Sample records for heretofore changed remains

  1. Mid-Late Holocene environmental change in northern Sweden: an investigation using fossil insect remains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khorasani, Sara

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, Mid-Late Holocene insect fossil assemblages were studied from inland northern Sweden, producing new evidence relating to both natural environmental changes and human impacts. The insect fossil ...

  2. NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 3 | FEBRUARY 2013 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 105 ossil fuels are expected to remain the dominant source of energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    fuels are expected to remain the dominant source of energy for decades to come1 (Fig. 1). Capturing, the International Energy Agency (IEA) Blue Map scenario2 envis- ages a 19% CO2 reductions contribution from CCS (ref. 4.) The IEA World Energy Outlook 20111 forecasts that existing energy facilities will account

  3. Armament remains from His Majesty's sloop Boscawen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Brinnen Stiles

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    His Majesty's Sloop Boscawen was built on Lake Champlain by British forces in 1759 as part of their successful campaign to drive the French Army from the Champlain Valley. This thesis describes and analyzes the armament remains found in and around...

  4. Coal remains a hot commodity for Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bram, L.

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based largely on analyses by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics in late 2005 and early 2006, the article looks at the recent and near future export market for Australian coal. Demand in Asia is growing; European demand remains steady. Developments existing and new mines in Queensland are summarised in the article. 3 tabs.

  5. Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long-Term Degradation of Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses. Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling...

  6. A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Cost-Effectiveness Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What...

  7. Accomplishments and Remaining Challenges: THREDDS Data Server and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accomplishments and Remaining Challenges: THREDDS Data Server and Common Data Model Ethan Davis Unidata Policy Committee Meeting 23-24 May 2011 #12;THREDDS Data Server (TDS) · Web server for scientific;THREDDS Data Server (TDS) · ... · Data access services: ­ OPeNDAP ­ OGC WMS and WCS ­ NCSS · Data

  8. Reply to Davies: Hydraulic fracturing remains a possible mechanism for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    LETTER Reply to Davies: Hydraulic fracturing remains a possible mechanism for observed methane in aquifers overlying the Marcellus formation but asserts that we prematurely ascribed its cause to hydraulic mechanisms were leaky gas well casings and the possibility that hydraulic fracturing might generate new

  9. Coal: Long-term prospects remain very good

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerell, P.E. [ed.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide, it is the most economic and widespread fossil fuel available. The importance of coal will continue to grow to generate enough electricity to meet a rapidly increasing demand for energy. The first sign of a rising standard of living is access to a reliable and plentiful supply of electricity-and that means power generation from coal. The World Energy Conference in Tokyo last October called upon governments to {open_quotes}recognize that fossil fuels are likely to remain cost-competitive against alternatives over the next few decades and are set to play a greater and longer role than is widely thought.{close_quotes} Since coal, of all fossil fuels, has by far the most abundant reserves, this applies especially to coal. The International Energy Agency in Paris predicts a constant increase in the international hard-coal trade. While in 1973 (at the beginning of the first oil price crisis) only 8% of world hard coal produced was traded worldwide, this contribution increased to 11% by 1992 and may even grow to 16% between 1992 and 2010. Regarding volume, this would mean that the international hard-coal trade would more than double in the 18 years to 2010, i.e., from 403M to 852 M mt/yr. The 1995 update of the {open_quotes}Review of World Coal Trade,{close_quotes} published by the U.N. Economic Commission for Europe in Geneva, Switzerland, gives lower but still very considerable growth rate estimates: requirements from 3.508B (1990) to 3.982B mt (2010), production from 3.549B to 3994B mt, imports from 396M to 566M mt, and exports from 395M to 578M mt.

