal channels, material and corrosion studies in loops and irradiation rigs, and for the isotope production. A conversion from HEU (IRT-2M 36%, so far used) to LEU (IRT-3M 19.5%, IRT- 4M 19.5%) is planned till 2010. The influence of the new type of fuel on the performance of the experimental facilities operated at the reactor has been studied. The comparison of the calculated neutron fluence rates and spectra using NODER operational code (3D nodal diffusion) and MCNP code for both the fresh and depleted cores was performed. Results of the analyses and future plans are presented in the article. (author)

Marek, M.; Kysela, J.; Ernest, J.; Flibor, S.; Broz, V. [Reactor Services Division, Nuclear Research Institute Rez, plc., Husinec 130, CZ-25068 (Czech Republic)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

NNSA Awards Funding to Accelerate Non-HEU-Based Production of Molybdenum-99  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Funding to Accelerate Non-HEU-Based Production of Molybdenum-99 Funding to Accelerate Non-HEU-Based Production of Molybdenum-99 in the United States | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Awards Funding to Accelerate Non-HEU-Based Production ... Press Release NNSA Awards Funding to Accelerate Non-HEU-Based Production of Molybdenum-99

138

Uranium Enrichment Standards of the Y-12 Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 National Security Complex has recently fabricated and characterized a new series of metallic uranium standards for use in the Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center (NDSTC). Ten uranium metal disks with enrichments varying from 0.2 to 93.2% {sup 235}U were designed to provide researchers access to a wide variety of measurement scenarios in a single testing venue. Special care was taken in the selection of the enrichments in order to closely bracket the definitions of reactor fuel at 4% {sup 235}U and that of highly enriched uranium (HEU) at 20% {sup 235}U. Each standard is well characterized using analytical chemistry as well as a series of gamma-ray spectrometry measurements. Gamma-ray spectra of these standards are being archived in a reference library for use by customers of the NDSTC. A software database tool has been created that allows for easier access and comparison of various spectra. Information provided through the database includes: raw count data (including background spectra), regions of interest (ROIs), and full width half maximum calculations. Input is being sought from the user community on future needs including enhancements to the spectral database and additional Uranium standards, shielding configurations and detector types. A related presentation are planned for the INMM 53rd Annual Meeting (Hull, et al.), which describe new uranium chemical compound standards and testing opportunities at Y-12 Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center (NDSTC).

Cantrell, J.

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

139

Oxygen pumping II: Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High Frequency CMB Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift inter-galactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 micron fine structure line of OI is pumped by the ~ 1300 AA soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen, assuming metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion, and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and on the cosmic epoch when the OI pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak \\delta y_{rms} ~ 10^{-7} (roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of few nK), it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able to useful constraints on the heavy element enrichment history of the IGM.

Carlos Hernandez-Monteagudo; Zoltan Haiman; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

CALIBRATION OF THE HB LINE ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE COUNTER FOR MEASUREMENT OF LANL 3013 HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM PRODUCT SPLITS  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we describe set-up, calibration, and testing of the F-Area Analytical Labs active well neutron coincidence counter(HV-221000-NDA-X-1-DK-AWCC-1)in SRNL for use in HB-Line to enable assay of 3013EU/Pu metal product. The instrument was required within a three-month window for availability upon receipt of LANL Category IV uranium oxide samples into the SRS HB-Line facility. We describe calibration of the instrument in the SRNL nuclear nondestructive assay facility in the range 10-400 g HEU for qualification and installation in HB-Line for assay of the initial suite of product samples.

Dewberry, R; Donald02 Williams, D; Rstephen Lee, R; David-W Roberts, D; Leah Arrigo, L

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Analyses of Greek Research Reactor with mixed HEU-LEU Be reflected core  

SciTech Connect

The fuel-cycle analyses presented in this paper provide specific steps to be taken in the transition from a 36-element water-reflected HEU core to a 33-element LEU equilibrium core with a Be reflector on two faces. The first step will be to install the Be reflector and remove the highest burnup HEU fuel. The smaller Be-reflected core will be refueled with LEU fuel. All analyses were performed using a planar 5-group REBUS3 model benchmarked to VIM Monte Carlo. In addition to fuel cycle results, the control rod worth, reactivity response to increased fuel and water temperature and decreased water density were compared for the transition core and the reference HEU core.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, K. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum-enriched high-density compositions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mathematics 2 Selected Physical Characteristics of PolystyreneHigh Density Polyethylene Composites Prepared from Virgin Summary: Selected Physical Characteristics of...

143

A Robust and Flexible Design for GCEP Unattended Online Enrichment Monitoring: An OLEM Collection Node Network  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laoratory (ORNL) has engineered an on-line enrichment monitor (OLEM) to continuously measure U-235 emissions from the UF6 gas flowing through a unit header pipe of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) as a component of the International Atomic Energy Agency s (IAEA) new generation of technology to support enrichment plant safeguards1. In contrast to other enrichment monitoring approaches, OLEM calibrates and corrects for the pressure and temperature dependent UF6 gas-density without external radiation sources by using the inherent unit header pipe pressure dynamics and combining U-235 gamma-ray spectrometery using a shielded NaI detector with gas pressure and temperature data near the spectrum measurement point to obtain the enrichment of the gas as a function of time. From a safeguards perspective, OLEM can provide early detection of a GCEP being misused for production of highly enriched uranium, but would not detect directly the isolation and use of a cascade within the production unit to produce HEU. OLEM may also reduce the number of samples collected for destructive assay and, if coupled with load cell monitoring, could support isotope mass balance verification and unattended cylinder verification. The earlier paper presented OLEM as one component along with shared load cells and unattended cylinder verification, in the IAEA emering toolbox for unattended instruments at GCEPs1 and described the OLEM concept and how previous modeling studies and field measurements helped confirm the viability of a passive on-line enrichment monitor for meeting IAEA objectives and to support the development of performance targets. Phase I of the United States Support Program (USSP) OLEM project completed a preliminary hardware, software and communications design; phase II will build and test field prototypes in controlled laboratory settings and then at an operational facility. That paper also discussed many of the OLEM collection node commercial off the shelf (COTS) components and summarized the OLEM collection node data security provisions. This paper will discuss a secure and redundant network of OLEM collection nodes, auxiliary detection units and supporting junction boxes distributed throughout a facility for monitoring enrichment on product, feed and tails unit header pipes; the purpose and capability of the built-in Electronic Optical Sealing System (EOSS) network gateway; and a network approach for obtaining reliable and authenticated pressure measurements.

Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL] [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

An integrated video- and weight-monitoring system for the surveillance of highly enriched uranium blend down operations  

SciTech Connect

An integrated video-surveillance and weight-monitoring system has been designed and constructed for tracking the blending down of weapons-grade uranium by the US Department of Energy. The instrumentation is being used by the International Atomic Energy Agency in its task of tracking and verifying the blended material at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio. The weight instrumentation developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory monitors and records the weight of cylinders of the highly enriched uranium as their contents are fed into the blending facility while the video equipment provided by Sandia National Laboratory records periodic and event triggered images of the blending area. A secure data network between the scales, cameras, and computers insures data integrity and eliminates the possibility of tampering. The details of the weight monitoring instrumentation, video- and weight-system interaction, and the secure data network is discussed.

Lenarduzzi, R.; Castleberry, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Whitaker, M. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Martinez, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

domestic enrichment industry, taking into account the sales of uranium under the U.S.-Russia Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement (HEU Agreement) and the Suspension Agreement. DOE -...

146

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched… (more)

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Status of reduced enrichment program for research reactors in Japan  

SciTech Connect

The status of reduced enrichment program for research reactors in Japan will be reviewed. The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-3M, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA, former name is Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)) has been completed by 1999, and the reactors are being satisfactory operated using LEU fuels. The KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) has been partially completed and is still in progress under the Joint Study Program with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JRR-3M using LEU silicide fuel elements have done a functional test by the Japanese Government in 2000, and the property of the reactor core was satisfied. JAEA has established a 'U-Mo fuel ad hoc committee' and has been studying the U-Mo fuel installation plan by carefully observing the development situation of the U-Mo fuel. In KURRI, the KUR has terminated its operation using HEU fuel on February 2006. The HEU KUR spent fuel elements will be sent to the U.S. by March 2008. Licensing for the full core conversion of KUR to LEU fuel is under progress and the core conversion to LEU is expected to be completed in 2008. (author)

Unesaki, Hironobu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Asashiro-nishi 2-1010, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Ohta, Kazunori; Inoue, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Using low-enriched uranium in research reactors: The RERTR program  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the RERTR program is to minimize and eventually eliminate use of highway enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. The program has been very successful, and has developed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel materials and designs which can be used effectively in approximately 90 percent of the research and test reactors which used HEU when the program began. This progress would not have been possible without active international cooperation among fuel developers, commercial vendors, and reactor operators. The new tasks which the RERTR program is undertaking at this time include development of new and better fuels that will allow use of LEU fuels in all research and test reactors; cooperation with Russian laboratories, which will make it possible to minimize and eventually eliminate use of HEU in research reactors throughout the world, irrespective of its origin; and development of an LEU-based process for the production of {sup 99}Mo. Continuation and intensification of international cooperation are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR program.

Travelli, A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the “complex” aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The present studies used current analytical tools to evaluate the various alternate designs for cycle length, scientific performance (e.g., neutron scattering), and steady-state and transient thermal performance using both safety limit and nominal parameter assumptions. The studies concluded that a new reference design combining a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone will allow successful conversion of HFIR. Future collaboration with the program will reveal whether the new reference design can be fabricated reliably and affordably. Following this feedback, additional studies using state-of-the-art developmental analytical tools are proposed to optimize the design of the fuel zone radial contour and the amount and location of both types of neutron absorbers to further flatten thermal peaks while maximizing the performance of the reactor.

Renfro, David [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer [ORNL

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

The U.S.-Russian HEU Agreement: A Modern Day Example of Swords Into Plowshares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On June 23, 1995, 24 metric tons of low enriched uranium arrived at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) facility in Portsmouth, Ohio. This was ... a $12 billion, 20-year contract between USEC, serving...

Philip G. Sewell

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Oxygen enriched fireflooding  

SciTech Connect

Both pure oxygen and enriched air have been considered in fireflooding for enhanced oil recovery. Laboratory and field testing have conclusively shown that oxygen is practical and cost effective for this application. For reservoirs that require a large volume of high pressure gas, oxygen is cheaper than air simply based on compression costs. Additional process benefits with oxygen include: Faster Oil Production; Lower Injection Pressure; Greater Well Spacing; Increased Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure; Lower Gas-to-Oil Ratios; and Purer Produced Gas. These features provide a compelling case for oxygen, once the safety and materials compatibility issues are properly addressed.

Shahani, G.H.; Gunardson, H.H. [Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, PA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Direct formation of supermassive black holes in metal-enriched gas at the heart of high-redshift galaxy mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present novel 3D multi-scale SPH simulations of gas-rich galaxy mergers between the most massive galaxies at $z \\sim 8 - 10$, designed to scrutinize the direct collapse formation scenario for massive black hole seeds proposed in \\citet{mayer+10}. The simulations achieve a resolution of 0.1 pc, and include both metallicity-dependent optically-thin cooling and a model for thermal balance at high optical depth. We consider different formulations of the SPH hydrodynamical equations, including thermal and metal diffusion. When the two merging galaxy cores collide, gas infall produces a compact, optically thick nuclear disk with densities exceeding $10^{-10}$ g cm$^3$. The disk rapidly accretes higher angular momentum gas from its surroundings reaching $\\sim 5$ pc and a mass of $\\gtrsim 10^9$ $M_{\\odot}$ in only a few $10^4$ yr. Outside $\\gtrsim 2$ pc it fragments into massive clumps. Instead, supersonic turbulence prevents fragmentation in the inner parsec region, which remains warm ($\\sim 3000-6000$ K) and dev...

Mayer, Lucio; Bonoli, Silvia; Quinn, Thomas; Roskar, Rok; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Student Science Enrichment Training Program  

SciTech Connect

Funds are requested for the science enrichment training program (emphasis on chemistry and computer science), which will be held at Claflin College during the 1990 and 1991 summers, concomitant with summer school. The thirty participants will include high school students and some college freshmen; the students will come from rural South Carolina schools with limited science and computer facilities. Focus will be on high ability minority students.

Sandhu, S.S.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Uranium Mining and Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in the earth's surface. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors. Uranium-bearing ores are mined, and the uranium is processed to make reactor fuel. In nature, uranium atoms exist in several forms called isotopes - primarily uranium-238, or U-238, and uranium-235, or U-235. In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.3%) would consist of atoms of U-238, and a very small portion of the total mass (0.7%) would consist of atoms of U-235. Uranium Isotopes Isotopes of Uranium Using uranium as a fuel in the types of nuclear reactors common in the United States requires that the uranium be enriched so that the percentage of U-235 is increased, typically to 3 to 5%.

157

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

158

Possibility of nuclear pumped laser experiment using low enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

Possibility to perform experiments for nuclear pumped laser oscillation by using low enriched uranium is investigated. Kinetic analyses are performed for two types of reactor design, one is using highly enriched uranium and the other is using low enriched uranium. The reactor design is based on the experiment reactor in IPPE. The results show the oscillation of nuclear pumped laser in the case of low enriched uranium reactor is also possible. The use of low enriched uranium in the experiment will make experiment easier.

Obara, Toru; Takezawa, Hiroki [Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-19, Ookayama Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

159

RERTR Program: goals, progress and plans. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The status of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the nearly null value of 1982 to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in early 1989. The technical needs of research reactors for HEU exports are also estimated to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

Travelli, A.

1984-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. Prior studies have shown that the MITR will be able to ...

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Expanding and optimizing fuel management and data analysis capabilities of MCODE-FM in support of MIT research reactor (MITR-II) LEU conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies are underway in support of the MIT research reactor (MITR-II) conversion from high enriched Uranium (HEU) to low enriched Uranium (LEU), as required by recent non-proliferation policy. With the same core configuration ...

Horelik, Nicholas E. (Nicholas Edward)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Assuaging Nuclear Energy Risks: The Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center  

SciTech Connect

The recent nuclear renaissance has motivated many countries, especially developing nations, to plan and build nuclear power reactors. However, domestic low enriched uranium demands may trigger nations to construct indigenous enrichment facilities, which could be redirected to fabricate high enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. The potential advantages of establishing multinational uranium enrichment sites are numerous including increased low enrichment uranium access with decreased nuclear proliferation risks. While multinational nuclear initiatives have been discussed, Russia is the first nation to actualize this concept with their Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC). This paper provides an overview of the historical and modern context of the multinational nuclear fuel cycle as well as the evolution of Russia's IUEC, which exemplifies how international fuel cycle cooperation is an alternative to domestic facilities.

Myers, Astasia [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA and MonAme Scientific Research Center, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

Overview of enrichment plant safeguards  

SciTech Connect

The relationship of enrichment plant safeguards to US nonproliferation objectives and to the operation and management of enrichment facilities is reviewed. During the review, the major components of both domestic and international safeguards systems for enrichment plants are discussed. In discussing domestic safeguards systems, examples of the technology currently in use to support nuclear materials accountability are described including the measurement methods, procedures and equipment used for weighing, sampling, chemical and isotopic analyses and nondestructive assay techniques. Also discussed is how the information obtained as part of the nuclear material accountancy task is useful to enrichment plant operations. International material accountancy verification and containment/surveillance concepts for enrichment plants are discussed, and the technologies presently being developed for international safeguards in enrichment plants are identified and the current development status is reported.

Swindle, D.W. Jr.; Wheeler, L.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

IPNS enriched uranium booster target  

SciTech Connect

Since startup in 1981, IPNS has operated on a fully depleted /sup 238/U target. With the booster as in the present system, high energy protons accelerated to 450 MeV by the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron are directed at the target and by mechanisms of spallation and fission of the uranium, produce fast neutrons. The neutrons from the target pass into adjacent moderator where they slow down to energies useful for spectroscopy. The target cooling systems and monitoring systems have operated very reliably and safely during this period. To provide higher neutron intensity, we have developed plans for an enriched uranium (booster) target. HETC-VIM calculations indicate that the target will produce approx.90 kW of heat, with a nominal x5 gain (k/sub eff/ = 0.80). The neutron beam intensity gain will be a factor of approx.3. Thermal-hydraulic and heat transport calculations indicate that approx.1/2 in. thick /sup 235/U discs are subject to about the same temperatures as the present /sup 238/U 1 in. thick discs. The coolant will be light demineralized water (H/sub 2/O) and the coolant flow rate must be doubled. The broadening of the fast neutron pulse width should not seriously affect the neutron scattering experiments. Delayed neutrons will appear at a level about 3% of the total (currently approx.0.5%). This may affect backgrounds in some experiments, so that we are assessing measures to control and correct for this (e.g., beam tube choppers). Safety analyses and neutronic calculations are nearing completion. Construction of the /sup 235/U discs at the ORNL Y-12 facility is scheduled to begin late 1985. The completion of the booster target and operation are scheduled for late 1986. No enriched uranium target assembly operating at the projected power level now exists in the world. This effort thus represents an important technological experiment as well as being a ''flux enhancer''.

Schulke, A.W. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

RERTR program activities related to the development and application of new LEU fuels. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor; low-enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

The statue of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the current 1.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in late 1988. The technical needs of research and test reactors for HEU exports are also forecasted to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

Travelli, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Extended Finite Element Method for High Gradient Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline Enrichment functions for high gradient solutions Motivation High gradient inside the domain (Shocks) High gradient at the boundary (boundary layers) Optimal set of enrichment functions Numerical for high gradient solutions Outline Enrichment functions for high gradient solutions Motivation High

167

Breaking the Tension: Development and Investigation of a Centrifugal Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid Mechanics CTMFD Centrifugal Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector HEU Highly Enriched Uranium IR Infrared LED Light Emitting Diode P Pressure PWM Pulse Width Modulation r Radius R Gas Constant SNM Special Nuclear Material T Temperature...

Solom, Matthew 1985-

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

Yang, Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

AVLIS enrichment of medical isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Under the Sponsorship of the United states Enrichment Corporation (USEC), we are currently investigating the large scale separation of several isotopes of medical interest using atomic vapor isotope separation (AVLIS). This work includes analysis and experiments in the enrichment of thallium 203 as a precursor to the production of thallium 201 used in cardiac imaging following heart attacks, on the stripping of strontium 84 from natural strontium as precursor to the production of strontium 89, and on the stripping of lead 210 from lead used in integrated circuits to reduce the number of alpha particle induced logic errors.

Haynam, C.A.; Scheibner, K.F.; Stern, R.C.; Worden, E.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0240-S EIS-0240-S For Further Information Contact: U.S. Departmel>t of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, D.C. 20585 . This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; telephone (423) 576-8401 for prices, Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. Copies of this document are available (while supplies last) upon written request to: Office of Fissile Materials Disposition, MD-4 Forrestal Building United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 @ Printed with soy ink on recycled paper. .__- -. @ .: Depafimmt of Energy . i i~t " Wastin@on, DC 20585 June 1996 Dear hterested

171

Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . ------- .--- --. ---- DOE/EIS-0240 I United States Department of Energy I For Further Information Contact: U.S. Department of Energy Otice of Fissile Materials Disposition, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, D.C. 20585 1 I ---- I I . I I I I This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; telephone (423) 576-8401 for prices. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. Copies of this document are available (while supplies last) upon written request to: I Office of Fissile Materials Disposition, MD-4 Forrestal Building United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 , @ Printed with soy ink on recycled paper. -_. - COVERS~ET

172

A Robust Infrastructure Design for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Unattended Online Enrichment Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

An online enrichment monitor (OLEM) is being developed to continuously measure the relative isotopic composition of UF6 in the unit header pipes of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP). From a safeguards perspective, OLEM will provide early detection of a facility being misused for production of highly enriched uranium. OLEM may also reduce the number of samples collected for destructive assay and if coupled with load cell monitoring can provide isotope mass balance verification. The OLEM design includes power and network connections for continuous monitoring of the UF6 enrichment and state of health of the instrument. Monitoring the enrichment on all header pipes at a typical GCEP could require OLEM detectors on each of the product, tails, and feed header pipes. If there are eight process units, up to 24 detectors may be required at a modern GCEP. Distant locations, harsh industrial environments, and safeguards continuity of knowledge requirements all place certain demands on the network robustness and power reliability. This paper describes the infrastructure and architecture of an OLEM system based on OLEM collection nodes on the unit header pipes and power and network support nodes for groupings of the collection nodes. A redundant, self-healing communications network, distributed backup power, and a secure communications methodology. Two candidate technologies being considered for secure communications are the Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture cross-platform, service-oriented architecture model for process control communications and the emerging IAEA Real-time And INtegrated STream-Oriented Remote Monitoring (RAINSTORM) framework to provide the common secure communication infrastructure for remote, unattended monitoring systems. The proposed infrastructure design offers modular, commercial components, plug-and-play extensibility for GCEP deployments, and is intended to meet the guidelines and requirements for unattended and remotely monitored safeguards systems.

Younkin, James R [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reactor and Material Supply | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor and Reactor and Material Supply Reactor and Material Supply Y-12 has processed highly enriched uranium for more than 60 years in support of the nation's defense. The end of the Cold War and ensuing strategic arms control treaties have resulted in an excess of HEU materials. In 1994, approximately 174 metric tons of weapons-usable HEU was declared surplus to defense needs. The HEU disposition program was established to make the surplus HEU unsuitable for use in weapons by blending it down to low-enriched uranium and to recover the economic value of the materials to the extent practical. In 2005, the Secretary of Energy announced that an additional 200 metric tons of HEU would be removed from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons. Approximately 20 metric tons of this material will

174

The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) program: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1985, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1986 are reviewed. The second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was expanded and its irradiation continued. Postirradiation examinations of several of these miniplates and of six previously irradiated U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al full-size elements were completed with excellent results. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ is well under way and due for completion before the end of 1987. DOE removed an important barrier to conversions by announcing that the new LEU fuels will be accepted for reprocessing. New DOE prices for enrichment and reprocessing services were calculated to have minimal effect on HEU reactors, and to reduce by about 8 to 10% the total fuel cycle costs of LEU reactors. New program activities include preliminary feasibility studies of LEU use in DOE reactors, evaluation of the feasibility to use LEU targets for the production of fission-product /sup 99/Mo, and responsibility for coordinating safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors, as required by NRC. Achievement of the final program goals is projected for 1990. This progress could not have been achieved without close international cooperation, whose continuation and intensification are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR Program.

