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1

Groton | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:Net Jump to: navigation, search Name:Groton Facility

2

EA-2007: Groton-Ordway 115-kV Transmission Line, Groton, South Dakota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Upper Great Plains Region) is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a new 115-kV transmission line that would connect Western’s existing Groton and Ordway Substations near Groton, South Dakota.

3

Construction Kathryn Hess  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cobar Construction Kathryn Hess A (neo)classical approach Topological applications of DCSH structure On beyond chain complexes The Cobar Construction Kathryn Hess Institute of Geometry, Algebra 2006 #12;The Cobar Construction Kathryn Hess A (neo)classical approach Topological applications of DCSH

Thévenaz, Jacques

4

EIS-0435: Modification of the Groton Generation Station Interconnection Agreement, Brown County, South Dakota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Western Area Power Administration to modify its Large Generator Connection Agreement for the Groton Generation Station in Brown County, South Dakota. The modification would allow Basin Electric Power Cooperative, which operates the generation station, to produce power above the current operating limit of 50 average megawatts.

5

Nancy J. Hess | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz,AerialStaff NUG 2012NakayasuJ. Hess Recent

6

Systems of Hess-Appel'rot type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct higher-dimensional generalizations of the classical Hess-Appel'rot rigid body system. We give a Lax pair with a spectral parameter leading to an algebro-geometric integration of this new class of systems, which is closely related to the integration of the Lagrange bitop performed by us recently and uses Mumford relation for theta divisors of double unramified coverings. Based on the basic properties satisfied by such a class of systems related to bi-Poisson structure, quasi-homogeneity, and conditions on the Kowalevski exponents, we suggest an axiomatic approach leading to what we call the "class of systems of Hess-Appel'rot type".

Vladimir Dragovic; Borislav Gajic

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 3148, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/31/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 31­48, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/31/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-31 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Transport International Centre for Hydrology "Dino Tonini" and Dipartimento IMAGE, Universit`a di Padova, via Loredan 20

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 111126, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/111/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 111­126, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/111/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-111 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Constraints of artificial neural networks for rainfall-runoff modelling: trade-offs in hydrological state representation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 1929, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/19/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 19­29, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/19/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-19 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Transport. Marani International Centre for Hydrology "Dino Tonini" and Dipartimento IMAGE, Universit`a di Padova

Boyer, Edmond

10

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 127137, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/127/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 127­137, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/127/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-127 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Centre, Maun, Botswana Received: 11 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 314, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/3/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 3­14, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/3/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-3 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Bringing it all, Dublin, Ireland Received: 6 December 2004 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 139155, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/139/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 139­155, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/139/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-139 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Using stable isotope tracers to assess hydrological flow paths, residence times and landscape influences in a nested

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 173183, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/173/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 173­183, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/173/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2005-9-173 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Soil moisture ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions: 2 March 2005 Revised: 29 June 2005 ­ Accepted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

14

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 7991, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/79/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 10, 79­91, 2006 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/10/79/ SRef-ID: 1607-7938/hess/2006-10-79 European Geosciences Union Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Scale, USA Received: 1 August 2005 ­ Published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions: 30 August

Boyer, Edmond

15

Aspects of Hess' Acquisition of American Oil & Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On July 27, 2010, Hess Corporation announced that it had agreed to acquire American Oil & Gas, Inc. in a stock-only transaction worth as much as $488 million (based on Hess' closing price of $53.30/share, anticipated number of newly issued shares, and $30 million credit facility extended to American Oil & Gas prior to closing).

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Sequential decoupling of negative-energy states in Douglas-Kroll-Hess theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here, we review the historical development, current status, and prospects of Douglas--Kroll--Hess theory as a quantum chemical relativistic electrons-only theory.

Reiher, Markus

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hess to serve on editorial advisory board | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL SecretaryHazmatHelping Those inHenryHess to

18

Stochastic Acceleration in the Galactic Center HESS Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic acceleration of electrons interacting resonantly with a turbulent magnetic field in a small accretion torus appears to be the likely mechanism responsible for much of Sagittarius A*'s millimeter and shorter wavelength spectrum. The longer wavelength radiation is produced at larger radii by electrons either diffusing from smaller scales or accelerated in situ. An important prediction of this model is the ejection of a significant flux of relativistic protons from a magnetic-field-dominated acceleration site into the wind-shocked medium surrounding the black hole. Recently, several air Cerenkov telescopes, notably HESS, have detected TeV emission from the Galactic center, with characteristics hinting at a p-p-induced pion decay process for the \\gamma-ray emission. Given (1) the size of this acceleration region measured in the radio band and (2) the wind-injected ISM mapped with Chandra using the diffuse X-rays, it is feasible to test the idea that protons accelerated within \\~20 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole produce the TeV emission farther out. We show a fraction of TeV protons scattering about once within ~3 pc of Sagittarius A* and the proton power (~10^37 erg s^-1) produced in concert with the 7 mm radio emission matches the TeV luminosity well. This model explains why the TeV source does not vary on a timescale of a year or less. The particle cascade generated by the p-p scatterings also produces bremsstrahlung, inverse Compton, and synchrotron emission at longer wavelengths from secondary particles. We compare these with current measurements and demonstrate that GLAST will detect this source during its one-year all-sky survey.

Siming Liu; Fulvio Melia; Vahe Petrosian; Marco Fatuzzo

2006-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY SEARCH FOR THE RADIO COUNTERPART OF HESS J1943+213  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HESS J1943+213, a TeV point source close to the Galactic plane recently discovered by the H.E.S.S. Collaboration, was proposed to be an extreme BL Lacertae object, though a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) nature could not be completely discarded. To investigate its nature, we performed high-resolution radio observations with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (EVN) and reanalyzed archival continuum and H I data. The EVN observations revealed a compact radio counterpart of the TeV source. The low brightness temperature and the resolved nature of the radio source are indications against the beamed BL Lacertae hypothesis. The radio/X-ray source appears immersed in a {approx}1' elliptical feature, suggesting a possible galactic origin (PWN nature) for the HESS source. We found that HESS J1943+213 is located in the interior of a {approx}1 Degree-Sign diameter H I feature and explored the possibility of them being physically related.

Gabanyi, K. E. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary)] [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Dubner, G.; Giacani, E. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Paragi, Z.; Pidopryhora, Y. [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)] [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Frey, S., E-mail: gabanyi@konkoly.hu [FOeMI Satellite Geodetic Observatory, P.O. Box 585, H-1592 Budapest (Hungary)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

VERITAS Observations of the Unidentified Point Source HESS J1943+213  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The H.E.S.S. Galactic plane scan has revealed a large population of Galactic very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) emitters. The majority of the galactic sources are extended and can typically be associated with pulsar wind nebulae (35%) and supernova remnants (21%), while some of the sources remain unidentified (31%). A much smaller fraction of point-like sources (5 in total, corresponding to 4%) are identified as gamma-ray binaries. Active galactic nuclei located behind the Galactic plane are also a potential source class. An active galaxy could be identified in the VHE regime by a point like extension, a high variability amplitude (up to a factor of 100) and a typically soft spectrum (due to absorption by the extra-galactic background light). Here we report on VERITAS observations of HESS J1943+213, an unidentified point source discovered to emit above 470 GeV during the extended H.E.S.S. Galactic plane scan. This source is thought to be a distant BL Lac object behind the Galactic plane and, though it exhibi...

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Possible Link Between the Galactic Center HESS Source and Sgr A*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, HESS and other air Cerenkov telescopes have detected a source of TeV gamma-rays coincident with the Galactic center. It is not yet clear whether the gamma-rays are produced via leptonic or hadronic processes, so it is important to consider possible acceleration sites for the charged particles which produce the gamma-rays. One exciting possibility for the origin of these particles is the central black hole, Sgr A*, where the turbulent magnetic fields close to the event horizon can accelerate protons to TeV energies. Using a realistic model of the density distribution in a 6 pc x 6 pc x 6pc cube at the Galactic center, we here calculate the trajectories followed by these TeV protons as they gyrate through the turbulent medium surrounding Sgr A*. Diffusing out from the black hole, the protons produce TeV gamma-rays via pi^0 decay following a collision with a proton in the surrounding medium. After following over 222,000 such trajectories, we find that the circumnuclear ring around Sgr A* can reproduce the observed 0.1-100 TeV HESS spectrum and flux if the protons are injected into this medium with an effective power-law index of 0.75, significantly harder than the observed photon index of 2.25. The total energy in the steady-state 1-40 TeV proton population surrounding Sgr A* is inferred to be approx 5x10^{45} ergs. Only 31% of the emitted 1-100 TeV protons encounter the circumnuclear torus, leaving a large flux of protons that diffuse outward to contribute to the Galactic ridge emission observed by HESS on scales of >~ 1 degree.

D. R. Ballantyne; Fulvio Melia; Siming Liu; Roland M. Crocker

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

NETL CT Imaging Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

None

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

23

NETL CT Imaging Facility  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use Level 2 proficiency in performing and interpreting cardiac nuclear imaging tests. Progression

Ford, James

25

VHE gamma-ray Emitting Pulsar Wind Nebulae Discovered by H.E.S.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy have opened a new observational window on the physics of pulsars. The high sensitivity of current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, and in particular of the H.E.S.S. array, has already led to the discovery of about a dozen VHE-emitting pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and PWN candidates. These include the plerions in the composite supernova remnants MSH 15-52, G21.5-0.9, Kes 75, and Vela, two sources in the Kookaburra, and the nebula of PSR B1823-13. This VHE emission is generally interpreted as inverse Compton emission from the relativistic electrons and positrons accelerated by the pulsar and its wind; as such, it can yield a more direct spatial and spectral view of the accelerated particles than can be inferred from observations of their synchrotron emission. The VHE-emitting PWNe detected by the H.E.S.S. telescopes are reviewed and the implications for pulsar physics discussed.

Gallant, Y.A.; /Montpellier U.; Carrigan, S.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Djannati-Atai, A.; /APC, Paris; Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Hinton, J.A.; /Leeds U.; Hoppe, S.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; de Jager, O.C.; /Potchefstroom U.; Khelifi, B.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Komin, Nu.; /Montpellier U.; Kosack, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Lemiere, A. /APC, Paris; Masterson, C.; /Dublin Inst.

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

EA-2007: Groton-Ordway 115-kV Transmission Line, Groton, South Dakota |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirant PotomacFinal1935:DepartmentDepartment of Energy EA-2007:

27

-CT CT)Computed Tomography(. ,. , -100 ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· . · , , , , . · , " , , . · , . , . : · . ·2-4 . ·2-3 -. ·) D,DMAIC, SPC, FMEA, Control Plan, Lean) 8(-. · -. ·. ·. NPI ·. · , , .' , ·" . " * . : ·) B.A ,(-. ·4-6. ·) QFD, CtQ breakdown, DfSS, SPC, AQP, FMEA, Control Plan.( ·Six Sigma GB

Pinsky, Ross

28

Multi-Zone Modeling of the Pulsar Win Nebula HESS J1825-137  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulsar wind nebula associated with PSR J1826-1334, HESS J1825-137, is a bright very high energy source with an angular extent of {approx} 1{sup o} and spatially-resolved spectroscopic TeV measurements. The gamma-ray spectral index is observed to soften with increasing distance from the pulsar, likely the result of cooling losses as electrons traverse the nebula. We describe analysis of X-ray data of the extended nebula, as well as 3-D time-dependent spectral energy distribution modeling, with emphasis on the spatial variations within HESS J1825-137. The multi-wavelength data places significant constraints on electron injection, transport, and cooling within the nebula. The large size and high nebular energy budget imply a relatively rapid initial pulsar spin period of 13 {+-} 7 ms and an age of 40 {+-} 9 kyr. The relative fluxes of each VHE zone can be explained by advective particle transport with a radially decreasing velocity profile with v(r) {proportional_to} r{sup -0.5}. The evolution of the cooling break requires an evolving magnetic field which also decreases radially from the pulsar, B(r, t) {proportional_to} r{sup -0.7} E(t){sup 1/2}. Detection of 10 TeV flux {approx} 80 pc from the pulsar requires rapid diffusion of high energy particles with {tau}{sub esc} {approx} 90 (R/10 pc){sup 2}(E{sub e}/100TeV){sup -1} year, contrary to the common assumption of toroidal magnetic fields with strong magnetic confinement. The model predicts a rather uniform Fermi LAT surface brightness out to {approx} 1{sup o} from the pulsar, in good agreement with the recently discovered LAT source centered 0.5{sup o} southwest of PSR J1826-1334 with extension 0.6 {+-} 0.1{sup o}.

Van Etten, Adam; Romani, Roger W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

29

11Frontier Science, June 16Frontier Science, June 16thth 2004, Frascati2004, Frascati The H.E.S.S. experimentThe H.E.S.S. experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11Frontier Science, June 16Frontier Science, June 16thth 2004, Frascati2004, Frascati The H-Ray Astronomy PCC/APC M. Punch, PCC/APC Collège de France for the H·E·S·S· Collaboration #12; 22Frontier Science, June 16Frontier Science, June 16thth 2004, Frascati2004, Frascati The H.E.S.S. experimentThe H

30

Sibley School of Mechanical Engineering -Undergraduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OH General Motors Associate Manufacturing Engineer Detroit MI Google Technical Account Specialist Electric Boat Engineer I Groton CT General Dynamics Electric Boat Mechanical Engineer I Groton CT General Electric Component Test Engineer Lynn MA General Electric GE Aviation Edison Cornerstone Engineer Evendale

Lipson, Michal

31

CT Solar Loan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

32

X-Ray Observations of Unidentified H.E.S.S. Gamma-Ray Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a survey of the inner part of the Galaxy, performed with the H.E.S.S. Instrument (High energy stereoscopic system) in 2004 and 2005, a large number of new unidentified very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray sources above an energy of 100 GeV was discovered. Often the {gamma}-ray spectra in these sources reach energies of up to {approx} 10 TeV. These are the highest energy particles ever attributed to single astrophysical objects. While a few of these sources can be identified at other wavebands, most of these sources remain unidentified so far. A positive identification of these new g-ray sources with a counterpart object at other wavebands requires (a) a positional coincidence between the two sources,( b) a viable {gamma}-ray emission mechanism and (c) a consistent multiwavelength behavior of the two sources. X-ray observations with satellites such as XMM-Newton, Chandra or Suzaku provide one of the best channels to studying these enigmatic {gamma}-ray sources at other wavebands, since they combine high angular resolution and sensitivity with the ability to access non-thermal electrons through their synchrotron emission. We therefore have started a dedicated program to investigate VHE {gamma}-ray sources with high-sensitivity X-ray instruments.

Funk, S.; /SLAC

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

33

XMM-Newton Observations Reveal the X-ray Counterpart of the Very-high-energy gamma-ray Source HESS J1640-465  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present X-ray observations of the as of yet unidentified very high-energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray source HESS J1640-465 with the aim of establishing a counterpart of this source in the keV energy range, and identifying the mechanism responsible for the VHE emission. The 21.8 ksec XMM-Newton observation of HESS J1640-465 in September 2005 represents a significant improvement in sensitivity and angular resolution over previous ASCA studies in this region. These new data show a hard-spectrum X-ray emitting object at the centroid of the H.E.S.S. source, within the shell of the radio Supernova Remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0. This object is consistent with the position and flux previously measured by both ASCA and Swift-XRT but is now shown to be significantly extended. We argue that this object is very likely the counterpart to HESS J1640-465 and that both objects may represent the Pulsar Wind Nebula of an as of yet undiscovered pulsar associated with G338.3-0.0.

Funk, S.; Hinton, J.A.; Puhlhofer, G.; Aharonian, F.A.; Hofmann, W.; Reimer, O.; Wagner, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Leeds U. /Dublin Inst. /Stanford U., HEPL; Funk, S.; Hinton, J.A.; Puehlhofer, G.; Aharonian, F.A.; Hofmann, W.; Reimer, O.; Wagner, S.

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

34

Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 2896 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 The central data acquisition system for the H.E.S.S. telescope system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the software design. 1 Introduction The High Energy Stereoscopic System, H.E.S.S. is a next generation imaging radiometers, cloud scanners, and op- tical telescopes for controlling the atmospheric properties. The Data. The signals of each pixel of a camera are read out via a high gain and a low gain path with 10 bits dynamic

35

Semi-Blind Cancellation of IQ-Imbalances Matthias Hesse, Student Member, IEEE, Marko Mailand, Student Member, IEEE, Hans-Joachim Jentschel,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semi-Blind Cancellation of IQ-Imbalances Matthias Hesse, Student Member, IEEE, Marko Mailand iterative blind source separation (IBSS) as well as information about the modulation scheme used (hence the term semi-blind). The novelty of our approach lies in the fact that we match the nonlinearity involved

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

Global MHD modeling of the impact of a solar wind pressure change Kristi A. Keller, Michael Hesse, Maria Kuznetsova, Lutz Rastatter, and Therese Moretto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global MHD modeling of the impact of a solar wind pressure change Kristi A. Keller, Michael Hesse of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Received 26 February 2001; revised 21 December 2001; accepted 21 December 2001; published 23 July 2002. [1] A sudden increase in the solar wind dynamic pressure compresses

De Zeeuw, Darren L.

37

Groton, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a county in Oklahoma.Groom Energy Solutions Jump

38

Town of Groton, Massachusetts (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmont Rural ElecTown ofFrederick, Colorado

39

Village of Groton, New York (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save EnergyGlouster, Ohio (Utility Company) JumpWisconsin

40

City of Groton, South Dakota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (Utility Company)Galion, OhioInformation Cove, TexasGriffin,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ContaCt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositionalInitial Validation andPWRContaCt The nuclear

42

CT NC0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,.

43

The properties of the putative pulsar associated with IGR J18135-1751/HESS J1813-178  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context: We investigate the possible theoretical properties of the putative pulsar associated with the pulsar wind nebula IGR J18135-1751/HESS J1813-178 based upon recent gamma-ray observations and archival multi-wavelength observations. Aims: We show that when using the standard equations for magnetic dipole radiation with recent soft gamma-ray observations leads to deriving an extreme set of parameters (magnetic field, period and spin down rate) for the putative pulsar. Alternative scenarios that generate more typical parameter values are explored. Methods: The properties of the putative pulsar are calculated assuming that the 20-100 keV luminosity corresponds to 1% of Edot, that the source is 4.5 kpc away, and that the pulsar age is 300 yrs. This gives P = 0.55 s, Pdot = 3E-11 s/s, and B = 1.28E14 G. This is a very extreme set compared to the population of known pulsars in PWN systems. Using the equations for magnetic dipole losses makes it possible to adjust the initial assumptions to see what is required for a more reasonable set of pulsar parameters. Results: The current measured properties for IGR J18135-1751/HESS J1813-178 (i.e. luminosity, distance, and age) result in extreme properties of the unseen pulsar within the PWN. The simplest method for achieving more reasonable properties for the pulsar is to decouple the spin-down age of the pulsar from the actual age for the system.

A. J. Dean; A. B. Hill

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

The 2012 flare of PG 1553+113 seen with H.E.S.S. and Fermi-LAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very high energy (VHE, $E>$100 GeV) $\\gamma$-ray flaring activity of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object \\pg\\ has been detected by the \\hess\\ telescopes. The flux of the source increased by a factor of 3 during the nights of 2012 April 26 and 27 with respect to the archival measurements with hint of intra-night variability. No counterpart of this event has been detected in the \\fla\\ data. This pattern is consistent with VHE $\\gamma$ ray flaring being caused by the injection of ultrarelativistic particles, emitting $\\gamma$ rays at the highest energies. The dataset offers a unique opportunity to constrain the redshift of this source at \\bestz\\ using a novel method based on Bayesian statistics. The indication of intra-night variability is used to introduce a novel method to probe for a possible Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV), and to set limits on the energy scale at which Quantum Gravity (QG) effects causing LIV may arise. For the subluminal case, the derived limits are $\\textrm{E}_{\\rm QG,1}>4.10\\times...

Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Fü\\ssling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzi?ska, M; Hadsch, D; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzy?ski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Klu?niak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, ?; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

R E V I E W A R T I C L E Trichodesmium a widespread marine cyanobacterium with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N2 at night (to avoid photosyn- thetically evolved oxygen) or differentiate a thick, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT, USA; and 3 Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, San

46

Detection of VHE gamma-ray emission from the distant blazar 1ES 1101-232 with H.E.S.S. and broadband characterisation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The blazar 1ES 1101-232 was observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACT) in 2004 and 2005, for a live time of 43 hours. VHE (E > 10^11 eV) gamma-rays were detected for the first time from this object. VHE observations of blazars are used to investigate the inner parts of the blazar jets, and also to study the extragalactic background light (EBL) in the near-infrared band. Observations in 2005 were conducted in a multiwavelength campaign, together with the RXTE satellite and optical observations. In 2004, simultaneous observations with XMM-Newton were obtained. 1ES 1101-232 was detected with H.E.S.S. with an excess of 722 photons, at a significance of 12 sigma. The measured VHE gamma-ray flux amounts to dN/dE = (5.63 +- 0.89) x 10^-13 (E/TeV)^-(2.94 +- 0.20) cm^-2 s^-1 TeV^-1, above a spectral energy threshold of 225 GeV. No significant variation of the VHE gamma-ray flux on any time scale was found. 1ES 1101-232 exhibits a very hard spectrum, and at a ...

Akhperjanian, A G; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brown, A M; Buhler, R; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Atai, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Fussling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moulin, E; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Olive, J P; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nancy J. Hess | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccounts andThe Role of MesoscaleNancy IsernNancy

48

Siemens AG, CT, September 2001 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s © Siemens AG, CT, September 2001 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY Research and Technology at Siemens Transportation Power Information & Communications Health Automation & Control #12;2© Siemens AGResearch and Technology at Siemens CORPORATETECHNOLOGY CT / E 020 a - 02.01 Key Figures for 2000 Amounts in billions

49

Limited View Angle Iterative CT Reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Some Prior Literature in Limited View Tomography CT with limited-angle data and few views IRR algorithm Iterative Reconstruction-Reprojection (IRR) : An Algorithm for Limited Data Cardiac- Computed-views and limited-angle data in divergent-beam CT by E. Y. Sidky, CM Kao, and X. Pan (2006) Few-View Projection

50

Student ConduCt Student Affairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Code of Student ConduCt 2013-14 Student Affairs #12;Contents Letter from the Dean of Students .........................................................................................ii University Code of Student Conduct Preamble............................................. 1 Section I: Rules of Student Conduct.............................................................. 1 Section

Suzuki, Masatsugu

51

CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

Gall, B.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

Gall, B.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was concluded following completion of Phase 1, and Phase 2 (design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype surface vibration system) was not pursued.

Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

Maletz, Kristina L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States); Ennis, Ronald D., E-mail: REnnis@chpnet.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Kagen, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Wernick, Iddo [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

abdominal ct images: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

methods establish microCT imaging as a useful tool for comparative Metscher, Brian 31 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

56

abdominal ct findings: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image Leow, Wee Kheng 11 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

57

Anatomic measurement accuracy: CT parameters and 3D rendering effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anatomic measurement accuracy: CT parameters and 3D rendering effects Brian J Whyms a, E Michael of Neuroscience #12;INTRODUCTION · Measurements from 3D-CT rendering are used in research and clinical management-CT rendering techniques on measurements #12;METHODS Scanned: · 3 human mandibles · a phantom object Phantom

Vorperian, Houri K.

58

Comparison of CT, PET, and PET/CT for Staging of Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. J. Fueger et al. : PET/CT for indolent lymphoma Table 2.Performance for detection of nodal disease Sensitivity PETCT PET/CT pG0.001 vs PET, CT Specificity pG0.001 vs PET

Fueger, Barbara J.; Yeom, Kristen; Czernin, Johannes; Sayre, James W.; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (?) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (? ? 200–400 HU) resulted in low ?-maps noise (? ? 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ?10% in 140 keV ?-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ?15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 ?Gy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected ? values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in ?. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ?100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in ?{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ?10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect SPECT quantification is low (CTDI{sub vol} ? 4 ?Gy), the low dose limit for the CT exam as part of SPECT/CT will be guided by CT image quality requirements for anatomical localization and artifact reduction. A CT technique with higher kVp in combination with lower mAs is recommended when low-dose CT images are used for AC to minimize beam-hardening artifacts.

Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C., E-mail: skappadath@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not adjusted by patient size. Additionally, considerable differences were noted in ED{sub adj} distributions between scanners, with scanners employing iterative reconstruction exhibiting significantly lower ED{sub adj} (range: 9%-64%). Finally, a significant difference (up to 59%) in ED{sub adj} distributions was observed between institutions, indicating the potential for dose reduction. Conclusions: The authors developed a robust automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT. Using this program, significant differences in ED{sub adj} were observed between scanner models and across institutions. This new dose monitoring program offers a unique tool for improving quality assurance and standardization both within and across institutions.

Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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61

CT volumetry of the skeletal tissues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computed tomography (CT) is an important and widely used modality in the diagnosis and treatment of various cancers. In the field of molecular radiotherapy, the use of spongiosa volume (combined tissues of the bone marrow and bone trabeculae) has been suggested as a means to improve the patient-specificity of bone marrow dose estimates. The noninvasive estimation of an organ volume comes with some degree of error or variation from the true organ volume. The present study explores the ability to obtain estimates of spongiosa volume or its surrogate via manual image segmentation. The variation among different segmentation raters was explored and found not to be statistically significant (p value >0.05). Accuracy was assessed by having several raters manually segment a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe with known volumes. Segmentation of the outer region of the PVC pipe resulted in mean percent errors as great as 15% while segmentation of the pipe's inner region resulted in mean percent errors within {approx}5%. Differences between volumes estimated with the high-resolution CT data set (typical of ex vivo skeletal scans) and the low-resolution CT data set (typical of in vivo skeletal scans) were also explored using both patient CT images and a PVC pipe phantom. While a statistically significant difference (p value <0.002) between the high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was observed with excised femoral heads obtained following total hip arthroplasty, the mean difference between high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was found to be only 1.24 and 2.18 cm{sup 3} for spongiosa and cortical bone, respectively. With respect to differences observed with the PVC pipe, the variation between the high-resolution and low-resolution mean percent errors was a high as {approx}20% for the outer region volume estimates and only as high as {approx}6% for the inner region volume estimates. The findings from this study suggest that manual segmentation is a reasonably accurate and reliable means for the in vivo estimation of spongiosa volume. This work also provides a foundation for future studies where spongiosa volumes are estimated by various raters in more comprehensive CT data sets.

Brindle, James M.; Alexandre Trindade, A.; Pichardo, Jose C.; Myers, Scott L.; Shah, Amish P.; Bolch, Wesley E. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Statistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

Nattenmüller, Johanna, E-mail: johanna.nattenmueller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Filsinger, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias_filsinger@web.de; Bryant, Mark, E-mail: mark.bryant@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stiller, Wolfram, E-mail: Wolfram.Stiller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Grenacher, Lars, E-mail: lars.grenacher@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hosch, Waldemar, E-mail: waldemar.hosch@urz.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

Michael Hess | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared Temanson -ofMarc MorialMegan Slack

64

CT. L-2 United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d! CT NC0 - i ,

65

Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,Pvt LtdShrub Oak, New York: EnergySibleySidney,EnergyCT

66

Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

CT Poison Control Center 2014 Video Contest Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entry form (found on posioncontrol.uchc.edu) b. Include a link to your video from your You Tube account and community partners. Judges will consider: length of video, appropriate format, accuracy of information poison center means to you, value of the CT Poison Control Center · Programming your phone with the CT

Kim, Duck O.

68

MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - angiographic cone-beam ct Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: medical multi-slicecone-beam CT scanners typically use equiangular projection data, our new formula may... : Computed tomography (CT), cone-beam geometry, Feldkamp-type...

71

Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration. of Michigan & Univ. of Washington Outline Introduction - PET/CT background - CT-based attenuation correction for PET Conventional sinogram decomposition in DE-CT Statistically motivated sinogram restoration in DE

Fessler, Jeffrey A.

72

Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

Arbisser, Amelia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Obscure pulmonary masses: bronchial impaction revealed by CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dilated bronchi impacted with mucus or tumor are recognized on standard chest radiographs because they are surrounded by aerated pulmonary parenchyma. When imaged in different projections, these lesions produce a variety of appearances that are generally familiar. This report characterizes less familiar computed tomographic (CT) findings in eight patients with pathologic bronchial distension of congenital, neoplastic, or infectious etiologies and correlates them with chest films. In seven patients, CT readily revealed dilated bronchi and/or regional lung hypodensity. In four of these cases, CT led to the initial suspicion of dilated bronchi. CT should be used early in the evaluation of atypical pulmonary mass lesions or to confirm suspected bronchial impaction because of the high probability it will reveal diagnostic features.

Pugatch, R.D.; Gale, M.E.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Departments of Internal Medicine, Chemistry, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation T. Fettah Kosar, PhD Center for Nanoscale Systems Harvard) Model: HMXST225 (max. 225 kV) #12;Overview 3 Introduction to X-ray imaging and Computed Tomography (CT) · What are X-rays and how do we generate and image them? · How do we magnify X-ray images and keep them

76

On Recent Claims Concerning the R_h=ct Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The R_h=ct Universe is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology which, like LCDM, assumes the presence of dark energy in addition to (baryonic and non-luminous) matter and radiation. Unlike LCDM, however, it is also constrained by the equation of state (EOS) p=-rho/3, in terms of the total pressure p and energy density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R_h=ct and LCDM have been carried out using over 14 different cosmological measurements and observations. In every case, the data have favoured R_h=ct over the standard model, with model selection tools yielding a likelihood ~90-95% that the former is correct, versus only ~5-10% for the latter. In other words, the standard model without the EOS p=-rho/3 does not appear to be the optimal description of nature. Yet in spite of these successes---or perhaps because of them---several concerns have been published recently regarding the fundamental basis of the theory itself. The latest paper on this subject even claims---quite remarkably---that R_h=ct is a vacuum solution, though quite evidently rho is not 0. Here, we address these concerns and demonstrate that all criticisms leveled thus far against R_h=ct, including the supposed vacuum condition, are unwarranted. They all appear to be based on incorrect assumptions or basic theoretical errors. Nevertheless, continued scrutiny such as this will be critical to establishing R_h=ct as the correct description of nature.

Fulvio Melia

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

Ryan, E. Ronan, E-mail: ronan@ronanryan.com; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Hsu, Meier [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Molecular imaging in oncology: the acceptance of PET/CT and the emergence of MR/PET imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CT—Computed tomography . PET—Positron Emission Tomography .body imaging with MRI or PET/CT: the future for single-Sollitto RA et al (2009) 18F-FDG PET/CT of transitional cell

Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Christie R, Daw NC et al ( 2005) PET/CT in the evaluation ofComparative study of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging inet al (2009) Diagnostic value of PET/CT for the staging and

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

VACT: Visualization-Aware CT Reconstruction Ziyi Zheng and Klaus Mueller, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract-- Computed tomography (CT) reconstruction methods are often unaware of the requirements Medical routine frequently utilizes 3D visualization tools for diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT between the raw projection data and their visualization via vol- ume rendering. Our framework can

Mueller, Klaus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

E-Print Network 3.0 - aneurysm ct evaluation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF SURGERY VOL 30 NO 4 OCTOBER 2007 2007 Elsevier. All rights reserved. Summary: tomography (CT). Follow-up CT scan at 22 months showed the presence of a markedly enlarged...

82

Detektion von Phäochromozytomen und rekurrenten medullären Schilddrüsenkarzinomen mit F18 DOPA PET/CT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Evaluating [18F]dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) in patients with clinical suspicion for a primary or recurrent pheochromocytoma (pheo) by means of whole body PET/CT. In pheos PET/CT detects… (more)

Zeich, Katrin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

On Recent Claims Concerning the R_h=ct Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The R_h=ct Universe is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology which, like LCDM, assumes the presence of dark energy in addition to (baryonic and non-luminous) matter and radiation. Unlike LCDM, however, it is also constrained by the equation of state (EOS) p=-rho/3, in terms of the total pressure p and energy density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R_h=ct and LCDM have been carried out using over 14 different cosmological measurements and observations. In every case, the data have favoured R_h=ct over the standard model, with model selection tools yielding a likelihood ~90-95% that the former is correct, versus only ~5-10% for the latter. In other words, the standard model without the EOS p=-rho/3 does not appear to be the optimal description of nature. Yet in spite of these successes---or perhaps because of them---several concerns have been published recently regarding the fundamental basis of the theory itself. The latest paper on this subject even claims---quite remarkably---that R_h=ct is ...

Melia, Fulvio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Status and Promise CT's and Magnetized Target Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hill (LLNL) #12;CT's: Spheromaks & Field Reversed Configurations At LLNL, the SSPX experiment is investigating spheromak formation, sustainment, and confinement issues. (Hill, Mclean, Wood, Ryutov). At UC-Davis, formation and acceleration of spheromaks. (Hwang) At the U of Washington, field reversed configuration

85

AUTOCORRECTING RECONSTRUCTION FOR FLEXIBLE CT SCANNERS Jeff Orchard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

revolutionize the world of computed tomography (CT). Tiny x-ray emitters and detectors could be embedded scanners. Index Terms: computed tomography, image reconstruction, entropy, nanotechnology, autofocus 1. An automatic (data-driven) motion-correction method for SPECT (single photon emission computed tomog- raphy

Orchard, Jeffery J.

86

Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook page 1 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook page 2 Table of Contents Standards 22 #12;Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook

Rose, Michael R.

87

Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model Antonio Moreno1 , Sylvie Chambon1 , Anand P Orlando, USA Abstract. In the context of thoracic CT-PET volume registration, we present a novel method applications. We consider Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in thoracic regions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

88

Measurements from 3D-CT renderings are used in research and clinical management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements from 3D-CT renderings are used in research and clinical management: · Characterization for the prism]) RENDERING TECHNIQUES USED in ANALYZE 10.0: - Volume Render - (2) Volumes of Interest 1) VOI-Auto & 2) VOI-Manual TOTAL 3D-CT MODELS: 3 mandibles X 18 CT series X 3 rendering techniques = 162 mandible

Vorperian, Houri K.

89

X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction via Wavelet Frame Based Regularization and Radon Domain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reconstruct high quality CT images from limited and noisy projection data. One of the common CT systems Bin Dong Jia Li Zuowei Shen December 22, 2011 Abstract X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been,8]. Numerical simulations and comparisons will be presented at the end. Keywords: Computed tomography, wavelet

Zakharov, Vladimir

90

In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom.Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K{sub CT} at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R{sub K}) as K/ K{sub CT}, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R{sub K} values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median R{sub K} values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R{sub K} for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 {+-} 0.08. Average R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R{sub K} values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R{sub K} values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R{sub K} value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R{sub K} value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the isocenter (free in air). Conversion from in-patient air KERMA values to tissue dose would require the use of energy-appropriate conversion factors.

Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), 96 Jonathan Lucas Street (MSC 323), Charleston, South Carolina 29425-3230 (United States); Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 750 E Adams Street, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

Fave, Xenia, E-mail: xjfave@mdanderson.org; Martin, Rachael [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Carvalho, Luis [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland)] [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - air ct cisternography Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

James E. Mason* and Cristina L. Archer1 Summary: supply with electricity from compressed air energy storage combustion turbine (CAES CT) power plants... compressed air energy...

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - axial ct scan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine 12 Projection-based features for reducing false positives in computer-aided detection of colonic polyps in CT colonography Summary: indicates one IPC....

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal multislice ct Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ge Wanga) and Michael W. Vannier Department... in multislice spiralhelical computed tomography CT and provide guidelines for scanner design and protocol... optimization....

95

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal ct replace Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leeds Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 23 ARTICLE IN PRESS Computer-Aided Design ( ) Summary: a limited number of CT images. The three- dimensional...

96

E-Print Network 3.0 - aided ct image Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 ARTICLE IN PRESS Computer-Aided Design ( ) Summary: a limited number of computed tomography (CT) images. The three-dimensional template geometry of a healthy... contour shown...

97

CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

98

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNY 28Dorr Corp - CT 14

99

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNYEra ToolFenn Machinery Co - CT

100

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTR.l\CT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies smartHistory:CONTR.l\CT 2.

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Validation of Plaster Endocast Morphology Through 3D CT Image Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation of Plaster Endocast Morphology Through 3D CT Image Analysis P. Thomas Schoenemann,1 by creating endo- casts out of rubber latex shells filled with plaster. The extent to which the method questions. Pairs of virtual endocasts (VEs) created from high-resolution CT scans of corresponding latex/plaster

Schoenemann, P. Thomas

103

Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong Department) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose the bleeding Tomography (CT) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose

Tan, Chew Lim

104

Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann1 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann1 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY System Identification & Forecasting with Advanced Neural Networks Principles, Techniques, Applications Hans Georg Zimmermann Siemens AG Email : Hans_Georg.Zimmermann@siemens.com © Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann2 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY . . . . ! " i ii wxw 0 w1 wn xn x1 Distinct

Schmidhuber, Juergen

105

Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1) Istv surfaces reconstructed from MR volumes are shown. 1 Outline of the project One of our current projects steps of bone surface reconstruction from CT/MR slice images. 2 Main steps of reconstruction 2.1

Chetverikov, Dmitry

106

Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computed Tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, is required to be converted to electron density for radiation dose calculation for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages were applied to take the patient CT image without applying the specific CT number to electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of dose calculation would be unassured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to change in tube voltage were demonstrated and the dose calculation errors in percentage depth dose (PDD) and a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in PDD from TPS dose calculation and Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3 % and 1.1 % respectively when applying the same CT number to electron density conversion curve to the 80 kVp and 140 kVp images. In the clinical case, the different CT nu...

Rhee, Dong Joo; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki; Jeong, Dong Hyeok

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M, we employ an atlas of labeled training images. We register each of these images to the unlabeled

Golland, Polina

108

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

Boykov, Yuri

109

CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 , A. Moreno1-based registration of CT (at two different instants of the breathing cycle, intermediate expirations) and PET images in order to simulate the instant in the breathing cycle most similar to the PET image and guarantee

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

GPU IMPLEMENTATION OF A 3D BAYESIAN CT ALGORITHM AND ITS APPLICATION ON REAL FOAM RECONSTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tomography (CT) [1, 3]. The limits of these meth- ods appear when the number of projections is small, and as well as any iterative algebraic meth- ods is the computation time and especially for projection solve is to reconstruct the object f from the projection data g collected by a cone beam 3D CT. The link

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

111

Searching Effective Parameters for Low-Dose CT Reconstruction by Ant Colony Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Eric Papenhausen and Klaus Mueller Abstract-- Low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) has been gaining. To cope with the limited data collected at 30% of standard radiation, low-dose CT reconstruction algorithms generally require several iterations of forward projection, back-projection and regularization

Mueller, Klaus

112

Locating the Eyes in CT Brain Scan Data Kostis Kaggelides, Peter J. Elliott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a technique for locating the eyes in Computed Tomography brain scan data, is described. The objective and implemented an algorithm which automaticallyidenti es and locates the eyes in a Computed Tomography(CT) brainLocating the Eyes in CT Brain Scan Data Kostis Kaggelides, Peter J. Elliott IBM UK Scienti c Centre

Fisher, Bob

113

CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November 6 2014)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 1 CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November straightness. Using #12;CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 2 the advanced output control-processing. Major features of the versions Version 1.3 Beta2 (newest): The primary change in CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2

Yavuz, Deniz

114

Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the measurements of the test persons, there is a very good correlation (?= 0.917) between the respiratory motion phases received by the radar system and the external motion monitor. Our concept of using an array of transmitting antennas turned out to be widely insensitive to the positioning of the test persons. A time shift between the respiratory motion curves recorded with the radar system and the motion curves from the external respiratory monitor was observed which indicates a slight difference between internal organ motion and motion detected by the external respiratory monitor. The simulations were in good accordance with the measurements.Conclusions: A continuous wave radar operating in the near field of the antennas can be used to determine the respiratory motion of humans accurately. In contrast to trigger systems used today, the radar system is able to measure motion inside the body. If such a monitor was routinely available in clinical CT, it would be possible optimizing the scan start with respect to the respiratory state of the patient. Breathing commands would potentially widely be avoided, and as far as uncooperative patients or children are concerned, less sedation might be necessary. Further applications of the radar system could be in radiation therapy or interventional imaging for instance.

Pfanner, Florian [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Maier, Joscha [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Kachelrieß, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Methods: Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E{sub 103}/E{sub 60}). Results: Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by {approx}11%, for chest scans by {approx}20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by {approx}25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Conclusions: Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He Wenjun [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson-MUSC Bioengineering Program, Clemson University, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the proposed method but with an edge-preserving regularization term. Results: On the Catphan phantom, the method maintains the same spatial resolution on the decomposed images as that of the CT images before decomposition (8 pairs/cm) while significantly reducing their noise standard deviation. Compared to that obtained by the direct matrix inversion, the noise standard deviation in the images decomposed by the proposed algorithm is reduced by over 98%. Without considering the noise correlation properties in the formulation, the denoising scheme degrades the spatial resolution to 6 pairs/cm for the same level of noise suppression. Compared to the edge-preserving algorithm, the method achieves better low-contrast detectability. A quantitative study is performed on the contrast-rod slice of Catphan phantom. The proposed method achieves lower electron density measurement error as compared to that by the direct matrix inversion, and significantly reduces the error variation by over 97%. On the head phantom, the method reduces the noise standard deviation of decomposed images by over 97% without blurring the sinus structures. Conclusions: The authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for DECT. The method combines noise suppression and material decomposition into an iterative process and achieves both goals simultaneously. By exploring the full variance-covariance properties of the decomposed images and utilizing the edge predetection, the proposed algorithm shows superior performance on noise suppression with high image spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability.

Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and can be used to segment regions containing iodinated blood and compute measures of cardiac function. Conclusions: We believe this combined spectral and temporal imaging technique will be useful for future studies of cardiopulmonary disease in small animals.

Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Thomas E. Hess Page 1 5/19/14 Thomas Hess  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

software QA, testing, knowledge management, training, worldwide customer support and critical problem, when optimally complied, dramatically increased the speed of end user experience and program execution implementation changes. As a result of this development, the "GeoFrame" product was significantly increased

Yang, Zong-Liang

119

RIS-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RISÃ?-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN - A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH Gunner C. Larsen Abstract. This report documents the results obtained from an elastic-plastic

120

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Finite Element Analysis of Ballistic Penetration of Plain Weave Twaron CT709® Fabrics: A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ballistic impact of Twaron CT709® plain weave fabrics is studied using an explicit finite element method. Many existing approximations pertaining to woven fabrics cannot adequately represent strain rate-dependent behavior exhibited by the Twaron...

Gogineni, Sireesha

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

MicroCT of Coronary Stents: Staining Techniques for 3-D Pathological Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2011 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering MicroCT of Coronary Stents: Staining Techniques for 3-D Pathological Analysis Copyright 2011 Stephen Daniel Darrouzet... ABSTRACT MicroCT of Coronary Stents: Staining Techniques for 3-D Pathological Analysis. (May 2011) Stephen Daniel Darrouzet, B.S., Texas A&M Unversity Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Fred Clubb, Jr. In the area of translational research...

Darrouzet, Stephen 1987-

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3, Edited by Mustafa Ali Mohd, Intech Publishers, ISBN 979-953-307-737-5. 8. Hess, J.R.; Kenney, K.L.; Wright, C.T.; Perlack, R.; and Turhollow, A. (2009). Corn Stover...

124

Microsoft Word - TM2012-003-0 35 dollar in TM format .docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cellulose, 16:599-619. Hess, J.R., Wright C.T., Kenney K.L. 2007. Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining,...

125

Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Adaptive mean filtering for noise reduction in CT polymer gel dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray computed tomography (CT) as a method of extracting 3D dose information from irradiated polymer gel dosimeters is showing potential as a practical means to implement gel dosimetry in a radiation therapy clinic. However, the response of CT contrast to dose is weak and noise reduction is critical in order to achieve adequate dose resolutions with this method. Phantom design and CT imaging technique have both been shown to decrease image noise. In addition, image postprocessing using noise reduction filtering techniques have been proposed. This work evaluates in detail the use of the adaptive mean filter for reducing noise in CT gel dosimetry. Filter performance is systematically tested using both synthetic patterns mimicking a range of clinical dose distribution features as well as actual clinical dose distributions. Both low and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situations are examined. For all cases, the effects of filter kernel size and the number of iterations are investigated. Results indicate that adaptive mean filtering is a highly effective tool for noise reduction CT gel dosimetry. The optimum filtering strategy depends on characteristics of the dose distributions and image noise level. For low noise images (SNR {approx}20), the filtered results are excellent and use of adaptive mean filtering is recommended as a standard processing tool. For high noise images (SNR {approx}5) adaptive mean filtering can also produce excellent results, but filtering must be approached with more caution as spatial and dose distortions of the original dose distribution can occur.