  10. Remaining-life estimation of boiler pressure parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borden, M.P.; Ellis, F.V. (ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, Chattanooga, TN (USA)); Miller, D.A.; Gladwin, D. (National Power, Leatherhead (UK))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the objectives of this project was to determine the effect of prior creep damage on the remaining life of base material and HAZ material subjected to pure fatigue and creep fatigue loading. Life assessment techniques for cyclic loading conditions are required due to the need to two shifts (two shifts on, one shift off) or load-follow for conventional fossil power plant as new nuclear units become available. Described herein are the results of work undertaken at ABB Combustion Engineering Systems in the US and South Western Regional Scientific Services Department and Central Electricity Research Laboratories of the Central Electricity Generating Board in the UK. An interrupted creep testing program was conducted on a single heat of 1Cr--1/2Mo steel to produce creep damaged or pre-crept material for the pure fatigue and creep-fatigue test programs. Metallographic examination of the pre-crept material revealed the primary creep damage mechanism was thermal softening for the base material and creep cavitation for the HAZ material. Creep rupture properties were measured for the virgin, aged, and pre-crept materials at the creep-fatigue test temperature of 535{degree}C to aid in interpretation of the effect of prior creep on creep-fatigue life. Creep-fatigue life prediction was performed using the linear life fraction rule, stress based and strain-based life fraction approaches. The remanent creep-fatigue of the HAZ material can be predicted by conducting a linear summation of creep life fraction and creep-fatigue life fraction. This approach is not applicable for base material. The life fraction method of predicting the as-received creep-fatigue endurance data based on a ductility exhaustion approach gave better prediction than a stress based approach. The implications of the current project results are discussed in terms of developing an assessment procedure for determining the creep-fatigue life of elevated temperature components. 21 refs., 54 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. The Jack Baskin School of Engineering In a rapidly changing world, the purpose of engineering remains constant: to use science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Botics & control Robots and robotic systems can impact and improve society on multiple levels. We combine systems is the ability to design computer systems that are more efficient and have increased data processing c. The world's challenges in energy, health, security and the environment require engineers who can apply

  12. As technology and generations in medical education change, what remains is the intersection between educator, learners, assessment and context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azzam, Amin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    series  of  articles   in   Academic  Medicine,  the  academic  medical  centers.  Non-­?specialist  examples  include  the  “Twelve   Tips”  series  of  articles  

  13. acromegaly remains under-recognized: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bees 144 Voices from the Small Cinemas: Beyond the Remaining Countries University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: This introduction to a special volume dedicated to...

  14. Decontamination and Management of Human Remains Following Incidents of Hazardous Chemical Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Bock, Robert Eldon [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Objective: To provide specific procedural guidance and resources for identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of compounds that may contaminate human remains resulting from chemical attack or release. Design: A detailed technical, policy, and regulatory review is summarized. Setting: Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present. Settings would include sites of transportation accidents, natural disasters, terrorist or military operations, mortuary affairs or medical examiner processing and decontamination points, and similar. Patients, Participants: While recommended procedures have not been validated with actual human remains, guidance has been developed from data characterizing controlled experiments with fabrics, materiel, and laboratory animals. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presentation of logic and specific procedures for remains management, protection and decontamination of mortuary affairs personnel, as well as decision criteria for determining when remains are sufficiently decontaminated so as to pose no chemical health hazard. Results: Established procedures and existing equipment/materiel available for decontamination and verification provide appropriate and reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from remains. Extensive characterization of issues related to remains decontamination indicates that supra-lethal concentrations of liquid chemical warfare agent VX may prove difficult to decontaminate and verify in a timely fashion. Specialized personnel can and should be called upon to assist with monitoring necessary to clear decontaminated remains for transport and processing. Conclusions: Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for remains processing and transport to the decedent s family and the continental United States can be followed.

  15. Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants – Interim Study FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Pardini, Allan F.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Jones, Anthony M.

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The most important criterion for cable performance is its ability to withstand a design-basis accident. With nearly 1000 km of power, control, instrumentation, and other cables typically found in an NPP, it would be a significant undertaking to inspect all of the cables. Degradation of the cable jacket, electrical insulation, and other cable components is a key issue that is likely to affect the ability of the currently installed cables to operate safely and reliably for another 20 to 40 years beyond the initial operating life. The development of one or more nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and supporting models that could assist in determining the remaining life expectancy of cables or their current degradation state would be of significant interest. The ability to nondestructively determine material and electrical properties of cable jackets and insulation without disturbing the cables or connections has been deemed essential. Currently, the only technique accepted by industry to measure cable elasticity (the gold standard for determining cable insulation degradation) is the indentation measurement. All other NDE techniques are used to find flaws in the cable and do not provide information to determine the current health or life expectancy. There is no single NDE technique that can satisfy all of the requirements needed for making a life-expectancy determination, but a wide range of methods have been evaluated for use in NPPs as part of a continuous evaluation program. The commonly used methods are indentation and visual inspection, but these are only suitable for easily accessible cables. Several NDE methodologies using electrical techniques are in use today for flaw detection but there are none that can predict the life of a cable. There are, however, several physical and chemical ptoperty changes in cable insulation as a result of thermal and radiation damage. In principle, these properties may be targets for advanced NDE methods to provide early warning of aging and degradation. Examples of such key indicators include changes in chemical structure, mechanical modulus, and dielectric permittivity. While some of these indicators are the basis of currently used technologies, there is a need to increase the volume of cable that may be inspected with a single measurement, and if possible, to develop techniques for in-situ inspection (i.e., while the cable is in operation). This is the focus of the present report.