Travelli, A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Engineering analysis of low enriched uranium fuel using improved zirconium hydride cross sections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the change out of the existing high enriched uranium fuel to this high-burnup, low enriched uranium fuel design. The codes MCNP and Monteburns were utilized for the neutronic analysis while the code PARET was used to determine fuel and cladding temperatures...

Candalino, Robert Wilcox

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

U.S. forms uranium enrichment corporation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After almost 40 years of operation, the federal government is withdrawing from the uranium enrichment business.On July 1, the Department of Energy turned over to a new government-owned entity—the U.S. Enrichment Corp. (USEC)—both the DOE enrichment ...

RICHARD SELTZER

1993-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

177

RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors worldwide Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors worldwide The High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands READY TO CONVERT - The High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands, has

178

Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a Bloom baffle burner at GTI. The results are positive and confirm that oxygen-enriched combustion can be carried out without producing higher levels of NOx than normal air firing, if lancing of combustion air is used and the excess air levels are controlled. A simple economic study shows that the membrane processes can produce O{sub 2} at less than $40/ton EPO{sub 2} and an energy cost of 1.1-1.5 MMBtu/ton EPO{sub 2}, which are very favorable compared with conventional technologies such as cryogenics and vacuum pressure swing adsorption processes. The benefits of integrated membrane processes/combustion process trains have been evaluated, and show good savings in process costs and energy consumption, as well as reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. For example, if air containing 30% oxygen is used in natural gas furnaces, the net natural gas savings are an estimated 18% at a burner temperature of 2,500 F, and 32% at a burner temperature of 3,000 F. With a 20% market penetration of membrane-based oxygen-enriched combustion in all combustion processes by 2020, the energy savings would be 414-736 TBtu/y in the U.S. The comparable net cost savings are estimated at $1.2-2.1 billion per year by 2020, calculated as the value of fuel savings subtracted from the cost of oxygen production. The fuel savings of 18%-32% by the membrane/oxygen-enriched combustion corresponds to an 18%-32% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions, or 23-40 MM ton/y less CO{sub 2} from natural gas-fired furnaces by 2020. In summary, results from this project (Concept Definition phase) are highly promising and clearly demonstrate that membrane processes can produce oxygen-enriched air in a low cost manner that will lower operating costs and energy consumption in industrial combustion processes. Future work will focus on proof-of-concept bench-scale demonstration in the laboratory.

Lin, Haiqing

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Automated UF6 Cylinder Enrichment Assay: Status of the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA) Project: POTAS Phase II  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intends to automate the UF6 cylinder nondestructive assay (NDA) verification currently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at enrichment plants. PNNL is proposing the installation of a portal monitor at a key measurement point to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until inspector arrival. This report summarizes the status of the research and development of an enrichment assay methodology supporting the cylinder verification concept. The enrichment assay approach exploits a hybrid of two passively-detected ionizing-radiation signatures: the traditional enrichment meter signature (186-keV photon peak area) and a non-traditional signature, manifested in the high-energy (3 to 8 MeV) gamma-ray continuum, generated by neutron emission from UF6. PNNL has designed, fabricated, and field-tested several prototype assay sensor packages in an effort to demonstrate proof-of-principle for the hybrid assay approach, quantify the expected assay precision for various categories of cylinder contents, and assess the potential for unsupervised deployment of the technology in a portal-monitor form factor. We refer to recent sensor-package prototypes as the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The report provides an overview of the assay signatures and summarizes the results of several HEVA field measurement campaigns on populations of Type 30B UF6 cylinders containing low-enriched uranium (LEU), natural uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Approaches to performance optimization of the assay technique via radiation transport modeling are briefly described, as are spectroscopic and data-analysis algorithms.

Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Smith, Leon E.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Experimental Research of the Oxygen-Enriched Combustion of Sewage Sludge and Coal in CFB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage sludge is the by-products of sewage treatment, and it is a fuel of high moisture, high ash and low caloric. Oxygen-enriched combustion technology is one of the new and clean coal combustion technologies...

S. W. Xin; X. F. Lu; H. Z. Liu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Enrichment of the Intracluster Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relevance of galaxies of different luminosity and mass for the chemical enrichment of the intracluster medium (ICM) is analysed. For this purpose, I adopt the composite luminosity function of cluster galaxies from Trentham (1998), which exhibits a significant rise at the very faint end. The model - adopting a universal Salpeter IMF - is calibrated on reproducing the M_Fe/L_tot, M_Fe/M_*, and alpha/Fe ratios observed in clusters. Although the contribution to total luminosity and ICM metals peaks around L* galaxies (M* approx -20), faint objects with M_B>-18 still provide at least 30 per cent of the metals present in the ICM. In consistency with the solar alpha/Fe ratios determined by {ASCA}, the model predicts that 60 per cent of the ICM iron comes from Type Ia supernovae. The predicted slope of the relation between intracluster gas mass and cluster luminosity emerges shallower than the observed one, indicating that the fraction of primordial gas increases with cluster richness.

D. Thomas

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Enrichment Assay Methods Development for the Integrated Cylinder Verification System  

SciTech Connect

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility's entire product-cylinder inventory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a concept to automate the verification of enrichment plant cylinders to enable 100 percent product-cylinder verification and potentially, mass-balance calculations on the facility as a whole (by also measuring feed and tails cylinders). The Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The three main objectives of this FY09 project are summarized here and described in more detail in the report: (1) Develop a preliminary design for a prototype NDA system, (2) Refine PNNL's MCNP models of the NDA system, and (3) Procure and test key pulse-processing components. Progress against these tasks to date, and next steps, are discussed.

Smith, Leon E.; Misner, Alex C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Curtis, Michael M.

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25°C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Brain Tumor Cells in Circulation Are Enriched for Mesenchymal Gene Expression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2014 research-article Research Briefs Brain Tumor Cells in Circulation Are Enriched...Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer characterized by local invasion...GBM, uncovering evidence of circulating brain tumor cells (CTC). Staining and scoring...

James P. Sullivan; Brian V. Nahed; Marissa W. Madden; Samantha M. Oliveira; Simeon Springer; Deepak Bhere; Andrew S. Chi; Hiroaki Wakimoto; S. Michael Rothenberg; Lecia V. Sequist; Ravi Kapur; Khalid Shah; A. John Iafrate; William T. Curry; Jay S. Loeffler; Tracy T. Batchelor; David N. Louis; Mehmet Toner; Shyamala Maheswaran; Daniel A. Haber

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

EIS-0240-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-SA-01: Supplement Analysis 0-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0240-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium This supplement analysis (SA) summarizes the status of HEU disposition activities conducted to date and evaluates the potential impacts of continued program implementation. In addition, this SA considers the potential environmental impacts of proposed new DOE/NNSA initiatives to support the surplus HEU disposition program. Specifically, DOE/NNSA is proposing new end-users for existing program material, new disposal pathways for existing program HEU discard material, and down-blending additional quantities of HEU. DOE/EIS-0240, Supplement Analysis for the Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium (October 2007) More Documents & Publications

186

Aseismic design criteria for uranium enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect

In this paper technological, economical, and safety issues of aseismic design of uranium enrichment plants are presented. The role of management in the decision making process surrounding these issues is also discussed. The resolution of the issues and the decisions made by management are controlling factors in developing aseismic design criteria for any facility. Based on past experience in developing aseismic design criteria for the GCEP various recommendations are made for future enrichment facilities, and since uranium enrichment plants are members of the nuclear fuel cycle the discussion and recommendations presented herein are applicable to other nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Beavers, J.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Consumption patterns, complexity and enrichment in aquatic food chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...22 May 1998 research-article Consumption patterns, complexity and enrichment...patterns resembling ratio-dependent consumption. However, whereas the prey-dependent...prey-dependent|enrichment|omnivory| Consumption patterns, complexity and enrichment...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Summary of a joint US-Japan study of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a nuclear explosive device by a terrorist group  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of a joint US-Japan study to establish a mutual understanding, through scientific-based study, of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a terrorist nuclear explosive device (NED). 4 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a very high degree of effectiveness are: -) diluting HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 10% U-235; -) storing Pu in nuclear fuel that is not man portable and with a dose rate greater or equal to 10 Gy/h at 1 m; -) storing Pu or HEU in heavy items, i.e. not transportable, provided the removal of the Pu or HEU from the item requires a purification/processing capability; and -) converting Pu and HEU to very dilute forms (such as wastes) that, without any security barriers, would require very long acquisition times to acquire a Category I quantity of Pu or of HEU. 2 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a high degree of effectiveness are: -) converting HEU-fueled research reactors into LEU-fueled research reactors or dilute HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 20% U-235; -) converting U/Al reactor fuel into U/Si reactor fuel. Other approaches have been assessed as moderately or totally inefficient to reduce the attractiveness of nuclear materials.

Bathke, C.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Inoue, N.; Kuno, Y.; Mihara, T.; Sagara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); Ebbinghaus, B.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box L-168, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Murphy, J.; Dalton, D. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Nagayama, Y. [Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, 3-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8959 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

EIS-0240: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40: Amended Record of Decision 40: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0240: Amended Record of Decision Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a semi-autonomous agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is amending the August 5, 1996, Record of Decision (the 1996 ROD) (61 FR 40619) for the Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Environmental Impact Statement (HEU EIS) (DOE/EIS-0240). The 1996 ROD included DOE's decision to implement a program to render a nominal 200 metric tons of surplus highly-enriched uranium (HEU) non-weapons-usable by blending it down to low-enriched uranium (LEU) and selling as much of the resulting LEU as possible (up to 85 percent) for use as reactor fuel. In 2007, NNSA prepared a Supplement Analysis (DOE/EIS-0240-SA1) to the HEU EIS but

190

Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at Paducah Site Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at Paducah Site November...

191

Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters Jenniferof Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historicallyof lactate-enriched Hanford well H-100 groundwater sample.

Mosher, Jennifer J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An...

193

U. S. forms uranium enrichment corporation  

SciTech Connect

After almost 40 years of operation, the federal government is withdrawing from the uranium enrichment business. On July 1, the Department of Energy turned over to a new government-owned entity--the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC)--both the DOE enrichment plants at Paducah, Ky., and Portsmouth, Ohio, and domestic and international marketing of enriched uranium from them. Pushed by the inability of DOE's enrichment operations to meet foreign competition, Congress established USEC under the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, envisioning the new corporation as the first step to full privatization. With gross revenues of $1.5 billion in fiscal 1992, USEC would rank 275th on the Fortune 500 list of top US companies. USEC will lease from DOE the Paducah and Portsmouth facilities, built in the early 1950s, which use the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment. USEC's stock is held by the US Treasury, to which it will pay annual dividends. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, which has operated Paducah since 1984 and Portsmouth since 1986 for DOE, will continue to operate both plants for USEC. Closing one of the two facilities will be studied, especially in light of a 40% world surplus of capacity over demand. USEC also will consider other nuclear-fuel-related ventures. USEC will produce only low-enriched uranium, not weapons-grade material. Indeed, USEC will implement a contract now being completed under which the US will purchase weapons-grade uranium from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons and convert it into low-enriched uranium for power reactor fuel.

Seltzer, R.

1993-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

194

2007 international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Abstracts and available papers presented at the meeting  

SciTech Connect

The Meeting papers discuss research and test reactor fuel performance, manufacturing and testing. Some of the main topics are: conversion from HEU to LEU in different reactors and corresponding problems and activities; flux performance and core lifetime analysis with HEU and LEU fuels; physics and safety characteristics; measurement of gamma field parameters in core with LEU fuel; nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel; thermal hydraulic analysis; fuel interactions; transient analyses and thermal hydraulics for HEU and LEU cores; microstructure research reactor fuels; post irradiation analysis and performance; computer codes and other related problems.

NONE

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Microsoft PowerPoint - RERTR_OpenHouse_Poster.pptx [Read-Only]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading the Way: Leading the Way: A More Secure Nuclear Future Leading the Way: A More Secure Nuclear Future Nuclear Proliferation Challenge in the 21 st Century  Safeguarding Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU) against nuclear weapon proliferation remains a major challenge throughout the world.  Starting in 1978, Argonne was the driving force behind the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) effort to eliminate the use HEU in research reactors.  Argonne continues to be a key player in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), which works to minimize and to the extent possible eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear applications throughout the world. GTRI Goals  CONVERT research reactors from operation with HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel.

196

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Use of MCNP + GADRAS in Generating More Realistic Gamma-Ray Spectra for Plutonium and HEU Objects  

SciTech Connect

The ability to accurately simulate high-resolution gamma spectra from materials that emit both neutrons and gammas is very important to the analysis of special nuclear materials (SNM), e.g., uranium and plutonium. One approach under consideration has been to combine MCNP and GADRAS. This approach is expected to generate more accurate gamma ray spectra for complex three-dimensional geometries than can be obtained from one-dimensional deterministic transport simulations (e.g., ONEDANT). This presentation describes application of combining MCNP and GADRAS in simulating plutonium and uranium spectra.

Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mattingly, John [North Carolina State University; Mitchell, Dean [Sandia National Laboratory

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

Standard specification for uranium hexafluoride enriched to less than 5 % 235U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This specification covers nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride (UF6) that either has been processed through an enrichment plant, or has been produced by the blending of Highly Enriched Uranium with other uranium to obtain uranium of any 235U concentration below 5 % and that is intended for fuel fabrication. The objectives of this specification are twofold: (1) To define the impurity and uranium isotope limits for Enriched Commercial Grade UF6 so that, with respect to fuel design and manufacture, it is essentially equivalent to enriched uranium made from natural UF6; and (2) To define limits for Enriched Reprocessed UF6 to be expected if Reprocessed UF6 is to be enriched without dilution with Commercial Natural UF6. For such UF6, special provisions, not defined herein, may be needed to ensure fuel performance and to protect the work force, process equipment, and the environment. 1.2 This specification is intended to provide the nuclear industry with a standard for enriched UF6 that is to be used in the pro...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Uncertainty clouds uranium enrichment corporation's plans  

SciTech Connect

An expected windfall to the US Treasury from the sale of the Energy Dept.'s commercial fuel enrichment facilities may evaporate in the next few weeks when the Clinton administration submits its fiscal 1994 budget proposal to Congress, according to congressional and administration officials. Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, DOE is required to lease two uranium enrichment facilities, Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, KY., to the government-owned US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) by July 1. Estimates by OMB and Treasury indicate a potential yearly payoff of $300 million from the government-owned company's sale of fuel for commercial reactors. Those two facilities use a process of gaseous diffusion to enrich uranium to about 3 percent for use as fuel in commercial power plants. DOE has contracts through at least 1996 to provide about 12 million separative work units (SWUs) yearly to US utilities and others world-wide. But under an agreement signed between the US and Russia last August, at least 10 metric tons, or 1.5 million SWUs, of low-enriched uranium (LEU) blended down from Russia warheads is expected to be delivered to the US starting in 1994. It could be sold at $50 to $60 per SWU, far below what DOE currently charges for its SWUs - $135 per SWU for 70 percent of the contract price and $90 per SWU for the remaining 30 percent.

Lane, E.

1993-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

200

The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX  

SciTech Connect

The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

Hartmann, F.X.; Hahn, R.L.

1991-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Onsite Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plant UF6 Cylinder Destructive Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The IAEA safeguards approach for gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) includes measurements of gross, partial, and bias defects in a statistical sampling plan. These safeguard methods consist principally of mass and enrichment nondestructive assay (NDA) verification. Destructive assay (DA) samples are collected from a limited number of cylinders for high precision offsite mass spectrometer analysis. DA is typically used to quantify bias defects in the GCEP material balance. Under current safeguards measures, the operator collects a DA sample from a sample tap following homogenization. The sample is collected in a small UF6 sample bottle, then sealed and shipped under IAEA chain of custody to an offsite analytical laboratory. Current practice is expensive and resource intensive. We propose a new and novel approach for performing onsite gaseous UF6 DA analysis that provides rapid and accurate assessment of enrichment bias defects. DA samples are collected using a custom sampling device attached to a conventional sample tap. A few micrograms of gaseous UF6 is chemically adsorbed onto a sampling coupon in a matter of minutes. The collected DA sample is then analyzed onsite using Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry-Destructive Assay (LAARS-DA). DA results are determined in a matter of minutes at sufficient accuracy to support reliable bias defect conclusions, while greatly reducing DA sample volume, analysis time, and cost.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Carter, Jennifer C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Phillips, Jon R.; Curtis, Michael M.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

202

Uranium enrichment management review: summary of analysis  

SciTech Connect

In May 1980, the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications within the Department of Energy requested that a group of experienced business executives be assembled to review the operation, financing, and management of the uranium enrichment enterprise as a basis for advising the Secretary of Energy. After extensive investigation, analysis, and discussion, the review group presented its findings and recommendations in a report on December 2, 1980. The following pages contain background material on which that final report was based. This report is arranged in chapters that parallel those of the uranium enrichment management review final report - chapters that contain summaries of the review group's discussion and analyses in six areas: management of operations and construction; long-range planning; marketing of enrichment services; financial management; research and development; and general management. Further information, in-depth analysis, and discussion of suggested alternative management practices are provided in five appendices.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Stochastic chemical enrichment in metal-poor systems I. Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic model of the chemical enrichment of metal-poor systems by core-collapse (Type II) supernovae is presented, allowing for large-scale mixing of the enriched material by turbulent motions and cloud collisions in the interstellar medium. Infall of pristine material is taken into account by following the evolution of the gas density in the medium. Analytical expressions were derived for the number of stars enriched by a given number of supernovae, as well as for the amount of mass with which the ejected material from a supernova is mixed before being locked up in a subsequently formed star. It is shown that for reasonable values of the gas density (~0.1 cm-3) and of the supernova rate (~0.25 kpc-3 Myr-1) of the Galactic halo, the resulting metallicity distributions of the extreme Population II stars show a distinct cut-off at [Fe/H] ~= -4. In fact, by assuming no low-mass Population III stars were able to form out of the primordial interstellar medium, the derived fraction of stars below [Fe/H] = -4 is in agreement with observations. Moreover, the probability is high that even the most metal-poor stars observed to date have been enriched by several contributing supernovae. This partly explains the relatively small star-to-star scatter in many chemical-abundance ratios for stars down to [Fe/H] = -4, as recently found in several observational studies. Contribution from the thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae is found to be negligible over almost the entire extremely metal-poor regime. (***abridged***)

T. Karlsson

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ejection of Supernova-Enriched Gas From Dwarf Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the efficiency with which supernova-enriched gas may be ejected from dwarf disk galaxies, using a methodology previously employed to study the self-enrichment efficiency of dwarf spheroidal systems. Unlike previous studies that focused on highly concentrated starbursts, in the current work we consider discrete supernova events spread throughout various fractions of the disk. We model disk systems having gas masses of 10^8 and 10^9 solar masses with supernova rates of 30, 300, and 3000 per Myr. The supernova events are confined to the midplane of the disk, but distributed over radii of 0, 30, and 80% of the disk radius, consistent with expectations for Type II supernovae. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that the enriched material from supernovae is largely lost when the supernovae are concentrated near the nucleus, as expected for a starburst event. In contrast, however, we find the loss of enriched material to be much less efficient when the supernovae occur over even a relatively small fraction of the disk. The difference is due to the ability of the system to relax following supernova events that occur over more extended regions. Larger physical separations also reduce the likelihood of supernovae going off within low-density "chimneys" swept out by previous supernovae. We also find that, for the most distributed systems, significant metal loss is more likely to be accompanied by significant mass loss. A comparison with theoretical predications indicates that, when undergoing self-regulated star formation, galaxies in the mass range considered shall efficiently retain the products of Type II supernovae.

P. Chris Fragile; Stephen D. Murray; Douglas N. C. Lin

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

205

Recovery and Blend-Down Uranium for Beneficial use in Commercial Reactors - 13373  

SciTech Connect

In April 2001 the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) signed an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 33 MT of off-specification (off-spec) highly enriched uranium (HEU) from DOE to TVA for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. Since that time additional surplus off-spec HEU material has been added to the program, making the total approximately 46 MT off-spec HEU. The disposition path for approximately half (23 MT) of this 46 MT of surplus HEU material, was down blending through the H-canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The HEU is purified through the H-canyon processes, and then blended with natural uranium (NU) to form low enriched uranium (LEU) solution with a 4.95% U-235 isotopic content. This material was then transported to a TVA subcontractor who converted the solution to uranium oxide and then fabricated into commercial light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This fuel is now powering TVA reactors and supplying electricity to approximately 1 million households in the TVA region. There is still in excess of approximately 10 to 14 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for use in either currently designed light water reactors, ?5% enriched LEU, or be made available for use in subsequent advanced 'fast' reactor fuel designs, ?19% LEU. (authors)

Magoulas, Virginia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

SciTech Connect: enriched uranium  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

enriched uranium Find enriched uranium Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

207

Withdrawal assay monitoring at US Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) controls two uranium enrichment facilities that produce enriched uranium for both military and commercial use. The process requires both feed and withdrawal operations. The withdrawal process requires both product (enriched uranium) withdrawal stations and tails (depleted uranium) withdrawal stations. A previous prototype system, ``X-330 Tails Cylinder Assay Monitor,`` was developed as a demonstration for the tails withdrawal station at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The prototype system was done in response to potential problems with the original method for determining the hourly weighted assay averages that are used to calculate the final weighted assay of the cylinder. In the original method the {sup 235}U assay of uranium hexaflouride withdrawn from PORTS cascade into tails cylinders is determined every 5 min by measurements from an in-line assay mass spectrometer. An average value for a 1-h period is then calculated by area control room personnel and assigned to the accumulated weight in the cylinder for the period. A potential problem with this method is that cylinder weight is not automatically recorded as often as the assay. The assay and withdrawal rate can both vary during the given period. This variation results in inaccuracies in the hourly weighted assays that are used to calculate the final weighted assay of the cylinder. Laboratory analysis is considered to be the most accurate method for determining the final cylinder assay; however, the cost and safety considerations of redundant cylinder handling limit the number of cylinders sampled to less than 10%.