Hilts, Michelle; Jirasek, Andrew [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, V8R6V5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W2Y2 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Malignant pleural mesothelioma: value of CT and MR imaging in predicting resectability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OBJECTIVE. The objective was to determine if CT or MR imaging findings could be used to accurately predict resectability in patients with biopsy-proved malignant pleural mesotheliomas. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. CT and MR findings in 41 consecutive patients with malignant mesotheliomas who were referred to the thoracic surgery clinic for extrapleural pneumonectomy were studied by thoracic radiologists before surgery. Review of radiologic studies focused on local invasion of three separate regions: the diaphragm, chest wall, and mediastinum. Results of all imaging examinations were carefully correlated with intraoperative, gross, and microscopic pathologic findings. RESULTS. After radiologic and clinical evaluation, 34 patients (83%) had thoracotomy; 24 of these had tumors that were resectable. The sensitivity was high (> 90%) for both CT and MR in each region. Specificity, however, was low, probably because of the small number of patients with unresectable tumors. CONCLUSION. CT and MR provided similar information on resectability in most cases. Sensitivity was high for both procedures. Because CT is more widely available and used, the authors suggest it as the initial study when determining resectability. In difficult cases, important complementary anatomic information can be derived from MR images obtained before surgical intervention.

Patz, E.F. Jr.; Shaffer, K.; Piwnica-Worms, D.R.; Jochelson, M.; Sarin, M.; Sugarbaker, D.J.; Pugatch, R.D. (Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%,?0.31% ± 0.10%,?0.69 ± 0.14?mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95,?0.90,?0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use.

Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua, E-mail: JYao@cc.nih.gov [Clinical Image Processing Service, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [Clinical Image Processing Service, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 and Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 and Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Nacif, Marcelo S. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)] [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Comparison of MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetric analysis of prostate brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 {+-} 6.17 cc (mean {+-} SD) in MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 {+-} 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported.

Tanaka, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan)]. E-mail: osa-mu@umin.ac.jp; Hayashi, Shinya [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Sakurai, Kota [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Nakano, Masahiro [Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Maeda, Sunaho [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro R.T. [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Deguchi, Takashi [Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

Shankar, Sridhar, E-mail: shankars@ummhc.org; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Flanagan, Hugh L. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Anesthesia (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Surgery (United States)

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Georgia Power`s Plant Yates CT-121 demonstration performance results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chiyoda CT-121 demonstration project, being conducted at Georgia Power`s Plant Yates` 100 MWe Unit 1, is an evaluation of a unique wet-limestone, forced-oxidized FGD process and is a part of the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) program. The CT-121 process uses a single unique absorber vessel made entirely of fiberglass reinforced plastics called a jet bubbling reactor (JBR). The JBR allows concurrent completion of all the necessary reactions to remove sulfur dioxide from the flue gas and to precipitate a gypsum byproduct. This paper will discuss the results of the low-particulate test phase, including the effects of higher-sulfur coal, as well as initial results from the high-particulate test phase (existing electrostatic precipitator deenergized). DOE-sponsored air toxics testing has also been conducted, but final results were not available at the time of this writing. A discussion of limestone selection and its impact on the dewatering properties of the CT-121 gypsum byproduct is also included. Performance results emphasize the efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of the CT-121 process. Preliminary testing of the CT-121 process at Plant Yates has produced excellent performance results. The process has proven itself capable of exceeding its design SO{sub 2} removal efficiency specification of 90%, both with and without the ESP in service. The process has also achieved SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies of greater than 98%. Particulate measurements, conducted with the ESP deenergized, have established the capability of the CT-121 process to remove over 99% of the boiler`s particulate emissions at 100% boiler load.

Burford, D.P. [Southern Co. Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States); Pearl, I.G. [Radian Corp., Tucker, GA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT data using multiscale interphase iterative nonlocal means  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in lung cancer radiotherapy due to its capability in providing important tumor motion information. However, the prolonged scanning duration required by 4D-CT causes considerable increase in radiation dose. To minimize the radiation-related health risk, radiation dose is often reduced at the expense of interslice spatial resolution. However, inadequate resolution in 4D-CT causes artifacts and increases uncertainty in tumor localization, which eventually results in extra damages of healthy tissues during radiotherapy. In this paper, the authors propose a novel postprocessing algorithm to enhance the resolution of lung 4D-CT data. Methods: The authors' premise is that anatomical information missing in one phase can be recovered from the complementary information embedded in other phases. The authors employ a patch-based mechanism to propagate information across phases for the reconstruction of intermediate slices in the longitudinal direction, where resolution is normally the lowest. Specifically, the structurally matching and spatially nearby patches are combined for reconstruction of each patch. For greater sensitivity to anatomical details, the authors employ a quad-tree technique to adaptively partition the image for more fine-grained refinement. The authors further devise an iterative strategy for significant enhancement of anatomical details. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm using a publicly available lung data that consist of 10 4D-CT cases. The authors' algorithm gives very promising results with significantly enhanced image structures and much less artifacts. Quantitative analysis shows that the authors' algorithm increases peak signal-to-noise ratio by 3-4 dB and the structural similarity index by 3%-5% when compared with the standard interpolation-based algorithms. Conclusions: The authors have developed a new algorithm to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. It outperforms the conventional interpolation-based approaches by producing images with the markedly improved structural clarity and greatly reduced artifacts.

Zhang Yu [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China and Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu Guorong [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Feng Qianjin; Chen Wufan [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Lian Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shen Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT via group-sparsity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: 4D-CT typically delivers more accurate information about anatomical structures in the lung, over 3D-CT, due to its ability to capture visual information of the lung motion across different respiratory phases. This helps to better determine the dose during radiation therapy for lung cancer. However, a critical concern with 4D-CT that substantially compromises this advantage is the low superior-inferior resolution due to less number of acquired slices, in order to control the CT radiation dose. To address this limitation, the authors propose an approach to reconstruct missing intermediate slices, so as to improve the superior-inferior resolution.Methods: In this method the authors exploit the observation that sampling information across respiratory phases in 4D-CT can be complimentary due to lung motion. The authors’ approach uses this locally complimentary information across phases in a patch-based sparse-representation framework. Moreover, unlike some recent approaches that treat local patches independently, the authors’ approach employs the group-sparsity framework that imposes neighborhood and similarity constraints between patches. This helps in mitigating the trade-off between noise robustness and structure preservation, which is an important consideration in resolution enhancement. The authors discuss the regularizing ability of group-sparsity, which helps in reducing the effect of noise and enables better structural localization and enhancement.Results: The authors perform extensive experiments on the publicly available DIR-Lab Lung 4D-CT dataset [R. Castillo, E. Castillo, R. Guerra, V. Johnson, T. McPhail, A. Garg, and T. Guerrero, “A framework for evaluation of deformable image registration spatial accuracy using large landmark point sets,” Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 1849–1870 (2009)]. First, the authors carry out empirical parametric analysis of some important parameters in their approach. The authors then demonstrate, qualitatively as well as quantitatively, the ability of their approach to achieve more accurate and better localized results over bicubic interpolation as well as a related state-of-the-art approach. The authors also show results on some datasets with tumor, to further emphasize the clinical importance of their method.Conclusions: The authors have proposed to improve the superior-inferior resolution of 4D-CT by estimating intermediate slices. The authors’ approach exploits neighboring constraints in the group-sparsity framework, toward the goal of achieving better localization and noise robustness. The authors’ results are encouraging, and positively demonstrate the role of group-sparsity for 4D-CT resolution enhancement.

Bhavsar, Arnav; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lian, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

for Proton CT R. P. Johnson, Member, IEEE, V. Bashkirov, V. Giacometti, R. F. Hurley, P. Piersimoni,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing treatment with particle beam a combination of the residual energy and range of the proton, from which we derive the water equivalent path. INTRODUCTION roton CT (pCT) is an evolving technology that promises to improve proton treatment planning

California at Santa Cruz, University of

136

A method for measuring joint kinematics designed for accurate registration of kinematic data to models constructed from CT data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for position and 0.1 degrees for orientation for linkage digitization and better than +/- 0.2 mm and +/- 0.2 degrees for CT digitization. Surface models of the radius and ulna were constructed from CT data, as an example application. Kinematics of the bones...

Fischer, Kenneth J.; Manson, T. T.; Pfaeffle, H. J.; Tomaino, M. M.; Woo, S. L-Y

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: ?5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Bailey, D; Bailey, E [Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal brain ct Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

P R I N G 2 0 0 7 N Y U P H Y S I C I A N S P R I N G 2 0 0 7 1 1 Summary: to put their head in a CT scanner," says Dr. de Leon. At the time, brain scans were used in dementia...

139

Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

Schmittbuhl, Jean

140

DAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ray/neutron spectrometer, a magnetometer and a gravity investigation. Dawn uses solar arrays to power its xenon ion engine solar panels roughly 21 m tip-to-tip, a 5 m magnetometer boom and three ion thrusters, one of whichDAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1) , A. Coradini(2) , W

Zuber, Maria

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141

Surface Extraction from Multi-Material Components for Metrology using Dual Energy CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials (e.g., carbon-fibre-reinforced plas- tics) induce manufacturers to design new functionSurface Extraction from Multi-Material Components for Metrology using Dual Energy CT Christoph surface models of multi-material components using dual energy com- puted tomography (DECT

142

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM) Hao Gao1 , Hengyong Yu2 spectrum. Besides, the energy-dependent intensity information can be incorporated into the PRISM in terms on the generalized rank and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base

Soatto, Stefano

143

The Mathematics of the Imaging Techniques of MEG, CT, PET and SPECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mathematics of the Imaging Techniques of MEG, CT, PET and SPECT A.S. Fokas, V. Marinakis), of positron emission tomography (PET) and of single photon emission computed to­ mography (SPECT) are reviewed techniques of positron emission tomography (PET) and of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT

Fokas, A. S.

144

CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING Maite L,cerquide,davidm,anna}@maia.ub.es ABSTRACT This paper introduces a machine learning approach into the process of direct volume rendering that generates the classification func- tion within the optical property function used for rendering. Briefly

López-Sánchez, Maite

145

Lack of Correlation Between External Fiducial Positions and Internal Tumor Positions During Breath-Hold CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: For thoracic tumors, if four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is unavailable, the internal margin can be estimated by use of breath-hold (BH) CT scans acquired at end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE). By use of external surrogates for tumor position, BH accuracy is estimated by minimizing the difference between respiratory extrema BH and mean equivalent-phase free breathing (FB) positions. We tested the assumption that an external surrogate for BH accuracy correlates with internal tumor positional accuracy during BH CT. Methods and Materials: In 16 lung cancer patients, 4DCT images, as well as BH CT images at EI and EE, were acquired. Absolute differences between BH and mean equivalent-phase (FB) positions were calculated for both external fiducials and gross tumor volume (GTV) centroids as metrics of external and internal BH accuracy, respectively, and the results were correlated. Results: At EI, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacement correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.11). Similarly, at EE, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacements correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.18). Conclusions: External surrogates for tumor position are not an accurate metric of BH accuracy for lung cancer patients. This implies that care should be taken when using such an approach because an incorrect internal margin could be generated.

Hunjan, Sandeep, E-mail: shunjan@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Starkschall, George; Prado, Karl; Dong Lei; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); School of Health Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Comparison of Fusion Imaging Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Intra-arterial CT: Assessment of Drug Distribution by an Implantable Port System in Patients Undergoing Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP) and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.

Ikeda, Osamu, E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Kusunoki, Shinichiroh; Nakaura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gastroenterological Surgery (Japan)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Estimation of the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} for multislice CT examinations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the variations of CT dose index (CTDI) efficiencies, {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100})=CTDI{sub 100}/CTDI{sub {infinity}}, with bowtie filters and CT scanner types. Methods: This was an extension of our previous study [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Phys. Med. Biol. 56, 5789-5803 (2011)]. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to calculate {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) on a Siemens Somatom Definition scanner. The {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) dependencies on tube voltages and beam widths were tested in previous studies. The influences of different bowtie filters and CT scanner types were examined in this work. The authors tested the variations of {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) with bowtie filters on the Siemens Definition scanner. The authors also analyzed the published CTDI measurements of four independent studies on five scanners of four models from three manufacturers. Results: On the Siemens Definition scanner, the difference in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub W}) between using the head and body bowtie filters was 2.5% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 32-cm phantom, and 1.7% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 16-cm phantom. Compared with CTDI{sub W}, the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} increased by 30.5% (on average) in the 32-cm phantom, and by 20.0% (on average) in the 16-cm phantom. These results were approximately the same for 80-140 kV and 1-40 mm beam widths (4.2% maximum deviation). The differences in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) between the simulations and the direct measurements of four previous studies were 1.3%-5.0% at the center/periphery of the 16-cm/32-cm phantom (on average). Conclusions: Compared with CTDI{sub vol}, the equilibrium dose for large scan lengths is 30.5% higher in the 32-cm phantom, and is 20.0% higher in the 16-cm phantom. The relative increases are practically independent of tube voltages (80-140 kV), beam widths (up to 4 cm), and the CT scanners covered in this study.

Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.3 mm{+-}1.0 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.6 mm{+-}1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.7 mm{+-}0.8 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.3 mm{+-}1.7 mm. We also noted that differences found for each of the fusion methods were similar for both the axial and helical CT image acquisition protocols.

Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E. [Department of Medical Physics, Radiation Oncology, Hospital Virgen del Consuelo, Callosa de Ensarria 12-Valencia, Valencia 46007 (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, H. NISA 'Virgen del Consuelo', Valencia (Spain)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

Tewari, Sanjit O., E-mail: tewaris@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Petre, Elena N., E-mail: petree@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Osborne, Joseph, E-mail: osbornej@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

PET/CT com FDG-18 F em pacientes com suspeita de recidiva de carcinoma de ovário.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??O exame PET/CT com FDG-18F é um método de diagnóstico por imagem, útil em oncologia. O câncer de ovário é o câncer ginecológico de maior… (more)

Sanja Dragosavac

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American

153

Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

CT-Guided Interventions Using a Free-Hand, Optical Tracking System: Initial Clinical Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PurposeThe present study was designed to evaluate the geometrical accuracy and clinical applicability of a new, free-hand, CT-guided, optical navigation system.MethodsFifteen procedures in 14 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. The navigation system was applied for interventional procedures on small target lesions, in cases with long needle paths, narrow access windows, or when an out-of-plane access was expected. Mean lesion volume was 27.9 ml, and mean distance to target measured was 107.5 mm. Eleven of 15 needle trajectories were planned as out-of-plane approaches regarding the axial CT plane.ResultsNinety-one percent of the biopsies were diagnostic. All therapeutic interventions were technically successful. Targeting precision was high with a mean distance of the needle tip from planned target of 1.98 mm. Mean intervention time was 1:12 h. A statistically significant correlation between angular needle deviation and intervention time (p = 0.007), respiratory movement of the target (p = 0.008), and body mass index (p = 0.02) was detected. None of the evaluated parameters correlated significantly with the distance from the needle tip to the planned target.ConclusionsThe application of a navigation system for complex CT-guided procedures provided safe and effective targeting within a reasonable intervention time in our series.

Schubert, Tilman, E-mail: TSchubert@uhbs.ch; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Pansini, Michele [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Liu, David [Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology (Canada); Gutzeit, Andreas [Winterthur Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Kos, Sebastian [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Retrocrural splanchnic nerve alchohol neurolysis with a CT-guided anterior transaortic approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Retrocrural splanchnic nerve alcohol neurolysis with a CT-guided anterior transonic approach, a new method for splanchnic block alleviation of chronic abdominal pain, is described. Ten patients with chronic abdominal pain requiring narcotic treatment, six with pancreatic carcinoma, one with gastric carcinoma, two with chronic pancreatitis, and one with pain of unknown etiology, were referred for splanchnic nerve neurolysis. With CT guidance, a 20 gauge needle was placed through the aorta into the retrocrural space at T11-T12, and 5-15 ml 96% alcohol was injected into the retrocrural space. Following the procedure, 6 of 10 patients were pain free, 2 patients had temporary pain relief, and 2 patients were without response. There were no significant complications. CT-guided anterior transaortic retrocrural splanchnic nerve alcohol neurolysis is technically feasible, easier to perform than the classic posterolateral approach, and may have less risk of complications. The success rate in this initial trial was reasonable and, therefore, this technique provides an additional method for the treatment of abdominal pain. 12 refs., 2 figs.

Fields, S. [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy utilizing CT-based technologies: A report of the AAPM TG-179  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Commercial CT-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems allow widespread management of geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. This document provides consensus recommendations for quality assurance protocols that ensure patient safety and patient treatment fidelity for such systems. Methods: The AAPM TG-179 reviews clinical implementation and quality assurance aspects for commercially available CT-based IGRT, each with their unique capabilities and underlying physics. The systems described are kilovolt and megavolt cone-beam CT, fan-beam MVCT, and CT-on-rails. A summary of the literature describing current clinical usage is also provided. Results: This report proposes a generic quality assurance program for CT-based IGRT systems in an effort to provide a vendor-independent program for clinical users. Published data from long-term, repeated quality control tests form the basis of the proposed test frequencies and tolerances.Conclusion: A program for quality control of CT-based image-guidance systems has been produced, with focus on geometry, image quality, image dose, system operation, and safety. Agreement and clarification with respect to reports from the AAPM TG-101, TG-104, TG-142, and TG-148 has been addressed.

Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Langen, Katja M.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Miften, Moyed; Moseley, Douglas J.; Pouliot, Jean; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Yoo, Sua [Task Group 179, Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero St., Suite H 1031, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Freehand Two-Step CT-Guided Brain Tumor Biopsy: A Fast and Effective Interventional Procedure in Selected Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided needle biopsy of brain lesions without a stereotactic device, and to determine the best possible indications for this technique. Methods. From February 2001 to February 2004, 20 patients (12 men, 8 women; age 61-82 years) underwent CT-guided brain lesion biopsy. The procedure started with a brain CT scan for lesion localization and for selection of the inlet for needle insertion. The patient was then transported to the operating room where cranioanatrisis was performed. Subsequently, the biopsy was performed under CT guidance using a 14G brain biopsy needle with a blind smooth end and lateral holes. At the end of the biopsy, the field was checked for possible complications with a CT scan. Results. Histopathologic results were: brain tumor in 16 patients (80%), inflammatory process in 3 (15%), and no conclusive diagnosis in 1 (5%). A repeat of the process was required in 2 patients. A minor complication of local hematoma was found in 1 patient (5%). There were no deaths or other serious complications.Conclusion. CT-guided biopsy is a reliable method for histopathologic diagnosis of brain lesions in selected cases. It is a simple, fast, effective, low-cost procedure with minimal complications, indicated especially for superficial and large tumors.

Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos ['Korgialeneio-Benakeio', Hellenic Red-Cross Hospital of Athens, Radiology Department (Greece)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 0°–30°, in 5° increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30° gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%–30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%–50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the gantry reduced the dose to the breast, while also increasing noise standard deviation. Overall, the noise increase outweighed the dose reduction for the eight voxelized phantoms, suggesting that tilted gantry acquisition may not be beneficial for reducing breast dose while maintaining image quality.

Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)] [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Foley, W. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Correlation between internal fiducial tumor motion and external marker motion for liver tumors imaged with 4D-CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We investigated the correlation between the motions of an external marker and internal fiducials implanted in the liver for 8 patients undergoing respiratory-based computed tomography (four-dimensional CT [4D-CT]) procedures. Methods and Materials: The internal fiducials were gold seeds, 3 mm in length and 1.2 mm in diameter. Four patients each had one implanted fiducial, and the other four had three implanted fiducials. The external marker was a plastic box, which is part of the Real-Time Position Management System (RPM) used to track the patient's respiration. Each patient received a standard helical CT scan followed by a time-correlated CT-image acquisition (4D-CT). The 4D-CT images were reconstructed in 10 separate phases covering the entire respiratory cycle. Results: The internal fiducial motion is predominant in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 7.5-17.5 mm. The correlation between external respiration and internal fiducial motion is best during expiration. For 2 patients with their three fiducials separated by a maximum of 3.2 cm, the motions of the fiducials were well correlated, whereas for 2 patients with more widely spaced fiducials, there was less correlation. Conclusions: In general, there is a good correlation between internal fiducial motion imaged by 4D-CT and external marker motion. We have demonstrated that gating may be best performed at the end of the respiratory cycle. Special attention should be paid to gating for patients whose fiducials do not move in synchrony, because targeting on the correct respiratory amplitude alone would not guarantee that the entire tumor volume is within the treatment field.

Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: abeddar@mdanderson.org; Kainz, Kristofer [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina Marie [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsunashima, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pan Tinsu [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Prado, Karl [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

PHILIPPE-JEAN HESSE JEAN-PIERRE LE CROM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Paris, IHTP et CRHMSS, 1992, pp. 335-342 ; Jean Bennet, « La mutualité pendant la Seconde Guerre

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

38017,"AMERADA HESS CORP ",1,130,"MOTOR...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SUPPLY CO ",55,850,"UNFINISHED OILS, RESIDUUM",5312,"CORPUS CHRIS, TX","TEXAS",3,428,"GERMANY",543,0,0,"VALERO REFG CO ","CORPUS CHRISTI","TX","TEXAS",3 38017,"VALERO MKTG &...

162

Hybrid energy systems (HESs) using small modular reactors (SMRs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale nuclear reactors are traditionally operated for a singular purpose: steady-state production of dispatchable baseload electricity that is distributed broadly on the electric grid. While this implementation is key to a sustainable, reliable energy grid, small modular reactors (SMRs) offer new opportunities for increased use of clean nuclear energy for both electric and thermal ap plications in more locations – while still accommodating the desire to support renewable production sources.

S. Bragg-Sitton

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SUR LES DILECTRIQUES HTROGNES; PAR M. A. HESS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~'~,~ ... lenrs pouvoirs inducteurs et r, t,', r~ ... leurs résis- tances spécifiqu es : Dans le cas particulier

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

164

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower Finance

165

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower FinanceInformation Delaware References: EIA

166

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maryland) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower FinanceInformation DelawareInformation

167

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Massachusetts) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower FinanceInformation

168

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower

169

SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A comparison of CT- and ultrasound-based imaging to localize the prostate for external beam radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of NOMOS B-mode acquisition and targeting system (BAT) compared with computed tomography (CT) in localizing the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were CT scanned, and the prostate was localized by 3 observers using the BAT system. The BAT couch shift measurements were compared with the CT localization. Six of the patients had gold markers present in the prostate, and the prostate movement determined by BAT was compared with the movement determined by the gold markers. Results: Using the BAT system, the 3 observers determined the prostate position to be a mean of 1-5 mm over all directions with respect to the CT. The proportion of readings with a difference >3 mm between the observers was in the range of 25% to 44%. The prostate movement based on gold markers was an average of 3-5 mm different from that measured by BAT. The literature assessing the accuracy and reproducibility on BAT is summarized and compared with our findings. Conclusions: We have found that there are systematic differences between the BAT-defined prostate position compared with that estimated on CT using gold grain marker seeds.