  16. An Analytical Model for Predicting the Remaining Battery Capacity of Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    An Analytical Model for Predicting the Remaining Battery Capacity of Lithium-Ion Batteries Peng cycle-life tends to shrink significantly. The capacities of commercial lithium-ion batteries fade by 10 prediction model to estimate the remaining capacity of a Lithium-Ion battery. The proposed analytical model

  17. PREDICTION OF REMAINING LIFE OF POWER TRANSFORMERS BASED ON LEFT TRUNCATED AND RIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREDICTION OF REMAINING LIFE OF POWER TRANSFORMERS BASED ON LEFT TRUNCATED AND RIGHT CENSORED of the remaining life of high-voltage power transform- ers is an important issue for energy companies because of the need for planning maintenance and capital expenditures. Lifetime data for such transformers

  18. Fish remains (Elasmobranchii, Actinopterygii) from the Late Cretaceous of1 the Benue Trough, Nigeria2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish remains (Elasmobranchii, Actinopterygii) from the Late Cretaceous of1 the Benue Trough address: romain.vullo@univ-rennes1.fr9 10 Abstract11 Selachian and ray-finned fish remains from various Cenomanian­early Turonian and25 Maastrichtian) created opportunities for the dispersal of many marine fish

  19. Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This report contains information on Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program."

  20. Comparative analysis of remaining oil saturation in waterflood patterns based on analytical modeling and simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azimov, Anar Etibar

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In assessing the economic viability of a waterflood project, a key parameter is the remaining oil saturation (ROS) within each pattern unit. This information helps in identifying the areas with the highest ROS and thus ...

  1. Taphonomy of the faunal remains of a rural roman farmsite, San Giovanni di Ruoti, Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Cristi Assad

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hunter, B. A. , California State University at Sacramento Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. D. Gentry Steele The faunal remains from a rural Roman farmsite, San Giovanni di Ruoti, Italy, were used to perform a taphonomic analysis. The goal... remains. The taphonomic analysis included examination of the pig skeletal element representation, identification of the specific agents that modify bone, identification of the butchering techniques used at the site, and documentation of possible...

  2. Material Aging and Degradation Detection and Remaining Life Assessment for Plant Life Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Pitman, Stan G.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major factors that may impact long term operations is structural material degradation, Detecting materials degradation, estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of the component, and determining approaches to mitigating the degradation are important from the perspective of long term operations. In this study, multiple nondestructive measurement and monitoring methods were evaluated for their ability to assess the material degradation state. Metrics quantifying the level of damage from these measurements were defined, and evaluated for their ability to provide estimates of remaining life of the component. An example of estimating the RUL from nondestructive measurements of material degradation condition is provided.

  3. Power Outage 1. Remain Calm; provide assistance to others if necessary.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Power Outage 1. Remain Calm; provide assistance to others if necessary. 2. Report the outage, call. Campus-wide telephone communications will continue to operate during a power outage on standard phones. If emergency assistance is required, call UC Security on Extn 6111 and state "POWEr OUTAgE" or mobile 0800 823

  4. Prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in men in the United States, with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in men in the United States, with an estimated of death from cancer in men, with 33,720 estimated deaths (11% of all estimated deaths) in 2011 (REF. 1-year relative survival rate is essentially 100% based on 2001­2007 statistics2 . However, for patients

  5. A Bayesian Prognostic Algorithm for Assessing Remaining Useful Life of Nuclear Power Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Dixit, Mukul; Henager, Charles H.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A central issue in life extension for the current fleet of light water nuclear power reactors is the early detection and monitoring of significant materials degradation. To meet this need nondestructive measurement methods that are suitable for on-line, continuous, in-plant monitoring over extended time periods (months to years) are needed. A related issue is then, based on a condition assessment or degradation trend, to have the ability to estimate the remaining useful life based of components, structures and systems based on the available materials degradation information. Such measurement and modeling methods form the basis for a new range of advanced diagnostic and prognostic approaches. Prognostic methods that predict remaining life based on large crack growth, and phenomena that can be described by linear elastic fracture mechanics, have been reported by several researchers. The challenge of predicting remaining life for earlier phases of degradation is largely unsolved. Monitoring for early detection of materials degradation requires novel and enhanced sensors and data integration techniques. A recent review has considered the stages of degradation and sensing methods that can potentially be employed to detect and monitor early degradation for nuclear power plant applications. An experimental assessment of selected diagnostic techniques was also reported recently. However, the estimation of remaining useful life (RUL) determined from nondestructive diagnostic measurements for early degradation is still an unsolved problem. This present paper will discuss the application of Bayesian prognostic algorithms applied to the early degradation- life problem.