Smith, D.E.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

KMi Technical Report Contextually-enriched Documents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-enriched Documents: Publishing for Organizational Learning Marek Hatala Knowledge Media Institute The Open University of organizational learning. Building on the Digital Document Discourse Environment (D3E) we have developed tools Knowledge, Ontologies, Organizational Learning, Digital Documents, Electronic Publishing, Hypertext, World

209

Total Cross Section Measurements of Highly Enriched Isotopic Mo in the Resolved and Unresolved Energy Regions R.M. Bahran, A.M. Daskalakis, B.J. McDermott, E.J. Blain and Y. Danon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

section data in particular are important because molybdenum can exist in reactors as a high yield fission structure based on fluctuations in the data. The analysis in this paper is limited to the unresolved energy reflective surfaces. The modular design allows operational reliability, functional versatility, relatively

Danon, Yaron

210

USE OF MAILBOX APPROACH, VIDEO SURVEILLANCE, AND SHORT-NOTICE RANDOM INSPECTIONS TO ENHANCE DETECTION OF UNDECLARED LEU PRODUCTION AT GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT PLANTS.  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability. ''Mailbox'' declarations have been used in the last two decades to verify receipts, production, and shipments at some bulk-handling facilities (e.g., fuel-fabrication plants). The operator declares the status of his plant to the IAEA on a daily basis using a secure ''Mailbox'' system such as a secure tamper-resistant computer. The operator agrees to hold receipts and shipments for a specified period of time, along with a specified number of annual inspections, to enable inspector access to a statistically large enough population of UF{sub 6} cylinders and fuel assemblies to achieve the desired detection probability. The inspectors can access the ''Mailbox'' during randomly timed inspections and then verify the operator's declarations for that day. Previously, this type of inspection regime was considered mainly for verifying the material balance at fuel-fabrication, enrichment, and conversion plants. Brookhaven National Laboratory has expanded the ''Mailbox'' concept with short-notice random inspections (SNRIs), coupled with enhanced video surveillance, to include declaration and verification of UF{sub 6} cylinder operational data to detect activities associated with undeclared LEU production at GCEPs. Since the ''Mailbox'' declarations would also include data relevant to material-balance verification, these randomized inspections would replace the scheduled monthly interim inspections for material-balance purposes; in addition, the inspectors could simultaneously perform the required number of Limited-Frequency Unannounced Access (LFUA) inspections used for HEU detection. This approach would provide improved detection capabilities for a wider range of diversion activities with not much more inspection effort than at present.

BOYER, B.D.; GORDON, D.M.; JO, J.

2006-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

DOE Signs Advanced Enrichment Technology License and Facility Lease |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Enrichment Technology License and Facility Lease Advanced Enrichment Technology License and Facility Lease DOE Signs Advanced Enrichment Technology License and Facility Lease December 8, 2006 - 9:34am Addthis Announces Agreements with USEC Enabling Deployment of Advanced Domestic Technology for Uranium Enrichment WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced the signing of a lease agreement with the United States Enrichment Corporation, Inc. (USEC) for their use of the Department's gas centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) facilities in Piketon, OH for their American Centrifuge Plant. The Department of Energy (DOE) also granted a non-exclusive patent license to USEC for use of DOE's centrifuge technology for uranium enrichment at the plant, which will initiate the first successful deployment of advanced domestic enrichment technology in the

212

Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3 Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3 The...

213

The Economics of Oxygen Enriched Air Production Via Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxygen enriched air combustion is a recognized approach to energy conservation. Conventional methods of producing oxygen enriched air: Pressure Swing Adsorption and Cryogenics, are energy-intensive and expensive. In this paper the economics of using...

Gollan, A.; Kleper, M. H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

US developments in technology for uranium enrichment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to review recent progress and the status of the work in the United States on that part of the fuel cycle concerned with uranium enrichment. The United States has one enrichment process, gaseous diffusion, which has been continuously operated in large-scale production for the past 37 years; another process, gas centrifugation, which is now in the construction phase; and three new processes, molecular laser isotope separation, atomic vapor laser isotope separation, plasma separation process, in which the US has also invested sizable research and development efforts over the last few years. The emphasis in this paper is on the technical aspects of the various processes, but the important economic factors which will define the technological mix which may be applied in the next two decades are also discussed.

Wilcox, W.J. Jr.; McGill, R.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Substantial increases in brake power and considerably lower peak pressure can result from oxygen-enriched diesel combustion

216

Protein-Enriched Spaghetti Fortified with Corn Gluten Meal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Protein-Enriched Spaghetti Fortified with Corn Gluten Meal ... Corn gluten meal was from Pekin Energy Co. (Pekin, IL). ...

Y. Victor Wu; Gary A. Hareland; Kathleen Warner

2001-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

DOE and the United States enrichment market  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have exerted a predominant influence in the uranium enrichment services industry since 1969, when it began to sell its services to private industry under a Requirement-Type Contract (RTC). After almost 25 years of providing these services to utilities throughout the world, DOE is now preparing to hand over responsibility to the emerging US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), which was created by the 1992 Energy Bill and will begin its tenure on July 1, 1993. DOE has had some notable successes, including revenue generation of about $25 billion from its domestic and foreign sales since 1969. Annual revenues from civilian dollars over the next several years. However, most of the sales attributed to these revenues took place in 1986-more than six years ago. Presently, US utility commitments are decreasing significantly; to date, US utilities have committed less than two percent of their total FY2002 enrichment requirements to DOE. In spite of the fact that DOE has enjoyed some success, its past actions, or sometimes inactions, have often been steeped in controversy that resulted in customer alienation and dissatisfaction. It is the legacy of past DOE contracting practices, increased competition, and massive contractual terminations, that USEC will inherit from DOE. Therefore, it is relevant to consider the major issues that have fashioned the current US market and resulted in USEC's initial position in the marketplace.

Rutkowski, E.E.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Investigation of the low enrichment conversion of the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The use of highly enriched uranium as a fuel research reactors is of concern due to the possibility of diversion for nuclear weapons applications. The Texas A M TRIGA reactor currently uses 70% enriched uranium in a FLIP (Fuel Life Improvement Program) fuel element manufactured by General Atomics. Thus fuel also contains 1.5 weight percent of erbium as a burnable poison to prolong useful core life. US university reactors that use highly enriched uranium will be required to covert to 20% or less enrichment to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for the next core loading if the fuel is available. This investigation examined the feasibility of a material alternate to uranium-zirconium hydride for LEU conversion of a TRIGA reactor. This material is a beryllium oxide uranium dioxide based fuel. The theoretical aspects of core physics analyses were examined to assess the potential advantages of the alternative fuel. A basic model was developed for the existing core configuration since it is desired to use the present fuel element grid for the replacement core. The computing approach was calibrated to the present core and then applied to a core of BeO-UO{sub 2} fuel elements. Further calculations were performed for the General Atomics TRIGA low-enriched uranium zirconium hydride fuel.

Reuscher, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

NONE

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

GLOBAL THREAT REDUCTION INITIATIVE REACTOR CONVERSION PROGRAM: STATUS AND CURRENT PLANS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Reactor Conversion Program supports the minimization, and to the extent possible, elimination of the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors and radioisotope production processes to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU). The Reactor Conversion Program is a technical pillar of the NNSA Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is a key organization for implementing U.S. HEU minimization policy and works to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material domestically and abroad.

Staples, Parrish A.; Leach, Wayne; Lacey, Jennifer M.

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Paducah Plant Begins Enrichment Operations after Five Parties Strike  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Begins Enrichment Operations after Five Parties Plant Begins Enrichment Operations after Five Parties Strike Agreement Paducah Plant Begins Enrichment Operations after Five Parties Strike Agreement May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis This cylinder hauler at Paducah’s Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services plant delivers the first of DOE’s 14-ton depleted uranium cylinders to USEC for re-enrichment as part of a five-party agreement that is extending enrichment operations at the 60-year-old plant for another year, delaying increased costs at the site for DOE. This cylinder hauler at Paducah's Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services plant delivers the first of DOE's 14-ton depleted uranium cylinders to USEC for re-enrichment as part of a five-party agreement that is extending enrichment operations at the 60-year-old plant for another year, delaying

222

Uranium enrichment. Printed at the request of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, May 1982  

SciTech Connect

Two congressional reports outline the need for new uranium-enrichment plants and their costs. Part I, The Need for Additional Uranium Enrichment Capacity to Meet Demand, examines DOE's case for continuing construction of the Portsmouth, Ohio gas centrifuge plant on the basis of projected demand. The report concludes that DOE projections are high and that future demand can be met through preproduction and stockpiling. Part II, Necessity for GCEP (Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant) Under Low Nuclear Power Growth Conditions, concludes that continued construction is economically valid because of the uncertainty of demand forecasts. 79 references, 12 tables. (DCK)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mineralization of trichloroethylene by heterotrophic enrichment cultures  

SciTech Connect

Microbial consortia capable of aerobically degrading greater than 99% of 50 mg/l exogenous trichloroethylene (TCE) have been enriched from TCE contaminated subsurface sediments. Concentrations of TCE greater than 300 mg/l were not degraded nor was TCE used as a sole energy source. Successful electron donors for growth included tryptone-yeast extract, methanol, methane or propane. The optimum temperature for growth was 22--37 C and the ph optimum was 7.0--8.1. Utilization of TCE occurred only after apparent microbial growth had ceased. The major end products recovered were hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Minor products included dichloroethylene, vinylidine chloride and possibly chloroform.

Phelps, T.J.; Ringelberg, D.; Mikell, A.T.; White, D.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Inst. for Applied Microbiology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., Knoxville, TN (United States); Fliermans, C.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaporation of Enriched Uranium Solutions Containing Organophosphates  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has enriched uranium (EU) solution which has been stored for almost 10 years since being purified in the second uranium cycle of the H area solvent extraction process. The preliminary SRTC data, in conjunction with information in the literature, is promising. However, very few experiments have been run, and none of the results have been confirmed with repeat tests. As a result, it is believed that insufficient data exists at this time to warrant Separations making any process or program changes based on the information contained in this report. When this data is confirmed in future testing, recommendations will be presented.

Pierce, R.A.

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

Boron isotope ratios in commercial produce and boron-10 foliar and hydroponic enriched plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boron isotope ratios in commercial produce and boron-10 foliar and hydroponic enriched plants ... The Absorption and Tissue Distribution of Selenium from High-Selenium Broccoli Are Different from Selenium from Sodium Selenite, Sodium Selenate, and Selenomethionine As Determined in Selenium-Deficient Rats ...

Richard A. Vanderpool; Phyllis E. Johnson

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimold, Benjamin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, Steven L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howell, John [GLASGOW UNIV.

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 14160 of 28,905 results. 51 - 14160 of 28,905 results. Download Federal Balanced Scorecard for FY 2012 http://energy.gov/management/downloads/federal-balanced-scorecard-fy-2012 Download 5th Report to Congress http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/5th-report-congress Download Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an... http://energy.gov/ne/downloads/report-effect-low-enriched-uranium-delivered-under-highly-enriched

228

Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EIS-0387: Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0387: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S4: Final Supplemental Programmatic Environmental...

229

Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1172 DOE Sale of Surplus Natural and Low Enriched Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1172 DOE Sale of Surplus Natural and Low Enriched Uranium | October 1996 | For additional information contact: Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 ii October 1996 | Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose and Need for Agency Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.2 Relationship to Other DOE NEPA Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 1.2.1 Environmental Assessment for the Purchase of Russian Low Enriched Uranium Derived from the Dismantlement of Nuclear Weapons in the | Countries of the Former Soviet Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 | 1.2.2 Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Final EIS . . . . . . . . 1-2 1.3 Public Comments on the Draft EA

230

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Audit Report: IG-0638 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Audit Report: IG-0638 February 9, 2004 Recovery of Highly Enriched Uranium Provided to Foreign Countries As part of its 1950s-era Atoms for Peace program, the Unites States provided nuclear technology to foreign nations for peaceful applications in exchange for their promise to forego development of nuclear weapons. The program provided foreign countries with research reactor technology and highly enriched (HEU) needed to fuel civilian nuclear reactors. Initially, the U.S. leased HEU to foreign countries with the explicity provision that the spent fuel be returned for treatment and disposal in the U.S. preventing its use in a weapons program. in 1964, the U.S. changed its policy and began selling its use in a weapon program. In 1964, the U.S. changed its policy and began selling HEU materials to foreign countries

232

Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria  

SciTech Connect

The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

234

CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Management program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

235

CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Emergency Management program at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

236

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January, 2005 assessment of Conduct of Operations program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

237

CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Training Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

238

Chapter 20 - Uranium Enrichment Decontamination & Decommissioning Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 CHAPTER 20 URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. To establish policies and procedures for the financial management, accounting, budget preparation, cash management of the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, referred to hereafter as the Fund. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are directly or indirectly involved with the Fund. c. Requirements and Sources of the Fund. (1) The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) requires DOE to establish and administer the Fund. EPACT authorizes that the

239

News Media invited to interview JLab summer, science enrichment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 Education Poster Session 2003 Education Poster Session News Media invited to interview JLab summer, science enrichment program participants; cover closing Poster Session July...

240

Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Substantial increases in brake power and considerably lower peak...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Measuring Team Collaboration in the Marshall University Summer Enrichment Program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present study investigates measures of team collaboration among graduate students participating in the Marshall University Graduate College Summer Enrichment Program. The purpose of the… (more)

Pyles, Marian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hybrid Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station: FY10 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing the concept of an automated UF6 cylinder verification station that would be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until the arrival of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. At the center of this unattended system is a hybrid enrichment assay technique that combines the traditional enrichment-meter method (based on the 186 keV peak from 235U) with non-traditional neutron-induced high-energy gamma-ray signatures (spawned primarily by 234U alpha emissions and 19F(alpha, neutron) reactions). Previous work by PNNL provided proof-of-principle for the non-traditional signatures to support accurate, full-volume interrogation of the cylinder enrichment, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties in enrichment assay due to UF6 heterogeneity and providing greater sensitivity to material substitution scenarios. The work described here builds on that preliminary evaluation of the non-traditional signatures, but focuses on a prototype field system utilizing NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers, and enrichment analysis algorithms that integrate the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Results for the assay of Type-30B cylinders ranging from 0.2 to 4.95 wt% 235U, at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant in Richland, WA, are described for the following enrichment analysis methods: 1) traditional enrichment meter signature (186 keV peak) as calculated using a square-wave convolute (SWC) algorithm; 2) non-traditional high-energy gamma-ray signature that provides neutron detection without neutron detectors and 3) hybrid algorithm that merges the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Uncertainties for each method, relative to the declared enrichment for each cylinder, are calculated and compared to the uncertainties from an attended HPGe verification station at AREVA, and the IAEA’s uncertainty target values for feed, tail and product cylinders. A summary of the major findings from the field measurements and subsequent analysis follows: • Traditional enrichment-meter assay using specially collimated NaI spectrometers and a Square-Wave-Convolute algorithm can achieve uncertainties comparable to HPGe and LaBr for product, natural and depleted cylinders. • Non-traditional signatures measured using NaI spectrometers enable interrogation of the entire cylinder volume and accurate measurement of absolute 235U mass in product, natural and depleted cylinders. • A hybrid enrichment assay method can achieve lower uncertainties than either the traditional or non-traditional methods acting independently because there is a low degree of correlation in the systematic errors of the two individual methods (wall thickness variation and 234U/235U variation, respectively). This work has indicated that the hybrid NDA method has the potential to serve as the foundation for an unattended cylinder verification station. When compared to today’s handheld cylinder-verification approach, such a station would have the following advantages: 1) improved enrichment assay accuracy for product, tail and feed cylinders; 2) full-volume assay of absolute 235U mass; 3) assay of minor isotopes (234U and 232U) important to verification of feedstock origin; single instrumentation design for both Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders; and 4) substantial reduction in the inspector manpower associated with cylinder verification.

Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges  

SciTech Connect

The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

Satkowiak, Lawrence [Director, Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security Programs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

244

U.S.-Russia Twenty-Year Partnership Completes Final Milestone in Converting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S.-Russia Twenty-Year Partnership Completes Final Milestone in U.S.-Russia Twenty-Year Partnership Completes Final Milestone in Converting 20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads into Fuel for U.S. Electricity U.S.-Russia Twenty-Year Partnership Completes Final Milestone in Converting 20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads into Fuel for U.S. Electricity November 14, 2013 - 11:26am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Public Affairs: (202) 586-7371 WASHINGTON - U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz today announced the final shipment of low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from Russian weapons-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) under the 1993 U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement, commonly known as the Megatons to Megawatts Program. Under this Agreement, Russia downblended 500 metric tons of HEU, equivalent to 20,000

245

Development of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production and their chemical processing status 1993  

SciTech Connect

Most of the world`s supply of {sup 99m}{Tc} for medical purposes is currently produced from {sup 99}Mo derived from the fastening of high enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low enriched uranium (LEU) silicide fuel for the HEU alloy and aluminide fuels used in current target designs will allow equivalent {sup 99}Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium oxide films in other target designs will also allow the substitution of LEU for HEU. In 1993, DOE renewed funding that was terminated in 1990 for development of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production. During the past year, our efforts were to (1) renew contact with {sup 99}Mo producers, (2) define the means to test our process for recovering {sup 99}Mo from irradiated LEU-silicide targets, and (3) begin to test our process on spent LEU-silicide miniplates stored at ANL from past fuel development studies.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Hutter, J.C.; Srinivasan, B.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan U.S. Department of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan September 29, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis Agreement Reached To Downblend HEU and Convert Reactor WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) today announced that they have reached an important agreement-in-principle with the Government of Kazakhstan to move forward with the down-blending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) currently stored at Kazakhstan's Institute of Nuclear Physics. The agreement also calls for the conversion of the VVR-K research reactor to operate on low enriched uranium fuel instead of HEU, which can be used in nuclear weapons. The

247

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

Michaels, E.D.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

Research Report Sensory experience determines enrichment-induced plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an enriched environment increases response strength and paired-pulse depression in the auditory cortex of awake and anesthetized rats [Engineer, N.D., Percaccio, C.R., Pandya, P.K., Moucha, R., Rathbun, D.L., Kilgard, M.P., 2004. Environmental enrichment improves response strength, threshold, selectivity

Kilgard, Michael P.

249

Enriched Protein-Protein Interactions from Biomedical Text  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enriched Protein-Protein Interactions from Biomedical Text Barry Haddow, Michael Matthews from Biomedical Text #12;Overview The TXM Project Protein-Protein Interactions Enriched Protein Protein-Protein Interactions from Biomedical Text #12;Project Information Text Mining Programme funded (3

Edinburgh, University of

250

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study. Phase 2: 100 percent oxygen enriched combustion in regenerative glass melters, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The field test project described in this report was conducted to evaluate the energy and environmental performance of 100% oxygen enriched combustion (100% OEC) in regenerative glass melters. Additional objectives were to determine other impacts of 100% OEC on melter operation and glass quality, and to verify on a commercial scale that an on-site Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant can reliably supply oxygen for glass melting with low electrical power consumption. The tests constituted Phase 2 of a cooperative project between the United States Department of Energy, and Praxair, Inc. Phase 1 of the project involved market and technical feasibility assessments of oxygen enriched combustion for a range of high temperature industrial heating applications. An assessment of oxygen supply options for these applications was also performed during Phase 1, which included performance evaluation of a pilot scale 1 ton per day PSA oxygen plant. Two regenerative container glass melters were converted to 100% OEC operation and served as host sites for Phase 2. A 75 ton per day end-fired melter at Carr-Lowrey Glass Company in Baltimore, Maryland, was temporarily converted to 100% OEC in mid- 1990. A 350 tpd cross-fired melter at Gallo Glass Company in Modesto, California was rebuilt for permanent commercial operation with 100% OEC in mid-1991. Initially, both of these melters were supplied with oxygen from liquid storage. Subsequently, in late 1992, a Pressure Swing Adsorption oxygen plant was installed at Gallo to supply oxygen for 100% OEC glass melting. The particular PSA plant design used at Gallo achieves maximum efficiency by cycling the adsorbent beds between pressurized and evacuated states, and is therefore referred to as a Vacuum/Pressure Swing Adsorption (VPSA) plant.

Tuson, G.B.; Kobayashi, H.; Campbell, M.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

252

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Y-12 Site Office's programs for oversight of its contractors at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

253

EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned 5: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transport 5.26 kilograms of enriched uranium-23 5 in the form of nuclear fuel, from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 30, 1998 EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia April 30, 1998 EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from

254

Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Development of an enrichment monitor for the Portsmouth GCEP  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a gas-phase UF/sub 6/ enrichment monitor for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant. The enrichment monitoring system provides a method for effective nuclear materials accountability verification while reducing the effort for both the facility operator and the inspector. The experience with an inplant prototype monitor, the facility and operational constraints, and the constraints related to international safeguards inspection are described in terms of the impact on the monitor design.

Strittmatter, R.B.; Stovall, L.A.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence arbuscular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence by examining the joint effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment, nitrogen (N) fertilization and plant enrichment, community composition, grassland, niche partitioning hypothesis, nitrogen fertilization, plant

Minnesota, University of

257

Characterization summary of candidate off-specification material for transfer to the Tennessee Valley Authority  

SciTech Connect

The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) Privatization Act provides that, prior to privatization, the Department of Energy (DOE) may transfer off-specification (off-spec) enriched uranium to a federal agency if the material is transferred for the use of the receiving agency without resale or subsequent transfer to another entity. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has expressed an interest in obtaining some of this off-spec surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) for the purpose of making fuel for its reactors. Discussions between DOE and TVA over the past two years have resulted in a framework between DOE and TVA within which to develop a program for the utilization of HEU blended to off-spec low-enriched uranium (LEU) for use in TVA commercial nuclear power reactors. A minimum of 30 metric tons uranium (t) of HEU has been designated for this program. DOE has identified material amounting to approximately 35 t that potentially will be transferred to TVA. This report describes four types of HEU that has been identified by the DOE.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3 Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Isotope Enrichment (Calutron) Facility Building 9204-3 The purpose of this document is to report the results of a survey conducted at the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF, Calutron, Building 9204-3) on the Y-12 Plant property at the Oak Ridge Site. The survey was conducted during the week of November 29, 1999. The primary purpose of the survey is to identify facility conditions and to define the characterization, stabilization, and material/waste/equipment removal (if any) requirements that need to be met to transfer responsibility for the facility from the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) to the Office of Environmental Management (EM). Additionally, estimated post stabilization surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities and costs are

259

Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at Paducah Site Energy Department Selects Global Laser Enrichment for Future Operations at Paducah Site November 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. Media Contact (202) 586-4940 Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will open negotiations with Global Laser Enrichment (GLE) for the sale of the depleted uranium hexafluoride inventory. The Department determined that GLE offered the greatest benefit to the government among those who responded to a Request for Offers (RFO) released earlier this year. Through the RFO review process, the Department also decided to enter into

260

Oak Ridge, Tenn. Selected as Uranium Enrichment Site | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Oak Ridge, Tenn. Selected as Uranium Enrichment Site | National Nuclear Oak Ridge, Tenn. Selected as Uranium Enrichment Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Oak Ridge, Tenn. Selected as Uranium Enrichment Site Oak Ridge, Tenn. Selected as Uranium Enrichment Site September 19, 1942 Oak Ridge, TN

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261

Assessing the demand for phytosterol-enriched products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phytosterol is a healthful ingredient that helps reduce blood cholesterol levels. It has been over ten years since the first phytosterol-enriched product, Benecol margarine, was launched in Finland in 1995; however, understanding of this product...