McNair, Helen A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Helen.McNair@rmh.nhs.uk; Mangar, Stephen A. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Coffey, Jerome [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Shoulders, Beverley [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke N. [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Norman, Andrew [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Staffurth, John [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, S. Aslam [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Warrington, Alan P. [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David P. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 × 2 to 60 × 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 × 70 × 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 × 50 × 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 × 70 × 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 × 50, 40 × 40, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%–20%) from 3.9 to 0.8 mm.Conclusions: A set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system were constructed with position reliably better than a tenth of a millimeter. The hardware system is ready for image-guided conformal radiotherapy for small animals with capability of respiratory-gated delivery.

Jensen, Michael D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Holdsworth, David W. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Surgery, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Drangova, Maria [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-EngineerSelling Corp - CT 0-01

175

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 95109, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/95/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

varying little from year to year. For hydroelectricity production, the water management therefore rather

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9, 535547, 2005 www.copernicus.org/EGU/hess/hess/9/535/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas, irrigation serves to increase yields, to at- tenuate the effects of droughts or, in the case), Germany 2Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy Received: 16 June 2005 land cover inventories. 1 Introduction Agriculture is by far the largest water-use sector, accounting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer’s law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ?{sub 1}-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

Gu, Renliang; Dogandži?, Aleksandar [Iowa State University, Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom measurements for some patients. The software has potential to be used in any application where one wishes to model changes to patient conditions.

Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie [Medical Physics Department, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality especially for children. Unless recalibrated, kV should be constant for all anatomical sites if diagnostic CT scanner is used as a simulator. This work was partially supported by Capital Medical Development Scientific Research Fund of China.

Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital ' Institute, Beijing (China); Deng, J [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin [Department of Medical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Multi-GPU parallelization of a 3D Bayesian CT algorithm and its application on real foam reconstruction with incomplete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tomography (CT) [1,2]. The limits of these methods appear when the number of projections is small, and for example, the data set are not complete due to the limited acquistion time. In this specific context is the computation time and especially for projection and backprojection steps. In this study, first we show how we

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

183

Methods for reduced platen compression (RPC) test specimen cutting locations using micro-CT and planar radiographs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to complete an RPC analysis and improving the quality of the obtained results. High-resolution micro-CT scans are used to gain a better understanding of rat long bone anatomy by quantifying the location, shape, and orientation of the growth plate, primary...

Lemmon, Heber

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

TRACE/PARCS calculations of exercises 1 and 2 of the V1000CT-2 benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exercises 1 and 2 of the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 2 (V1000CT-2) are investigated using coupled three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulics code TRACE/PARCS. Two coarse mesh 3-D thermal-hydraulic models (with six angular sectors and with eighteen angular sectors) were developed for the system code TRACE for Exercise 1 and their applicability is evaluated using the test data provided in the benchmark specification. The six sector model is then coupled with the PARCS 3-D neutron kinetics model in order to analyze Exercise 2 of the benchmark. The results show that TRACE code is accurate enough to simulate the flow mixing occurring in the downcomer of the VVER-1000 reactor. (authors)

Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K. [Pennsylvania State Univ., 230 Reber Bldg, Univ. Park, PA 16801 (United States); Popov, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fast Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone-Beam CT without System Modification and Repeat Scan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profile for a set of CBCT images. A total-variation denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signal is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental CBCT phantom data, and \\emph{in vivo} human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU within either projection domain or image domain. Further test shows the method is robust with respect to segmentation procedure.

Zhao, Wei; Wang, Luyao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

CT Measurements of Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Porous Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. Preliminary results are presented from a water/air experiment. These results suggest that it is incorrect to assume negligible capillary continuity between matrix blocks as is often done.

Brigham, William E.; Castanier Louis M.; Hughes, Richard G.

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

Dynamic Multiscale Boundary Conditions for 4D CT Images of Healthy and Emphysematous Rat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in the shape of the lung during breathing determine the movement of airways and alveoli, and thus impact airflow dynamics. Modeling airflow dynamics in health and disease is a key goal for predictive multiscale models of respiration. Past efforts to model changes in lung shape during breathing have measured shape at multiple breath-holds. However, breath-holds do not capture hysteretic differences between inspiration and expiration resulting from the additional energy required for inspiration. Alternatively, imaging dynamically – without breath-holds – allows measurement of hysteretic differences. In this study, we acquire multiple micro-CT images per breath (4DCT) in live rats, and from these images we develop, for the first time, dynamic volume maps. These maps show changes in local volume across the entire lung throughout the breathing cycle and accurately predict the global pressure-volume (PV) hysteresis.

Jacob, Rick E.; Carson, James P.; Thomas, Mathew; Einstein, Daniel R.

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (?20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (?10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ?70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: clbrace@wisc.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8?mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

Jensen, Nikolaj K. G., E-mail: nkyj@regionsjaelland.dk [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada)] [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Stewart, Errol [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kozak, Roman [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada)] [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

Khalvati, Farzad, E-mail: farzad.khalvati@uwaterloo.ca; Tizhoosh, Hamid R. [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)] [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Calculations of two new dose metrics proposed by AAPM Task Group 111 using the measurements with standard CT dosimetry phantoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the equilibrium dose-pitch product D-caret{sub eq} for scan modes involving table translation and the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) for stationary-table modes on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long (e.g., at least 40 cm) phantoms. This paper presents an alternative approach to calculate both metrics using the measurements of scanning the standard computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry phantoms on CT scanners.Methods: D-caret{sub eq} was calculated from CTDI{sub 100} and ?(CTDI{sub 100}) (CTDI{sub 100} efficiency), and D{sub L}(0) was calculated from D-caret{sub eq} and the approach to equilibrium function H(L) =D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq}, where D{sub eq} was the equilibrium dose. CTDI{sub 100} may be directly obtained from several sources (such as medical physicist's CT scanner performance evaluation or the IMPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator), or be derived from CTDI{sub Vol} using the central to peripheral CTDI{sub 100} ratio (R{sub 100}). The authors have provided the required ?(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers [X. Li, D. Zhang, and B. Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 901–905 (2012); and ibid. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)]. R{sub 100} was assessed for a series of GE, Siemens, Philips, and Toshiba CT scanners with multiple settings of scan field of view, tube voltage, and bowtie filter.Results: The calculated D{sub L}(0) and D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} in PMMA and water cylinders were consistent with the measurements on two GE CT scanners (LightSpeed 16 and VCT) by Dixon and Ballard [Med. Phys. 34, 3399–3413 (2007)], the measurements on a Siemens CT scanner (SOMATOM Spirit Power) by Descamps et al. [J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 13, 293–302 (2012)], and the Monte Carlo simulations by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547–4554 (2009)].Conclusions: D-caret{sub eq} and D{sub L}(0) can be calculated using the alternative approach. The authors have provided the required ?(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers. R{sub 100} is presented for a majority of multidetector CT scanners currently on the market, and can be easily assessed for other CT scanners or operating conditions not covered in this study. The central to peripheral D{sub eq} ratio is about 1.50 and 1.12 times of R{sub 100} for the 32- and 16-cm diameter PMMA phantom, respectively.

Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Effects of ray profile modeling on resolution recovery in clinical CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. However, among vendors and researchers, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these goals. The authors are focusing on the aspect of geometric ray profile modeling, which is realized by some algorithms, while others model the ray as a straight line. The authors incorporate ray-modeling (RM) in nonregularized iterative reconstruction. That means, instead of using one simple single needle beam to represent the x-ray, the authors evaluate the double integral of attenuation path length over the finite source distribution and the finite detector element size in the numerical forward projection. Our investigations aim at analyzing the resolution recovery (RR) effects of RM. Resolution recovery means that frequencies can be recovered beyond the resolution limit of the imaging system. In order to evaluate, whether clinical CT images can benefit from modeling the geometrical properties of each x-ray, the authors performed a 2D simulation study of a clinical CT fan-beam geometry that includes the precise modeling of these geometrical properties. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and a Forbild thorax phantom with circular resolution patterns representing calcifications in the heart region are simulated. An FBP reconstruction with a Ram–Lak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The FBP is compared to iterative reconstruction techniques with and without RM: An ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm without any RM (OSC), an OSC where the forward projection is modeled concerning the finite focal spot and detector size (OSC-RM) and an OSC with RM and with a matched forward and backprojection pair (OSC-T-RM, T for transpose). In all cases, noise was matched to be able to focus on comparing spatial resolution. The authors use two different simulation settings. Both are based on the geometry of a typical clinical CT system (0.7 mm detector element size at isocenter, 1024 projections per rotation). Setting one has an exaggerated source width of 5.0 mm. Setting two has a realistically small source width of 0.5 mm. The authors also investigate the transition from setting one to two. To quantify image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through the resolution patterns to define a contrast factor (CF) for contrast-resolution plots, and the authors compare the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with respect to the ground truth of the circular resolution patterns. To independently analyze whether RM is of advantage, the authors implemented several iterative reconstruction algorithms: The statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm OSC, the ordered subsets simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OSSART) and another statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, denoted with ordered subsets maximum likelihood (OSML) algorithm. All algorithms were implemented both without RM (denoted as OSC, OSSART, and OSML) and with RM (denoted as OSC-RM, OSSART-RM, and OSML-RM). Results: For the unrealistic case of a 5.0 mm focal spot the CF can be improved by a factor of two due to RM: the 4.2 LP/cm bar pattern, which is the first bar pattern that cannot be resolved without RM, can be easily resolved with RM. For the realistic case of a 0.5 mm focus, all results show approximately the same CF. The NCC shows no significant dependency on RM when the source width is smaller than 2.0 mm (as in clinical CT). From 2.0 mm to 5.0 mm focal spot size increasing improvements can be observed with RM. Conclusions: Geometric RM in iterative reconstruction helps improving spatial resolution, if the ray cross-section is significantly larger than the ray sampling distance. In clinical CT, however, the ray is not much thicker than the distance between neighboring ray centers, as the focal spot size is small and detector crosstalk is negligi

Hofmann, Christian [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany); Knaup, Michael [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kachelrieß, Marc, E-mail: marc.kachelriess@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more smoothed appearance than the pre-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign 100% FBP image. Finally, relative to non-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign images with 100% of standard dose across the pediatric phantom age spectrum, similar noise levels were obtained in the images at a dose reduction of 48% with 40% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign and a dose reduction of 82% with 100% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign . Conclusions: The authors' work was conducted to identify the dose reduction limits of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for a pediatric oncology population using automatic tube current modulation. Improvements in noise levels from ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction were adapted to provide lower radiation exposure (i.e., lower mA) instead of improved image quality. We have demonstrated for the image quality standards required at our institution, a maximum dose reduction of 82% can be achieved using 100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ; however, to negate changes in the appearance of reconstructed images using ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign with a medium to low frequency noise preserving reconstruction filter (i.e., standard), 40% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign was implemented in our clinic for 42%-48% dose reduction at all pediatric ages without a visually perceptible change in image quality or image noise.

Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

SU-E-I-78: Improving Prostatic Delineation Using Dual-Energy CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Visual prostatic definition is difficult using conventional CT. This is because the prostate is surrounded closely with tissue of similar electron density. Definition is further hindered when the region contains high-Z material (such as fiducial markers). Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a technique where images are rendered using two tube voltages during a single scan session. This study evaluates DECT as a means of improving prostatic volume delineation for radiation oncology. Methods: The patients were scanned using a Definition AS20 (Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, PA). This device uses a single-tube configuration, where two scans of differing energies are performed in serial. The scans are acquired with tube voltage of 80kVp and 140kVp. Following acquisition, these scan data were used to generate effective monoenergetic scans ranging from 40keV to 190keV. In the current study, the data were presented to observers using a novel program, which allows real-time adjustment of window, level, and effective keV; all while scrolling through volumetric slices. Three patients were scanned, each with a different high-contrast material in or around the prostate: I-125 seeds, gold fiducial markers, and prostatic calcifications. These images are compared to a weighted average of the 80kVp and 140kVP scans, which yield a scan similar to that of a 120 kVp scan, which is a common tube voltage in radiation oncology. Results: Prostatic definition improved in each case. Differentiation of soft tissue from surrounding adipose improved with lower keV, while higher keV provided a reduction of high-z artifacts. Furthermore, the dynamic adjustment of the keV allowed observers to better recognize regions of differing tissue composition within this relatively homogeneous area. Conclusion: By simultaneously providing the observer with the benefits of high-energy images and low-energy images, and allowing adjustment in real-time, improved imaging in highly homogeneous regions such as the male pelvis is achievable.

Gersh, J; Fried, D [Gibbs Cancer Center ' Research Institute - Pelham, Greer, SC (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200{sup o} rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients.

Hirota, Shozo, E-mail: hirota-s@hyo-med.ac.jp; Nakao, Norio; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Maeda, Hiroaki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Miura, Koui; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ueda, Ken [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Research and Development Center (Japan); Baba, Rika [Hitachi Limited, Central Research Laboratory (Japan)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Application of X-ray CT for investigating fluid flow and conformance control during CO2 injection in highly heterogeneous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were performed using homogeneous and heterogeneous cores and a 4th generation X-Ray CT scanner was used to visualize heterogeneity and fluid flow in the core. Porosity and saturation measurements were made during the course of the experiment...

Chakravarthy, Deepak

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

200

SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens.

Held, M; Morin, O; Pouliot, J [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain-CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined -helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.; (GSKNC); (Duke); (UNC)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan©600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution on ?CT-based morphological analysis. • Surface properties influence accuracy of ?CT-based morphology of porous structures. • Total porosity was the least sensitive to surface complexity and scan voxel size. • The beam thickness analysis was overestimated by the surface roughness. • Voxel size customization can significantly reduce a cost of the ?CT-based analysis.

Pyka, Grzegorz, E-mail: gregory.pyka@mtm.kuleuven.be [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kerckhofs, Greet [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Biomechanics Research Unit, Université de Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1 - BAT 52/3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan; Wevers, Martine [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

CT measurements of two-phase flow in fractured porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation of flow in naturally fractured reservoirs commonly divides the reservoir into two continua - the matrix system and the fracture system. Flow equations are written presuming that the primary flow between grid blocks occurs through the fracture system and that the primary fluid storage is in the matrix system. The dual porosity formulation of the equations assumes that there is no flow between matrix blocks while the dual permeability formulation allows fluid movement between matrix blocks. Since most of the fluid storage is contained in the matrix, recovery is dominated by the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the high conductivity fractures. The physical mechanisms influencing this transfer have been evaluated primarily through numerical studies. Relatively few experimental studies have investigated the transfer mechanisms. Early studies focused on the prediction of reservoir recoveries from the results of scaled experiments on single reservoir blocks. Recent experiments have investigated some of the mechanisms that are dominant in gravity drainage situations and in small block imbibition displacements. The mechanisms active in multiphase flow in fractured media need to be further illuminated, since some of the experimental results appear to be contradictory. This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner.

Hughes, R.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

MicroCT-Based Skeletal Models for Use in Tomographic Voxel Phantoms for Radiological Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The University of Florida (UF) proposes to develop two high-resolution image-based skeletal dosimetry models for direct use by ICRP Committee 2’s Task Group on Dose Calculation in their forthcoming Reference Voxel Male (RVM) and Reference Voxel Female (RVF) whole-body dosimetry phantoms. These two phantoms are CT-based, and thus do not have the image resolution to delineate and perform radiation transport modeling of the individual marrow cavities and bone trabeculae throughout their skeletal structures. Furthermore, new and innovative 3D microimaging techniques will now be required for the skeletal tissues following Committee 2’s revision of the target tissues of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. This target tissue had been defined in ICRP Publication 30 as a 10-?m cell layer on all bone surfaces of trabecular and cortical bone. The revised target tissue is now a 50-?m layer within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone only and is exclusive of the marrow adipocytes. Clearly, this new definition requires the use of 3D microimages of the trabecular architecture not available from past 2D optical studies of the adult skeleton. With our recent acquisition of two relatively young cadavers (males of age 18-years and 40-years), we will develop a series of reference skeletal models that can be directly applied to (1) the new ICRP reference voxel man and female phantoms developed for the ICRP, and (2) pediatric phantoms developed to target the ICRP reference children. Dosimetry data to be developed will include absorbed fractions for internal beta and alpha-particle sources, as well as photon and neutron fluence-to-dose response functions for direct use in external dosimetry studies of the ICRP reference workers and members of the general public

Wesley Bolch

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

A robust and efficient approach to detect 3D rectal tubes from CT colonography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The rectal tube (RT) is a common source of false positives (FPs) in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for CT colonography. A robust and efficient detection of RT can improve CAD performance by eliminating such ''obvious'' FPs and increase radiologists' confidence in CAD. Methods: In this paper, we present a novel and robust bottom-up approach to detect the RT. Probabilistic models, trained using kernel density estimation on simple low-level features, are employed to rank and select the most likely RT tube candidate on each axial slice. Then, a shape model, robustly estimated using random sample consensus (RANSAC), infers the global RT path from the selected local detections. Subimages around the RT path are projected into a subspace formed from training subimages of the RT. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) provides a classification of a subimage as RT or non-RT based on the projection. Finally, a bottom-top clustering method is proposed to merge the classification predictions together to locate the tip position of the RT. Results: Our method is validated using a diverse database, including data from five hospitals. On a testing data with 21 patients (42 volumes), 99.5% of annotated RT paths have been successfully detected. Evaluated with CAD, 98.4% of FPs caused by the RT have been detected and removed without any loss of sensitivity. Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates a high detection rate of the RT path, and when tested in a CAD system, reduces FPs caused by the RT without the loss of sensitivity.

Yang Xiaoyun; Slabaugh, Greg [Medicsight PLC, Kensington Centre, 66 Hammersmith Road, London (United Kingdom)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in areas of above 40% of the prescription dose. The final inverse treatment plan was comprised of 43 beams ranging from 5 to 12.5 mm in diameter (2.5 mm size increments are available up to 15 mm in diameter collimation). Using the Xsight Spine Tracking module, the CyberKnife system could not reliably identify and track the tiny mouse spine; however, the CyberKnife system could identify and track the fiducial markers on the 3D mold.In vivo positional accuracy analysis using the 3D mold generated a mean error of 1.41 mm ± 0.73 mm when fiducial markers were used for position tracking. Analysis of the dissected brain confirmed the ability to target the correct brain volume. Conclusions: With the use of a stereotactic body mold with fiducial markers, microCT imaging, and resolution down-sampling, the CyberKnife system can successfully perform small-animal radiotherapy studies.

Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based external–internal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the reliability of the motion model is envisaged, the developed technique does not involve the estimation and continuous update of correlation parameters, thus requiring a less intense use of invasive imaging.

Fassi, Aurora, E-mail: aurora.fassi@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Schaerer, Joël; Fernandes, Mathieu [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy); Sarrut, David [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Université Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Using Synchrotron X-Ray Nano-CT to Characterize SOFC Electrode Microstructures in Three-Dimensions at Operating Temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, developments in tomography tools have provided unprecedented insight into the microstructure of electrodes for solid oxide fuel cells, enabling researchers to establish direct links between electrode microstructure and electrochemical performance. Here we present results of high resolution, synchrotron X-ray nano computed tomography experiments, which have enabled microstructural characterisation of a mixed ionic electronic conducting lanthanum strontium cobalt iron oxide (LSCF) cathode with sub-50nm resolution at operating temperature. Using the uniquely non-destructive nano-CT platform, it is possible to characterise microstructural evolution processes associated with heating and operation in-situ.

Shearing, P.R.; Bradley, R.S.; Gelb, J.; Lee, S.N.; Atkinson, A.; Withers, P.J.; Brandon, N.P. (Manchester); (Xradia); (ICL)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

213

Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, {lambda} = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, {lambda} = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGE{sup TM} dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to {approx}40% in magnitude. The flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wells, Derek M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Rotational micro-CT using a clinical C-arm angiography gantry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rotational angiography (RA) gantries are used routinely to acquire sequences of projection images of patients from which 3D renderings of vascular structures are generated using Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. However, these systems have limited resolution (<4 lp/mm). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems have better resolution (>10 lp/mm) but to date have relied either on rotating object imaging or small bore geometry for small animal imaging, and thus are not used for clinical imaging. The authors report here the development and use of a 3D rotational micro-angiography (RMA) system created by mounting a micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) [35 {mu}m pixel, resolution >10 lp/mm, field of view (FOV)=3.6 cm] on a standard clinical FPD-based RA gantry (Infinix, Model RTP12303J-G9E, Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tustin, CA). RA image sequences are obtained using the MAF and reconstructed. To eliminate artifacts due to image truncation, lower-dose (compared to MAF acquisition) full-FOV (FFOV) FPD RA sequences (194 {mu}m pixel, FOV=20 cm) were also obtained to complete the missing data. The RA gantry was calibrated using a helical bead phantom. To ensure high-quality high-resolution reconstruction, the high-resolution images from the MAF were aligned spatially with the lower-dose FPD images, and the pixel values in the FPD image data were scaled to match those of the MAF. Images of a rabbit with a coronary stent placed in an artery in the Circle of Willis were obtained and reconstructed. The MAF images appear well aligned with the FPD images (average correlation coefficient before and after alignment: 0.65 and 0.97, respectively) Greater details without any visible truncation artifacts are seen in 3D RMA (MAF-FPD) images than in those of the FPD alone. The FWHM of line profiles of stent struts (100 {mu}m diameter) are approximately 192{+-}21 and 313{+-}38 {mu}m for the 3D RMA and FPD data, respectively. In addition, for the dual-acquisition 3D RMA, FFOV FPD data need not be of the highest quality, and thus may be acquired at lower dose compared to a standard FPD acquisition. These results indicate that this system could provide the basis for high resolution images of regions of interest in patients with a reduction in the integral dose compared to the standard FPD approach.

Patel, V.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Keleshis, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S. [Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Physics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physics, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Department of Computer Science, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physics, and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance.

Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model (PRISM) This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model (PRISM) This article has been:10.1088/0266-5611/27/11/115012 Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base materials. Furthermore, we

Wang, Ge

218

3/26/13 Section of brain does more than expected, Universityof Chicago scientists find -chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing-visual-information-0320-20130320,0,298755.story 1/3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing-visual-information-0320 of brain does more than expected, Universityof Chicago scientists find - chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing and troubleshooting HOME PROTECTION PLANS From foundation to fixtures FESTIVAL OF HOMES Five financial things every

Freedman, David J.

219

CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR brachytherapy planning.

Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

EU contract number RII3-CT-2003-506395 CARE-Note-07-004-SRF Radiation hardness tests of piezoelectric actuators with fast neutrons at liquid helium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RII3-CT-2003-506395 CARE-Note-07-004-SRF Introduction Motorized Fast Active Cold Tuning System (FACTS frequency in SRF cavities of various projects and Test facilities (e.g., TESLA [1], Test Facility (TTF) [2], XFEL [3], ILC [4]). The motorized mechanical part of the FACTS is used for long range (i.e., 1.9 mm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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A detailed pore characterization in 2D and 3D by means of optical and fluorescence microscopy combined with high-resolution X-ray CT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combined with high-resolution X-ray CT. Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic about oil reservoirs, aquifers, building stone weathering). In the past, the pore network was mainly/or laboratory work: Precise sampling of the geological material. Petrographical research with optical

Gent, Universiteit

223

ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 49  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 49 Issue 2.2 ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD.P. Donovan G-J van Zadelhoff #12;ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638

Stoffelen, Ad

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ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 25  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 25 Issue 1.3 ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD-J van Zadelhoff #12;ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL

Stoffelen, Ad

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Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Three-dimensional multiphase segmentation of X-ray CT data of porous materials using a Bayesian Markov random field framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advancements in noninvasive imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) have led to a recent surge of applications in porous media research with objectives ranging from theoretical aspects of pore-scale fluid and interfacial dynamics to practical applications such as enhanced oil recovery and advanced contaminant remediation. While substantial efforts and resources have been devoted to advance CT technology, microscale analysis, and fluid dynamics simulations, the development of efficient and stable three-dimensional multiphase image segmentation methods applicable to large data sets is lacking. To eliminate the need for wet-dry or dual-energy scans, image alignment, and subtraction analysis, commonly applied in X-ray micro-CT, a segmentation method based on a Bayesian Markov random field (MRF) framework amenable to true three-dimensional multiphase processing was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, several heuristic and deterministic combinatorial optimization schemes required to solve the labeling problem of the MRF image model were implemented and tested for computational efficiency and their impact on segmentation results. Test results for three grayscale data sets consisting of dry glass beads, partially saturated glass beads, and partially saturated crushed tuff obtained with synchrotron X-ray micro-CT demonstrate great potential of the MRF image model for three-dimensional multiphase segmentation. While our results are promising and the developed algorithm is stable and computationally more efficient than other commonly applied porous media segmentation models, further potential improvements exist for fully automated operation.

Kulkarni, Ramaprasad; Tuller, Markus; Fink, Wolfgang; Wildschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.); (Ariz)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

227

ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have become the gold standard for imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have these results to their human counterparts. Current small-animal PET scanners are very costly and complicated for Gamma-Ray Imaging, we are developing a novel small-animal PET scanner that utilizes common modular

Arizona, University of

228

High resolution cortical thickness measurement from clinical CT data G.M. Treece, A.H. Gee, P.M. Mayhew and K.E.S. Poole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) methods of assessing hip structure, most notably with multi-detector computed tomography, MDCT (Bouxsein and technically limited by thresholding errors caused by relatively low resolution data sets. Ideally, we wouldHigh resolution cortical thickness measurement from clinical CT data G.M. Treece, A.H. Gee, P

Drummond, Tom

229

1. Birru, D., C.-T. Chou, and A. Seyedi, "Coordination in Wireless Networks Having Devices with Different Physical Layer Transmission Schemes," US Patent 8233505, Jul. 31, 2012.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patents 1. Birru, D., C.-T. Chou, and A. Seyedi, "Coordination in Wireless Networks Having Devices with Different Physical Layer Transmission Schemes," US Patent 8233505, Jul. 31, 2012. 2. Birru, D. and A. Seyedi, "Cost-Effective Preamble Structure for High-Speed Communication of Packetized System," US Patent 8

Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

230

54 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUIT THEORY, VOL. CT-15,NO. 1, MARCH 1968 Synthesis of a Class of n-Port Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUIT THEORY, VOL. CT-15,NO. 1, MARCH 1968 Synthesis of a Class of n-Port ports is connected to a voltage source keep- ing all the other ports short circuited, then all the short-circuited ports are at the same potential. The Zn-node network with a pair of equal conductances joining any two

Thulsiraman, Krishnaiyan

231

SU-E-I-93: Improved Imaging Quality for Multislice Helical CT Via Sparsity Regularized Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Inspired by compressive sensing, sparsity regularized iterative reconstruction method has been extensively studied. However, its utility pertinent to multislice helical 4D CT for radiotherapy with respect to imaging quality, dose, and time has not been thoroughly addressed. As the beginning of such an investigation, this work carries out the initial comparison of reconstructed imaging quality between sparsity regularized iterative method and analytic method through static phantom studies using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. Methods: In our iterative method, tensor framelet (TF) is chosen as the regularization method for its superior performance from total variation regularization in terms of reduced piecewise-constant artifacts and improved imaging quality that has been demonstrated in our prior work. On the other hand, X-ray transforms and its adjoints are computed on-the-fly through GPU implementation using our previous developed fast parallel algorithms with O(1) complexity per computing thread. For comparison, both FDK (approximate analytic method) and Katsevich algorithm (exact analytic method) are used for multislice helical CT image reconstruction. Results: The phantom experimental data with different imaging doses were acquired using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. The reconstructed image quality was compared between TF-based iterative method, FDK and Katsevich algorithm with the quantitative analysis for characterizing signal-to-noise ratio, image contrast, and spatial resolution of high-contrast and low-contrast objects. Conclusion: The experimental results suggest that our tensor framelet regularized iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the helical CT imaging quality from FDK and Katsevich algorithm for static experimental phantom studies that have been performed.

Nam, H [Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Guo, M [Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Lee, K [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Xing, L [Stanford UniversitySchool of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gao, H [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A dense gas survey of the gamma-ray sources HESS J1731-347 and HESS J1729-345  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of Mopra molecular spectral line observations towards the supernova remnant HESSJ1731-347 (G353.6-0.7) and the unidentified gamma-ray source HESSJ1729-345 are presented. Dense molecular gas in three different velocity-bands (corresponding to three Galactic arms) are investigated using the CS(1-0) line. The CS-traced component provides information about the dense target material in a hadronic scenario for gamma-ray production (cosmic rays interacting with gas) and an understanding of the dynamics. Furthermore, the effects of cosmic ray diffusion into dense gas may alter the gamma-ray spectrum to cause a flattening of spectra towards such regions. Dense molecular gas mass at a level of ~10^5 Mo was revealed in this survey, with mass of the order of ~10^3 Mo towards HESSJ1729-345 in each coincident Galactic arm, but no significant detection of dense molecular gas towards HESSJ1731-347 at the currently-preferred distance of ~5.2-6.2 kpc was discovered.

Maxted, Nigel; de Wilt, Phoebe; Burton, Michael; Renaud, Matthieu; Fukui, Yasuo; Hawkes, Jarryd; Blackwell, Rebecca; Voisin, Fabien; Lowe, Vicki; Aharonian, Felix

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Assessment and management of interfractional variations in daily diagnostic-quality-CT guided prostate-bed irradiation after prostatectomy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomic variations and limitations of the current practice of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for prostate-bed patients and to study dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning scheme that addresses the interfractional variations. Methods: Contours for the targets and organs at risk (OARs) from daily diagnostic-quality CTs acquired with in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were generated by populating the planning contours using an autosegmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing for ten prostate-bed patients treated with postoperative daily CT-guided IMRT. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) obtained by maximizing the overlap of contours for a structure between the daily and plan contours was used to quantify the organ deformation between the plan and daily CTs. Three interfractional-variation-correction schemes, the current standard practice of IGRT repositioning, a previously developed online adaptive RT (ART), and the full reoptimization, were applied to these daily CTs and a number of dose-volume quantities for the targets and organs at risk were compared for their effectiveness to account for the interfractional variations. Results: Large interfractional organ deformations in prostate-bed irradiation were seen. The mean DSCs for CTV, rectum, and bladder were 86.6 ± 5.1% (range from 61% to 97%), 77.3% ± 7.4% (range from 55% to 90%), and 75.4% ± 11.2% (range from 46% to 96%), respectively. The fractional and cumulative dose-volume quantities for CTV and PTV: V100 (volume received at least 100% prescription dose), and rectum and bladder: V{sub 45Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} (volume received at least 45 or 60 Gy), were compared for the repositioning, adaptive, reoptimization, and original plans. The fractional and cumulative dosimetric results were nearly the same. The average cumulative CTV V100 were 88.0%, 98.4%, 99.2%, and 99.3% for the IGRT, ART, reoptimization, and original plans, respectively. The corresponding rectal V{sub 45Gy} (V{sub 60Gy}) were 58.7% (27.3%), 48.1% (20.7%), 43.8% (16.1%), and 44.9% (16.8%). The results for bladder were comparable among three schemes. Paired two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed and it was found that ART and reoptimization provide better target coverage and better OAR sparing, especially rectum sparing. Conclusions: The interfractional organ motions and deformations during prostate-bed irradiation are significant. The online adaptive replanning scheme is capable of effectively addressing the large organ deformation, resulting in cumulative doses equivalent to those originally planned.

Liu, Feng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Lawton, Colleen; Allen Li, X., E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

NONE

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Record of decision: Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This record of decision (ROD) completes the environmental review by the Federal Administration (FRA) of the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to extend electric train operation from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. In this ROD, FRA approves Amtrak`s proposal subject to the inclusion into the project of a number of measures to eliminate or minimize potential adverse environmental impacts.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Appendix to the final environmental impact report supplement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is an appendix to the final Environmental Impact Report Supplement, published on February 15, 1995, addressing the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this document is to discuss the selection of the Boston area electrical substation site and the relocation of a paralleling station in East Foxboro.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Influence of radiation therapy on the lung-tissue in breast cancer patients: CT-assessed density changes and associated symptoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative electron density of lung tissue was measured from computer tomography (CT) slices in 33 breast cancer patients treated by various techniques of adjuvant radiotherapy. The measurements were made before radiotherapy, 3 months and 9 months after completion of radiation therapy. The changes in lung densities at 3 months and 9 months were compared to radiation induced radiological (CT) findings. In addition, subjective symptoms such as cough and dyspnoea were assessed before and after radiotherapy. It was observed that the mean of the relative electron density of lung tissue varied from 0.25 when the whole lung was considered to 0.17 when only the anterior lateral quarter of the lung was taken into account. In patients with positive radiological (CT) findings the mean lung density of the anterior lateral quarter increased 2.1 times 3 months after radiotherapy and was still increased 1.6 times 6 months later. For those patients without findings, in the CT pictures the corresponding values were 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The standard deviation of the pixel values within the anterior lateral quarter of the lung increased 3.8 times and 3.2 times at 3 months and 9 months, respectively, in the former group, as opposed to 1.2 and 1.1 in the latter group. Thirteen patients had an increase in either cough or dyspnoea as observed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. In eleven patients these symptoms persisted 6 months later. No significant correlation was found between radiological findings and subjective symptoms. However, when three different treatment techniques were compared among 29 patients the highest rate of radiological findings was observed in patients in which the largest lung volumes received the target dose. A tendency towards an increased rate of subjective symptoms was also found in this group.

Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.; Svane, G. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in radiation therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy, so-called "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover all steps from therapy planning to follow-up to fulfill the high demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gains growing importance in the treatment process and established phantoms (such as the Alderson head) cannot be used for those tests, novel multimodality phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study for such a customizable multimodality head phantom. We used a set of patient CT images as the basis for the anthropomorphic head shape. The recipient - consisting of an epoxy resin - was produced using rapid prototyping (3D printing). The phantom recipient includes a nasal air cavity, two soft tissues volumes and cranial bone. Additionally a spherical tumor volume was positioned in the center. The volumes were filled with dipotassium phosphate-based cranial bone surrogate, agarose gel, and distilled water. The tumor volume was filled with normoxic dosimetr...

Gallas, Raya R; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize acute-stage cerebral infarction by applying virtual monochromatic images to this phantom using dual-energy CT (DECT). Virtual monochromatic images were created using DECT from 40 to 100 keV at every 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV at every 1 keV, under three energy conditions of tube voltages with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created energy images. Therefore, optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

Hara, Hidetake; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

Dudeck, O. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany)], E-mail: oliver.dudeck@charite.de; Okuducu, A. F. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Neuropathology (Germany); Jordan, O. [University of Geneva, School of Pharmacy (Switzerland); Tesmer, K.; Pech, M. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany); Weigang, E. [Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Ruefenacht, D. A. [University Hospital of Geneva, Neuroradiology Section (Switzerland); Doelker, E. [University of Geneva, School of Pharmacy (Switzerland); Felix, R. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)] [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States)] [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Predicting target vessel location on robot-assisted coronary artery bypass graft using CT to ultrasound registration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Although robot-assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (RA-CABG) has gained more acceptance worldwide, its success still depends on the surgeon's experience and expertise, and the conversion rate to full sternotomy is in the order of 15%-25%. One of the reasons for conversion is poor pre-operative planning, which is based solely on pre-operative computed tomography (CT) images. In this paper, the authors propose a technique to estimate the global peri-operative displacement of the heart and to predict the intra-operative target vessel location, validated via both an in vitro and a clinical study. Methods: As the peri-operative heart migration during RA-CABG has never been reported in the literatures, a simple in vitro validation study was conducted using a heart phantom. To mimic the clinical workflow, a pre-operative CT as well as peri-operative ultrasound images at three different stages in the procedure (Stage{sub 0}--following intubation; Stage{sub 1}--following lung deflation; and Stage{sub 2}--following thoracic insufflation) were acquired during the experiment. Following image acquisition, a rigid-body registration using iterative closest point algorithm with the robust estimator was employed to map the pre-operative stage to each of the peri-operative ones, to estimate the heart migration and predict the peri-operative target vessel location. Moreover, a clinical validation of this technique was conducted using offline patient data, where a Monte Carlo simulation was used to overcome the limitations arising due to the invisibility of the target vessel in the peri-operative ultrasound images. Results: For the in vitro study, the computed target registration error (TRE) at Stage{sub 0}, Stage{sub 1}, and Stage{sub 2} was 2.1, 3.3, and 2.6 mm, respectively. According to the offline clinical validation study, the maximum TRE at the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery was 4.1 mm at Stage{sub 0}, 5.1 mm at Stage{sub 1}, and 3.4 mm at Stage{sub 2}. Conclusions: The authors proposed a method to measure and validate peri-operative shifts of the heart during RA-CABG. In vitro and clinical validation studies were conducted and yielded a TRE in the order of 5 mm for all cases. As the desired clinical accuracy imposed by this procedure is on the order of one intercostal space (10-15 mm), our technique suits the clinical requirements. The authors therefore believe this technique has the potential to improve the pre-operative planning by updating peri-operative migration patterns of the heart and, consequently, will lead to reduced conversion to conventional open thoracic procedures.

Cho, Daniel S.; Linte, Cristian; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Wedlake, Chris; Moore, John; Barron, John; Patel, Rajni; Peters, Terry [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Computer Science, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); and Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Design and evaluation of a variable aperture collimator for conformal radiotherapy of small animals using a microCT scanner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of small animals with radiation has in general been limited to planar fields shaped with lead blocks, complicating spatial localization of dose and treatment of deep-seated targets. In order to advance laboratory radiotherapy toward what is accomplished in the clinic, we have constructed a variable aperture collimator for use in shaping the beam of microCT scanner. This unit can image small animal subjects at high resolution, and is capable of delivering therapeutic doses in reasonable exposure times. The proposed collimator consists of two stages, each containing six trapezoidal brass blocks that move along a frame in a manner similar to a camera iris producing a hexagonal aperture of variable size. The two stages are offset by 30 deg. and adjusted for the divergence of the x-ray beam so as to produce a dodecagonal profile at isocenter. Slotted rotating driving plates are used to apply force to pins in the collimator blocks and effect collimator motion. This device has been investigated through both simulation and measurement. The collimator aperture size varied from 0 to 8.5 cm as the driving plate angle increased from 0 to 41 deg. . The torque required to adjust the collimator varied from 0.5 to 5 N{center_dot}m, increasing with increasing driving plate angle. The transmission profiles produced by the scanner at isocenter exhibited a penumbra of approximately 10% of the collimator aperture width. Misalignment between the collimator assembly and the x-ray source could be identified on the transmission images and corrected by adjustment of the collimator location. This variable aperture collimator technology is therefore a feasible and flexible solution for adjustable shaping of radiation beams for use in small animal radiotherapy as well as other applications in which beam shaping is desired.

Graves, Edward E.; Zhou Hu; Chatterjee, Raja; Keall, Paul J.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Contag, Christopher H.; Boyer, Arthur L. [Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, Texas 76508 (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Quantitative CT of lung nodules: Dependence of calibration on patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size for single- and dual-energy techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calcium concentration may be a useful feature for distinguishing benign from malignant lung nodules in computer-aided diagnosis. The calcium concentration can be estimated from the measured CT number of the nodule and a CT number vs calcium concentration calibration line that is derived from CT scans of two or more calcium reference standards. To account for CT number nonuniformity in the reconstruction field, such calibration lines may be obtained at multiple locations within lung regions in an anthropomorphic phantom. The authors performed a study to investigate the effects of patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size on the derived calibration lines at ten lung region positions using both single energy (SE) and dual energy (DE) CT techniques. Simulated spherical lung nodules of two concentrations (50 and 100 mg/cc CaCO{sub 3}) were employed. Nodules of three different diameters (4.8, 9.5, and 16 mm) were scanned in a simulated thorax section representing the middle of the chest with large lung regions. The 4.8 and 9.5 mm nodules were also scanned in a section representing the upper chest with smaller lung regions. Fat rings were added to the peripheries of the phantoms to simulate larger patients. Scans were acquired on a GE-VCT scanner at 80, 120, and 140 kVp and were repeated three times for each condition. The average absolute CT number separations between the calibration lines were computed. In addition, under- or overestimates were determined when the calibration lines for one condition (e.g., small patient) were used to estimate the CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules for a different condition (e.g., large patient). The authors demonstrated that, in general, DE is a more accurate method for estimating the calcium contents of lung nodules. The DE calibration lines within the lung field were less affected by patient body size, calibration nodule size, and nodule position than the SE calibration lines. Under- or overestimates in CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules were also in general smaller in quantity with DE than with SE. However, because the slopes of the calibration lines for DE were about one-half the slopes for SE, the relative improvement in the concentration estimates for DE as compared to SE was about one-half the relative improvement in the separation between the calibration lines. Results in the middle of the chest thorax section with large lungs were nearly completely consistent with the above generalization. On the other hand, results in the upper-chest thorax section with smaller lungs and greater amounts of muscle and bone were mixed. A repeat of the entire study in the upper thorax section yielded similar mixed results. Most of the inconsistencies occurred for the 4.8 mm nodules and may be attributed to errors caused by beam hardening, volume averaging, and insufficient sampling. Targeted, higher resolution reconstructions of the smaller nodules, application of high atomic number filters to the high energy x-ray beam for improved spectral separation, and other future developments in DECT may alleviate these problems and further substantiate the superior accuracy of DECT in quantifying the calcium concentrations of lung nodules.

Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Way, Ted W.; Schipper, Mathew J.; Larson, Sandra C.; Christodoulou, Emmanuel G. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate total organ doses calculated using our database are within 1% of those calculated using Monte Carlo simulations with the same geometry and scan parameters for all organs except red bone marrow (within 6%), and within 23% of published estimates for different voxelized phantoms. Results from the example of using the database to estimate organ dose for coronary angiography CT acquisitions show 2.1%, 1.1%, and -32% change in breast dose and 2.1%, -0.74%, and 4.7% change in lung dose for reduced kVp, tube current modulated, and partial angle protocols, respectively, relative to the reference protocol. Results show -19.2% difference in dose to eye lens for a tilted scan relative to a nontilted scan. The reported relative changes in organ doses are presented without quantification of image quality and are for the sole purpose of demonstrating the use of the proposed database. Conclusions: The proposed database and calculation method enable the estimation of organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans utilizing any spectral shape and angular tube current modulation scheme by taking advantage of the precalculated Monte Carlo simulation results. The database can be used in conjunction with image quality studies to develop optimized acquisition techniques and may be particularly beneficial for optimizing dual kVp acquisitions for which numerous kV, mA, and filtration combinations may be investigated.

Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics (OSEL/CDRH), US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20905 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Mario Hess, Bernadine Strik, Jason Smesrud, and John Selker November 1997 Department of Bioresource Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they are shallow-rooted, strawberries are subject to drought injury. A uniform and adequate supply of mo isture development (strawberry fruit is about 90% water). Water stress at this time results in small fruit size of fruit rot. On medium- and heavy-textured soils, a good rain or irrigation just before the first picking

Selker, John

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - amerada hess corp Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 45 GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 60, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 1995); P. 580488, 8 FIGS. Limited-view diffraction tomography in a Summary: (Grant no. 13 220), and partly by the...

250

Jason Smesrud, Bill Mansour, Mario Hess, and John Selker November 1997 Department of Bioresource Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

excessive stalk and leaf mass. The use of big guns and center pivot systems is common in corn due to difficulties in moving pipe as fields approach maturity. When using big guns, it is critical to pay close

Selker, John

251

10 Questions for a Spectroscopy Expert: Nancy Hess | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials Disposition#EnergyFaceoff1 1 1 More

252

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower FinanceInformation Delaware References:

253

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower FinanceInformation Delaware

254

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New Hampshire) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower FinanceInformationInformation Hampshire

255

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New York) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPower FinanceInformationInformation

256

Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPowerInformation Rhode Island References: EIA

257

Comparison of Planned Versus Actual Dose Delivered for External Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Cone-Beam CT and Deformable Registration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the adequacy of dose delivery to the clinical target volume (CTV) using external beam (EB) accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients treated with EB APBI underwent cone beam CT (CBCT) before each fraction and daily helical CT (HCT) scans to determine setup errors and calculate the dose per fraction. For 12 patients, an in-house image-intensity-based deformable registration program was used to register the HCTs to the planning CT and generate the cumulative dose. Treatment was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. EB APBI constraints from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Phase III protocol were used. Results: The mean setup error per CBCT registration was 9 {+-} 5 mm. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed only one patient (8%) with a decrease in the CTV V90 (8% underdosage). All other patients demonstrated adequate target coverage. PTV{sub E}VAL V90 was on average 3% (range, 0%-16%) less than planned. For the ipsilateral breast, four patients had an increase in V50 ({<=}1% increase) and three patients had an increase in V100 ({<=}9% increase). Only one patient showed an increase >5%. Four patients had an increase in ipsilateral lung V30 (maximum 3%), and one had an increase in heart V5 (1%). Four patients had an increase in MaxDose (maximum 89 cGy). Conclusions: The current CTV-to-PTV margin of 10 mm appears sufficient for {approx}92% of patients treated with EB APBI. Although expansion of the population PTV margin to 14 mm would provide {approx}97% confidence level for CTV coverage, online image guidance should be considered.

Hasan, Yasmin; Kim, Leonard; Wloch, Jennifer; Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from all four radiologists. These 2669 lesions include nodule outlines and subjective nodule characteristic ratings. Conclusions: The LIDC/IDRI Database is expected to provide an essential medical imaging research resource to spur CAD development, validation, and dissemination in clinical practice.