  6. `TVLSI-00029-2003.R1 An Analytical Model for Predicting the Remaining Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    . Reference [7] studied the battery discharge efficiency under different loading conditions and approximated`TVLSI-00029-2003.R1 1 An Analytical Model for Predicting the Remaining Battery Capacity of Lithium-Ion Batteries Peng Rong, Student Member, IEEE and Massoud Pedram, Fellow, IEEE Abstract -- Predicting

  7. Grantee Performance Required to Release the Hold on Remaining 50% of Obligated Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization Assistance Program Notice 10-05 deals with performance requirements for program grantees?states and U.S. territories?to receive the remaining 50% of obligated funds under the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act.

  8. An increase in the magnitude of the electric charge, Q, with c and G remaining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Socha, Jake

    -horizon area implies a violation of the generalized second law of thermo- dynamics, and so the fundamental the Hawking process, and, as Q changes, the temperature will also change. For the second law of thermo. Furthermore, equation (3) is based on standard gravitational theory. In a non- standard theory that involves

  9. Method and apparatus to predict the remaining service life of an operating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greitzer, Frank L. (Richland, WA); Kangas, Lars J. (West Richland, WA); Terrones, Kristine M. (Los Alamos, NM); Maynard, Melody A. (Richland, WA); Pawlowski, Ronald A. (West Richland, WA), Ferryman; Thomas A. (Richland, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA); Wilson, Bary W. (Coconut Creek, FL)

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and computer-based apparatus for monitoring the degradation of, predicting the remaining service life of, and/or planning maintenance for, an operating system are disclosed. Diagnostic information on degradation of the operating system is obtained through measurement of one or more performance characteristics by one or more sensors onboard and/or proximate the operating system. Though not required, it is preferred that the sensor data are validated to improve the accuracy and reliability of the service life predictions. The condition or degree of degradation of the operating system is presented to a user by way of one or more calculated, numeric degradation figures of merit that are trended against one or more independent variables using one or more mathematical techniques. Furthermore, more than one trendline and uncertainty interval may be generated for a given degradation figure of merit/independent variable data set. The trendline(s) and uncertainty interval(s) are subsequently compared to one or more degradation figure of merit thresholds to predict the remaining service life of the operating system. The present invention enables multiple mathematical approaches in determining which trendline(s) to use to provide the best estimate of the remaining service life.

  10. Globular clusters with the extended horizontal-branch as remaining cores of galaxy building blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Wook Lee; Hansung B. Gim; Chul Chung

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The relics of building blocks that made stellar halo and bulge are yet to be discovered unless they were completely disrupted throughout the history of the Galaxy. Here we suggest that about 25% of the Milky Way globular clusters have characteristics of the remaining cores of these early building blocks rather than genuine star clusters. They are clearly distinct from other normal globular clusters in the presence of extended horizontal-branch and multiple stellar populations, in mass (brightness), and most importantly in orbital kinematics. Based on this result, a three-stage formation picture of the Milky Way is suggested, which includes early mergers, collapse, and later accretion.

  11. Crack closure effects on fatigue crack growth thresholds and remaining life in an HSLA steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, J.A.; Mostovoy, S. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering; Chen, L. [Texas Instruments, Attleboro, MA (United States); Yankov, E.Y. [A. Finkl and Sons, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of crack closure on the near-threshold corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior of Mil S-24645 HSLA steel and its weld metal have been investigated in air, ASTM seawater at the free corrosion potential, and ASTM seawater at {minus}0.8V and {minus}1.0V (SCE) using frequencies of 10, 2, and 0.2 Hz, and a stress ratio, R = 0.1. Remaining life, in the presence and absence of crack closure, has been estimated as a function of applied stress range for a structure containing a 3-mm-deep surface semi-elliptical flaw.

  12. A little rain doesn't fix it: Farmers and ranchers remain cautious as drought continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A little rain doesn?t fix it Farmers and ranchers remain cautious as drought continues Summer 2012 tx H2O 11 ] Story by Danielle Kalisek Rains in the Brazos Valley early in 2012 helped this grass green up, but more rains are needed now... to help warm-season grasses. Photo by Danielle Kalisek. This might sound like a broken record, but it still rings true: Last year?s drought was historic the worst one-year drought in Texas? history. #31;ough recent rains in some parts of the state...