Yuan, Yan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Description of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) will be located at the site of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the facility is to provide enriching services for the production of low assay enriched uranium for civilian nuclear power reactors. The construction and operation of the GCEP is administered by the US Department of Energy. The facility will be operated under contract from the US Government. Control of the GCEP rests solely with the US Government, which holds and controls access to the technology. Construction of GCEP is expected to be completed in the mid-1990's. Many facility design and operating procedures are subject to change. Nonetheless, the design described in this report does reflect current thinking. Descriptions of the general facility and major buildings such as the process buildings, feed and withdrawal building, cylinder storage and transfer, recycle/assembly building, and a summary of the centrifuge uranium enriching process are provided in this report.

Arthur, W.B. (comp.)

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards  

SciTech Connect

Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.

Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, Carlos D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwamoto, Tomonori [JNFL; Tamura, Takayuki [JNFL; Aiuchi, Syun [JNFL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Thomas L. McCall, Jr. http:www.em.doe.govffaaortsca.html 4252001 Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agree.. Page 12 of 26 Deputy...

265

Enrichment reliability of solid polymer electrolysis for tritium water analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a novel advanced enrichment apparatus for environmental tritium analysis called SPET (Solid Polymer Electrolysis for Tritium Water). It generates no explosive gas, requires ... of SPET was studi...

M. Saito

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Optimal enrichment time for isolation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from seafood.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isolation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from seafood. E Dupray M Cormier The growth of Vibrio...parahaemolyticus, permitting more rapid results in seafood analysis. Optimal enrichment time for isolation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from seafood. | The growth of Vibrio parahaemolyticus...

E Dupray; M Cormier

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

ON POINTED ENRICHMENTS AND ILLEGAL COMPOSITIONS MARK W. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON POINTED ENRICHMENTS AND ILLEGAL COMPOSITIONS MARK W. JOHNSON Abstract. This note gives a brief consisting of both basepoints as the basepoint. However, the Date: April 1, 2003. 1 #12; 2 M. W. JOHNSON

Atkinson, Katie

268

STUDY OF USING OXYGEN-ENRICHED COMBUSTION AIR FOR LOCOMOTIVE...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and J.G. Whipple, Test and Evaluation o f Polymeric Membranes for Oxygen-Enrichment of Air, DOEAD- 127 10- 1, U S . Department of Energy, 1989. Sawyer, R.F., N.P. Cemansky, and...

269

Developing a classroom science enrichment programme for gifted primary school boys in Saudi Arabia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Enrichment is one of the important educational facilities that are provided for gifted students. However, the research on gifted enrichment programmes still requires further exploration… (more)

Alarfaj, Abdulhamid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOE hands over uranium enrichment duties to government corporation  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to renew the United States' competitiveness in the world market for uranium enrichment services, the Department of Energy (DOE) is turning over control of its Paducah, KY, and Portsmouth, OH, enrichment facilities to a for-profit organization, the United States Enrichment Corp. (USEC), which was created by last year's Energy Policy Act. William H. Timbers, Jr., a former investment banker who was appointed acting CEO in March, said the Act's mandate will mean more competitive prices for enriched reactor fuel and greater responsiveness to utility customers. As a government corporation, USEC, with current annual revenues estimated at $1.5 billion, will no longer be part of the federal budget appropriations process, but will use business management techniques, set market-based prices for enriched uranium, and pay annual dividends to the US Treasury-its sole stockholder-from earnings. The goal is to finish privatizing the corporation within two years, and to sell its stock to investors for an estimated $1 to $3 billion. USEC's success will depend in part on developing short- and long-term marketing plants to help stanch the flow of enriched-uranium customers to foreign suppliers. (DOE already has received notice from a number of US utilities that they want to be let out of their long-term enrichment contracts as they expire over the next several years).USEC's plans likely will include exploring new joint ventures with other businesses in the nuclear fuel cycle-such as suppliers, fabricators, and converters-and offering a broader range of enrichment services than DOE provided. The corporation will have to be responsive to utilities on an individual basis.

Simpson, J.

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Strategies for denaturing the weapons-grade plutonium stockpile  

SciTech Connect

In the next few years, approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and 150 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be removed from nuclear weapons in the US and declared excess. These materials represent a significant energy resource that could substantially contribute to our national energy requirements. HEU can be used as fuel in naval reactors, or diluted with depleted uranium for use as fuel in commercial reactors. This paper proposes to use the weapons-grade plutonium as fuel in light water reactors. The first such reactor would demonstrate the dual objectives of producing electrical power and denaturing the plutonium to prevent use in nuclear weapons.

Buckner, M.R.; Parks, P.B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Preparation and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for nuclear astrophysics studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct measurement of reaction cross sections at astrophysical energies often requires the use of solid targets of known thickness, isotopic composition, and stoichiometry that are able to withstand high beam currents for extended periods of time. Here, we report on the production and characterisation of isotopically enriched Ta$_2$O$_5$ targets for the study of proton-induced reactions at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics facility of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The targets were prepared by anodisation of tantalum backings in enriched water (up to 66% in $^{17}$O and up to 96% in $^{18}$O). Special care was devoted to minimising the presence of any contaminants that could induce unwanted background reactions with the beam in the energy region of astrophysical interest. Results from target characterisation measurements are reported, and the conclusions for proton capture measurements with these targets are drawn.

A. Caciolli; D. A. Scott; A. Di Leva; A. Formicola; M. Aliotta; M. Anders; A. Bellini; D. Bemmerer; C. Broggini; M. Campeggio; P. Corvisiero; R. Depalo; Z. Elekes; Zs. Fülöp; G. Gervino; A. Guglielmetti; C. Gustavino; Gy. Gyürky; G. Imbriani; M. Junker; M. Marta; R. Menegazzo; E. Napolitani; P. Prati; V. Rigato; V. Roca; C. Rolfs; C. Rossi Alvarez; E. Somorjai; C. Salvo; O. Straniero; F. Strieder; T. Szücs; F. Terrasi; H. P. Trautvetter; D. Trezzi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Growth and characterization of isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge and {sup 74}Ge single crystals  

SciTech Connect

Isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge and {sup 74}Ge single crystals were successfully gown by a newly developed vertical Bridgman method. The system allows us to reliably grow high purity Ge single crystals of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} volume. To our knowledge, we have grown the first {sup 70}Ge single crystal. The electrically active chemical impurity concentration for both crystals was found to be {approximately}2 {times} cm{sup {minus}3} which is two order of magnitude better that of {sup 74}Ge crystals previously grown by two different groups. Isotopic enrichment of the {sup 70}Ge and the {sup 74}Ge crystals is 96.3% and 96.8%, respectively. The residual chemical impurities present in both crystals were identified as phosphorus, copper, aluminum, and indium. A wide variety of experiments which take advantage of the isotopic purity of our crystals are discussed.

Itoh, K.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Growth and characterization of isotopically enriched [sup 70]Ge and [sup 74]Ge single crystals  

SciTech Connect

Isotopically enriched [sup 70]Ge and [sup 74]Ge single crystals were successfully gown by a newly developed vertical Bridgman method. The system allows us to reliably grow high purity Ge single crystals of approximately 1 cm[sup 3] volume. To our knowledge, we have grown the first [sup 70]Ge single crystal. The electrically active chemical impurity concentration for both crystals was found to be [approximately]2 [times] cm[sup [minus]3] which is two order of magnitude better that of [sup 74]Ge crystals previously grown by two different groups. Isotopic enrichment of the [sup 70]Ge and the [sup 74]Ge crystals is 96.3% and 96.8%, respectively. The residual chemical impurities present in both crystals were identified as phosphorus, copper, aluminum, and indium. A wide variety of experiments which take advantage of the isotopic purity of our crystals are discussed.

Itoh, K.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

276

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

External Photoevaporation of the Solar Nebula: Jupiter's Noble Gas Enrichments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model explaining elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments ($\\sim$3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from ${\\rm H}_{2}$. We argue that external photoevaporation by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed ${\\rm H}_{2}$, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough ($\\lt 30$ K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot \\& Hueso (2006). We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production also is necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water va...

Monga, Nikhil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program: Progress and plans  

SciTech Connect

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results, and new developments which occurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al fuels, was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm/sup 3/ was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40% average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission /sup 99/Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of US university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U/sub 3/Si-Al with 19.75% enrichment and U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al with 45% enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR Program.

Travelli, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

SciTech Connect: "enriched uranium"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

enriched uranium" Find enriched uranium" Find How should I search Scitech Connect ... Basic or Advanced? Basic Search Advanced × Advanced Search Options Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Title: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States) Argonne National Laboratory-Advanced Photon Source (United States) Atlanta Regional Office, Atlanta, GA (United States) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

280

Enrichment of selected fatty acids in broiler tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENRICHMENT OF SELECTED FATTY ACIDS IN BROILER TISSUES A Thesis by JIA-CHYI YAU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Study of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990... Major Subject: Food Science and Technology ENRICHMENT OF SELECTED FATTY ACIDS IN BROILER TISSUES A Thesis by JIA-CHYI YAU Approved as to style and content by A. R. Sams (Chair of Comittee) C. A. Bailey (Member) J. T Eeet n (M mber) R. Creg...

Yau, Jia-Chyi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Random?walk model of isotope enrichment in cascades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steady opertional parameters such as enrichment flow rates isotopic distributions in the product and in the waste and their variation over the cascade are evaluated in terms of transit probabilities and average transit times of different gas molecules in their random walk from one stage to another of a cascade. The random?walk model is also used for describing transient properties i.e. the output response to input perturbation and the relaxation time. Calculations in terms of the model are carried out for UF6 of natural abundance enriched in a diffusion cascade. With the appropriate numerical values the model can also be applied to centrifuge cascades.

I. Kiss; Sz. Vass

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

NNSA NEWS OCTOBER 2010.pmd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2010 National Nuclear Security Administration Monthly News NNSA Completes Largest Fuel Return Campaign NNSA Senior Leadership Team in Place This month, NNSA successfully completed the largest fuel return campaign in the agency's history by removing more than 450 kilograms of Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Maria and Ewa reactors in Swierk, Poland. The nuclear material, enough to make more than 18 nuclear weapons, was sent back to Russia in a series of five shipments. It included the largest single shipment of HEU spent fuel (187 kilograms), which required the entire fleet of spent fuel transportation casks used for transportation of Russian-origin HEU. "This major milestone brings us one step closer to achieving

283

NNSA NEWS OCTOBER 2010.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 National Nuclear Security Administration Monthly News NNSA Completes Largest Fuel Return Campaign NNSA Senior Leadership Team in Place This month, NNSA successfully completed the largest fuel return campaign in the agency's history by removing more than 450 kilograms of Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Maria and Ewa reactors in Swierk, Poland. The nuclear material, enough to make more than 18 nuclear weapons, was sent back to Russia in a series of five shipments. It included the largest single shipment of HEU spent fuel (187 kilograms), which required the entire fleet of spent fuel transportation casks used for transportation of Russian-origin HEU. "This major milestone brings us one step closer to achieving

284

DOE F 1325  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 23, 2010 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-10-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A10OR006) SUBJECT: Final Report on "National Nuclear Security Administration's Contracts for the Down-Blending of Highly Enriched Uranium" TO: Assistant Deputy Administrator for Fissile Materials Disposition, NA-26 Director, Office of Acquisition and Supply Management, NA-63 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE To support nonproliferation objectives, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages a program for converting surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) suitable for use in commercial nuclear reactors. Under this program, NNSA entered into agreements with a private contractor to produce LEU by blending HEU with

285

Commissioning Measurements and Experience Obtained from the Installation of a Fissile Mass Flow monitor in the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) equipment sent earlier to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) at Novouralsk, Russia, was installed and implemented successfully on February 2, 1999. The BDMS installation supports the highly enriched uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program for material subject to monitoring under the HEU purchase agreement between the United States of America (USA) and the Russian Federation (RF). The BDMS consists of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile (uranium-235) Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Enrichment Monitor (EM). Two BDMS?s for monitoring the Main and Reserve HEU blending process lines were installed at UEIP. Independent operation of the FMFM Main and FMFM Reserve was successfully demonstrated for monitoring the fissile mass flow as well as the traceability of HEU to the product low enriched uranium. The FMFM systems failed when both systems were activated during the calibration phase due to a synchronization problem between the systems. This operational failure was caused by the presence of strong electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the blend point. The source-modulator shutter motion of the two FMFM systems was not being properly synchronized because of EMI producing a spurious signal on the synchronization cable connecting the two FMFM cabinets. The signature of this failure was successfully reproduced at ORNL after the visit. This unexpected problem was eliminated by a hardware modification and software improvements during a recent visit (June 9-11, 1999) to UEIP, and both systems are now operating as expected.

March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, V.

1999-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Metal enrichment and reionization constraints on early star formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cut-offs for the IMFs, respectively. Z input denotes the metallicity of the gas from...results of analysis with higher fixed input metallicity for models 2-4 in Fig...not enrich the ISM with the products of nuclear fusion that takes place in the core. The ratio......

J. S. Bagla; Girish Kulkarni; T. Padmanabhan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Marketability of omega-3 fatty acid enriched shell eggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on oxidative stability and flavor of enriched eggs, eggs were collected weekly (week 0, 1, 2, 3, 4) for each of 3 replicates/diet, and all weeks analyzed within 24 hours of the week 0 collection. Effect of storage on flavor of eggs (weeks 0, 2, 4...

Marshall, Autumn Chester

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Nutrient enrichment, biodiversity loss, and consequent declines in ecosystem productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the species compo- sitions, biodiversity, and functioning of terrestrial and marine ecosystems worldwide (1, freshwater, and marine ecosystems (8­15). This has raised concerns that contemporary biodiversity declinesNutrient enrichment, biodiversity loss, and consequent declines in ecosystem productivity Forest

Minnesota, University of

289

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Enrichment, isolation and characterization of fungi tolerant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the petroleum-based transportation fuels (Gomez et al. 2008). Currently, most first-generation biofuels et al. 2004). The recovered cellulose is enzymatically hydrolyzed to glucose at much faster rates and Results: Enrichment experiments performed using inocula treated with [C2mim][OAc] under solid and liquid

Hazen, Terry

290

Enrichment of Heavy Metals in Sediment Resulting from Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, U.K. Heavy metal pollution of soil and water is often associatedEnrichment of Heavy Metals in Sediment Resulting from Soil Erosion on Agricultural Fields J O H N N concentrations of these heavy metals were up to 3.98 times higher in the sediment than in the parent soil

Quinton, John

291

CRAD, Training- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Training Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

292

CRAD, Management- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Management program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

293

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect

Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old ”calutrons” (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation repression. In this scheme a gas, of the selected isotopes for enrichment, is irradiated with a laser at a particular wavelength that would excite only one of the isotopes. The entire gas is subject to low temperatures sufficient to cause condensation on a cold surface. Those molecules in the gas that the laser excited are not as likely to condense as are the unexcited molecules. Hence the gas drawn out of the system will be enriched in the isotope that was excited by the laser. We have evaluated the relative energy required in this process if applied on a commercial scale. We estimate the energy required for laser isotope enrichment is about 20% of that required in centrifuge separations, and 2% of that required by use of "calutrons".

Leonard Bond

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Dust Explosion Characteristics of Coal Dust in an Oxygen Enriched Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to mix pulverised coal with oxygen at concentrations greater than the currently applied 21% may well provide advantages for burner design in oxy/coal fired systems. However the risk of dust explosions increases significantly with increasing oxygen concentration and temperature. In this study the influence of enriched oxygen concentrations is researched on the dust explosion characteristics of Indonesian (Sebuku) high volatile bituminous coal dust and on Pittsburgh Coal n¡8. Both ignition sensitivity characteristics (minimum ignition energy and minimum ignition temperatures) and explosion severity characteristics (maximum explosion pressure, Pmax, and maximum rate of pressure rise, Kst) are investigated.

Frederik Norman; Jan Berghmans; Filip Verplaetsen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Approach to proliferation risk assessment based on multiple objective analysis framework  

SciTech Connect

The approach to the assessment of proliferation risk using the methods of multi-criteria decision making and multi-objective optimization is presented. The approach allows the taking into account of the specifics features of the national nuclear infrastructure, and possible proliferation strategies (motivations, intentions, and capabilities). 3 examples of applying the approach are shown. First, the approach has been used to evaluate the attractiveness of HEU (high enriched uranium)production scenarios at a clandestine enrichment facility using centrifuge enrichment technology. Secondly, the approach has been applied to assess the attractiveness of scenarios for undeclared production of plutonium or HEU by theft of materials circulating in nuclear fuel cycle facilities and thermal reactors. Thirdly, the approach has been used to perform a comparative analysis of the structures of developing nuclear power systems based on different types of nuclear fuel cycles, the analysis being based on indicators of proliferation risk.

Andrianov, A.; Kuptsov, I. [Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineering of NNRU MEPhI (Russian Federation); Studgorodok 1, Obninsk, Kaluga region, 249030 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

RERTR program  

SciTech Connect

The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 at the Argonne National Laboratory by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which continues to fund the program and to manage it in coordination with the U.S. Department of State, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The primary objective of the program is to develop the technology needed to use low-enrichment uranium (LEU) instead of high-enrichment uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors, without significant penalties in experiment performance, economics, or safety. Eliminating the continuing need of HEU supplies for research and test reactors has long been an integral part of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This paper reviews the main accomplishments of the program through the years.

Travelli, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The RERTR program.  

SciTech Connect

The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) by the Department of Energy (DOE), which continues to fund the program and to manage it in coordination with the Department of State (DOS), the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The primary objective of the program is to develop the technology needed to use Low-Enrichment Uranium (LEU) instead of High-Enrichment Uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors, without significant penalties in experiment performance, economics, or safety. Eliminating the continuing need of HEU supplies for research and test reactors has long been an integral part of US nonproliferation policy. This paper reviews the main accomplishments of the program through the years.

Travelli, A.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Our short-term outlook for a wide array of energy prices has been adjusted upward as international and domestic energy supply conditions have tightened. We think that crude oil prices are as likely as not to end the year $2 to $3 per barrel higher than our previous projections. Thus, we think that the probability of West Texas Intermediate costing an average of $30 per barrel or more at midwinter is about 50 percent. On their current track, heating oil prices are likely to be about 30 percent above year-ago levels in the fourth quarter. Prices for Q1 2001 seem more likely now to match or exceed the high level seen in Q1 2000. Tight oil markets this year and an inherent propensity for high gas utilization in incremental power supply have resulted in rising North American natural gas

299

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence arbuscular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence by examining the joint effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment, nitrogen (N) fertilization and plant, community composition, grassland, niche partitioning hypothesis, nitrogen fertilization, plant richness

Minnesota, University of

300

Comparison of enrichment techniques for the isolation of Salmonella sp. from swine feces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seven comparative techniques for isolation. A standard protocol, consisting of xylose lysine tergitol-4 agar (XLT4) paired with a primary enrichment in tetrathionate broth with iodine (TTH) and secondary enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis R10 broth (RV...

Andrews, Kimberley Denise

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Deep-sea bacteria enriched by oil and dispersant from the Deepwater Horizon spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep-sea bacteria enriched by oil and dispersant from the510- Running title: Enrichment of oil degraders from Gulf ofThe Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in a massive influx

Baelum, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Study of Transients in an Enrichment Closed Loop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present thesis a mathematic model is presented in order to describe the dynamic behavior inside a closed enrichment loop, the latter representing a single stage of an uranium gaseous diffusion enrichment cascade.The analytical model is turned into a numerical model, and implemented through a computational code.For the verification of the model, measurements were taken in an experimental circuit using air as the process fluid.This circuit was instrumented so as to register its characteristic thermohydraulic variables.The measured transients were simulated, comparing the numerical results with the experimental measurements.A good agreement between the characteristic setting times and the thermohydraulic parameters evolution was observed.Besides, other transients of two species separation were numerically analyzed, including setting times of each magnitude, behavior of each one of them during different transients, and redistribution of concentrations.

Fernandino, M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Enriching Sustainable Transport Decisions: Inputs from Operations Research and the Management Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to decision processes involving sustainable transportused to enrich sustainable transport decision processes andthe process of making decisions about sustainable transport

Wellar, Barry; Garrison, William

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

An Inspector's Assessment of the New Model Safeguards Approach for Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

This conference paper assesses the changes that are being made to the Model Safeguards Approach for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants.