NONE

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

CT Clean Energy Communities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

260

CT Clean Energy Communities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

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261

Validity of Fusion Imaging of Hamster Heart obtained by Fluorescent and Phase-Contrast X-Ray CT with Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluorescent X-ray CT (FXCT) to depict functional information and phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) to demonstrate morphological information are being developed to analyze the disease model of small animal. To understand the detailed pathological state, integration of both functional and morphological image is very useful. The feasibility of image fusion between FXCT and PCCT were examined by using ex-vivo hearts injected fatty acid metabolic agent (127I-BMIPP) in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. Fusion images were reconstructed from each 3D image of FXCT and PCCT. 127I-BMIPP distribution within the heart was clearly demonstrated by FXCT with 0.25 mm spatial resolution. The detailed morphological image was obtained by PCCT at about 0.03 mm spatial resolution. Using image integration technique, metabolic abnormality of fatty acid in cardiomyopathic myocardium was easily recognized corresponding to anatomical structures. Our study suggests that image fusion provides important biomedical information even in FXCT and PCCT imaging.

Wu, J.; Takeda, T.; Lwin, Thet Thet; Huo, Q.; Minami, M. [Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Sunaguchi, N.; Murakami, T.; Mouri, S.; Nasukawa, S.; Fukami, T.; Yuasa, T.; Akatsuka, T. [Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Hyodo, K. [Institute of Material Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hontani, H. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Comparative Analysis of the Supernova Legacy Survey Sample with {\\Lambda}CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of Type~Ia SNe has thus far produced the most reliable measurement of the expansion history of the Universe, suggesting that $\\Lambda$CDM offers the best explanation for the redshift--luminosity distribution observed in these events. But the analysis of other kinds of source, such as cosmic chronometers, gamma ray bursts, and high-$z$ quasars, conflicts with this conclusion, indicating instead that the constant expansion rate implied by the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is a better fit to the data. The central difficulty with the use of Type~Ia SNe as standard candles is that one must optimize three or four nuisance parameters characterizing supernova luminosities simultaneously with the parameters of an expansion model. Hence in comparing competing models, one must reduce the data independently for each. We carry~out such a comparison of $\\Lambda$CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe, using the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) sample of 252 SN~events, and show that each model fits its individually reduced data...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio; Maier, Robert S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed similarly (AUC{sub OBS1}=0.80 [0.73,0.86] vs AUC{sub ANN1}=0.88 [0.82,0.92]) as that of the second observer and the corresponding ANN (AUC{sub OBS2}=0.87 [0.83,0.91] vs AUC{sub ANN2}=0.90 [0.85,0.94]). Moreover, the ANN-predicted indices were generated in a fraction of the time required to obtain the observer-assigned indices. Conclusions: ANN-predicted assessability indices performed similar to observer-assigned assessability indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores from the physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using computerized methods for identifying images with diagnostic clinical indices in cardiac CT images.

King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R. [Department of Radiology, Committee on Medical Physics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5084, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the HDTV algorithm shows the best performance. At 50 mGy, the deviation from the reference obtained at 500 mGy were less than 4%. Also the LDPC algorithm provides reasonable results with deviation less than 10% at 50 mGy while PCF and MKB reconstruction show larger deviations even at higher dose levels. Conclusions: LDPC and HDTV increase CNR and allow for quantitative evaluations even at dose levels as low as 50 mGy. The left ventricular volumes exemplarily illustrate that cardiac parameters can be accurately estimated at lowest dose levels if sophisticated algorithms are used. This allows to reduce dose by a factor of 10 compared to today's gold standard and opens new options for longitudinal studies of the heart.

Maier, Joscha, E-mail: joscha.maier@dkfz.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen–Nürnberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi et al., “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011)]. The agreement between the x-ray spectra calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model and the measured spectra was evaluated for various levels of deadtime loss ratios (DLR) and incident spectral shapes, realized using different attenuators, in terms of the weighted coefficient of variation (COV{sub W}), i.e., the root mean square difference weighted by the statistical errors of the data and divided by the mean. Results: At low count rates, when DLR < 10%, the distorted spectra measured by the DXMCT-1 were in agreement with those calculated by SRE only, with COV{sub W}'s less than 4%. At higher count rates, the measured spectra were also in agreement with the ones calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model; with PMMA as attenuator, COV{sub W} was 5.6% at a DLR of 22% and as small as 6.7% for a DLR as high as 55%. Conclusions: The x-ray spectra calculated by the proposed model agreed with the measured spectra over a wide range of count rates and spectral shapes. The SRE model predicted the distorted, recorded spectra with low count rates over various types and thicknesses of attenuators. The study also validated the hypothesis that the complex spectral distortions in a PCD can be adequately modeled by cascading the count-rate independent SRE and the count-rate dependent PPE.

Cammin, Jochen, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Xu, Jennifer [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D warping improved the SSIM in the central slice by 20.22%, 16.83%, and 25.77% in the data with the largest motion among the five datasets (SCAN5); improvement in off-center slices was 18.94%, 29.14%, and 36.08%, respectively. Conclusions: The authors showed that C-arm CT control can be implemented for nonstandard horizontal trajectories which enabled us to scan and successfully reconstruct both legs of volunteers in weight-bearing positions. As predicted using theoretical models, the proposed motion correction methods improved image quality by reducing motion artifacts in reconstructions; 3D warping performed better than the 2D methods, especially in off-center slices.

Choi, Jang-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pal, Saikat [Biomedical Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California 93407 (United States)] [Biomedical Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California 93407 (United States); Beaupré, Gary S. [Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 3. Response to comments on draft environmental impact statement/report. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume III) of the FEIS/R presents summaries of comments received on the DEIS/R and responses to these comments.

NONE

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (?17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results for external calibrations exhibited much larger RMS errors than size matched internal calibration. Use of an average body size external-to-internal calibration correction factor reduced the errors to closer to those for internal calibration. RMS errors of less than 30% or about 0.01 for the bone and 0.1 for the red marrow volume fractions would likely be satisfactory for human studies. Such accuracies were achieved for 3 × 3 segmentation of 5 mm slice images for: (a) internal calibration with 4 times dose for all size body phantoms, (b) internal calibration with 2 times dose for the small and medium size body phantoms, and (c) corrected external calibration with 4 times dose and all size body phantoms. Conclusions: Phantom studies are promising and demonstrate the potential to use dual energy quantitative CT to estimate the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone within the vertebral spongiosa.

Goodsitt, Mitchell M., E-mail: goodsitt@umich.edu; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Jincheng [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Schipper, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wilderman, Scott [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chun, Se Young [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of signal-to-noise ratio mainly to the peripheral region of the phantom. Conclusions: Despite typical peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain, and RBM from the standard low-dose brain perfusion 256-slice CT protocol are well below the corresponding thresholds for the induction of erythema, cataract, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively, every effort should be made toward optimization of the procedure and minimization of dose received by these tissues. The current study provides evidence that the use of the narrower bowtie filter available may considerably reduce peak absorbed dose to all above radiosensitive tissues with minimal deterioration in image quality. Considerable reduction in peak eye-lens dose may also be achieved by positioning patient head center a few centimeters above isocenter during the exposure.

Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece); Medical Diagnostic Center 'Ayios Therissos,' P.O. Box 28405, Nicosia 2033, Cyprus and Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Panepistimioupolis, Dragana 68100, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Heraklion 71110, Crete (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seymour CT Site - CT 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborneSavannah River Swamp -

271

Organophosphates as Solvents for Electrolytes in Electrochemical Andrew Hess, Greg Barber, Chen Chen, Thomas E. Mallouk, and Harry R. Allcock*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that employ liquid electrolytes for solar power conversion and energy storage, respectively.1,2 Although these problems. DSSCs are also a promising alternative to silicon-based solar cells due to their low raw-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and secondary lithium batteries. Unoptimized DSSC electrolyte formulations for DSSCs

272

eHealth Research from the User's Perspective Bradford W. Hesse, PhD, Ben Shneiderman, PhD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

people do?" How can eHealth take part in national goals for healthcare reform to empower relationships (IT) to issues of personal health and health care has had a long and surprisingly complex history of IT applied to health care reflect the lessons learned from computer science more generally. The field

Shneiderman, Ben

273

CT_50m_Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Metadata also available as Metadata: IdentificationInformation DataQualityInformation SpatialDataOrganizationInformation SpatialReferenceInformation EntityandAttributeI...

274

NCAR/CT 167 Universiteit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a bird's eye view 16 2.1 Hydrodynamic description of shock phenomena in gases . 17 2- pound shocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.3.3 Bow shocks in the solar system: planets, comets and the heliosphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 2.3.4 Solar coronal mass ejections

De Sterck, Hans

275

CT Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumSunways JV JumpBraselcoCMNA Power Jump to:CPVOffshore

276

CX-006889: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bristol to Groton Transmission Line Upgrade ProjectCX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 10/11/2011Location(s): South DakotaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region

277

Electric power generation using a phosphoric acid cell on a municipal solid waste landfill gas stream. Technology verification report, November 1997--July 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phosphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Performance data were collected at two sites determined to be representative of the U.S. landfill market. The Penrose facility, in Los Angeles, CA, was the first test site. The landfill gas at this site represented waste gas recovery from four nearby landfills, consisting primarily of industrial waste material. It produced approximately 3000 scf of gas/minute, and had a higher heating value of 446 Btu/scf at about 44% methane concentration. The second test site, in Groton, CT, was a relatively small landfill, but with greater heat content gas (methane levels were about 57% and the average heating value was 585 Btu/scf). The verification test addressed contaminant removal efficiency, flare destruction efficiency, and the operational capability of the cleanup system, and the power production capability of the fuel cell system.

Masemore, S.; Piccot, S.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Novel Routing Metric for Environmentally-Powered Sensors With Hybrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Hybrid Energy Storage System (HESS). An HESS is composed of a supercapacitor (SC) and a rechargeable storage system (HESS), in which a supercapacitor (SC) protects the battery from current spikes, is another

Ingram, Mary Ann

279

Northeast Corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. to Boston, MA. Volume 3. Technical appendices. Final report, September 1992-September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 x 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. The volume Number III contains the detailed technical studies that were performed in order to identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed project. Some of these studies have been included entirely in the Draft Environmental Impact Statements-draft (DEIS/R) (Volume 1). The technical evaluations performed were based upon regulatory requirements as well as substantive issues raised by individuals and public agencies as part of the public participation program.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Northeast corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. To Boston, MA. Volume 1. Final report, September 1992-September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 X 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. This volume considers impacts on the Human and Natural Environment utilizing guidance as outlined in CFR Part 1500, Council on Environmental Quality, Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA as amended and the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) regulations (301 CMR 11:00). Impacts analyzed include changes in the natural environment (air quality, noise and vibration, energy, electromagnetic fields, natural resources, hazardous materials and visual/aesthetics), changes in the social environment (land use and recreation, transportation and traffic), impacts on historic and archaeological sites, changes in transit service and patronage, associated changes in highway and airport congestion, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and financial implications. Impacts are identified both for the proposed construction period and for the long-term operation of the alternatives.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

The shape and size of crowding for moving targets Peter J. Bex *, Steven C. Dakin, Anita J. Simmers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Bondarko & Danilova, 1997; Hess, Dakin, & Kapoor, 2000). How- ever, crowding also occurs between target

Bex, Peter

282

Reconstruction of CT Images from Parsimonious Angular ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

signal from a limited number of samples provided that the signal is sparse in a ... The entire process of compressed sensing consists of three steps: encoding, ...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Eric S. Erdmann 4504 Oak Ct.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Passage Time analysis tool links the statistical analysis power of the R #12;environment to geospatial data. Graduate Research (UW-Madison): Using GIS in the Analysis of Seabird Foraging Behavior; Development of a First-Passage Time Analysis Tool in ArcGIS and R. GIS/Software Windows XP OS, Microsoft Office, (Word

Turner, Monica G.

284

conversation! ConneCt with BBi online  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dowling TJ Hooker Corey Reese Steve Sartori Please direct all correspondence to: Editor, Snapshots with disabilities. Officially launched in 2005, BBI builds on the legacy of Burton Blatt, former dean of SU's School

Mather, Patrick T.

285

CT January 2012 Page 1 of 14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Government means the United States of America and includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or duly22725 with DOE. (c) Seller means the person or organization that has entered into this Agreement. (d) Agreement means Purchase Order, Subcontract, General Order Agreement, Basic Ordering Agreement, Task Order

286

CT September 2012 Page 1 of 14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Government means the United States of America and includes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or duly22725 with DOE. (c) Seller means the person or organization that has entered into this Agreement. (d) Agreement means Purchase Order, Subcontract, General Order Agreement, Basic Ordering Agreement, Task Order

Pennycook, Steve

287

PET/CT shielding design comparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

moving through the gantry (with permission from Bushong 2001). 7 Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging tool that takes advantage of certain radiopharmaceuticals and allows abnormal metabolic... activity in and around organs to be examined by injection of a radionuclide into a patient (Radiology 2006). These radiopharmaceuticals, biological compounds linked to radiation-emitting radionuclides, can in some cases be tailored for concentration...

Coker, Audra Lee

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

NFolkstoneCt PepperPikeRd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0446 0600 2515 2701 2702 0409 0440 5092 5205 0500 0498 0499 0390 2703 2704 Aerospace Plasma Research

Kamat, Vineet R.

289

ct200914j 1..6  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as well as the capacitance of supercapacitor, by selective etching of metal carbides in a chlorine-containing environment. Single- wall CNTs were assembled into ultrathin...

290

Maximizing dose reductions with cardiac CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when heart rates are [60 bpm or when heart rate variabilitya heart rate dependent fashion as follows: 30–39 bpm, 175 mspadding; 40–49 bpm, 150 ms padding; 50– 59 bpm, 125 ms

Budoff, Matthew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

CT Investment Partners LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis a city in ChittendenPartners LLCInvestment Partners LLP

292

CT Solar Loan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis a city in ChittendenPartners LLCInvestment Partners LLP

293

Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind Farm JumpBLM) Lease. Add.png Add aNDGo Back

294

Sandia National Laboratories: Ct-TSR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandia Involves Wind-FarmCool Earth SolarCrystalline

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - andis auhinna soome Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 A sgn(v) o... ) Coulumb+viscous e) Karnopp c) Coulumb+viscous+stiction f) Hess and Soom Armstrong, etc 12... Friction Friction velocity lag time Hess and Soom (1990): F(v; t) ...

296

Helping people 2 Johnson Controls September 18, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Johnson Controls 4 Ford Motor Co. 5 Intel Corp. 6 Hess Corp. 7 Air Products & Chemicals 8 Praxair Inc. 9

Subramanian, Venkat

297

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 609627, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/609/2014/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

convection (Lawrence et al., 2003; Liu et al., 2003; Hess, 2005; Halland et al., 2009; Zhao et al., 2009

Meskhidze, Nicholas

298

98:537-541, 2007. First published Apr 18, 2007; doi:10.1152/jn.01229.2006J Neurophysiol Eliana M. Klier, Dora E. Angelaki and Bernhard J. M. Hess  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the nervous system. It is published 12 times a yearJournal of Neurophysiology onFebruary19,2009jn rotations about different axes--yaw, pitch, and roll. The order in which we rotate about these axes are accurate after intervening, whole-body rotational sequences. The sequences were reversed, either yaw

Crawford, Doug

299

acquired cholesteatomas ct: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dr MarkbarryDr BardstownTrl PepperPikeRd Wynnsto Kamat, Vineet R. 23 Acquired Dyslexia in Japanese: Implications for Reading Theory . Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

300

USACE, HUMPHREYS ENGR CTR SPT ACTIVITY ATTN: CEHEC-CT,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-4107 CODE 10. THIS ACQUISITION IS UNRESTRICTED FAX: NAICS: TEL: CODE 18a. PAYMENT WILL BE MADE BYOFFEROR INTEGRITY DRIVE MILLINGTON TN 38054-5005 18b. SUBMIT INVOICES TO ADDRESS SHOWN IN BLOCK 18a. UNLESS BLOCK 15 SEE ADDENDUM BLOCK IS MARKED DESTINATION UNLESS 12. DISCOUNT TERMS F&A HQ (No Collect Calls) $6.0 mil

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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301

COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, four principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 is aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations.

D. Gandy; R. Viswanathan; S. Cheruvu; K. Krzywosz

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT GET TO KNOW THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.D. Dermatology James Whalen, M.D. Dermatology Joseph Lorenzo, M.D. Endocrinology James Menzoian, M.D. Vascular.D., Ph.D. Orthopaedic Surgery Augustus Mazzocca, M.S., M.D. Orthopaedic Surgery Raymond Foley, D

Kim, Duck O.

303

COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbine is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 key tasks. Two supporting tasks relating to field validation (Task 4) and economic analysis (Task 5) have not yet been initiated.

R. Viswanathan; D. Gandy; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

304

A new CT grading system for hip osteoarthritis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protocol and methodology and were then free to examine test cases over the next few weeks. A second meeting followed this familiarisation period to cover any questions on methodology. The first interpretation run was performed in a randomised order? #28... , and Doherty M. Radiographic patterns and associations of osteoarthritis of the hip. Ann Rheum Dis 1992;51(10):1111-6. 23. Solomon L, Schnitzler CM, and Browett JP. Osteoarthritis of the hip: the patient behind the disease. Ann Rheum Dis 1982...

Turmezei, T. D.; Fotiadou, A.; Lomas, D. J.; Hopper, M. A.; Poole, K. E. S.

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

HANWEI ZHANG 19 Riley Ct. Skillman, NJ 08558  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3, Pages 277-298 [6]. Klein, A., Zhang, H. & Themelis, N. J. (2003). A Waste-To-Energy Power Plant.zhang@gmail.com Research Interests Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste to energy; Numerical Analysis of High (2007). Process Simulation of a large Mass Burn Waste-To-Energy boiler by the combination of CFD

306

File: CT3286 IN THE MATTER OF AN ARBITRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" or "Association") INTEREST ARBITRATION 2013 COUNSEL: Allan E. Black. Q.C. Thomas A. Roper, Q.C. For Faculty of an award from its general purpose operating funds. In doing so, with due regard to the primacy, not surprisingly, thorough and excellent. [5] My role in this proceeding is to interpret and apply the parties

Michelson, David G.

307

Hemangioma of the Interatrial Septum: CT and MRI Features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hemangioma of the heart is a rare primary benign tumor mainly appearing as enhancing, homogenous, well-circumscribed mass. We report a case of a 61-year-old asymptomatic woman, whose echocardiography showed a cardiac mass, which was described as the atypical myxoma of the right atrium. For further imaging, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging were undertaken, which showed a tumor located in the interatrial septum with imaging characteristics of hemangioma. In the literature, cardiac hemangioma is usually described as an intensely enhancing mass. In our opinion, early peripheral puddling of contrast material with filling in on delayed images is a typical pattern of its enhancement. This characteristic, in addition to high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, allows differentiation of a hemangioma from other benign and malignant tumors.

Hrabak-Paar, Maja, E-mail: majahrabak@gmail.com [University Hospital Center Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Croatia); Huebner, Marisa [University Hospital Mainz (Germany); Stern-Padovan, Ranka; Lusic, Mario [University Hospital Center Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Croatia)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

ankylosing spondylitis ct: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 Etablering av PETCT i Norge. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Establishment of PETCT in...

309

Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We sought to study the accuracy of dual-energy computed tomographic angiography (DE-CTA) for the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity by using the dual-energy bone removal technique compared with a commercially available conventional bone removal tool. Twenty patients underwent selective digital subtraction angiography and DE-CTA of the pelvis and lower extremities. CTA data were postprocessed with two different applications: conventional bone removal and dual-energy bone removal. All data were reconstructed and evaluated as 3D maximum-intensity projections. Time requirements for reconstruction were documented. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and concordance of DE-CTA regarding degree of stenosis and vessel wall calcification were calculated. A total of 359 vascular segments were analyzed. Compared with digital subtraction angiography, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, of CTA was 97.2%, 94.1%, and 94.7% by the dual-energy bone removal technique. The conventional bone removal tool delivered a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 70.7%, and an accuracy of 72.0%. Best results for both postprocessing methods were achieved in the vascular segments of the upper leg. In severely calcified segments, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy stayed above 90% by the dual-energy bone removal technique, whereas the conventional bone removal technique showed a substantial decrease of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. DE-CTA is a feasible and accurate diagnostic method in the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Results obtained by DE-CTA are superior to the conventional bone removal technique and less dependent on vessel wall calcifications.

Brockmann, Carolin, E-mail: carolin.brockmann@rad.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Jochum, Susanne; Sadick, Maliha [University of Heidelberg, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany); Huck, Kurt [University of Heidelberg, I. Medical Clinic, Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany); Ziegler, Peter [University of Heidelberg, Department of Surgery, Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Diehl, Steffen J. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

ACCELERATING REGULARIZED ITERATIVE CT RECONSTRUCTION ON COMMODITY GRAPHICS HARDWARE (GPU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overhead to very moderate levels. Index Terms-- Iterative Reconstruction, Computed Tomography, Ordered Klaus Mueller Center for Visual Computing, Computer Science Department, Stony Brook University ABSTRACT) is the overall theme in many efforts to lower these exposures. Effective methods here include limiting either

Mueller, Klaus

311

bectso-ct121 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Clean Coal Power Initiative Power Plant Improvement Initiative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program FutureGen Demonstration of...

312

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)References ↑ US Census BureauNorthbrook, Ohio: EnergyJump to:

313

Predix and Robots in CT Systems | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design PassivePostdoctoralKanareykin,URobots and Predix make

314

BAIC CT T SK Holdings JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: EnergyAustin Energy Place: TexasAvoyellesdeA S Biogas AnlagenB9

315

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:Community NominationsCarolina‎ |NAE/Enel NorthMiddleNortheast

316

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJ 24 FUSRAPAlaskaBearing

317

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJ 24

318

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Combustion Engineering Co - CT 03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »Hill -ElmorePlantFuel

319

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexico

320

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT 07  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborneSavannahIllinois SiteSouthKS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Torrington Co - CT 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MO

322

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT 12  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami -New Jersey

323

bectso-ct121 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview64,783ENCOAL®Evaluation of332

324

QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Local Affairs - New England Dominion Resources, Inc. Remarks of Joe Rose, President, Propane Gas Association of New England Remarks of Michael Trunzo, President & CEO, New...

325

Making an impact in public health through philanthrocapitalism : the PaCT Project and ImPaCT Commercial Ventures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale epidemiologic longitudinal cohort studies are a distinct area of epidemiology and public health. To conduct such studies, it often requires exorbitant resources. African collaborators and a team of Harvard ...