  13. MCA 22-3-801 - Human Skeletal Remains and Burial Site Protection Act | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump to: navigation,Remains |

  14. appearance of the remaining chapters. This Flash transmits the first installment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @JoinEnergyappearance of the remaining

  15. Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long-Term Degradation of Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoda (Japan)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical durability is not a single material property that can be uniquely measured. Instead it is the response to a host of coupled material and environmental processes whose rates are estimated by a combination of theory, experiment, and modeling. High-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is perhaps the most studied of any material yet there remain significant technical gaps regarding their chemical durability. The phenomena affecting the long-term performance of HLW glasses in their disposal environment include surface reactions, transport properties to and from the reacting glass surface, and ion exchange between the solid glass and the surrounding solution and alteration products. The rates of these processes are strongly influenced and are coupled through the solution chemistry, which is in turn influenced by the reacting glass and also by reaction with the near-field materials and precipitation of alteration products. Therefore, those processes must be understood sufficiently well to estimate or bound the performance of HLW glass in its disposal environment over geologic time-scales. This article summarizes the current state of understanding of surface reactions, transport properties, and ion exchange along with the near-field materials and alteration products influences on solution chemistry and glass reaction rates. Also summarized are the remaining technical gaps along with recommended approaches to fill those technical gaps.

  16. Lubrication Oil Condition Monitoring and Remaining Useful Life Prediction with Particle Filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junda Zhu; Jae M. Yoon; David He; Yongzhi Qu; Eric Bechhoefer

    In order to reduce the costs of wind energy, it is necessary to improve the wind turbine availability and reduce the operational and maintenance costs. The reliability and availability of a functioning wind turbine depend largely on the protective properties of the lubrication oil for its drive train subassemblies such as the gearbox and means for lubrication oil condition monitoring and degradation detection. The wind industry currently uses lubrication oil analysis for detecting gearbox and bearing wear but cannot detect the functional failures of the lubrication oils. The main purpose of lubrication oil condition monitoring and degradation detection is to determine whether the oils have deteriorated to such a degree that they no longer fulfill their functions. This paper describes a research on developing online lubrication oil condition monitoring and remaining useful life prediction using particle filtering technique and commercially available online sensors. It first introduces the lubrication oil condition monitoring and degradation detection for wind turbines. Viscosity and dielectric constant are selected as the performance parameters to model the degradation of lubricants. In particular, the lubricant performance evaluation and remaining useful life prediction of degraded lubrication oil with viscosity and dielectric constant data using particle filtering are presented. A simulation study based on lab verified models is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed technique. 1.

  17. have risen by about 15 percent. These increases, which tend to remain in the atmo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    States emitted 25 percent of the total global greenhouse gases. The largest contributors are electricity Warming Trend: How Climate Change Could Affect the Northwest W hile the debate over global warming global temperatures, that the earth is warm- ing. Over the last 100 years, the earth's average

  18. Why does Low-Luminosity AGN Fueling Remain an Unsolved Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Martini

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite many years of effort, observational studies have not found a strong correlation between the presence of any proposed fueling mechanism and low-luminosity AGN. After a discussion of the mass requirements for fueling, I summarize this observational work and provide a number of hypotheses for why the nature of AGN fueling has remained unresolved. In particular, I stress the potential importance of the increasing number of candidate fueling mechanisms with decreasing mass accretion rate, the relevant spatial scales for different fueling mechanisms, and the lifetime of an individual episode of nuclear accretion. The episodic AGN lifetime is a particularly relevant complication if it is comparable to or shorter than the time that the responsible fueling mechanisms are observationally detectable. I conclude with a number of relatively accessible areas for future investigation.

  19. An Assessment of Uncertainty in Remaining Life Estimation for Nuclear Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Fricke, Jacob M.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, several operating US light-water nuclear power reactors (LWRs) have moved to extended-life operations (from 40 years to 60 years), and there is interest in the feasibility of extending plant life to 80 years. Operating experience suggests that material degradation of structural components in LWRs (such as the reactor pressure vessel) is expected to be the limiting factor for safe operation during extended life. Therefore, a need exists for assessing the condition of LWR structural components and determining its remaining useful life (RUL). The ability to estimate RUL of degraded structural components provides a basis for determining safety margins (i.e., whether safe operation over some pre-determined time horizon is possible), and scheduling degradation management activities (such as potentially modifying operating conditions to limit further degradation growth). A key issue in RUL estimation is calculation of uncertainty bounds, which are dependent on current material state, as well as past and future stressor levels (such as time-at-temperature, pressure, and irradiation). This paper presents a preliminary empirical investigation into the uncertainty of RUL estimates for nuclear structural materials.