Curtis, Michael M.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Ontology enrichment through automatic semantic annotation of on-line glossaries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontology enrichment through automatic semantic annotation of on-line glossaries. Roberto Navigli1 enrichment and for document annotation with the concepts and properties of a domain core ontology. Natural in applications, it is necessary to enrich the core structure with the thousands of concepts and instances

Velardi, Paola

307

Enriching a formal ontology with a thesaurus: an application in the cultural heritage domain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enriching a formal ontology with a thesaurus: an application in the cultural heritage domain,velardi@di.uniroma1.it Abstract This paper describes a pattern-based method to automatically enrich a core ontology, using the CIDOC CRM core ontology. To enrich the CIDOC, we use available resources such as the AAT art

Navigli, Roberto

308

Compton DIV: Using a Compton-Based Gamma-Ray Imager for Design Information Verification of Uranium Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study has been performed to determine the potential usefulness of Compton imaging as a tool for design information verification (DIV) of uranium enrichment plants. Compton imaging is a method of gamma-ray imaging capable of imaging with a 360-degree field of view over a broad range of energies. These systems can image a room (with a time span on the order of one hour) and return a picture of the distribution and composition of radioactive material in that room. The effectiveness of Compton imaging depends on the sensitivity and resolution of the instrument as well the strength and energy of the radioactive material to be imaged. This study combined measurements and simulations to examine the specific issue of UF{sub 6} gas flow in pipes, at various enrichment levels, as well as hold-up resulting from the accumulation of enriched material in those pipes. It was found that current generation imagers could image pipes carrying UF{sub 6} in less than one hour at moderate to high enrichment. Pipes with low enriched gas would require more time. It was also found that hold-up was more amenable to this technique and could be imaged in gram quantities in a fraction of an hour. another questions arises regarding the ability to separately image two pipes spaced closely together. This depends on the capabilities of the instrument in question. These results are described in detail. In addition, suggestions are given as to how to develop Compton imaging as a tool for DIV.

Burks, M; Verbeke, J; Dougan, A; Wang, T; Decman, D

2009-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Developing a Methodology for Characterizing the Effects of Building Materials’ Natural Radiation Background on a Radiation Portal Monitoring System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sponsors of this research, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). vi NOMENCLATURE EW Energy Windowing FWHM Full-Width at Half Maximum HEU Highly Enriched Uranium HPGe High-Purity Germanium ISOCS In-Situ Object Counting System MCA Multichannel... Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material ? Diameter ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PMT Photomultiplier Tube PNNL Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PVT Polyvinyl Toluene RDD Radiological Dispersal Device vii RPM Radiation Portal Monitor...

Fitzmaurice, Matthew Blake 1988-

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

310

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously assumed (Q3 instead of Q2). Our current estimate for the average import cost this past January is now $25 per barrel, a nearly $15-per-barrel increase from January 1999. Crude oil prices are expected to remain at relatively high levels for the first half of 2000, but

311

FEMO, A FLOW AND ENRICHMENT MONITOR FOR VERIFYING COMPLIANCE WITH INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS REQUIREMENTS AT A GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A number of countries have received construction licenses or are contemplating the construction of large-capacity gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The capability to independently verify nuclear material flows is a key component of international safeguards approaches, and the IAEA does not currently have an approved method to continuously monitor the mass flow of 235U in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas streams. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating the development of a flow and enrichment monitor, or FEMO, based on an existing blend-down monitoring system (BDMS). The BDMS was designed to continuously monitor both 235U mass flow and enrichment of UF6 streams at the low pressures similar to those which exists at GCEPs. BDMSs have been installed at three sites-the first unit has operated successfully in an unattended environment for approximately 10 years. To be acceptable to GCEP operators, it is essential that the instrument be installed and maintained without interrupting operations. A means to continuously verify flow as is proposed by FEMO will likely be needed to monitor safeguards at large-capacity plants. This will enable the safeguards effectiveness that currently exists at smaller plants to be maintained at the larger facilities and also has the potential to reduce labor costs associated with inspections at current and future plants. This paper describes the FEMO design requirements, operating capabilities, and development work required before field demonstration.

Gunning, John E [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

313

Critical experiments on low-enriched uranium oxide systems with H/U = 2. 03  

SciTech Connect

Seven critical experiments were performed on a horizontal split table machine using 4.48% enriched /sup 235/U uranium oxide (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/). The oxide was compacted to a density of 4.68 g/cm/sup 3/ and placed in 152-mm cubical aluminum cans. Water was added to achieve an H/U atomic ratio of 2.03. Various arrays of oxide cans were distributed on each half of the split table and the separation between halves reduced until criticality occurred. The critical table separation varied from 4.3 mm to 29.3 mm. These experiments were performed in both plastic and concrete reflectors. The first five experiments required the addition of a high-enriched (approx. 93% /sup 235/U) metal driver to achieve criticality. Critical uranium driver masses ranged from 2.765 kg to 13.730 kg for 5 x 5 x 5 arrays of uranium oxide cans. In all five cases, the center can of the array was deleted to accommodate the driver. The uranium oxide mass was 1859.6 kg. Two additional experiments in the plastic reflector contained either 9.3-mm- or 24.3-mm-thick plastic moderator material between the oxide cans. These latter experiments did not require a driver to achieve criticality; and the uranium oxide mass was 723.9 kg for the configuration having the thinner interstitial moderator and 452.4 kg for the other.

Rothe, R E; Goebel, G R

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

SciTech Connect

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Separation of carbon nanotubes into chirally enriched fractions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixture of single-walled carbon nanotubes ("SWNTs") is separated into fractions of enriched chirality by preparing an aqueous suspension of a mixture of SWNTs and a surfactant, injecting a portion of the suspension on a column of separation medium having a density gradient, and centrifuging the column. In some embodiments, salt is added prior to centrifugation. In other embodiments, the centrifugation is performed at a temperature below room temperature. Fractions separate as colored bands in the column. The diameter of the separated SWNTs decreases with increasing density along the gradient of the column. The colored bands can be withdrawn separately from the column.

Doorn, Stephen K. (Los Alamos, NM); Niyogi, Sandip (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division) [Nuclear Engineering Division

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fissile Flow and Enrichment Monitor for GCEP Advanced Safeguards Application  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental data that demonstrate a concept for a {sup 235}U flow and enrichment monitor (FEMO) based on passive measurements of process equipment in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The primary goal of the FEMO is to prevent, without using pipe penetrations or active interrogation with external sources, the production and diversion of undeclared nuclear material. This FEMO concept utilizes: (1) calibrated measurements of {sup 235}U density in cascade headers, and (2) measurements of pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate, which are correlated to the electrical power consumed by the GCEP pumps that transport UF{sub 6} from the cascade to the condensation cylinders. The {sup 235}U density is measured by counting 186 keV emissions using a NaI gamma detector located upstream of the pump. The pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate are determined using a correlation that is a function of the measured pump operational parameters (e.g., electric power consumption and rotational frequency) and the pumping configuration. The concept has been demonstrated in a low-pressure flow loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL] [ORNL; Uckan, Taner [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Variable oxygen/nitrogen enriched intake air system for internal combustion engine applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air supply control system for selectively supplying ambient air, oxygen enriched air and nitrogen enriched air to an intake of an internal combustion engine includes an air mixing chamber that is in fluid communication with the air intake. At least a portion of the ambient air flowing to the mixing chamber is selectively diverted through a secondary path that includes a selectively permeable air separating membrane device due a differential pressure established across the air separating membrane. The permeable membrane device separates a portion of the nitrogen in the ambient air so that oxygen enriched air (permeate) and nitrogen enriched air (retentate) are produced. The oxygen enriched air and the nitrogen enriched air can be selectively supplied to the mixing chamber or expelled to atmosphere. Alternatively, a portion of the nitrogen enriched air can be supplied through another control valve to a monatomic-nitrogen plasma generator device so that atomic nitrogen produced from the nitrogen enriched air can be then injected into the exhaust of the engine. The oxygen enriched air or the nitrogen enriched air becomes mixed with the ambient air in the mixing chamber and then the mixed air is supplied to the intake of the engine. As a result, the air being supplied to the intake of the engine can be regulated with respect to the concentration of oxygen and/or nitrogen.

Poola, Ramesh B. (Woodridge, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL); Cole, Roger L. (Elmhurst, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Assessment tool for nuclear material acquisition pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be obtained. The two types of material used in nuclear weapons are Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium (Pu). Uranium is an element found in nature and is contained in the soil all over the world. However, certain geological formations contain a... (LEU) portion of the network ..................................... 22 Figure 11 Last seciton of the Pu (LEU) portion of the network...................................... 23 Figure 12 Plutonium Section of the Network produced via Natural Uranium...

Ford, David Grant

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Simulated Real-World Energy Impacts of a Thermally Sensitive Powertrain Considering Viscous Losses and Enrichment (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

It is widely understood that cold-temperature engine operation negatively impacts vehicle fuel use due to a combination of increased friction (high-viscosity engine oil) and temporary enrichment (accelerated catalyst heating). However, relatively little effort has been dedicated to thoroughly quantifying these impacts across a large number of driving cycles and ambient conditions. This work leverages high-quality dynamometer data collected at various ambient conditions to develop a modeling framework for quantifying engine cold-start fuel penalties over a wide array of real-world usage profiles. Additionally, mitigation strategies including energy retention and exhaust heat recovery are explored with benefits quantified for each approach.

Wood, E.; Gonder, J.; Lopp, S.; Jehlik, F.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

EIS-0279-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-SA-01: Supplement Analysis -SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0279-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management (DOE/EIS-0279-SA-01 and DOE/EIS-0218-SA-06) This Supplement Analysis evaluates DOE's proposal to change the management method for approximately 3.3 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from melt and dilute to conventional processing in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and to down-blend the resultant highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for use in commercial nuclear reactor fuel. The potential environmental impacts associated with the use of conventional processing, like those associated with the melt and dilute technology, were analyzed in the SRS SNF EIS (DOE/EIS-0279). Separately, DOE proposes to transport target material, which contains HEU

323

Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR using a U7Mo Dispersion Fuel  

SciTech Connect

A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The LEU fuel may be a monolithic foil (LEUm) of U10Mo (10% molybdenum by weight in an alloy with uranium) or a dispersion of U7Mo in aluminum (LEUd). A previous report provided neutronic calculations for the LEUm fuel and this report presents the neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel. The neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel are compared to those previously obtained for the present HEU fuel and the proposed LEUm fuel. The results show no significant differences between the LEUm and the LEUd other than the LEUd fuel requires slightly less uranium than the LEUm fuel due to less molybdenum being present. The calculations include kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions under normal operation and with misloaded fuel elements.

Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Evaluation of potential for xenon oscillation in the N reactor  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the Chernobyl accident, the susceptibility of the N reactor, a large graphite-moderated reactor, to xenon oscillations was studied using the xenon simulation code GFN-XE. Core loadings fueled with low-enriched uranium (LEU) metal fuel and with high-enriched uranium (HEU) alloy fuel were evaluated. Susceptibility to radial, axial, and azimuthal oscillations was computed for a series of variables. An improvement in stability was observed for the alloy fuel core. The results of the GFN-XE analyses indicate that large graphite-moderated reactors can be designed that are not susceptible to xenon oscillations and that different core loadings such as a HEU-Zr fuel load can have an even larger margin of stability.

Finfrock, S.H.; Toffer, H.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Method for enriching a middle isotope using vibration-vibration pumping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for producing isotopically enriched material by vibration-vibration excitation of gaseous molecules wherein a middle mass isotope of an isotopic mixture including lighter and heavier mass isotopes preferentially populates a higher vibrational mode and chemically reacts to provide a product in which it is enriched. The method can be used for vibration-vibration enrichment of .sup.17 O in a CO reactant mixture.

Rich, Joseph W. (East Aurora, NY); Homicz, Gregory F. (Getzville, NY); Bergman, Richard C. (Corfu, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

Ilas, Dan [ORNL] ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Systems approach used in the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

A requirement exists for effective and efficient transfer of technical knowledge from the design engineering team to the production work force. Performance-Based Training (PBT) is a systematic approach to the design, development, and implementation of technical training. This approach has been successfully used by the US Armed Forces, industry, and other organizations. The advantages of the PBT approach are: cost-effectiveness (lowest life-cycle training cost), learning effectiveness, reduced implementation time, and ease of administration. The PBT process comprises five distinctive and rigorous phases: Analysis of Job Performance, Design of Instructional Strategy, Development of Training Materials and Instructional Media, Validation of Materials and Media, and Implementation of the Instructional Program. Examples from the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) are used to illustrate the application of PBT.

Rooks, W.A. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Single Ion Trapping For The Enriched Xenon Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of ? m?? ≃ .010 eV.

Waldman, S J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Event extraction from corefering mentions to enrich semantic web metadata  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since an enormous amount of information is available on the web and much time is needed to find and read the desired information, users require precise information from the documents. More specifically, most users are interested in precise information about events occurring in different parts of the world, such as when and where the event has occurred and who was involved in the event. The task of finding such information is called event extraction. Event extraction from text documents is an important task in the field of natural language processing, as it helps improve information retrieval and summarisation, as well as enriching the semantic web with event-based metadata. This paper provides a method to extract event arguments from corefering sentences of a particular event instance using rule learning based on rough sets. It also provides a metadata adoption strategy to exploit the results in the semantic web environment as metadata.

S. Sangeetha; Michael Arock

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

99.996 %{sup 12}C films isotopically enriched and deposited in situ  

SciTech Connect

Ionizing natural abundance carbon dioxide gas, we extract and mass select the ions, depositing thin films isotopically enriched to 99.9961(4) %{sup 12}C as measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In solid state quantum information, coherence times of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in {sup 12}C enriched diamond exceeding milliseconds demonstrate the viability of NV centers as qubits, motivating improved isotopic enrichment. NV centers in diamond are particularly attractive qubit candidates due to the optical accessibility of the spin states. We present SIMS analysis and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy of {sup 12}C enriched thin film samples grown with this method.

Dwyer, K. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8423 (United States); Pomeroy, J. M.; Simons, D. S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8423 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8423 (United States)

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Tolerate Haploidentical Related-Donor Natural Killer Cell Enriched Infusions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Killer Cell Enriched Infusions Hans Klingemann 1 , CarrieMedical Center leukapheresis and infusion center and MonicaMartinson J, Klingemann H. Infusion of the allogeneic cell

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic enrichment culture Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions in enrichment cultures from northern soils. Appl... Controlled Release of Nitrate and Sulfate to Enhance Anaerobic ......

333

The slightly-enriched spectral shift control reactor  

SciTech Connect

An advanced converter reactor design utilizing mechanical spectral shift control rods in a conventional pressurized water reactor configuration is under investigation. The design is based on the principle that a harder spectrum during the early part of the fuel cycle will result in large neutron captures in fertile {sup 238}U, which can then be burned in situ in a softer spectrum later in the cycle. Preliminary design calculations performed during FY 89 showed that the slightly-enriched spectral shift reactor design offers the benefit of substantially increased fuel resource utilization with the proven safety characteristics of the pressurized water reactor technology retained. Optimization of the fuel design and development of fuel management strategies were carried out in FY 90, along with effort to develop and validate neutronic methodology for tight-lattice configurations with hard spectra. During FY 91, the final year of the grant, the final Slightly-Enriched Spectral Shift Reactor (SESSR) design was determined, and reference design analyses were performed for the assemblies as well as the global core configuration, both at the beginning of cycle (BOC) and with depletion. The final SESSR design results in approximately a 20% increase in the utilization of uranium resources, based on equilibrium fuel cycle analyses. Acceptable pin power peaking is obtained with the final core design, with assembly peaking factors equal to less than 1.04 for spectral shift control rods both inserted and withdrawn, and global peaking factors at BOC predicted to be 1.4. In addition, a negative Moderation Temperature Coefficient (MTC) is maintained for BOC, which is difficult to achieve with conventional advanced converter designs based on a closed fuel cycle. The SESSR design avoids the need for burnable poison absorber, although they could be added if desired to increase the cycle length while maintaining a negative MTC.

Martin, W.R.; Lee, J.C.; Larsen, E.W. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Edlund, M.C. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Status of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program  

SciTech Connect

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1987, the major events, findings and activities of 1988 are reviewed. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a formal and generic approval of the use of U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel in research and test reactors, with densities up to 4.8 g U/cmT. New significant findings from postirradiation examinations, from ion-beam irradiations, and from analytical modeling, have raised serious doubts about the potential of LEU U3Si-Al dispersion fuel for applications requiring very high uranium densities and high burnups (>6 g U/cmT, >50% burnup). As a result of these findings, the fuel development efforts have been redirected towards three new initiatives: (1) a systematic application of ion-beam irradiations to screen new materials; (2) application of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) procedures to produce U3Si2-Al plates with high uranium densities and thin uniform cladding; and (3) application of HIP procedures to produce plates with U3Si wires imbedded in an aluminum matrix, achieving stability, high uranium density, and thin uniform cladding. The new fuel concepts hold the promise of extraordinary performance potential and require approximately five years to develop.

Travelli, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Field Use of NMIS at Oak Ridge  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS), developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12), has been successfully used at Y-12 for nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A). It is particularly useful in the high gamma-ray background of storage arrays and for shielded HEU. With three systems in use at Y-12, NMIS has enhanced the NMC&A capability for verification and for confirmation of materials in storage and for HEU receipts by providing capability not available or practical by other NDA methods for safeguards. It has recently cost-effectively quantified the HEU mass and enrichment of hundreds of HEU metal items to within a total spread of {+-} 5% (3 sigma) with and mean deviations for all HEU verified of + 0.2% for mass and {minus}0.2% for enrichment. Three cart portable systems are easily moved around with minimal impact on facility operations since no permanent dedicated floor space is required. The positive impact of NMIS at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is improved and more cost effective NMC&A as well as the resolution of NMC&A findings. Its operation at the Y-12 Plant is essential for compliance with the NMC&A requirements of the US Department of Energy. NMIS portability has allowed one system to be moved temporarily to the former K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant for characterization of a large deposit of hydrated uranyl fluoride. The impact of this NMIS application was enhanced and verified nuclear criticality safety that led to the safe removal of a large deposit originally estimated by gamma-ray spectrometry and neutron counting to contain 1300 kg of 3.3 wt% {sup 235}U material. NMIS has also been operational at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pantex.

Chiang, L.G.; Conger, M.; Hughes, S.S.; Mattingly, J.K.; McEvers, J.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Perez, R.B.; Turner, C.R.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.

1999-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR  

SciTech Connect

The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Development and processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production-overview of the ANL program  

SciTech Connect

Most of the world`s supply of {sup 99m}Tc for medical purposes is currently produced from the decay of {sup 99}Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) silicide fuel for the HEU alloy and aluminide fuels used in most current target designs will allow equivalent {sup 99}Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium oxide films in other target designs will also allow the substitution of LEU for HEU. During 1995, we have continued to study the modification of current targets and processes to allow the conversion from HEU to LEU. A uranium-metal-foil target was fabricated at ANL and irradiated to prototypic burnup in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. Postirradiation examination indicated that minor design modifications will be required to allow the irradiated foil to be removed for chemical processing. Means to dissolve and process LEU foil have been developed, and a mock LEU foil target was processed in Indonesia. We have also developed means to dissolve the LEU foil in alkaline peroxide, where it can be used to replace HEU targets that are currently dissolved in base before recovering and purifying the {sup 99}Mo. We have also continued work on the dissolution of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and have a firm foundation on dissolving these targets in alkaline peroxide. The technology-exchange agreement with Indonesia is well underway, and we hope to expand our international cooperations in 1996.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

PERCEPTUALLY BASED AUTOMATIC PROSODY LABELING AND PROSODICALLY ENRICHED UNIT SELECTION IMPROVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inventory and in prosodically enriched unit selection. A formal listening test was conducted to com­ parePERCEPTUALLY BASED AUTOMATIC PROSODY LABELING AND PROSODICALLY ENRICHED UNIT SELECTION IMPROVE the process of prosodically la­ beling our TTS inventory. However, reliability among label­ ers for some To

Greenberg, Albert

339

Trophic transfer of biodiversity effects: functional equivalence of prey diversity and enrichment?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trophic transfer of biodiversity effects: functional equivalence of prey diversity and enrichment-Martinsried, Germany 2 European Institute for Marine Studies, Place Nicolas Copernic, Technopo^ le Brest-Iroise, 29280 Keywords Biodiversity, carbon-to-phosphorus ratio, chlorophytes, Daphnia magna, enrichment, light intensity

Boyer, Edmond

340

Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Experiment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard J. Norby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Experiment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard J. Norby PARTICIPATING Research PARTNERS: Argonne National Lab, Chapman University, University of Illinois-Chicago, University Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) project is to understand how the eastern deciduous forest

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: magnitude, mechanisms and its implications for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: magnitude, mechanisms and its implications of SOC enrichment in dust emissions is necessary to evaluate the impact of wind erosion on the carbon) across landscapes and soil carbon emissions (van Oost et al., 2007). The dust cycle rep- resents

342

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

343

New Measures to Safeguard Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

As Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs) increase in separative work unit (SWU) capacity, the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) model safeguards approach needs to be strengthened. New measures to increase the effectiveness of the safeguards approach are being investigated that will be mutually beneficial to the facility operators and the IAEA. One of the key concepts being studied for application at future GCEPs is embracing joint use equipment for process monitoring of load cells at feed and withdrawal (F/W) stations. A mock F/W system was built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to generate and collect F/W data from an analogous system. The ORNL system has been used to collect data representing several realistic normal process and off-normal (including diversion) scenarios. Emphasis is placed on the novelty of the analysis of data from the sensors as well as the ability to build information out of raw data, which facilitates a more effective and efficient verification process. This paper will provide a progress report on recent accomplishments and next steps.