Reid, Todd Germaine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Murray Gell-Mann den ttafaldiga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Murray Gell-Mann och den åttafaldiga vägen Kathryn Hess Lite partikelteori Matriser och Lie-algebror Representationer av Lie-algebror Murray Gell-Mann och den åttafaldiga vägen Kathryn Hess Institute of Geometry november 2008 #12;Murray Gell-Mann och den åttafaldiga vägen Kathryn Hess Lite partikelteori Matriser och

Thévenaz, Jacques

327

Constraints on the TeV source population and its contribution to the galactic diffuse TeV emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cerenkov telescope of fourteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by the Milagro Collaboration. The number-intensity relation and the luminosity function for the HESS source population are investigated. By evaluating the contribution of such a source population to the diffuse emission we conclude that a significant fraction of the TeV energy emission measured by the Milagro experiment could be due to unresolved sources like HESS sources. Predictions concerning the number of sources which Veritas, Milagro, and HAWC should detect are also given.

Casanova, Sabrina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Neal Currier, Junhui Li, Alex Yezerets Cummins Inc. Hai-Ying Chen, Howard Hess Johnson Matthey ACE026 2 Project Overview Timeline Budget Partners Barriers * Start - March...

329

Mechanisms of Sulfur Poisoning of NOx Adsorber (LNT) Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stafford, John Stang (retired), Alex Yezerets Cummins Inc. Hai-Ying Chen, Howard Hess Johnson Matthey Project ID: ace24peden 2 Project Overview Timeline Budget Partners Barriers...

330

Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Junhui Li, Alex Yezerets Cummins Inc. Mario Castagnola, Hai-Ying Chen, Howard Hess Johnson Matthey ACE026 2 Project Overview Timeline Budget Partners Barriers * Start - March...

331

Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Neal Currier, Junhui Li, Alex Yezerets Cummins Inc. Hai-Ying Chen, Howard Hess Johnson Matthey Ace026 2 Project Overview Timeline Budget Partners Barriers * Start - July...

332

Approaches To Integrating A HIgh Penertration Of Solar PV and CPV Onto The Electrical Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Happy Camp Sanitation District  Harwood Products, Inc.   Healdsburg City  Herlong PUD  Hess Collection Winery  Hidden Valley 

Hill, Steven Craig

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Constraints on the TeV source population and its contribution to the galactic diffuse TeV emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cerenkov telescope of fourteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by the Milagro Collaboration. The number-intensity relation and the luminosity function for the HESS source population are investigated. By evaluating the contribution of such a source population to the diffuse emission we conclude that a significant fraction of the TeV energy emission measured by the Milagro experiment could be due to unresolved sources like HESS sources. Predictions concerning the number of sources which Veritas, Milagro, and HAWC should detect are also given.

Sabrina Casanova; Brenda L. Dingus

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Photon stimulated desorption from KI: Laser control of I-atom...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M Henyk AG Joly KM Beck WP Hess Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction NMR and EPR Facility: Radiochemistry Annex Science Theme: Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial...

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic local gabor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

orientation Harriet A. Allen, Robert F. Hess, and Behzad Mansouri Summary: of Gabors, a task requiring that the visual system combine local estimates of orientation across space......

336

President Obama Announces New Public-Private Manufacturing Innovation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Gridbridge, Hesse Mechantronics, II-VI, IQE, John Deere, Monolith Semiconductor, RF Micro Devices, Toshiba International, Transphorm, USCi, Vacon 7 Universities and Labs:...

337

Power Maps in Algebra and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Maps in Algebra and Topology Kathryn Hess Preface The case of commutative algebras The Hochschild complex of a twisting cochain Power maps on the Hochschild complex Topological relevance Power Compostela, 17 September 2008 #12;Power Maps in Algebra and Topology Kathryn Hess Preface The case

Thévenaz, Jacques

338

Discovery of two candidate pulsar wind nebulae in very-high-energy gamma rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the discovery of two very-high-energy gamma-ray sources in an ongoing systematic search for emission above 100 GeV from pulsar wind nebulae in survey data from the H.E.S.S. telescope array. Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes are ideal tools for searching for extended emission from pulsar wind nebulae in the very-high-energy regime. H.E.S.S., with its large field of view of 5 degrees and high sensitivity, gives new prospects for the search for these objects. An ongoing systematic search for very-high-energy emission from energetic pulsars over the region of the Galactic plane between -60 degrees wind nebulae, HESS J1718-385 and HESS J1809-193. H.E.S.S. has proven to be a suitable instrument for pulsar wind nebula searches.

H. E. S. S. Collaboration; :; F. Aharonian

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

339

Repeatability of quantitative FDG-PET/CT and contrast enhanced CT in recurrent ovarian carcinoma: test retest measurements for tumor FDG uptake, diameter and volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Corresponding author: Andrea G. Rockall, MRCP, FRCR, Division of Cancer and Surgery, Imperial College London, First Floor, ICTEM Building, Hammersmith Campus, Du Cane Road, London, W12 ONN, UK. Phone: +44 (0) 207 594 2793, Fax: +44 (0) 208 383 5830 Email: a... of lymphomas. Diagn Interv Imaging 2013. (15) Hoekstra CJ, Hoekstra OS, Stroobants SG, Vansteenkiste J, Nuyts J, Smit EF et al. Methods to monitor response to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer with 18F- FDG PET. J Nucl Med 2002; 43...

Rockall, Andrea G.; Avril, Norbert; Lam, Raymond; Iannone, Robert; Mozley, P. David; Parkinson, Christine; Bergstrom, Donald; Sala, Evis; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; McNeish, Iain A.; Brenton, James D.

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:Net Jump to: navigation, search Name:Groton

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1993 January ... 94.3 95.7 94.9 85.2 94.0 87.1 91.7 93.4 91.2 105.2 February ... 94.6 95.9 96.2 85.4 94.4 86.9 91.8 93.3 90.8 106.8...

342

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1994 January ... 89.6 91.0 90.2 83.8 88.4 80.4 87.3 88.8 92.1 102.5 February ... 92.9 94.6 93.8 90.4 91.3 86.6 91.4 92.3 91.5 105.5...

343

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1995 January ... 86.9 87.6 86.7 77.8 84.8 78.4 87.3 85.7 88.4 102.4 February ... 87.4 88.2 87.8 77.4 84.9 78.5 87.3 85.9 88.5 103.4...

344

Introducing a Clinical Practice Guideline Using Early CT in the Diagnosis of Scaphoid and Other Fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

immobilization (mean time in plaster 2.7 days) and had no orwere immobilized in a plaster of Paris cast and referred todiagnosis, and duration of plaster and further treatment

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Color intensity projections: A rapid approach for evaluating four-dimensional CT scans in treatment planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional computerized tomography scans (4DCT) enable intrafractional motion to be determined. Because more than 1500 images can be generated with each 4DCT study, tools for efficient data visualization and evaluation are needed. We describe the use of color intensity projections (CIP) for visualizing mobility. Methods: Four-dimensional computerized tomography images of each patient slice were combined into a CIP composite image. Pixels largely unchanged over the component images appear unchanged in the CIP image. However, pixels whose intensity changes over the phases of the 4DCT appear in the CIP image as colored pixels, and the hue encodes the percentage of time the tissue was in each location. CIPs of 18 patients were used to study tumor and surrogate markers, namely the diaphragm and an abdominal marker block. Results: Color intensity projections permitted mobility of high-contrast features to be quickly visualized and measured. In three selected expiratory phases ('gating phases') that were reviewed in the sagittal plane, gating would have reduced mean tumor mobility from 6.3 {+-} 2.0 mm to 1.4 {+-} 0.5 mm. Residual tumor mobility in gating phases better correlated with residual mobility of the marker block than that of the diaphragm. Conclusion: CIPs permit immediate visualization of mobility in 4DCT images and simplify the selection of appropriate surrogates for gated radiotherapy.

Cover, Keith S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lagerwaard, Frank J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: s.senan@vumc.nl

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

CtIP Is Required to Initiate Replication-Dependent Interstrand Crosslink Repair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

software (Tree Star Inc. , Ashland, OR) with the ‘‘removebottom dishes (Mattek, Ashland, MA) for 16 hours in 2 mM

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thoracic cavity segmentation algorithm using multiorgan extraction and surface fitting in volumetric CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop and validate a semiautomatic segmentation method for thoracic cavity volumetry and mediastinum fat quantification of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: The thoracic cavity region was separated by segmenting multiorgans, namely, the rib, lung, heart, and diaphragm. To encompass various lung disease-induced variations, the inner thoracic wall and diaphragm were modeled by using a three-dimensional surface-fitting method. To improve the accuracy of the diaphragm surface model, the heart and its surrounding tissue were segmented by a two-stage level set method using a shape prior. To assess the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, the algorithm results of 50 patients were compared to the manual segmentation results of two experts with more than 5 years of experience (these manual results were confirmed by an expert thoracic radiologist). The proposed method was also compared to three state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The metrics used to evaluate segmentation accuracy were volumetric overlap ratio (VOR), false positive ratio on VOR (FPRV), false negative ratio on VOR (FNRV), average symmetric absolute surface distance (ASASD), average symmetric squared surface distance (ASSSD), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD). Results: In terms of thoracic cavity volumetry, the mean ± SD VOR, FPRV, and FNRV of the proposed method were (98.17 ± 0.84)%, (0.49 ± 0.23)%, and (1.34 ± 0.83)%, respectively. The ASASD, ASSSD, and MSSD for the thoracic wall were 0.28 ± 0.12, 1.28 ± 0.53, and 23.91 ± 7.64 mm, respectively. The ASASD, ASSSD, and MSSD for the diaphragm surface were 1.73 ± 0.91, 3.92 ± 1.68, and 27.80 ± 10.63 mm, respectively. The proposed method performed significantly better than the other three methods in terms of VOR, ASASD, and ASSSD. Conclusions: The proposed semiautomatic thoracic cavity segmentation method, which extracts multiple organs (namely, the rib, thoracic wall, diaphragm, and heart), performed with high accuracy and may be useful for clinical purposes.

Bae, JangPyo [Interdisciplinary Program, Bioengineering Major, Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744, South Korea and Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)] [Interdisciplinary Program, Bioengineering Major, Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744, South Korea and Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namkug, E-mail: namkugkim@gmail.com; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Chan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Multi-level Ground Glass Nodule Detection and Segmentation in CT Lung Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for experiments is an order of magnitude larger than previous work. The effectiveness of our method in order to obtain the final GGN nodule boundaries and opacity values. Fig. 1. Flow chart of the proposed

Corso, Jason J.

349

RE@CT -IMMERSIVE PRODUCTION AND DELIVERY OF INTERACTIVE 3D CONTENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(OMG group), Oxford, UK; 6 Fraunhofer/HHI, Berlin, Germany E-mail: 1 Oliver.Grau@bbc.co.uk, 2 edmond.boyer@inria.fr , 3 peng.huang@surrey.ac.uk, 4 d.knossow@artefacto.fr, 5 emilio.maggio@vicon.com, 6 David.schneider@hhi.fraunhofer animated characters from actor performance capture in a multiple camera studio. The key innovation

Boyer, Edmond

350

I-5 CorrIdor reInforCement ProjeCt B  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

records. This project requires close collaboration with operations managers of major timber companies, county surveyors, public works directors, geographic information system...

351

Relationship of emphysema and airway disease assessed by CT to exercise capacity in COPD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Diaz a,f, *, Brian Bartholmai b , Rau´l San Jose´ Este´par c , James Ross c , Shin Matsuoka d , Tsuneo Yamashiro d , Hiroto Hatabu d , John J. Reilly e , Edwin K. Silverman a,g , George R. Washko's Hospital, Boston MA, USA d Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston MA, USA e Division

352

Image features for misalignment correction in medical flat-detector CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Misalignment artifacts are a serious problem in medical flat-detector computed tomography. Generally, the geometrical parameters, which are essential for reconstruction, are provided by preceding calibration routines. These procedures are time consuming and the later use of stored parameters is sensitive toward external impacts or patient movement. The method of choice in a clinical environment would be a markerless online-calibration procedure that allows flexible scan trajectories and simultaneously corrects misalignment and motion artifacts during the reconstruction process. Therefore, different image features were evaluated according to their capability of quantifying misalignment. Methods: Projections of the FORBILD head and thorax phantoms were simulated. Additionally, acquisitions of a head phantom and patient data were used for evaluation. For the reconstruction different sources and magnitudes of misalignment were introduced in the geometry description. The resulting volumes were analyzed by entropy (based on the gray-level histogram), total variation, Gabor filter texture features, Haralick co-occurrence features, and Tamura texture features. The feature results were compared to the back-projection mismatch of the disturbed geometry. Results: The evaluations demonstrate the ability of several well-established image features to classify misalignment. The authors elaborated the particular suitability of the gray-level histogram-based entropy on identifying misalignment artifacts, after applying an appropriate window level (bone window). Conclusions: Some of the proposed feature extraction algorithms show a strong correlation with the misalignment level. Especially, entropy-based methods showed very good correspondence, with the best of these being the type that uses the gray-level histogram for calculation. This makes it a suitable image feature for online-calibration.

Wicklein, Julia; Kunze, Holger; Kalender, Willi A.; Kyriakou, Yiannis [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hierarchical Part-Based Detection of 3D Flexible Tubes: Application to CT Colonoscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operations (region growing). Fig. 1. The rectal tubes are flexible and have variable shape and appearance and tube segments to the whole flexible tube. To increase the speed of the algorithm, can- didate parts are generated using a voting strategy. The detected tube segments are combined into a flexible tube using

Barbu, Adrian

354

E-Print Network 3.0 - aorta ct findings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0.85 0.06, n 12), which was in agreement with previous... between the normaland CaCl2 -treated aortas (2.95 0.90ms (r 2 0.51 0.22,n 5 Source: Konofagou, Elisa E. -...

355

E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic dissection ct Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(rf... ) signals noninvasively. An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was induced using a CaCl2 model in order Source: Konofagou, Elisa E. - Department of Biomedical Engineering,...

356

IntroduCtIon: QuantIfyIng soCIal develoPment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

civilization are most often traced back to the ancient Greeks and romans, although other advocates identify pre

Landweber, Laura

357

Louisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout coastal Louisiana, including 3-Mile Bay, Drum Bay, Lake Fortuna, South Black Bay, Hackberry Bay

358

CONE-BEAM HELICAL CT VIRTUAL ENDOSCOPY: RECONSTRUCTION, SEGMENTATION AND AUTOMATIC NAVIGATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) from Brazil, the National

Plotkin, Joshua B.

359

BONE DENSITOMETRY IN PEDIATRIC POPULATIONS: DISCREPANCIES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF OSTEOPOROSIS BY DXA AND CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BONE DENSITOMETRY IN PEDIATRIC POPULATIONS: DISCREPANCIES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF OSTEOPOROSIS BY DXA, osteoporosis is frequently overdiagnosed in children when using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA osteoporosis in pediatric populations. (J Pediatr 2005;146:776-9) D ual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

360

Independent measurement of femoral cortical thickness and cortical bone density using clinical CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure, there is often an unequivocal need to be able to decompose it into its constituent parts. For example, in studying the effects of osteoporosis treatment with two different drugs, Teriparatide (Poole et al., 2011) and Denosumab (Poole et al., 2012a...

Treece, G. M.; Gee, A. H.

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administrati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security August 16, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job...

362

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT CONTRACT N : ENK5-CT-2002-00603  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: WaveDragon 1:4.5 TITLE: Sea Testing and Optimisation of Power Production on a Scale 1:4.5 Test Rig of the Offshore Wave Energy Converter Wave Dragon. PROJECT CO-ORDINATOR: SPOK ApS (SPO) DK PARTNERS : Wave Dragon by the European Community under the `Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development' Programme (1998-2002) #12

363

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1997 January ... 107.9 109.0 108.6 105.2 106.5 102.1 107.0 104.4 106.5 130.4 February ... 105.1 106.0 105.2 102.2 103.4 101.0 104.5...

364

PAPER 2004-232 Application of X-Ray CT for Investigation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to both secondary and tertiary recovery operations. In a fractured system, the displacement process Fractured reservoirs have always been considered poor candidates for enhanced oil recovery. This is mainly of multiphase flow in fractures is important to reduce oil bypass and increase recovery in these reservoirs

Schechter, David S.

365

Image Analysis of Turbine Blades Using CT Scans| GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are hidden and undetected. These flaws can occur during the manufacturing processes of turbine blades in a jet or gas engine. If large enough, they can have significant impact on...

366

A Bayesian Hierarchical Model for Classifying Craniofacial Malformations from CT Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Radiology, Children's National Medical Center (CNMC), Washington, D.C., USA. D. Gatica of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, CNMC. a b c Fig. 1. Volumetric reformations (top view) of the skull and clinical intervention for craniofacial providers and pediatric psychol- ogists. Single suture synostoses

Shapiro, Linda

367

Microsoft Word - CX-ChemawaWoodPolesCT-KFG12-KOCFGT-FY12_WEB...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemawa District Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2325 (Carlton-Tillamook 1, Keeler-Forest Grove 2, Keeler-Oregon City 2, Keeler-Forest Grove 1, Forest...

368

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Additional Information Additional information about the non-medical uses of nuclear imaging, computed tomography, and non-destructive testing is available in DOE...

369

CARLOS ALBERTO PALACIOS TENREIRO 11905 SOUTHERN TRAILS CT, PEARLAND, TX, 77584  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Venezuela and Petrozuata (Conoco-Philips/PDVSA joint venture); Ecopetrol­ Colombia; PEMEX, Mexico ­ Colombia, Pipeline System 4 for PEMEX ­ Mexico. Have experience and background of oil/gas fields

Botte, Gerardine G.

370

Segmenting the Papillary Muscles and the Trabeculae from High Resolution Cardiac CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to automatically segment the four chambers of the heart in four seconds. Ecabert et al. [5] presented a learning

Chen, Kuang-Yu

371

Micro-CT for the quantification of 3D voids within damaged structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micro X-ray Computed Tomography (MXCT) is widely used in the materials community to examine the internal structure of materials for voids and cracks due to damage or casting, or other defects. Most research in this area focuses on the qualitative aspect of the image, simply answering; Are there voids present? Here we present an ongoing study of the quantified incipient spall voids in Cu with different grain sizes, using a gas gun with various velocities. Data analysis packages for MXCT are just now becoming able to dimensionally measure and produce statistics on the voids-present. In order to make the size of the features in the 3D image quantifiable, the question, how many radiographs are required to render the object dimensionally accurate in 3D, must be answered. A series of data sets has been coUected, varying the number of radiographs collected in order to determine the appropriate number required.

Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamilton, Christopher E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dennis - Koller, Darcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bronkhorst, C. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, B. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

372

MD CT Angiography and MR Angiography of Nonatherosclerotic Renal Artery Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We reviewed the computed tomographic and magnetic resonance angiographic appearances of the various nonatherosclerotic renal artery pathologies. Rapid progress in cross-sectional techniques has allowed computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography to replace digital subtraction angiography in most circumstances. When state-of-the-art equipment and optimized protocols are used, diagnosing a wide range of nonatherosclerotic pathologies is possible.

Flors, Lucia; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Ahmad, Ehab Ali; Norton, Patrick T.; Turba, Ulku C.; Bozlar, Ugur; Hagspiel, Klaus D., E-mail: kdh2n@virginia.edu [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Exact image reconstruction for triple-source cone-beam CT along saddle trajectories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with percutaneous coronary intervention indicated that "fixing the stenosis" did not reduce death and other major

Wang, Ge

374

jCT: A Java Code Tomograph Markus Lumpe, Samiran Mahmud, and Olga Goloshchapova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-invasive manner, a three-dimensional image through computed tomography ­ a process that joins a series of two and quantity of data resulting from the measurement process must not arbitrarily limit analysis. Suitable post, and resources of software development. A well-established means to study software attributes is metrics data

Lumpe, Markus

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - angiographic c-arm ct Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of GPU-Based Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Summary: . 5. Reconstruction of CBCT data from mobile C-arm units by using NVIDIA devices is presented in 6... ., Riabkov, D.,...

376

Soclety of Petroteum Engineers CT Scan and Neural Network Technology for Construction of Detailed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Detailed Distribution of Residual Oil Saturation During Waterflooding A. Garg', A.R. Kovscek2, M. Nikravesh reservoirs. Fractured petroleum reservoirs provide over 20 ?ZO of the world oil reserves [1]. Examples of prolific fmctured reservoirs are: the Monterey Shales in California (estimated tens of billions of barrels

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

377

RGP.CT.07.pdf 1 Climate Change: A Growing Scientific Impetus for Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a significant scientific impetus for lowering greenhouse gas emissions. First, I will briefly say something on climate that is so important to policy. Third, I will address the uncertainty in current forecasts. Fourth. Easily the most important greenhouse gas is water vapor but this gas typically remains for only a week

378

Microsoft Word - 10PVSC_PVsim_rev31_CT edits_06 14 10_clean.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Each of the power supplies is a high-speed switching power supply that utilizes power MOSFET technology to minimize the output capacitor and inductor, which typically...

379

Dosimetry of Y-90 Liquid Brachytherapy in a Dog with Osteosarcoma Using PET/CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

receive a total dose of over 1000 Gy. Y-90 liquid brachytherapy has the potential to be used as an adjuvant therapy or for palliation purposes. Future work includes evaluation of pharmacokinetics of the Y-90 radiopharmaceutical, calibration of PET...

Zhou, Jingjie

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

380

Simultaneous ??m?Tc-MDP/¹²³I-MIBG imaging of neuroblastoma using SPECT-CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous ??m??Tc-MDP/ ¹²³I-MIBG SPECT has the potential to replace current clinical sequential acquisitions of ??m?Tc-MDP and ¹²³-MIBG SPECT studies, and therefore has great potential to reduce imaging time, sedation ...

Pérez-Gutiérrez, José P. (José Pablo Andrés)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PIXSCAN: Pixel Detector CT-Scanner for Small Animal Imaging P. Delpierrea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

very large dynamic range of photons counting at very low detector noise. They also provide high-scanner, especially for soft tissues, and to reduce both the scan duration and the absorbed dose. A proof of principle initially built for detection of X-ray synchrotron radiations. Despite the relatively large pixel size

Boyer, Edmond

382

Session: Advances in measuring methods (CT2.1) Track: Technical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the wind shear, the turbulence and the wind direction influence the performance of MW wind turbines turbine is the wind shear, the turbulence and the wind direction changes within the turbine's rotor disk. Likewise, the turbulence intensity and wind direction variations with height influence the turbine power

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - abbott real-time ct Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The main challenge involved in scheduling transactions in a Real-Time Data... scheduling and concurrency control techniques. Current real-time concurrency control...

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropometry bia ct Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Finnish growth charts. Preg- nancy... characteristics and, notably, no differences in birth weight, birth anthropometry, or gestation length (Table 1 Source: Bergstrom, Carl T....