  20. Neutron measurements of the fuel remaining in the TMI II once-through steam generators (OTSG'S)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geelhood, B.D.; Abel, K.H.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polypropylene tubes containing a string of 18 copper rods were inserted into the lower head region and each J-leg of the two once-through steam generators (OTSG) of the unit two reactor at Three Mile Island. The object was to measure the neutron flux present in those regions and estimate the amount of residual fuel remaining in each OTSG. The neutron flux from any residual fuel induces a radioisotope, /sup 64/Cu, in the copper coupons. The /sup 64/Cu activity is detected by coincidence counting the two 511-keV gamma rays produced by the annihilation of the positron emitted in the decay of /sup 64/Cu. The copper coupons were placed between two 6-inch diameter, 6-inch long NaI(Tl) crystals and the electronics produced a coincidence count whenever the two gamma rays were uniquely detected. The net coincidence count is proportional to the amount of /sup 64/Cu activity in the coupon. This document discusses calculation methods, statistical methods, and results of this research. 3 figs., 30 tabs.

  1. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Buffered climate change effects in a Mediterranean pine species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Buffered climate change effects in a Mediterranean pine Abstract Within-range effects of climatic change on tree growth at the sub-regional scale remain poorly- growth responses to climate change, the role of drought becomes even more complex in shaping communities

  2. Do bark beetle remains in lake sediments correspond to severe outbreaks? A review of published and ongoing research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, R. Scott

    Watt e , Kelly Derr a , Michael F.J. Pisaric f , R. Scott Anderson g , Andrea R. Brunelle d outbreak episodes. Our synthesis suggests that the remains of pri- mary attack beetles are rarely preserved

  3. An analysis of the lithic remains from several ring middens in Crockett County, Texas: A study in site function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Bill

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE LITHIC REMAINS FROM SEVERAL RING MIDDENS IN CROCKETT COUNTY, TEXAS: A STUDY IN SITE FUNCTION A Thesis by WILLIAM EDWARD MOORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AKIM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 1980 Major Subject: Anthropology AN ANALYSIS OF THE LITHIC REMAINS FROM SEVERAL RING MIDDENS IN CROCKETT COUNTY, TEXAS: A STUDY IN SITE FUNCTION A Thesis by WILLIAM EDWARD MOORE Approved as to style...

  4. Apparatus for determining past-service conditions and remaining life of thermal barrier coatings and components having such coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Devitt, John William (Clifton Park, NY); Ruud, James Anthony (Delmar, NY); Brewer, Luke Nathaniel (Rexford, NY)

    2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for determining past-service conditions and/or remaining useful life of a component of a combustion engine and/or a thermal barrier coating ("TBC") of the component comprises a radiation source that provides the exciting radiation to the TBC to excite a photoluminescent ("PL") material contained therein, a radiation detector for detecting radiation emitted by the PL material, and means for relating a characteristic of an emission spectrum of the PL material to the amount of a crystalline phase in the TBC, thereby inferring the past-service conditions or the remaining useful life of the component or the TBC.

  5. Proceedings: EPRI Workshop on Condition and Remaining Life Assessment of Hot Gas Path Components of Combustion Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The severity of modern combustion turbine operation is a reflection of industry competition to achieve higher thermal efficiency. This competitive stance has resulted in new turbine designs and material systems that have at times outpaced condition and remaining life assessment (CARLA) technology. These proceedings summarize a two-day workshop on CARLA technology for hot section components of large combustion turbines.

  6. Volume rendering at interactive frame rates remains a chal-lenge, especially with today's increasingly large datasets. We pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawfis, Roger

    Abstract Volume rendering at interactive frame rates remains a chal- lenge, especially with today's increasingly large datasets. We pro- pose a framework, using concepts from Image-Based Rendering (IBR), that decreases the required framerate for the volume ren- derer significantly. All the volume renderer needs

  7. Volume rendering at interactive frame rates remains a chal-lenge, especially with today's increasingly large datasets. We pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Klaus

    1 Abstract Volume rendering at interactive frame rates remains a chal- lenge, especially with today's increasingly large datasets. We pro- pose a framework, using concepts from Image-Based Rendering (IBR), that decreases the required framerate for the volume ren- derer significantly. All the volume renderer needs

  8. of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of hydrogen-powered cars," he says. But a major hurdle remains: the cost of platinum metal needed to make fuel cells efficient. Fuel cells work by combining hydrogen gas with oxygen from the air for hydrogen-powered cars in mass production facilities," says SFU chemistry professor Steve Holdcroft, who

  9. eleCTriCAl AnD CoMPUTer engineering 31 foundation needed to remain effective,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    eleCTriCAl AnD CoMPUTer engineering · 31 foundation needed to remain effective, take on new fundamental areas of mathematics, science, and electrical engineering that are required to support specialized-the-art specialty areas in electrical engineering. This is implemented through our senior electives. Students