Whitaker, Jr., James [ORNL; Garner, James R [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL; Lockwood, Dunbar [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA; Gilligan, Kimberly V [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Hooper, David A [ORNL; Henkel, James J [ORNL; Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex, Piketon, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (PUEC), conducted August 4 through August 15, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team specialists are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at PUEC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the PUEC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the PUEC Survey. 55 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Non-Proliferating Fuel Cycle: No Enrichment, Reprocessing or Accessible Spent Fuel - 12375  

SciTech Connect

Current fuel cycles offer a number of opportunities for access to plutonium, opportunities to create highly enriched uranium and access highly radioactive wastes to create nuclear weapons and 'dirty' bombs. The non-proliferating fuel cycle however eliminates or reduces such opportunities and access by eliminating the mining, milling and enrichment of uranium. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces the production of plutonium per unit of energy created, eliminates reprocessing and the separation of plutonium from the spent fuel and the creation of a stream of high-level waste. It further simplifies the search for land based deep geologic repositories and interim storage sites for spent fuel in the USA by disposing of the spent fuel in deep sub-seabed sediments after storing the spent fuel at U.S. Navy Nuclear Shipyards that have the space and all of the necessary equipment and security already in place. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces transportation risks by utilizing barges for the collection of spent fuel and transport to the Navy shipyards and specially designed ships to take the spent fuel to designated disposal sites at sea and to dispose of them there in deep sub-seabed sediments. Disposal in the sub-seabed sediments practically eliminates human intrusion. Potential disposal sites include Great Meteor East and Southern Nares Abyssal Plain. Such sites then could easily become international disposal sites since they occur in the open ocean. It also reduces the level of human exposure in case of failure because of the large physical and chemical dilution and the elimination of a major pathway to man-seawater is not potable. Of course, the recovery of uranium from sea water and the disposal of spent fuel in sub-seabed sediments must be proven on an industrial scale. All other technologies are already operating on an industrial scale. If externalities, such as reduced terrorist threats, environmental damage (including embedded emissions), long term care, reduced access to 'dirty' bomb materials, the social and political costs of siting new facilities and the psychological impact of no solution to the nuclear waste problem, were taken into account, the costs would be far lower than those of the present fuel cycle. (authors)

Parker, Frank L. [Vanderbilt University (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Student science enrichment training program. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Historically Black Colleges and Universities wing of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) provided funds to Claflin College, Orangeburg, S.C. To conduct a student Science Enrichment Training Program for a period of six weeks during 1991 summer. Thirty participants were selected from a pool of applicants, generated by the High School Seniors and Juniors and the Freshmen class of 1990-1991 at Claflin College. The program primarily focused on high ability students, with potential for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Careers. The major objectives of the program were W to increase the pool of well qualified college entering minority students who will elect to go in Physical Sciences and Engineering and (II) to increase the enrollment in Chemistry and Preprofessional-Pre-Med, Pre-Dent, etc.-majors at Claflin College by including the Claflin students to participate in summer academic program. The summer academic program consisted of Chemistry and Computer Science training. The program placed emphasis upon laboratory experience and research. Visits to Scientific and Industrial laboratories were arranged. Guest speakers which were drawn from academia, industry and several federal agencies, addressed the participants on the future role of Science in the industrial growth of United States of America. The guest speakers also acted as role models for the participants. Several videos and films, emphasizing the role of Science in human life, were also screened.

Sandhu, S.S.

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Methods for nondestructive assay holdup measurements in shutdown uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

Measurement surveys of uranium holdup using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are being conducted for shutdown gaseous diffusion facilities at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant). When in operation, these facilities processed UF{sub 6} with enrichments ranging from 0.2 to 93 wt % {sup 235}U. Following final shutdown of all process facilities, NDA surveys were initiated to provide process holdup data for the planning and implementation of decontamination and decommissioning activities. A three-step process is used to locate and quantify deposits: (1) high-resolution gamma-ray measurements are performed to generally define the relative abundances of radioisotopes present, (2) sizable deposits are identified using gamma-ray scanning methods, and (3) the deposits are quantified using neutron measurement methods. Following initial quantitative measurements, deposit sizes are calculated; high-resolution gamma-ray measurements are then performed on the items containing large deposits. The quantitative estimates for the large deposits are refined on the basis of these measurements. Facility management is using the results of the survey to support a variety of activities including isolation and removal of large deposits; performing health, safety, and environmental analyses; and improving facility nuclear material control and accountability records. 3 refs., 1 tab.

Hagenauer, R.C.; Mayer, R.L. II.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Enrichment and Molecular Characterization of a Bacterial Culture That Degrades Methoxy-Methyl Urea Herbicides and Their Aniline Derivatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to identify the bacterial composition of a coculture capable of...changes in bacterial species composition in enrichment cultures prepared...Changes in bacterial species composition in enrichment cultures with...and remediation for retail agrochemical dealers R. Pasquini G...

Said El-Fantroussi

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Robotic Enrichment Processing of Roche 454 Titanium Emlusion PCR at the DOE Joint Genome Institute  

SciTech Connect

Enrichment of emulsion PCR product is the most laborious and pipette-intensive step in the 454 Titanium process, posing the biggest obstacle for production-oriented scale up. The Joint Genome Institute has developed a pair of custom-made robots based on the Microlab Star liquid handling deck manufactured by Hamilton to mediate the complexity and ergonomic demands of the 454 enrichment process. The robot includes a custom built centrifuge, magnetic deck positions, as well as heating and cooling elements. At present processing eight emulsion cup samples in a single 2.5 hour run, these robots are capable of processing up to 24 emulsion cup samples. Sample emulsions are broken using the standard 454 breaking process and transferred from a pair of 50ml conical tubes to a single 2ml tube and loaded on the robot. The robot performs the enrichment protocol and produces beads in 2ml tubes ready for counting. The robot follows the Roche 454 enrichment protocol with slight exceptions to the manner in which it resuspends beads via pipette mixing rather than vortexing and a set number of null bead removal washes. The robotic process is broken down in similar discrete steps: First Melt and Neutralization, Enrichment Primer Annealing, Enrichment Bead Incubation, Null Bead Removal, Second Melt and Neutralization and Sequencing Primer Annealing. Data indicating our improvements in enrichment efficiency and total number of bases per run will also be shown.

Hamilton, Matthew; Wilson, Steven; Bauer, Diane; Miller, Don; Duffy-Wei, Kecia; Hammon, Nancy; Lucas, Susan; Pollard, Martin; Cheng, Jan-Fang

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

FACE: Free-Air CO[sub 2] Enrichment for plant research in the field  

SciTech Connect

Research programs concerning the effects of Carbon Dioxide(CO)[sub 2] on cotton plants are described. Biological responses studied include foliage response to CO[sub 2] fluctuations; yield of cotton exposed to CO[sub 2] enrichment; responses of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance to elevated CO[sub 2] in field-grown cotton; cotton leaf and boll temperatures; root response to CO[sub 2] enrichment; and evaluations of cotton response to CO[sub 2] enrichment with canopy reflectance observations.

Hendrey, G.R. (ed.)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

FACE: Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment for plant research in the field  

SciTech Connect

Research programs concerning the effects of Carbon Dioxide(CO){sub 2} on cotton plants are described. Biological responses studied include foliage response to CO{sub 2} fluctuations; yield of cotton exposed to CO{sub 2} enrichment; responses of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance to elevated CO{sub 2} in field-grown cotton; cotton leaf and boll temperatures; root response to CO{sub 2} enrichment; and evaluations of cotton response to CO{sub 2} enrichment with canopy reflectance observations.

Hendrey, G.R. [ed.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Combustion and \\{NOx\\} emissions of biomass-derived syngas under various gasification conditions utilizing oxygen-enriched-air and steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the \\{NOx\\} emissions from combustion of syngas derived from gasification of three different biomass feedstock (i.e., pine, maple–oak mixture, and seed corn) at different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions. Three different oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions were tested for each feedstock, thus resulting in nine different sets of syngas. The biomass-derived syngas was burned in an industrial burner that was integrated into the gasification system. The gasifier and burner are rated at 800 kW and 879 kW thermal, respectively. For each set of biomass-derived syngas, \\{NOx\\} emissions were measured at different burner operating conditions including various heat rates and equivalence ratios using emission analyzers with chemiluminescence technology. All the combustion test conditions are in the lean mixture ranges in order to avoid the peak temperature limitation of both the burner and combustion chamber. Results show that \\{NOx\\} emissions using syngas obtained from woody feedstock decrease almost linearly as the combustion mixture becomes leaner and the heat rate decreases. When compared to natural gas, syngas from both woody feedstock generates higher \\{NOx\\} emissions even when the heat rates are comparable, indicating that fuel \\{NOx\\} formation is highly important in biomass-derived syngas combustion. In contrast to syngas from woody feedstock, syngas from seed corn results in peak \\{NOx\\} emissions before \\{NOx\\} decreases with leaner conditions. The trend is observed for all fuel flow rates and all oxygen-enriched-air and steam conditions of seed corn-derived syngas. Among the three feedstock, seed corn has the highest nitrogen content which yields the highest ammonia concentration in syngas, which, in turn, results in the highest \\{NOx\\} emissions for all test conditions. Overall, the \\{NOx\\} emissions from seed corn-derived syngas combustion are approximately in the range of 450–900 ppm higher compared to those from wood-derived syngas combustion.

Cuong Van Huynh; Song-Charng Kong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Localized Si enrichment in coherent self-assembled Ge islands grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (001)Si single crystal  

SciTech Connect

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) have been used to investigate the morphology, structure, and composition of self-assembled Ge islands grown on Si (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at different temperatures. Increasing the temperature from 550 Degree-Sign C to 700 Degree-Sign C causes progressive size and shape uniformity, accompanied by enhanced Si-Ge intermixing within the islands and their wetting layer. Elemental maps obtained by energy filtered-TEM (EF-TEM) clearly show pronounced Si concentration not only in correspondence of island base perimeters, but also along their curved surface boundaries. This phenomenon is strengthened by an increase of the growth temperature, being practically negligible at 550 Degree-Sign C, while very remarkable already at 650 Degree-Sign C. The resulting island shape is affected, since this localized Si enrichment not only provides strain relief near their highly stressed base perimeters but it also influences the cluster surface energy by effective alloying, so as to form Si-enriched SiGe interfaces. Further increase to 700 Degree-Sign C causes a shape transition where more homogenous Si-Ge concentration profiles are observed. The crucial role played by local 'flattened' alloyed clusters, similar to truncated pyramids with larger bases and enhanced Si enrichment at coherently stressed interfaces, has been further clarified by EF-TEM analysis of a multi-layered Ge/Si structure containing stacked Ge islands grown at 650 Degree-Sign C. Sharp accumulation of Si has been here observed not only in proximity of the uncapped island surface in the topmost layer but also at the buried Ge/Si interfaces and even in the core of such capped Ge islands.

Valvo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95127 Catania (Italy); Bongiorno, C.; Giannazzo, F. [IMM-CNR, VIII strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Terrasi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95127 Catania (Italy); MATIS IMM-CNR UOS Catania (Universita), via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

NNSA NEWS DRAFT October final edits 19 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 National Nuclear Security Administration Monthly News On March 22, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at a dedication ceremony recognizing the start-up of operations at the nation's new, one of a kind storage facility for weapons-grade uranium at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF) is a single, 21st century highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage facility that will replace multiple Cold War-era buildings at Y-12. "Your work matters deeply to the safety and security of our country, and we must ensure you have the tools - like the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility - to do your jobs," said Secretary Chu. "The Highly Enriched Uranium Material Facility is essential to achieving the

355

NNSA NEWS DRAFT October final edits 19 2009  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 0 National Nuclear Security Administration Monthly News On March 22, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at a dedication ceremony recognizing the start-up of operations at the nation's new, one of a kind storage facility for weapons-grade uranium at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF) is a single, 21st century highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage facility that will replace multiple Cold War-era buildings at Y-12. "Your work matters deeply to the safety and security of our country, and we must ensure you have the tools - like the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility - to do your jobs," said Secretary Chu. "The Highly Enriched Uranium Material Facility is essential to achieving the

356

High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress and Challenges in Enzyme Development for Biomasscommunities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks AmithaStrain selection, enzyme extraction optimization, and

Reddy, A. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks Amitha P. ReddyVanderGheynst 1,2* Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA2009. The water footprint of bioenergy. Proceedings of the

Reddy, A. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

employing plant biomass conversion to fuels (Gerbens-LeenesLaboratory, 94551; Biomass Science and Conversion Technologybiomass for liquid fuel production. Limiting factors to their utilization include sustainable harvest, transportation, storage and conversion

Reddy, A. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan U.S.-Russia Twenty-Year Partnership Completes Final Milestone in Converting 20,000 Russian Nuclear...

360

PIK-2 Reactor with a Low Consumption of High-Enrichment Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculations of the possibility of switching the matrix of the fuel-element cores and the vessel with the reactor envelope to weakly neutron-absorbing aluminum and lowering at the same time the fuel content in...

Yu. V. Petrov; A. N. Erykalov; L. M. Kotova; M. S. Onegin…

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

MOBILE SYSTEMS FOR DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM AND URANIUM CONTAINING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

A mobile melt-dilute (MMD) module for the treatment of aluminum research reactor spent fuel is being developed. The process utilizes a closed system approach to retain fission products/gases inside a sealed canister after treatment. The MMD process melts and dilutes spent fuel with depleted uranium to obtain a fissile fraction of less than 0.2. The final ingot is solidified inside the sealed canister and can be stored safely either wet or dry until final disposition or reprocessing. The MMD module can be staged at or near the research reactor fuel storage sites to facilitate the melt-dilute treatment of the spent fuel into a stable non-proliferable form.

Adams, T

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application December 28, 2009 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application submitted by Areva Enrichment Services LLC to help fund a uranium enrichment facility in Idaho. The simple answer is no. The Act, as passed by Congress, applies only to government procurements. It does not apply to financial assistance programs or loan guarantee programs. The Act, as passed by Congress, also applies only to the investments of the actual offerors (or contractors) for

363

Enrichment and hydrogen production by marine anaerobic hydrogen-producing microflora  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid, alkali, heat-shock, KNO3 and control pretreatment methods applied to anaerobic sludge were evaluated for their ability to selectively enrich the marine hydrogen-producing mixed microflora. Seawater culture ...

JinLing Cai; GuangCe Wang; YanChuan Li; DaLing Zhu…

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The enrichment ratio of atomic contacts in crystals, an indicator derived from the Hirshfeld surface analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An enrichment ratio is derived from the decomposition of the crystal contact surface between pairs of interacting chemical species. The propensity of different contact types to form is investigated.

Jelsch, C.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

Nutrient enrichment and zooplankton effects on the phytoplankton community in microcosms from El Andino reservoir (Venezuela)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To quantify the effects of nutrient enrichment (N and P) and zooplankton grazing on the phytoplankton community structure of El Andino reservoir (Venezuela), in situ microcosms were installed for 6–7 days. Microc...

Ernesto J. González

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of titanium-enriched V. E. Hamilton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of titanium-enriched pyroxenes V. E. Hamilton Hawai, Angra dos Reis, remote sensing Citation: Hamilton, V. E., Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy [Lyon, 1962], and emission [Hamilton, 1998, 2000] spectroscopic studies. These studies have documented

Hamilton, Victoria E.

367

Metal enrichment of the intracluster medium: a three-dimensional picture of chemical and dynamical properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......supply of this enriched gas include galactic winds...baryonic component due to gas cooling, star formation, metal production and energetic and chemical...of the intracluster gas through radial velocity...smaller computational cost. In particular, it......

Sofía A Cora

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Strain aging and strain rate sensitivity of oxygen-enriched (? + ?) Zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flow behavior of oxygen-enriched Zircaloy-2, with oxygen concentrations ranging from 1260 to 12360 ppm, was investigated over the (? +?) phase field and parts of the adjacent ? and? phase regions. The flow cu...

R. Choubey; J. J. Jonas; B. A. Cheadle

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Laser ablation ignition of premixed methane and oxygen-enriched air mixtures using a tantalum target  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the laser ablation ignition of premixed methane and oxygen-enriched air mixtures using a tantalum target. The minimum laser pulse energy (MPE) of the ablation ignition was...

Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Yu, Yang; Liu, Chang; Chen, Deying

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Water Quality and Enrichment of Sedimentary Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) Relation to Fish Culture in Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the potential effects of the fish aquaculture on water quality and enrichment of PAHs in the aquaculture surface sediments. Water quality parameters and PAHs were determined at fish far...

Ananthy Retnam; Hafizan Juahir; Mohamad Pauzi Zakaria…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2 Carbon Dioxide Enrichment: Data on the Response of Cotton to Varying CO2 Irrigation, and Nitrogen (1992) (NDP-037) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/vrc.ndp037 image Data image PDF file Investigators B. A. Kimball, J. R. Mauney, R. L. La Morte, G. Guinn, F. S. Nakayama, J. W. Radin, E. A. Lakatos, S. T. Michell, L. L. Parker, G. J. Peresta, P. E. Nixon III, B. Savoy, S. M. Harris, R. MacDonald, H. Pros, and J. Martinez This NDP presents data on the effects of continuous CO2 enrichment of cotton during five consecutive growing seasons, 1983 to 1987, under both optimal and limiting levels of water and nitrogen. Unlike many prior CO2-enrichment experiments in growth chambers or greenhouses, these studies were conducted on field-planted cotton at close to natural conditions with

372

Mathematical modeling of a CO?b2?s-enriched waterflood in fractured reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF A COg-ENRICHED WATERFLOOD IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Thesis by STANLEY BRIAN LITTLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF A COZ-ENRICHED WATERFI. OOD IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Thesis by STANLEY BRIAN LITTLE Approved as to style and content by C. H. Wu (Chair of Committee...

Little, Stanley Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Standard test method for measurement of 235U fraction using enrichment meter principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of the fraction of 235U in uranium using measurement of the 185.7 keV gamma-ray produced during the decay of 235U. 1.2 This test method is applicable to items containing homogeneous uranium-bearing materials of known chemical composition in which the compound is considered infinitely thick with respect to 185.7 keV gamma-rays. 1.3 This test method can be used for the entire range of 235U fraction as a weight percent, from depleted (0.2 % 235U) to highly enriched (97.5 % 235U). 1.4 Measurement of items that have not reached secular equilibrium between 238U and 234Th may not produce the stated bias when low-resolution detectors are used with the computational method listed in Annex A2. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety co...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Use of bromodeoxyuridine immunocapture to identify psychrotolerant phenanthrene-degrading bacteria in phenanthrene-enriched polluted Baltic Sea sediments  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to enrich and identify psychrotolerant phenanthrenedegrading bacteria from polluted Baltic Sea sediments. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediments were spiked with phenanthrene and incubated for 2 months in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine that is incorporated into the DNA of replicating cells. The bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA was extracted by immunocapture and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing to identify bacterial populations that were growing. In addition, degradation genes were quantified in the bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA by real-time PCR. Phenanthrene concentrations decreased after 2 months of incubation in the phenanthrene-enriched sediments and this reduction correlated to increases in copy numbers of xylE and phnAc dioxygenase genes. Representatives of Exiguobacterium, Schewanella,Methylomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacteroides and an uncultured Deltaproteobacterium and a Gammaproteobacterium dominated the growing community in the phenanthrene spiked sediments. Isolates that were closely related to three of these bacteria (two pseudomonads and an Exiguobacterium sp.) could reduce phenanthrene concentrations in pure cultures and they all harbored phnAc dioxygenase genes. These results confirm that this combination of culture-based and molecular approaches was useful for identification of actively growing bacterial species with a high potential for phenanthrene degradation.

Edlund, A.; Jansson, J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Summary of INEL research on the iron-enriched basalt waste form  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the knowledge base on the iron-enriched basalt (IEB) waste form developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during 1979--1982. The results presented discuss the applicability of IEB in converting retrieved transuranic (TRU) waste from INEL`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) into a vitreous/ceramic (glassy/rock) stable waste form suitable for permanent disposal in an appropriate repository, such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Borosilicate glass (BSG), the approved high-level waste form, appears unsuited for this application. Melting the average waste-soil mix from the RWMC produces the IEB composition and attempting to convert IEB to the BSG composition would require additions of substantial B{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Na, and SiO{sub 2} (glass frit). IEB requires processing temperatures of 1400 to 1600{degrees}C, depending upon the waste composition. Production of the IEB waste form, using Joule heated melters, has proved difficult in the past because of electrode and refractory corrosion problems associated with the high temperature melts. Higher temperature electric melters (arc and plasma) are available to produce this final waste form. Past research focused on extensive slag property measurements, waste form leachability tests, mechanical, composition, and microstructure evaluations, as well as a host of experiments to improve production of the waste form. Past INEL studies indicated that the IEB glass-ceramic is a material that will accommodate and stabilize a wide range of heterogeneous waste materials, including long lived radionuclides and scrap metals, while maintaining a superior level of chemical and physical performance characteristics. Controlled cooling of the molten IEB and subsequent heat treatment will produce a glass-ceramic waste form with superior leach resistance.

Reimann, G.A.; Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Summary of INEL research on the iron-enriched basalt waste form  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the knowledge base on the iron-enriched basalt (IEB) waste form developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during 1979--1982. The results presented discuss the applicability of IEB in converting retrieved transuranic (TRU) waste from INEL's Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) into a vitreous/ceramic (glassy/rock) stable waste form suitable for permanent disposal in an appropriate repository, such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Borosilicate glass (BSG), the approved high-level waste form, appears unsuited for this application. Melting the average waste-soil mix from the RWMC produces the IEB composition and attempting to convert IEB to the BSG composition would require additions of substantial B{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Na, and SiO{sub 2} (glass frit). IEB requires processing temperatures of 1400 to 1600{degrees}C, depending upon the waste composition. Production of the IEB waste form, using Joule heated melters, has proved difficult in the past because of electrode and refractory corrosion problems associated with the high temperature melts. Higher temperature electric melters (arc and plasma) are available to produce this final waste form. Past research focused on extensive slag property measurements, waste form leachability tests, mechanical, composition, and microstructure evaluations, as well as a host of experiments to improve production of the waste form. Past INEL studies indicated that the IEB glass-ceramic is a material that will accommodate and stabilize a wide range of heterogeneous waste materials, including long lived radionuclides and scrap metals, while maintaining a superior level of chemical and physical performance characteristics. Controlled cooling of the molten IEB and subsequent heat treatment will produce a glass-ceramic waste form with superior leach resistance.

Reimann, G.A.; Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Growth of high-temperature superconductor crystals from flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystallization of high-temperature superconductors was studied in La-Sr-Cu-O,...2Cu3O6.5+x were obtained by spontaneous crystallization from homogeneous nonstoichiometric melts enriched in bariu...

L N Demianets; A B Bykov; O K Melnikov; S M Stishov

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nuclear non-proliferation regime effectiveness : an integrated methodology for analyzing highly enriched uranium production scenarios at gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dramatic change in the international security environment after the collapse of the bipolar system has had a negative impact on the effectiveness of the existing nuclear non-proliferation regime. Furthermore, the success ...