385

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions473.6 W 54,849.0 52,418.4520.7 W203,449.894 1993

386

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions473.6 W 54,849.0 52,418.4520.7 W203,449.894 1993

387

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions473.6 W 54,849.0 52,418.4520.7 W203,449.894 1993

388

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions473.6 W 54,849.0 52,418.4520.7 W203,449.894 1993

389

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions473.6 W 54,849.0 52,418.4520.7 W203,449.894 1993

390

CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO6,Act of 1956 AnCSGFApril

391

CT Scan Not Only a Medical Technique NETL Wins Two 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO6,Act of 1956

392

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurity Complex Non-destructive Assay

393

QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans | Department of- East |

394

STATE OF OHIO, IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT FOR THE .SOUTHERN DIS~CT OF  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1 ThisAprilOCTOBERSTART Projects.. ..

395

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAlliance |Department ofShowerheadsDepartment of

396

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAlliance |Department ofShowerheadsDepartment

397

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramofContract at itsSelectionsBoulderDepartment of

398

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramofContract at itsSelectionsBoulderDepartment

399

Physikalisches Kolloquium 05.12.2011, 17 Uhr c.t. Hrsaal E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to study the energetics of feedback in clusters and map the sites where this energy is being deposited. In particular we discuss how new, low-frequency radio data from LOFAR, a new array of radio telescopes built redshifts. With such new samples from LOFAR, and ultimately the planned Square Kilometre Array, we can

Sanderson, Yasmine

400

Confirmatory Survey for the Partial Site Release at the ABB Inc. CE Winsor Site, Windsor, CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to confirm that remedial actions had been effective in meeting established release criteria and that documentation accurately and adequately describes the final radiological conditions of the PSR Impacted Areas.

W.C. Adams

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Influence of surfactant on single ion track etching , Leo C.T.; Apel2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, reproducible break-through times are achieved. Above 0.1 vol.-% surfactant concentration cylindrical channels heavy ion or fission fragment to supply the energy necessary for rendering a cylindrical volume around shapes are possible, such as narrow and wide cones, spherical troughs, barrels, and bottle necked

Yu, K.N.

402

CHAMADA PBLICA MCTI/ FINEP/ CT-INFRA 01/2013 Resultado Preliminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

da 2.024.759,00 UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO PAMPA INMETRO INSTITUTO NACIONAL DE METROLOGIA NORMALIZAÃ?Ã?O E

Maier, Rudolf Richard

403

Implementation of an Integrated Quality Assurance Program for a CT-TPS Process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Systematic constancy and accuracy of a treatment planning system (TPS) are crucial for the entire radiation treatment planning process (TPP). The Quality Assurance (QA) of… (more)

Wu, Junqing

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment( Sample of Shipment Notice) FederalLANDFILLStatement ofAnnounce

405

I-5 CorrIdor reInforCement ProjeCt B  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure eind ExcBAECC:CorrIdor

406

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Chain and Cable Co - CT 15  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJ 24 FUSRAPAlaskaBearingChain

407

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexicoEngland Lime Co -

408

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A01EngineeringOlin

409

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami -NewPlantSteel Co - NJ

410

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan, Sw China) | OpenbeneathMargin-

411

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwhich, CT, Custom  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartnersDepartment of EnergyEnergy U.S.DOEPreferred

412

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: BPC Green Builders, New Fairfield, CT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero Energy Ready Home 2014BPC

413

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Preferred Builders, Old Greenwhich, CT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZero EnergyNew TownPalo

414

DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Trolle Residence, Danbury, CT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of EnergyZeroHealthyHomeAmerisipsBPC

415

DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Singer Village, Derby, CT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment of

416

New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Nelson Construction, Farmington, CT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S iPartnership Program |Million DOE AwardCDC Realty,thehomeNelson

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis dual-source-ct in-vitro-charakterisieru...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 2 Experimental measurement of human head motion for high-resolution computed tomography Summary: other methods are also available to reduce motion artifacts, such as...

418

Nonoperable Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma: Management with Embolization and CT-Guided RF Ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the case of a 59-year-old male who underwent embolization and computed-tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation of a recurrent renal cell carcinoma that developed after radical nephrectomy in contiguity to the inferior vena cava. The alternative of a new operation was rejected because of the proximity of the tumor to the vessel and percutaneous approach seemed to be the better solution.

Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Pomomi, Maria; Mylona, Sophia; Ntai, Sparti; Mpatakis, Nikolaos ['Korgialenio Benakio' Red Cross Hospital of Athens, Department of Radiology (Greece)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Independent Scientific Advisory Board Review of Salmon and Steelhead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hoc Member Richard N. Williams -ISRP #12;Acknowledgements The ISAB thanks all of the scientists Hallerman, Pete Hassemer, Jay Hesse, Ray Hilborn, Mike Kern, Paul Kline, Jim Lannan, Si Levin, Jeff Lutch

420

CCSM Atmosphere Model Working Group Report, 22-24 March 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Aiguo Donner, Leo Eaton, Brian Gent, Peter Gettelman, Andrew Ghan, Steven J Hack, James Hannay, Cecile, Colette L. Hess, Peter Heymsfeld, Andrew Liu, Hongyu Neu, Jessica Rodriguez, Jose M. Vit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CFSES Blue Team Presentations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Marc Hesse (May, 2014) Nanoscale CO2-brine-mineral interactions Craig M. Tenney, Randall T. Cygan, Evgeniy M. Myshakin, Wissam A. Saidi, Vyacheslav N. Romanov, and Kenneth D....

422

Interfacial ionic liquids: connecting static and dynamic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

L, Lee S S and Fenter P 2012 Real-time observations of interfacial lithiation in a metal silicide thin film J. Phys. Chem. C 116 22341-5 43 Lindahl E, Hess B and van der...

423

Universittsmedizin Gttingen Publikationen und Hochschulschriften 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-assisted image-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation for somatotopic mapping of the motor cortex: a clinical Volumensequenzen bei 3 Tesla. Dissertation Universität Göttingen 2010. 2. Hesse A, Dr. med., Untersuchung neuer

Gollisch, Tim

424

Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

Casanova, S; Casanova, Sabrina; Dingus, Brenda L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ultracapacitor/Battery Hybrid Energy Storage Systems for Electric Vehicles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis deals with the design of Hybrid Energy Storage System (HESS) for Light Electric Vehicles (LEV) and EVs. More specifically, a tri-mode high-efficiency non-isolated… (more)

Moshirvaziri, Mazhar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic mirror alignment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: automatic mirror alignment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Mirror Alignment and Optical Quality of the H.E.S.S. Summary: the automatic...

427

Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aleksey Yezerets, Michael Ruth Cummins Inc. Hai-Ying Chen, Howard Hess, Mojghan Naseri Johnson Matthey 10252011 US DoE DEER Conference 2011 * 40% Fuel Economy improvement over...

428

Mechanisms of Sulfur Poisoning of NOx Adsorber (LNT) Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stafford, Junhui Li, John Stang, Alex Yezerets Cummins Inc. Hai-Ying Chen, Howard Hess Johnson Matthey 2 The project is a CRADA between PNNL and Cummins Inc. It involves a...

429

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 24, PAGES 4631-4634, DECEMBER 15, 2001 Remote sensing of global wetland dynamics with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a linear mixture model with end-members calibrated with radar observations to account for vegetation cover-arid environments [Gumbricht et al., personal communication]. Synthetic aper- ture radar (SAR) studies [Hess et al

Aires, Filipe

430

Clin. Vision Sci. Vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 143-158, 1988 Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUDY MEDIA D. KERSTEN Psychology Department, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, U.S.A. R. F. HEss imposed by the receptor spacing (Campbell and Green, 1965). As Green points out, in practice it can

Kersten, Dan

431

Table of Contents Invited Talks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shih, Keith Sklower, Lakshminarayanan Subramanian, Takashi Suzuki, Shelley Zhuang, Anthony D. Joseph . . . . . . . . . . 16 Christopher K. Hess, Manuel Rom´an, Roy H. Campbell Systems Support for Ubiquitous Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Christopher Lueg Applications The Fastap Keypad and Pervasive Computing

432

Contribution of unresolved point sources to the galactic diffuse emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope of fifteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved point sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by EGRET and recently at higher energies by the Milagro Collaboration. Assuming that HESS sources have all the same intrinsic luminosity, the contribution of this new source population can account for most of the Milagro $\\gamma$-ray emission at TeV energies and between 10 and 20 per cent of EGRET diffuse Galactic $\\gamma$-ray emission for energies bigger than 10 GeV. Also, by combining the HESS and the Milagro results, constraints can be put on the distribution and the luminosities of gamma ray emitters in the Galaxy.

Sabrina Casanova; Brenda L. Dingus

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

VIBRATION->VIBRATION ENERGY TRANSFER IN METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIBRATION ENERGY TRANSFER IN METHANE Peter Hess, A. H. Kung,Rotation Spectra of Methane, U.S. Nat'L· Tech. Inform.tret t tllll. I. INTRODUCTION Methane is a relatively simple

Hess, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Rock art boundaries: considering geographically limited elements within the Pecos River Style  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dering, Jim Finnegan, Tommy Grey, Hubert Gubbels, Jim Bob Hargrove, Jack and Missy Harrington, Jerome Hesse, Howard Hunt, Roy Hurley, John and Judy Krevling, Lonnie Lischka, Ken Moore, Steve Norman, Elton Prewitt, Clyde Pursley, Rick Rylander, Rod Sanders...

Harrison, James Burr

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Diffuse TeV Emission at the Galactic Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) has detected intense diffuse TeV emission correlated with the distribution of molecular gas along the galactic ridge at the centre of our Galaxy. Earlier HESS observations of this region had already revealed the presence of several point sources at these energies, one of them (HESS J1745-290) coincident with the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A*. It is still not entirely clear what the origin of the TeV emission is, nor even whether it is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions. It is reasonable to suppose, however, that at least for the diffuse emission, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the molecular gas indicates a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In this paper, we explore the possible source(s) of energetic hadrons at the galactic centre, and their propagation through a turbulent medium. We conclude that though Sagittarius A* itself may be the source of cosmic rays producing the emission in HESS J1745-290, it cannot be responsible for the diffuse emission farther out. A distribution of point sources, such as pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the galactic plane, similarly do not produce a TeV emission profile consistent with the HESS map. We conclude that only a relativistic proton distribution accelerated throughout the inter-cloud medium can account for the TeV emission profile measured with HESS.

Elizabeth Wommer; Fulvio Melia; Marco Fatuzzo

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

436

Analysis of HMA permeability through microstructure characterization and simulation of fluid flow in X-ray CT images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are not restricted by |Rec|?2. The validity of the numerical model is verified through comparisons with closed-form solutions for idealized microstructure. The numerical model was used to find the components of the three-dimensional (3-D) permeability tensor...

Al Omari, Aslam Ali Mufleh

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

KATHLEEN WU 228 Devonshire Lane, Madison, CT, 06443 (203) 671-6704 kathleen.wu@yale.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate & Energy Institute (YCEI) Energy Scholar Relevant Coursework: Freshman Organic Chemistry (TPO) and MS Center for Green Chemistry & Green Engineering, Research assistant Spring 2012 Prepared

Firoozabadi, Abbas

438

Routine Repeat Head CT may not be Indicated in Patients on Anticoagulant/Antiplatelet Therapy Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

therapy is frequently employed to treat or prevent vascularare separate units which both treat this patient population,

McCammack, Kevin C.; Sadler, Charlotte; Guo, Yueyang; Ramaswamy, Raja S; Farid, Nikdokht

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Routine Repeat Head CT may not be Indicated in Patients on Anticoagulant/Antiplatelet Therapy Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and an intracranial bleed. J Trauma. brain injury deaths andFollowing Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Kevin C. McCammack,after mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) are controversial.

McCammack, Kevin C.; Sadler, Charlotte; Guo, Yueyang; Ramaswamy, Raja S; Farid, Nikdokht

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Vol. 17, No. 16/0ct. 20,1971/Vancouver 8, B.C. UBCREPORTS CAMIPUS EDITICIN ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

newspaper, The Ubyssey. "UBC has always welcomed union organizationwhena majorityof persans concerned have

Farrell, Anthony P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Plant & CtU Pkfsiol. 15: 213-224 (1974) Salt-induced alterations of the fluorescence yield and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and of emission spectra in Chlorella pyrenoidosa Prasanna Mohanty, Govindjee and Thomas Wydrzynski Department afluorescencein normal and DCMU-poisoned intact algal cells of Chlorella pyrcnoidosa. Potassium and sodium acetate, the dark adapted cells of Chlorella pyrenoidosa show characteristic fluctuations (labelled 0->-I

Govindjee

442

Image quality improvement in megavoltage cone beam CT using an imaging beam line and a sintered pixelated array system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify the improvement in megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) image quality enabled by the combination of a 4.2 MV imaging beam line (IBL) with a carbon electron target and a detector system equipped with a novel sintered pixelated array (SPA) of translucent Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S ceramic scintillator. Clinical MVCBCT images are traditionally acquired with the same 6 MV treatment beam line (TBL) that is used for cancer treatment, a standard amorphous Si (a-Si) flat panel imager, and the Kodak Lanex Fast-B (LFB) scintillator. The IBL produces a greater fluence of keV-range photons than the TBL, to which the detector response is more optimal, and the SPA is a more efficient scintillator than the LFB. Methods: A prototype IBL + SPA system was installed on a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator equipped with the MVision{sup TM} image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. A SPA strip consisting of four neighboring tiles and measuring 40 cm by 10.96 cm in the crossplane and inplane directions, respectively, was installed in the flat panel imager. Head- and pelvis-sized phantom images were acquired at doses ranging from 3 to 60 cGy with three MVCBCT configurations: TBL + LFB, IBL + LFB, and IBL + SPA. Phantom image quality at each dose was quantified using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) metrics. Head and neck, thoracic, and pelvic (prostate) cancer patients were imaged with the three imaging system configurations at multiple doses ranging from 3 to 15 cGy. The systems were assessed qualitatively from the patient image data. Results: For head and neck and pelvis-sized phantom images, imaging doses of 3 cGy or greater, and relative electron densities of 1.09 and 1.48, the CNR average improvement factors for imaging system change of TBL + LFB to IBL + LFB, IBL + LFB to IBL + SPA, and TBL + LFB to IBL + SPA were 1.63 (p < 10{sup -8}), 1.64 (p < 10{sup -13}), 2.66 (p < 10{sup -9}), respectively. For all imaging doses, soft tissue contrast was more easily differentiated on IBL + SPA head and neck and pelvic images than TBL + LFB and IBL + LFB. IBL + SPA thoracic images were comparable to IBL + LFB images, but less noisy than TBL + LFB images at all imaging doses considered. The mean MTFs over all imaging doses were comparable, at within 3%, for all imaging system configurations for both the head- and pelvis-sized phantoms. Conclusions: Since CNR scales with the square root of imaging dose, changing from TBL + LFB to IBL + LFB and IBL + LFB to IBL + SPA reduces the imaging dose required to obtain a given CNR by factors of 0.38 and 0.37, respectively. MTFs were comparable between imaging system configurations. IBL + SPA patient image quality was always better than that of the TBL + LFB system and as good as or better than that of the IBL + LFB system, for a given dose.

Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Anderson, Carryn M.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Stiles, Jared; Edwards, Drake S.; Flynn, Ryan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Siemens Medical Solutions, Inc., Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

REPORTSVol 18, NO. 13/0ct. 12, 1972lVancouver 8, I?.C. UBC REPORTS CAMPUS EDITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wastes of ev'ery kind, said Mr. ArthurSlipper,assistanttothe director-planning in UBC"s Department it for sale as a kind of fireplace log or as wallboard. It might also prove tao be possible to convert manure

Farrell, Anthony P.

444

Delegation Issuing Service for X.509 D.W.Chadwick, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7NZ, England  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.509 [1] defines a Privilege Management Infrastructure (PMI) based on attribute certificates (ACs) instead of public keys. In the X.509 PMI model, the root of the PMI is termed the Source of Authority (So

Kent, University of

445

Automated 3D trabecular bone structure analysis of the proximal femur—prediction of biomechanical strength by CT and DXA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and preven- tion of osteoporosis-related fractures. Jtechnique for assessing osteoporosis is dual X-raytomography . Failure load . Osteoporosis . Proximal femur .

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

J. DALTON YORK 110 Sheffield Ct., Cookeville, TN 38506 | 931-854-1068 | dyork@tntech.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Membrane development for intermediate temperature fuel cells (ITFC) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC on project Support role on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack design modeling as part of Advanced Portable co-surfactant application to improve anti-agglomerant performance. Statistical optimization

Firoozabadi, Abbas

447

The ICT SCRM CoMMunITy FRaMewoRk DevelopMenT pRojeCT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a more defined public/private partnership in this space has also been expressed as a call to action were an independent public/ private partnership model to spur further community development (which ways for the public and private sectors, as well as large numbers of standards development

448

Tracking Waves and Vortex Nucleation in Excitable Systems with Anomalous Dispersion N. Manz, C.T. Hamik, and O. Steinbock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking Waves and Vortex Nucleation in Excitable Systems with Anomalous Dispersion N. Manz, C obtained from a chemical reaction-diffusion system in which wave propagation is limited to a finite band of wavelengths and in which no solitary pulses exist. Wave patterns increase their size through repeated

Steinbock, Oliver

449

Reaction in NiAl laminates by laser-shock compression and spalling C.T. Wei a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these energies significantly raise the temperature of the product, they may facilitate the self-propagating high ), but the intermetallic reaction did not propagate through the laminates. The estimated temperature changes inside temperature synthesis (SHS). Conventional shock loading experiments have been tra- ditionally conducted

Meyers, Marc A.

450

ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

Leonard Angello

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Automated 3D trabecular bone structure analysis of the proximal femur—prediction of biomechanical strength by CT and DXA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

z ORIGINAL ARTICLE Automated 3D trabecular bone structureIntroduction An automated 3D segmentation algorithm wasstudy was to use an automated 3D segmentation algorithm to

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Verh. Zool.-Bot. Ges. sterreich 147, 2010, 9398 Value-adding application of micro-CT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Pragmites australis, knot sections, transverse sections, micro-tomography. Introduction rigid plant tissues: Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud. knot sections Gabriele OkOrn, Brian australis Cav. Trin ex Steud.), grown in natural habitats and in constructed wetlands, authors tried

Metscher, Brian

453

CT10 NLO and NNLO Parton Distribution Functions from the Coordinated Theoretical-Experimental Project on QCD  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Coordinated Theoretical-Experimental Project on QCD is a multi-institutional collaboration devoted to a broad program of research projects and cooperative enterprises in high-energy physics centered on Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and its implications in all areas of the Standard Model and beyond. The Collaboration consists of theorists and experimentalists at 18 universities and 5 national laboratories. More than 65 sets of Parton Distribution Functions are available for public access. Links to many online software tools, information about Parton Distribution Functions, papers, and other resources are also available.

Huston, Joey (Co-Spokesperson); Ownes, Joseph (Co-Spokesperson)

454

Statistical analysis of Multi-Material Components using Dual Energy CT Christoph Heinzl, Johann Kastner, Torsten Moller, and Eduard Groller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scan fusion, the statistical analysis step computes probability volumes of the fused data using a local-ray computed tomography (3DCT). 3DCT is a non-touching and non-destructive method, which allows a fast char: Photograph (a) and principle scheme (b) of an industrial 3D X-ray computed tomography system. General design

455

ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

Leonard Angello

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: a 5-year retrospective review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE, Thomas SR et al (2002) MIRD dose estimate report No. 19:of a mathematical phantom (MIRD phantom) by a range of CTselect using a diagram of the MIRD phantom provided. Based

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Ocean Field Test of Methane Hydrate Formation from aW.J. , and Mason, D.H. , Methane Hydrate Formation inNatural and Laboratory--Formed Methane Gas Hydrate. American

Rees, E.V.L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Biophysical Characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis CT584 Supports Its Potential Role as a Type III Secretion Needle Tip Protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Starnbach MN. The Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium-encoded type III secretion systems can translocate Chlamydia trachomatis proteins into the cytosol of host cells. Infect Immun. 2005; 73:905–911. [PubMed: 15664932] 20. Hower S, Wolf K, Fields KA...

Markham, Aaron P.; Jaafar, Zane A.; Kemege, Kyle E.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Hefty, P. Scott

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote Access08:Energy 94:Service2 1

460

VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote Access08:Energy 94:Service2 1 2 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hess groton ct" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote Access08:Energy 94:Service2 1 2 1

462

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2014: Murphy Brothers Contracting, Shore Road Project, Old Greenwich, CT  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramofContract at itsSelectionsBoulder ZED DesignMurphy

463

Department of Residential Life University of Connecticut 626 Gilbert Rd Extension Unit 1022 Storrs, CT 06269 Rome Hall, Ground Floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Residential Life · University of Connecticut 626 Gilbert Rd Extension · Unit 1022 be directed to Student Health Services. Residential Life is unable to accept medical information. Students correspondence. Sincerely, Pamela Schipani Interim Director of Residential Life University of Connecticut Rome

Alpay, S. Pamir

464

2 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUIT THEORY, VOL. CT-16, NO. 1, BBBRUARY 1969 The Modified Circuit Matrix of an &Port  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an &Port Network and Its Applications KRISIINAIYAN THULASIRAMRN AND VEMPATI G. I Abstracf-Certain properties of the modified circuit matrix useful in the analysis and synthesis of n-port pseudoseries connection of n-port networks. The use- fulness of the concept of the modified circuit matrix

Thulsiraman, Krishnaiyan

465

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K. and McDonald, T. , Gas Hydrates of the Middle Americaet al. , Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01et al. , Drilling Gas Hydrates on Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia

Rees, E.V.L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATION OF CONTRACT 1 I . CONTR"CT ID CODE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational NuclearhasAdministration77 Sandia National005-2010 or 1l PAGEMI54 I(

467

List of OTC Products (Items subject to change without notice)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

List of OTC Products (Items subject to change without notice) Allergy/Cough/Cold/Flu Symptoms * Requires Valid ID for purchase/18 yo Cough Drops Cherry 30ct Cold Eeze tablets 18ct Allergy Tablets 24ct Loratidine D* 10ct Comtrex Cold and Cough* Daytime* Softgels 12 & 20ct Nighttime* Softgels 12ct Banophen Tabs

Stuart, Steven J.

468

Title of dissertation: CONTROL, DYNAMICS, AND EPIDEMIC SPREADING IN COMPLEX SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To my wife Zsofi and to my parents ii #12;Acknowledgments There are many people to whom I am grateful scientific ideas are lost if not conveyed in a clear accessible manner. He is he sharpest minded critic and professionalism of Jane Hessing. Finally, I would like to thank my parents for their encouragement and support. iv

Anlage, Steven