  10. A Joint Programme of: "Water will remain a strategic resource for countries worldwide, and the quest for water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    the distinction between water as a resource and water as a service and thus lack the necessary institutionalA Joint Programme of: "Water will remain a strategic resource for countries worldwide, and the quest for water sustainability will become increasingly intricate and delicate. A keen understanding

  11. Job Postings The question was raised about the minimum time a position should remain posted before it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    Job Postings 121610 The question was raised about the minimum time a position should remain: EXTERNAL JOB POSTINGS1, 2 · Staff ­ one week minimum · Administrative ­ two weeks minimum · Faculty ­ two weeks minimum 1 The recruitment process for EXTERNAL job postings may be opened to: all

  12. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Log NERSC-8 Trinity Benchmarks Change Log 09032013 Correction applied to MiniDFT web-page (to remove inconsistency with MiniDFT README). Capability Improvement measurements...

  13. Investigations of late archaic coprolites: pollen and macrofossil remains from Hinds Cave (41VV456), Val Verde County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Sherrian Kay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KAY EDWARDS Approved as to style and content by: aughn M. Bryant, J (+air of Comm' te r &) Merrill H. Sweet (Member) p' Vaughn M. Br ant, J (Head of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT Investigations of Late Archaic Coprolites: Pollen... and Macrofossil Remains from Hinds Cave (41VV456), Val Verde County, Texas. (May 1990) Sherrian Ray Edwards, B. A. , University of Texas Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Vaughn M. Bryant, Jr. The analysis of desiccated human fecal material (coprolites) left...

  14. Old Socorro Mission: an osteobiological analysis of the skeletal remains from the 1982-1985 field excavations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raisor, Michelle Jeanette

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 119 Skull 38 exhibiting "saddle nose". 122 FIGURE Page 19 20 Cranial deformation of Burial 18. Bifid sacral hiatus of Burial 36. 126 129 21 Asymmetry of mandibular condyles (Burial 20). 132 22 Congenital absence of the left transverse process... River, it remained in constant use until A. D. 1829 when the church was severely damaged by flood waters and abandoned (Figure 1). Originally the small mission was built to administer to the Spanish families and the Piro Indians that accompanied...

  15. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  16. THE PERUVIAN fl SHERIES 97 I 98 THE GEOGR.'\\PHICAL REVIEW The peoples of many maritime countries that heretofore have depended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the government is seeking to improve the diet of the people by making lower-priced protein foods available, thus of these conditions, anadromous species of fish are lacking. However, in the lower reaches and estuaries of some

  17. 3.-0BSERVATl ONS UP0N FISHES AND FISH-CULTURE. Materials of the kind included in this article have heretofore appeared in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the auxiliary station at Havre de Grace. This he attributes to the better lighting of the Battery hatching house, lieutonant U. S. Navy, steamer W. de C. Ravenel, Battery station and Havre H. M. Smith, M. D., Washington, D that the fry hatched at Battery station seemed stronger and in better general condition than those

  18. Changing Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a wide range of academic areas are investigating the different compo- nents. More recently, they are taking information gleaned from the global climate models and applying them to research questions pertaining to Texas. Dr. Bruce Mc...Carl, Regents Professor of agricultural economics at Texas A&M University, has researched the economics of climate change for the last 20 years. McCarl, as a lead CHANGING CLIMATES tx H2O | pg. McCarl ] tx H2O | pg. 4 Changing Climates author...

  19. Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery.

  20. Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouhani, S.Z.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery. 35 figs.

  1. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to perform detailed hourly impact studies of building adaptation and mitigation strategies on energy use and electricity peak demand within the context of the entire grid and economy.

  2. Climate Change: The Sun's Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2007-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The sun's role in the earth's recent warming remains controversial even though there is a good deal of evidence to support the thesis that solar variations are a very significant factor in driving climate change both currently and in the past. This precis lays out the background and data needed to understand the basic scientific argument behind the contention that variations in solar output have a significant impact on current changes in climate. It also offers a simple, phenomenological approach for estimating the actual-as opposed to model dependent-magnitude of the sun's influence on climate.