Kwak, Taeshin (Taeshin S.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Summer Enrichment Camp 2014 The Uni High Summer Enrichment Camp is open to all students who are going into the 6th or 7th grade. We support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

____ Fantasy Accessories: Masks, Crowns, Shields, & Scepters ____ Geometry & 3D Printing** ____ At the Reader

Bashir, Rashid

380

Examination of the proposed conversion of the U.S. Navy nuclear fleet from highly enriched Uranium to low enriched Uranium .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??.The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons creates a loophole that allows a non-nuclear-weapon country to avoid international safeguards governing fissile materials if it… (more)

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Statistical Hot Channel Analysis for the NBSR  

SciTech Connect

A statistical analysis of thermal limits has been carried out for the research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The objective of this analysis was to update the uncertainties of the hot channel factors with respect to previous analysis for both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. Although uncertainties in key parameters which enter into the analysis are not yet known for the LEU core, the current analysis uses reasonable approximations instead of conservative estimates based on HEU values. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) were obtained for critical heat flux ratio (CHFR), and onset of flow instability ratio (OFIR). As was done previously, the Sudo-Kaminaga correlation was used for CHF and the Saha-Zuber correlation was used for OFI. Results were obtained for probability levels of 90%, 95%, and 99.9%. As an example of the analysis, the results for both the existing reactor with HEU fuel and the LEU core show that CHFR would have to be above 1.39 to assure with 95% probability that there is no CHF. For the OFIR, the results show that the ratio should be above 1.40 to assure with a 95% probability that OFI is not reached.

Cuadra A.; Baek J.

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

Modeling of UF{sub 6} enrichment with gas centrifuges for nuclear safeguards activities  

SciTech Connect

The physical modeling of uranium isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U) separation process by centrifugation of is a key aspect for predicting the nuclear fuel enrichment plant performances under surveillance by the Nuclear Safeguards Authorities. In this paper are illustrated some aspects of the modeling of fast centrifuges for UF{sub 6} gas enrichment and of a typical cascade enrichment plant with the Theoretical Centrifuge and Cascade Simulator (TCCS). The background theory for reproducing the flow field characteristics of a centrifuge is derived from the work of Cohen where the separation parameters are calculated using the solution of a differential enrichment equation. In our case we chose to solve the hydrodynamic equations for the motion of a compressible fluid in a centrifugal field using the Berman - Olander vertical velocity radial distribution and the solution was obtained using the Matlab software tool. The importance of a correct estimation of the centrifuge separation parameters at different flow regimes, lies in the possibility to estimate in a reliable way the U enrichment plant performances, once the separation external parameters are set (feed flow rate and feed, product and tails assays). Using the separation parameters of a single centrifuge allow to determine the performances of an entire cascade and, for this purpose; the software Simulink was used. The outputs of the calculation are the concentrations (assays) and the flow rates of the enriched (product) and depleted (tails) gas mixture. These models represent a valid additional tool, in order to verify the compliance of the U enrichment plant operator declarations with the 'on site' inspectors' measurements.

Mercurio, G.; Peerani, P.; Richir, P.; Janssens, W.; Eklund, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements Via Fermi, 2749-TP181,20127 Ispra (Italy)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Plutonium Disposition Program Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Plutonium Disposition Program Fact Sheet Plutonium Disposition Program Jun 26, 2013 SUPPORTING NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION Weapon-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) are the critical ingredients for making a nuclear weapon. With the end of the Cold War, hundreds of tons of these materials were determined to be surplus to U.S. and Russian defense needs. Denying access to plutonium and HEU is the best way to prevent nuclear proliferation to rogue states and terrorist organizations. The most certain method to prevent these materials from falling into the wrong hands is to dispose of them. During the April 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov signed a protocol

384

The MARVEL assembly for neutron multiplication  

SciTech Connect

A new multiplying test assembly is under development at Idaho National Laboratory to support research, validation, evaluation, and learning. The item is comprised of three stacked, highly-enriched uranium (HEU) cylinders, each 11.4 cm in diameter and having a combined height of up to 11.7 cm. The combined mass of all three cylinders is 20.3 kg of HEU. Calculations for the bare configuration of the assembly indicate a multiplication level of >3.5 (keff=0.72). Reflected configurations of the assembly, using either polyethylene or tungsten, are possible and have the capability of raising the assembly's multiplication level to greater than 10. This paper describes simulations performed to assess the assembly's multiplication level under different conditions and describes the resources available at INL to support the use of these materials. We also describe some preliminary calculations and test activities using the assembly to study neutron multiplication.

David L. Chichester; Mathew T. Kinlaw

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development of a New Multiplying Assembly for Research, Validation, Evaluation, and Learning  

SciTech Connect

A new multiplying test assembly is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support research, validation, evaluation, and learning. The item is comprised of two stacked highly-enriched uranium (HEU) cylinders each 11.4 cm in diameter and having a combined height of 8.4 cm. The combined mass is 14.4 kg of HEU. Calculations for the bare configuration of the assembly indicate a multiplication level of >2.5 (keff = 0.62). Reflected configurations of the assembly, using either polyethylene or tungsten, are possible and have the capability of raising its multiplication level to approximately 8. This paper will describe the MCNP calculations performed to assess the assembly's multiplication level under different conditions and describe the resource available at INL to support visiting researchers in their use of the material. We will also describe some preliminary calculations and test activities using the assembly to study neutron multiplicity.

David L. Chichester

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

L.E.A.P. 2010 LEARNING ENRICHMENT ADVANCEMENT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master Universities Engineering Faculty, we are able to introduce high school students to a variety of career options that they may not of found elsewhere. At L.E.A.P. we are dedicated to the development of creativity, innovationMaster University, IAMI, and the Faculty of Engineering, L.E.A.P. has again provided an introduction to engineering

Thompson, Michael

387

Lithium Isotope Separation & Enrichment Technologies (4577), 2/9/2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lithium Isotope Separation & Enrichment Technologies (4577) Lithium Isotope Separation & Enrichment Technologies (4577) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: Submit by E-mail This is entirely a paper study. The scope of this Cooperative Research and Development (CRADA) is to: 1) systematically review existing potential lithium enrichment processes, 2) evaluate the individual process, 3) determine the economic feasibility, 4) rank the processes as a function of economic feasibility, technical probability, Health, Safety and Environmental impacts, 5) identify best candidate technology for proof of principle evaluation, 6) develop outside funding proposals, and 7) pursue funding to perform proof of principle/prototyping of candidate

388

Axi-symmetrical flow reactor for [sup 196]Hg photochemical enrichment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an improved photochemical reactor useful for the isotopic enrichment of a predetermined isotope of mercury, especially, [sup 196]Hg. Specifically, two axi-symmetrical flow reactors were constructed according to the teachings of the present invention. These reactors improve the mixing of the reactants during the photochemical enrichment process, affording higher yields of the desired [sup 196]Hg product. Measurements of the variation of yield (Y) and enrichment factor (E) along the flow axis of these reactors indicates very substantial improvement in process uniformity compared to previously used photochemical reactor systems. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the photoreactor system was built such that the reactor chamber was removable from the system without disturbing the location of either the photochemical lamp or the filter employed therewith. 10 figures.

Grossman, M.W.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Application of atomic vapor laser isotope separation to the enrichment of mercury  

SciTech Connect

Workers at GTE/Sylvania have shown that the efficiency of fluorescent lighting may be markedly improved using mercury that has been enriched in the /sup 196/Hg isotope. A 5% improvement in the efficiency of fluorescent lighting in the United States could provide a savings of approx. 1 billion dollars in the corresponding reduction of electrical power consumption. We will discuss the results of recent work done at our laboratory to develop a process for enriching mercury. The discussion will center around the results of spectroscopic measurements of excited state lifetimes, photoionization cross sections and isotope shifts. In addition, we will discuss the mercury separator and supporting laser mesurements of the flow properties of mercury vapor. We will describe the laser system which will provide the photoionization and finally discuss the economic details of producing enriched mercury at a cost that would be attractive to the lighting industry.

Crane, J.K.; Erbert, G.V.; Paisner, J.A.; Chen, H.L.; Chiba, Z.; Beeler, R.G.; Combs, R.; Mostek, S.D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Challenge on Ca-48 enrichment for CANDLES double beta decay experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical isotope effects of calcium were studied by liquid-liquid extraction using a crown ether of dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 for the purpose of finding a cost-effective and efficient way of enrichment of Ca-48 towards the study of the neutrinoless double beta decay of Ca-48. We evaluated each contribution ratio of the field shift effect and the hyperfine splitting shift effect to the mass effect of the calcium isotopes for the first time. The present preliminary result suggests the contribution of the field shift effect is small, especially for Ca-40-Ca-48 case, compared with the case of Chromium trichloride-crown in which the isotope enrichment factors are strongly affected by the field shifts. These indications are promising towards the mass producion of enriched Ca-48 by the chemical separation method.

R. Hazama; Y. Tatewaki; T. Kishimoto; K. Matsuoka; N. Endo; K. Kume; Y. Shibahara; M. Tanimizu

2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

391

Metal enriched gaseous halos around distant radio galaxies: Clues to feedback in galaxy formation  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of an optical and near-IR spectroscopic study of giant nebular emission line halos associated with three z > 3 radio galaxies, 4C 41.17, 4C 60.07 and B2 0902+34. Previous deep narrow band Ly{alpha} imaging had revealed complex morphologies with sizes up to 100 kpc, possibly connected to outflows and AGN feedback from the central regions. The outer regions of these halos show quiet kinematics with typical velocity dispersions of a few hundred km s{sup -1}, and velocity shears that can mostly be interpreted as being due to rotation. The inner regions show shocked cocoons of gas closely associated with the radio lobes. These display disturbed kinematics and have expansion velocities and/or velocity dispersions >1000 km s{sup -1}. The core region is chemically evolved, and we also find spectroscopic evidence for the ejection of enriched material in 4C 41.17 up to a distance of {approx} 60 kpc along the radio-axis. The dynamical structures traced in the Ly{alpha} line are, in most cases, closely echoed in the Carbon and Oxygen lines. This shows that the Ly{alpha} line is produced in a highly clumped medium of small filling factor, and can therefore be used as a tracer of the dynamics of HzRGs. We conclude that these HzRGs are undergoing a final jet-induced phase of star formation with ejection of most of their interstellar medium before becoming 'red and dead' Elliptical galaxies.

Reuland, M; van Breugel, W; de Vries, W; Dopita, A; Dey, A; Miley, G; Rottgering, H; Venemans, B; Stanford, S A; Lacy, M; Spinrad, H; Dawson, S; Stern, D; Bunker, A

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Status Report on the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) for UF6 Cylinder Assay  

SciTech Connect

The Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) system being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). It was designed to determine {sup 235}U mass and enrichment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in product, feed, and tails cylinders (i.e., 30B and 48Y cylinders). These cylinders are found in the nuclear fuel cycle at uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The PNEM is a {sup 3}He-based neutron detection system that consists of two briefcase-sized detector pods. A photograph of the system during characterization at LANL is shown in Fig. 1. Several signatures are currently being studied to determine the most effective measurement and data reduction technique for unfolding {sup 235}U mass and enrichment. The system collects total neutron and coincidence data for both bare and cadmium-covered detector pods. The measurement concept grew out of the success of the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), which is an operator system at Rokkasho Enrichment Plant (REP) that uses total neutron counting to determine {sup 235}U mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The PNEM system was designed with higher efficiency than the UCAS in order to add coincidence counting functionality for the enrichment determination. A photograph of the UCAS with a 48Y cylinder at REP is shown in Fig. 2, and the calibration measurement data for 30B product and 48Y feed and tails cylinders is shown in Fig. 3. The data was collected in a low-background environment, meaning there is very little scatter in the data. The PNEM measurement concept was first presented at the 2010 Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) Annual Meeting. The physics design and uncertainty analysis were presented at the 2010 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Symposium, and the mechanical and electrical designs and characterization measurements were published in the ESARDA Bulletin in 2011.

Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM EVOLUTION. I. TEST OF THE SUBGRID CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT MODEL  

SciTech Connect

We present a one-zone galactic chemical enrichment model that takes into account the contribution of stellar winds from massive stars under the effect of rotation, Type II supernovae, hypernovae, stellar winds from low- and intermediate-mass stars, and Type Ia supernovae. This enrichment model will be implemented in a galactic model designed to be used as a subgrid treatment for galaxy evolution and outflow generation in large-scale cosmological simulations, in order to study the evolution of the intergalactic medium. We test our enrichment prescription by comparing its predictions with the metallicity distribution function and the abundance patterns of 14 chemical elements observed in the Milky Way stars. To do so, we combine the effect of many stellar populations created from the star formation history of the Galaxy in the solar neighborhood. For each stellar population, we keep track of its specific mass, initial metallicity, and age. We follow the time evolution of every population in order to respect the time delay between the various stellar phases. Our model is able to reproduce the observed abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, S, and Ca. For Si, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn, the fits are still reasonable, but improvements are needed. We marginally reproduce the nitrogen abundance in very low metallicity stars. Overall, our results are consistent with the predicted abundance ratios seen in previous studies of the enrichment history of the Milky Way. We have demonstrated that our semi-analytic one-zone model, which cannot deal with spatial information such as the metallicity gradient, can nevertheless successfully reproduce the global Galactic enrichment evolution obtained by more complex models, at a fraction of the computational cost. This model is therefore suitable for a subgrid treatment of chemical enrichment in large-scale cosmological simulations.

Côté, Benoit; Martel, Hugo; Drissen, Laurent [Département de physique, de Génie Physique et d'Optique, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6 (Canada)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

DOE Announces Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory DOE Announces Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory March 12, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released a Policy Statement on the management of the Department of Energy's (DOE) excess uranium inventory, providing the framework within which DOE will make decisions concerning future use and disposition of its inventory. During the coming year, DOE will continue its ongoing program for downblending excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) into low enriched uranium (LEU), evaluate the benefits of enriching a portion of its excess natural uranium into LEU, and complete an analysis on enriching and/or selling some of its depleted uranium. Specific transactions are expected to occur in

396

An isotopic analysis system for plutonium samples enriched in sup 238 Pu  

SciTech Connect

We have designed and built a gamma-ray spectrometer system that measures the relative plutonium isotopic abundances of plutonium oxide enriched in {sup 238}Pu. The first system installed at Westinghouse Savannah River Company was tested and evaluated on plutonium oxide in stainless steel EP60/61 containers. {sup 238}Pu enrichments ranged from 20% to 85%. Results show that 200 grams of plutonium oxide in an EP60.61 container can be measured with {plus minus}0.3% precision and better than {plus minus}1.0% accuracy in the specific power using a counting time of 50 minutes. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Application of atomic vapor laser isotope separation to the enrichment of mercury  

SciTech Connect

Workers at GTE/Sylvania have shown that the efficiency of fluorescent lighting may be markedly improved using mercury that has been enriched in the /sup 196/Hg isotope. A 5% improvement in the efficiency of fluorescent lighting in the United States could provide a savings of $450 million dollars in the corresponding reduction of electrical power consumption. We discuss the results of recent work done at our laboratory to develop a process for enriching mercury. The discussion centers around the results of spectroscopic measurements of excited-state lifetimes, photoionization cross sections, and isotope shifts.

Crane, J.; Erbert, G.; Paisner, J.; Chen, H.; Chiba, Z.; Beeler, R.; Combs, R.; Mostek, S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25 demolition project. The combined review of the HMS software algorithms and supporting field measurements lead to the conclusion that the majority of process gas pipe measurements are adequately corrected for source self-attenuation using HMS4. While there will be instances where the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup mass presents an infinitely thick deposit to the NaI-HMS4 system these situations are expected to be infrequent. This work confirms that the HMS4 system can quantify UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup, in its current configuration (deposition, enrichment, and geometry), below the DQO levels for the K-25 building decommissioning and demolition project. For an area measurement of process gas pipe in the K-25 building, if an infinitely thick UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposit is identified in the range of enrichment of {approx}4-40%, the holdup quantity exceeds the corresponding DQO established for the K-25 building demolition project.

Rasmussen B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Improved -Elimination-Based Affinity Purification Strategy for Enrichment of Phosphopeptides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved -Elimination-Based Affinity Purification Strategy for Enrichment of Phosphopeptides Derek for affinity purification via disulfide exchange with an activated thiol resin and the develop- ment.) During our experiments, we observed a side reaction in which water was eliminated from unmodified serine

Chait, Brian T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Continental Shelf Research 21 (2001) 587606 Nutrient enrichment off Port Stephens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental Shelf Research 21 (2001) 587­606 Nutrient enrichment off Port Stephens: the role of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans occurred off Port Stephens, on the New South Wales (NSW) central coast water into the euphotic zone off Port Stephens. To this end, a regional model of the NSW coast

Oke, Peter

402

CRAD, Criticality Safety- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility.

403

Broad-Enrich: functional interpretation of large sets of broad genomic regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......permuted ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets. We then illustrate the benefits...Broad-Enrich across the same set of 55 datasets, concentrating on H3K4me1...TES sites. We removed small nuclear RNAs, as they are likely to...Experimental ChIP-seq peak datasets We used 155 ENCODE ChIP-seq......

Raymond G. Cavalcante; Chee Lee; Ryan P. Welch; Snehal Patil; Terry Weymouth; Laura J. Scott; Maureen A. Sartor

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Student science enrichment training program: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This is a status report on a Student Science Enrichment Training Program held at the campus of Claflin College, Orangeburg, SC. The topics of the report include the objectives of the project, participation experienced, financial incentives and support for the program, curriculum description, and estimated success of the program in stimulating an occupational interest in science and research fields by the students.

Sandhu, S.S.

1989-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

Street Light View: Enriching Navigable Panoramic Street View Maps with Informative Illumination Thumbnails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Street Light View: Enriching Navigable Panoramic Street View Maps with Informative Illumination, Stony Brook University ABSTRACT Google Street View is a technology featured in Google Maps and Google Earth that provides panoramic and immersive views of street scenes in many cities around the world

Mueller, Klaus

406

Enriched stable carbon isotopes in the pore waters of carbonate sediments dominated by seagrasses: Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enriched stable carbon isotopes in the pore waters of carbonate sediments dominated by seagrasses inorganic carbon (d13 C-DIC) were carried out in shallow water carbonate sediments of the Great Bahamas Bank (GBB) to further examine sediment­seagrass relationships and to more quantitatively describe the cou

Burdige, David

407

Enrichment strategies and convergence properties of the XFEM for hydraulic fracture problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enrichment strategies and convergence properties of the XFEM for hydraulic fracture problems Finite Ele- ment Method (XFEM) for modeling hydraulic fractures (HF), two classes of boundary value energy, is not suitable for modeling hydraulic fractures in which the uid and the fracture fronts

Peirce, Anthony

408

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January, 2005 assessment of Conduct of Operations program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

409

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

410

CRAD, Radiological Controls- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

411

Explosions of Syngas/CO2 Mixtures in Oxygen-Enriched Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the scientific works on syngas combustion deal with dry air as oxidizer, whereas very few studies have been carried out on syngas combustion in oxygen-enriched air (i.e., oxy-combustion). In this work, the explosion behavior (peak pressure and ...

Ernesto Salzano; Anna Basco; Francesco Cammarota; Valeria Di Sarli; Almerinda Di Benedetto

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Semi-automatic enrichment of crowdsourced synonymy networks: the WISIGOTH system applied to Wiktionary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Semantic lexical resources are a mainstay of various Natural Language Processing applications. However, comprehensive and reliable resources are rare and not often freely available. Handcrafted resources are too costly for being a general solution while ... Keywords: Collaboratively constructed resources, Random walks, Semantic relatedness, Semi-automatic enrichment, Small worlds, Synonymy networks, Wiktionary

Franck Sajous; Emmanuel Navarro; Bruno Gaume; Laurent Prévot; Yannick Chudy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Semi-automatic endogenous enrichment of collaboratively constructed lexical resources: piggybacking onto wiktionary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lack of large-scale, freely available and durable lexical resources, and the consequences for NLP, is widely acknowledged but the attempts to cope with usual bottlenecks preventing their development often result in dead-ends. This article introduces ... Keywords: collaboratively constructed lexical resources, crowdsourcing, endogenous enrichment, random walks, wiktionary

Franck Sajous; Emmanuel Navarro; Bruno Gaume; Laurent Prévot; Yannick Chudy

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

CRAD, Environmental Protection- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

415

CRAD, DOE Oversight- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Y-12 Site Office's programs for oversight of its contractors at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

416

CRAD, Emergency Management- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Emergency Management program at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

417

CRAD, Safety Basis- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Safety Basis at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

418

ENRICHED STABLE ISOTOPE TARGET PREPARATION AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960s the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Program, through the Isotope Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been developing and supplying, among other things, enriched stable isotope targets for nuclear research around the world. This group also maintains and distributes the DOE inventory of enriched stable isotopes. Chemical and pyrochemical techniques are used to prepare enriched stable isotopes from this inventory in the desired chemical form. Metallurgical, ceramic, or vacuum processing methods are then used to prepare the isotopes in a wide range of physical forms from thin films, foils, and coatings to large fabricated shapes to meet the needs of experimenters. Significant characterization capabilities are also available to assist in the preparation and evaluation of these custom materials. This work is part of the DOE Isotope Program, which recently transferred to the Office of Nuclear Physics, DOE Office of Science, resulting in a stronger emphasis on enabling R&D. This presentation will focus on the custom preparation of enriched stable isotope targets and other research materials.

Aaron, W Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Zevenbergen, Lee [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Safety of CANDU reactors utilizing plutonium-enriched mixed-oxide fuel  

SciTech Connect

Substantial quantities of plutonium have become available as a result of nuclear arms reduction agreements. Irradiation of plutonium enriched fuel in Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) heavy water moderated and cooled reactors, of which there are 22 in operation in Canada, has been evaluated as a means of managing it. This paper summarizes the results of a study of reactor safety.

Chan, P.; Feinroth, H.; Luxat, J.; Pendergast, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Design of an Unattended Environmental Aerosol Sampling and Analysis System for Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

The resources of the IAEA continue to be challenged by the rapid, worldwide expansion of nuclear energy production. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) represent an especially formidable dilemma to the application of safeguard measures, as the size and enrichment capacity of GCEPs continue to escalate. During the early part of the 1990's, the IAEA began to lay the foundation to strengthen and make cost-effective its future safeguard regime. Measures under Part II of 'Programme 93+2' specifically sanctioned access to nuclear fuel production facilities and environmental sampling by IAEA inspectors. Today, the Additional Protocol grants inspection and environmental sample collection authority to IAEA inspectors at GCEPs during announced and low frequency unannounced (LFUA) inspections. During inspections, IAEA inspectors collect environmental swipe samples that are then shipped offsite to an analytical laboratory for enrichment assay. This approach has proven to be an effective deterrence to GCEP misuse, but this method has never achieved the timeliness of detection goals set forth by IAEA. Furthermore it is questionable whether the IAEA will have the resources to even maintain pace with the expansive production capacity of the modern GCEP, let alone improve the timeliness in reaching current safeguards conclusions. New safeguards propositions, outside of familiar mainstream safeguard measures, may therefore be required that counteract the changing landscape of nuclear energy fuel production. A new concept is proposed that offers rapid, cost effective GCEP misuse detection, without increasing LFUA inspection access or introducing intrusive access demands on GCEP operations. Our approach is based on continuous onsite aerosol collection and laser enrichment analysis. This approach mitigates many of the constraints imposed by the LFUA protocol, reduces the demand for onsite sample collection and offsite analysis, and overcomes current limitations associated with the in-facility misuse detection devices. Onsite environmental sample collection offers the ability to collect fleeting uranium hexafluoride emissions before they are lost to the ventilation system or before they disperse throughout the facility, to become deposited onto surfaces that are contaminated with background and historical production material. Onsite aerosol sample collection, combined with enrichment analysis, provides the unique ability to quickly detect stepwise enrichment level changes within the facility, leading to a significant strengthening of facility misuse deterence. We report in this paper our study of several GCEP environmental sample release scenarios and simulation results of a newly designed aerosol collection and particle capture system that is fully integrated with the Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) uranium particle enrichment analysis instrument that was developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Anheier, Norman C.; Munley, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

High Sensitivity EPR with Superconducting Microresonators DMR 0819860 IRG-D: H. Malissa,1 D.I. Schuster, 2 A.M. Tyryshkin,1 A.A. Houck,1 and S.A. Lyon1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Sensitivity EPR with Superconducting Microresonators DMR 0819860 IRG-D: H. Malissa,1 D the thin isotopically enriched silicon layer Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is commonly used

Petta, Jason

422

K-infinite trends with burnup, enrichment, and cooling time for BWR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the work performed by ORNL for the Yucca Mountain project (YMP) M and O contractor, Framatome Cogema Fuels. The goal of this work was to obtain k{sub inf} values for infinite arrays of flooded boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies as a function of various burnup/enrichment and cooling-time combinations. These scenarios simulate expected limiting criticality loading conditions (for a given assembly type) for drift emplacements in a repository. Upon consultation with the YMP staff, a Quad Cities BWR fuel assembly was selected as a baseline assembly. This design consists of seven axial enrichment zones, three of which contain natural uranium oxide. No attempt was made to find a bounding or even typical assembly design due to the wide variety in fuel assembly designs necessary for consideration. The current work concentrates on establishing a baseline analysis, along with a small number of sensitivity studies which can be expected later if desired. As a result of similar studies of this nature, several effects are known to be important in the determination of the final k{sub inf} for spent fuel in a cask-like geometry. For a given enrichment there is an optimal burnup: for lower burnups, excess energy (and corresponding excess reactivity) is present in the fuel assembly; for larger burnups, the assembly is overburned and essentially driven by neighboring fuel assemblies. The majority of the burnup/enrichment scenarios included in this study were for some near-optimum burnup/enrichment combinations as determined from Energy Information Administration (EIA) data. Several calculations were performed for under- and over-burned fuel to show these effects.

Broadhead, B.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction, operation, and decommissioning of the proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF), a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility to be located in a rural area in western Bonneville County, Idaho. (DOE adopted this EIS issued by NRC on 04/13/2007.)

424

Comparison of HEU Measurements Using Measured and Simulated Data  

SciTech Connect

Correlated neutron data analyzed using the Feynman Variance-to-Mean method are can be used to assess the multiplication and mass of special nuclear material (SNM) systems. After list-mode data are acquired, the multiplication and mass can be determined using detector parameters. This work compares data sets that were measured to simulated data using recent MCNP list-mode modifications. In addition, both sets of data are analyzed using both measured and simulated parameters to infer the system multiplication.

Hutchinson, Jesson D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sood, Avneet [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith-Nelson, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dinwiddie, Derek R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

U.S. HEU Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

several DOE facilities, but primarily at NNSA's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tenn. When ready for down-blending, it is shipped to a private sector facility...

426

Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Growth and Chemical Responses to CO2 Enrichment Virginia Pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) (1985) (NDP-009) image Data Investigators R. J. Luxmoore, R. J. Norby, E. G. O'Neill, D. G. Weller, J. M. Ells, and H. H. Rogers From June 28 to October 29 in 1982, Virginia pine seedlings were exposed to elevated CO2 levels in open-top growth chambers at one of four concentrations (75, 150, 300, and 600 ppm above ambient). Plant dry weight; height; stem diameter; and chemical contents of leaf, stem, and root tissues were measured before and after exposure. Soil variables were also characterized. These data illustrate the short-term physical and chemical response of Virginia pine seedlings to elevated levels of CO2. The data are in seven files: initial dry weights before exposure (844 kB), dry weights after

427

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit OAS-FS-13-02 October 2012 September 7, 2012 Mr. Gregory Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Room 5D-039 Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Friedman: We have audited the financial statements of the Department of Energy's (the Department) Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) as of and for the year ended September 30, 2011, and have issued our report thereon dated September 7, 2012. In planning and performing our audit of the consolidated financial statements, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, we considered the Department's internal control

428

Critical core mass for enriched envelopes: the role of H2O condensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Within the core accretion scenario of planetary formation, most simulations performed so far always assume the accreting envelope to have a solar composition. From the study of meteorite showers on Earth and numerical simulations, we know that planetesimals must undergo thermal ablation and disruption when crossing a protoplanetary envelope. Once the protoplanet has acquired an atmosphere, the primordial envelope gets enriched in volatiles and silicates from the planetesimals. This change of envelope composition during the formation can have a significant effect in the final atmospheric composition and on the formation timescale of giant planets. Aims. To investigate the physical implications of considering the envelope enrichment of protoplanets due to the disruption of icy planetesimals during their way to the core. Particular focus is placed on the effect on the critical core mass for envelopes where condensation of water can occur. Methods. Internal structure models are numerically solved with th...

Venturini, J; Benz, W; Ikoma, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay Experiments  

SciTech Connect

We present data characterizing the performance of the _rst segmented, N- type Ge detector, isotopically enriched to 85% 76Ge. This detector, based on the Ortec PT6x2 design and referred to as SEGA (Segmented, Enriched Germanium Assembly), was developed as a possible prototype for neutrinoless double beta-decay measurements by the Majorana collaboration. We present some of the general characteristics (including bias potential, efficiency, leakage current, and integral cross-talk) for this detector in its temporary cryostat. We also present an analysis of the resolution of the detector, and demonstrate that for all but two segments there is at least one channel that reaches the Majorana resolution goal below 4 keV FWHM at 2039 keV, and all channels are below 4.5 keV FWHM.

Leviner, L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ahmed, M. W.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Boswell, M.; De Braeckeleer, L.; Brudanin, V.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Elliott, Steven R.; Gehman, Victor M.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Kephart, Jeremy; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S.; Lesko, Kevin; Li, Jingyi; Mei, Dongming; Mikhailov, S.; Miley, Harry S.; Radford, D. C.; Reeves, James H.; Sandukovsky, Viatcheslav; Umatov, Valdimir; Underwood, T. A.; Tornow, W.; Wu, Y. K.; Young, A.

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

430

RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION DEVICES: EFFECTIVENESS IN IMPROVING SAFEGUARDS AT GAS-CENTRIFUGE URANIUM-ENRICHMENT PLANTS.  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs) have engendered a growing interest among international safeguards experts. Potentially, RFIDs could reduce inspection work, viz. the number of inspections, number of samples, and duration of the visits, and thus improve the efficiency and effectiveness of international safeguards. This study systematically examined the applications of RFIDs for IAEA safeguards at large gas-centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). These analyses are expected to help identify the requirements and desirable properties for RFIDs, to provide insights into which vulnerabilities matter most, and help formulate the required assurance tests. This work, specifically assesses the application of RFIDs for the ''Option 4'' safeguards approach, proposed by Bruce Moran, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for large gas-centrifuge uranium-enrichment plants. The features of ''Option 4'' safeguards include placing RFIDs on all feed, product and tails (F/P/T) cylinders, along with WID readers in all FP/T stations and accountability scales. Other features of Moran's ''Option 4'' are Mailbox declarations, monitoring of load-cell-based weighing systems at the F/P/T stations and accountability scales, and continuous enrichment monitors. Relevant diversion paths were explored to evaluate how RFIDs improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards. Additionally, the analysis addresses the use of RFIDs in conjunction with video monitoring and neutron detectors in a perimeter-monitoring approach to show that RFIDs can help to detect unidentified cylinders.

JOE,J.

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

Safety Evaluation Report for the Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3070)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff review and safety evaluation of the Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES, the applicant) application for a license to possess and use byproduct, source, and special nuclear material and to enrich natural uranium to a maximum of 5 percent U-235 by the gas centrifuge process. The plant, to be known as the Claiborne Enrichment Center (CEC), would be constructed near the town of Homer in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana. At full production in a given year, the plant will receive approximately 4,700 tonnes of feed UF{sub 6} and produce 870 tonnes of low-enriched UF{sub 6}, and 3,830 tonnes of depleted UF{sub 6} tails. Facility construction, operation, and decommissioning are expected to last 5, 30, and 7 years, respectively. The objective of the review is to evaluate the potential adverse impacts of operation of the facility on worker and public health and safety under both normal operating and accident conditions. The review also considers the management organization, administrative programs, and financial qualifications provided to assure safe design and operation of the facility. The NRC staff concludes that the applicant`s descriptions, specifications, and analyses provide an adequate basis for safety review of facility operations and that construction and operation of the facility does not pose an undue risk to public health and safety.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Occurrence of naturally enriched {sup 235}U: Implications for plutonium behavior in natural environments  

SciTech Connect

It is generally accepted that uranium and most of the fission products, with the exception of the alkalis, alkaline earths and rare gases, remained in the irradiated uranium oxides during the nuclear reactions that took place 2.0 Ga ago in the Oklo uranium deposit (Gabon). New isotope investigations show that clay minerals from argillaceous rocks neighboring the natural fission reactor 10 at Oklo have depleted {sup 235}U with {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios ranging between 0.00560 and the common natural value of 0.00725. One sample, however, is enriched in {sup 235}U with a {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratio of 0.007682. Leach experiments of this sample with dilute 1N HCl revealed that the {sup 235}U enrichment is actually restricted to the insoluble residue ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U = 0.010511), whereas the leachate remains depleted in {sup 235}U. This unique discovery of very enriched uranium, together with samarium, neodymium, rubidium, and strontium isotopic analyses, indicate that a small amount of plutonium could have been more mobile than uranium in the reactor 10, and it is suggested that plutonium was incorporated in the crystallographic structure of clay minerals such as the chlorites. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Bros, R.; Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Stille, P. [CNRS, Strasbourg (FR)] [CNRS, Strasbourg (FR); Turpin, L. [CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette (FR)] [CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette (FR); Holliger, Ph. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Grenoble (FR)] [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Grenoble (FR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Monitoring the process to obtain red wine enriched in resveratrol and piceatannol without quality loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stilbene-enriched wine is considered an interesting new food product with added value as a consequence of the numerous health-promoting properties ascribed to it, mainly from its trans-resveratrol content. Postharvest grapes have been treated with ultraviolet-C light to produce stilbene-enriched grapes that were later used in a conventional winemaking process to obtain a red wine enriched in stilbenes. By measuring oenological parameters and stilbene concentration it has been possible to monitor both the quality parameters and stilbenes throughout the process. The maximum concentration in trans-resveratrol and piceatannol was obtained after pressing, but there was significant loss from grape to wine. A significant increase in both piceatannol and trans-resveratrol concentration (up to 26 times and 3.2 times higher than in control, respectively) was achieved in bottled wine. Regarding the oenological parameters, the wines obtained possessed good quality, apart from a herbaceous aroma, which could not be identified by GC–olfactometry.

Raúl F. Guerrero; Belén Puertas; Maria J. Jiménez; Juan Cacho; Emma Cantos-Villar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

FMDP reactor alternative summary report. Volume 1 - existing LWR alternative  

SciTech Connect

Significant quantities of weapons-usable fissile materials [primarily plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] are becoming surplus to national defense needs in both the United States and Russia. These stocks of fissile materials pose significant dangers to national and international security. The dangers exist not only in the potential proliferation of nuclear weapons but also in the potential for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) consequences if surplus fissile materials are not properly managed. This document summarizes the results of analysis concerned with existing light water reactor plutonium disposition alternatives.

Greene, S.R.; Bevard, B.B. [and others

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Passive and Active Fast-Neutron Imaging in Support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Results from safeguards-related passive and active coded-aperture fast-neutron imaging measurements of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) material configurations performed at Idaho National Laboratory s Zero Power Physics Reactor facility are presented. The imaging measurements indicate that it is feasible to use fast neutron imaging in a variety of safeguards-related tasks, such as monitoring storage, evaluating holdup deposits in situ, or identifying individual leached hulls still containing fuel. The present work also presents the first demonstration of imaging of differential die away fast neutrons.

Blackston, Matthew A [ORNL; Hausladen, Paul [ORNL

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

FINFROCK SH

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

From the Lab to the real world : sources of error in UF {sub 6} gas enrichment monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Safeguarding uranium enrichment facilities is a serious concern for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Safeguards methods have changed over the years, most recently switching to an improved safeguards model that calls for new technologies to help keep up with the increasing size and complexity of today’s gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). One of the primary goals of the IAEA is to detect the production of uranium at levels greater than those an enrichment facility may have declared. In order to accomplish this goal, new enrichment monitors need to be as accurate as possible. This dissertation will look at the Advanced Enrichment Monitor (AEM), a new enrichment monitor designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically explored are various factors that could potentially contribute to errors in a final enrichment determination delivered by the AEM. There are many factors that can cause errors in the determination of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas enrichment, especially during the period when the enrichment is being measured in an operating GCEP. To measure enrichment using the AEM, a passive 186-keV (kiloelectronvolt) measurement is used to determine the {sup 235}U content in the gas, and a transmission measurement or a gas pressure reading is used to determine the total uranium content. A transmission spectrum is generated using an x-ray tube and a “notch” filter. In this dissertation, changes that could occur in the detection efficiency and the transmission errors that could result from variations in pipe-wall thickness will be explored. Additional factors that could contribute to errors in enrichment measurement will also be examined, including changes in the gas pressure, ambient and UF{sub 6} temperature, instrumental errors, and the effects of uranium deposits on the inside of the pipe walls will be considered. The sensitivity of the enrichment calculation to these various parameters will then be evaluated. Previously, UF{sub 6} gas enrichment monitors have required empty pipe measurements to accurately determine the pipe attenuation (the pipe attenuation is typically much larger than the attenuation in the gas). This dissertation reports on a method for determining the thickness of a pipe in a GCEP when obtaining an empty pipe measurement may not be feasible. This dissertation studies each of the components that may add to the final error in the enrichment measurement, and the factors that were taken into account to mitigate these issues are also detailed and tested. The use of an x-ray generator as a transmission source and the attending stability issues are addressed. Both analytical calculations and experimental measurements have been used. For completeness, some real-world analysis results from the URENCO Capenhurst enrichment plant have been included, where the final enrichment error has remained well below 1% for approximately two months.

Lombardi, Marcie L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United Kingdom; thus,...

439

Entrainment of trace-metal-enriched Atlantic-shelf water in the inflow to the Mediterranean Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... by modified Co-APDC (cobalt-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) co-precipitation5, and analysed by graphite furnace flameless atomic absorption. Cd is enriched in Atlantic surface waters on the Spanish shelf outside ...

Alexander van Geen; Paula Rosener; Edward Boyle

1988-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

440

Development and application of the spatially explicit load enrichment calculation tool (select) to determine potential E. coli loads in watersheds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the USEPA National Section 303(d) List Fact Sheet, bacterial pathogens are the leading cause of water quality impairments in Texas. The automated Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool (SELECT) uses spatially variable...

Riebschleager, Kendra Jean

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heu highly enriched" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Effect of Lithium Enrichment on the Tritium Breeding Characteristics of Various Breeders in a Fusion Driven Hybrid Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selection of lithium containing materials is very important in the design of a deuterium–tritium (DT) fusion driven hybrid reactor in order to supply its tritium self- ... lithium-6 enrichment in the coolant of t...

Mustafa Übeyli

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Microsoft PowerPoint - factoids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tennis ball size quantity tennis ball size quantity of nuclear fuel commonly used in commercial nuclear plants can power the average daily needs in the U.S. of 200,000 homes. It would take 31 boxcars of coal, at 100 tons per boxcar, to generate the same 250 MWe of power. Reducing the threat of nuclear weapon proliferation Argonne's Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, initiated in 1978, has long utilized our nuclear expertise to convert research & test reactors using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel - a material that cannot be diverted for direct use in nuclear weapons. 63 reactors in 32 countries from Argentina to Uzbekistan have been converted; 66 additional reactors are prime candidates. RERTR is a key element of the nation's efforts to

443

The development of uranium foil farication technology utilizing twin roll method for Mo-99 irradiation target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MDS Nordion in Canada, occupying about 75% of global supply of Mo-99 isotope, has provided the irradiation target of Mo-99 using the rod-type UAl sub x alloys with HEU(High Enrichment Uranium). ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) through co-operation with BATAN in Indonesia, leading RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program substantially for nuclear non-proliferation, has designed and fabricated the annular cylinder of uranium targets, and successfully performed irradiation test, in order to develop the fabrication technology of fission Mo-99 using LEU(Low Enrichment Uranium). As the uranium foils could be fabricated in laboratory scale, not in commercialized scale by hot rolling method due to significant problems in foil quality, productivity and economic efficiency, attention has shifted to the development of new technology. Under these circumstances, the invention of uranium foil fabrication technology utilizing twin-roll casting method in KAERI is found to be able to fabricate LEU or...

Kim, C K; Park, H D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Hydroelectric 1.1.3 Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . .Gain GNEP Global Nuclear Energy Partnership HEU HighlyIn Progress in Nuclear Energy, 17. Pergamon Press, 1986.

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The RERTR Program status and progress  

SciTech Connect

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. The major events, findings, and activities of 1995 are reviewed after a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1994. The revelation that Iraq was on the verge of developing a nuclear weapon at the time of the Gulf War, and that it was planning to do so by extracting HEU from the fuel of its research reactors, has given new impetus and urgency to the RERTR commitment of eliminating HEU use in research and test reactors worldwide. Development of advanced LEU research reactor fuels is scheduled to begin in October 1995. The Russian RERTR program, which aims to develop and demonstrate within the next five years the technical means needed to convert Russian-supplied research reactors to LEU fuels, is now in operation. A Statement of Intent was signed by high US and Chinese officials, endorsing cooperative activities between the RERTR program and Chinese laboratories involved in similar activities. Joint studies of LEU technical feasibility were completed for the SAFARI-I reactor in South Africa and for the ANS reactor in the US. A new study has been initiated for the FRM-II reactor in Germany. Significant progress was made on several aspects of producing {sup 99}Mo from fission targets utilizing LEU instead of HEU. A cooperation agreements is in place with the Indonesian BATAN. The first prototypical irradiation of an LEU metal-foil target for {sup 99}Mo production was accomplished in Indonesia. The TR-2 reactor, in Turkey, began conversion. SAPHIR, in Switzerland, was shut down. LEU fuel fabrication has begun for the conversion of two more US reactors. Twelve foreign reactors and nine domestic reactors have been fully converted. Approximately 60 % of the work required to eliminate the use of HEU in US-supplied research reactors has been accomplished.

Travelli, A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Spatial correction factors for YALINA Booster facility loaded with medium and low enriched fuels  

SciTech Connect

The Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used in analyses of subcritical assemblies to correct the experimental reactivity as function of the detector position. Besides the detector position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the energy weighting function of the detector, the detector size, the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons, and the reactivity of the subcritical assembly. This work focuses on the dependency of the correction factor on the detector material and it investigates the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly loaded with medium (36%) and low (10%) enriched fuels. (authors)

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Inst. for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, 99 Academician A.K.Krasin Str, Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Progress of the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program in 1989  

SciTech Connect

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1988, the major events, findings, and activities of 1989 are reviewed. The scope of the RERTR Program activities was curtailed, in 1989, by an unexpected legislative restriction which limited the ability of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency to adequately fund the program. Nevertheless, the thrust of the major planned program activities was maintained, and meaningful results were obtained in several areas of great significance for future work. 15 refs., 12 figs.

Travelli, A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Selective enrichment of phenols from coal liquefaction oil by solid phase extraction method  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the solid phase extraction method for the enrichment and separation of phenol from coal liquefaction oil. The phenols' separation efficiency was compared on different solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges, and the effect of solvents with different polarity and solubility parameter on amino-bonded silica was compared for selection of optimal elution solution. The result showed that amino-bonded silica has the highest selectivity and best extraction capability due to two factors, weak anion exchange adsorption and polar attraction adsorption.

Tian, M.; Feng, J. [Taiyuan University of Technoloy, Taiyuan (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Characteristics of Photosynthesis in Wheat Cultivars with Different Sensitivities to Ozone Under O3-Free Air Concentration Enrichment Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the help of the Chinese Ozone-Free Air Concentration Enrichment (O3FACE) platform, the responses of photosynthsis characteristics to elevated O3 concentration were investigated using winter wheat (Tritcium aestivum L.) cultivars Yannong 19 and Yangmai 16, which differ in sensitivities to O3. Under O3 treatment for 75 d, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomtal conductance (Gs), and transpiration rate (Tr) decreased significantly in both cultivars, whereas the intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) changed slightly. The O3-sensitive cultivar Yannong 19 had larger reductions in Pn (61.1%), Gs (68.0%), a