  3. Remote Methodology used at B Plant Hanford to Map High Radiation and Contamination Fields and Document Remaining Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote radiation mapping system using the Gammacam{trademark} (AIL Systems Inc. Trademark) with real-time response was used in deactivating the B Plant at Hanford to produce digitized images showing actual radiation fields and dose rates. Deployment of this technology has significantly reduced labor requirements, decreased personnel exposure, and increased the accuracy of the measurements. Personnel entries into the high radiation/contamination areas was minimized for a dose savings of 30 Rem (.3 Seivert) and a cost savings of $640K. In addition, the data gathered was utilized along with historical information to estimate the amount of remaining hazardous waste in the process cells. The B Plant facility is a canyon facility containing 40 process cells which were used to separate cesium and strontium from high level waste. The cells and vessels are contaminated with chemicals used in the separation and purification processes. Most of the contaminants have been removed but the residual contamination from spills in the cells and heels in the tanks contribute to the localized high radioactivity. The Gammacam{trademark} system consists of a high density terbium-activated scintillating glass detector coupled with a digitized video camera. Composite images generated by the system are presented in pseudo color over a black and white image. Exposure times can be set from 10 milliseconds to 1 hour depending on the field intensity. This information coupled with process knowledge is then used to document the hazardous waste remaining in each cell. Additional uses for this radiation mapping system would be in support of facilities stabilization and deactivation activities at Hanford or other DOE sites. The system is currently scheduled for installation and mapping of the U Plant in 1999. This system is unique due to its portability and its suitability for use in high dose rate areas.

  4. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  5. Changing Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

  6. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference MaterialsChange Log

  7. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference MaterialsChange

  8. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference6-02-01Change Number

  9. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference6-02-01Change

  10. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference6-02-01Change20-02-01

  11. Stream ecosystem responses to the 2007 spring freeze in the Southeastern United States: unexpected effects of climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Roberts, Brian J [ORNL; Hill, Walter [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some expected changes in climate resulting from human greenhouse gas emissions are clear and well documented, but others may be harder to predict because they involve extreme weather events or heretofore unusual combinations of weather patterns. One recent example of unusual weather that may become more frequent with climate change occurred in early spring 2007 when a large Arctic air mass moved into the eastern United States following a very warm late winter. In this paper, we document effects of this freeze event on Walker Branch, a well-studied stream ecosystem in eastern Tennessee. The 2007 spring freeze killed newly grown leaf tissues in the forest canopy, dramatically increasing the amount of light reaching the stream. Light levels at the stream surface were sustained at levels considerably above those normal for the late spring and summer months due to the incomplete recovery of canopy leaf area. Increased light levels caused a cascade of ecological effects in the stream beginning with considerably higher (two-three times) rates of gross primary production (GPP) during the late spring and summer months when normally low light levels severely limit stream GPP. Higher rates of stream GPP in turn resulted in higher rates of nitrate (NO3-) uptake by the autotrophic community and lower NO3- concentrations in stream water. Higher rates of stream GPP in summer also resulted in higher growth rates of a dominant herbivore, the snail Elimia clavaeformis. Typically, during summer months net NO3- uptake and snail growth rates are zero to negative; however, in 2007 uptake and growth were maintained at moderate levels. These results show how changes in forest vegetation phenology can have dramatic effects on stream productivity at multiple trophic levels and on nutrient cycling as a result of tight coupling of forest and stream ecosystems. Thus, climate change-induced changes in canopy structure and phenology may lead to large effects on stream ecosystems in the future.

  12. Funding for adaptation to climate change : the case of Surat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Toral

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for cities to adapt to climate change is widely acknowledged, yet the question of adaptation finance remains uncertain. Unable to access global climate funds, cities must seek out alternative sources to support ...

  13. Session 35 - Panel: Remaining US Disposition Issues for Orphan or Small Volume Low Level and Low Level Mixed Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blauvelt, Richard [Navarro Engineering Research Inc. (United States); Small, Ken [Doe Nevada (United States); Gelles, Christine [DOE EM HQ (United States); McKenney, Dale [Fluor Hanford (United States); Franz, Bill [LATA Portsmouth (United States); Loveland, Kaylin [Energy Solutions Inc. (United States); Lauer, Mike [Waste Control Specialists (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Faced with closure schedules as a driving force, significant progress has been made during the last 2 years on the disposition of DOE mixed waste streams thought previously to be problematic. Generators, the Department of Energy and commercial vendors have combined to develop unique disposition paths for former orphan streams. Recent successes and remaining issues will be discussed. The session will also provide an opportunity for Federal agencies to share lessons learned on low- level and mixed low-level waste challenges and identify opportunities for future collaboration. This panel discussion was organized by PAC member Dick Blauvelt, Navarro Research and Engineering Inc who served as co-chair along with Dave Eaton from INL. In addition, George Antonucci, Duratek Barnwell and Rich Conley, AFSC were invited members of the audience, prepared to contribute the Barnwell and DOD perspective to the issues as needed. Mr. Small provide information regarding the five year 20K M3 window of opportunity at the Nevada Test Site for DOE contractors to dispose of mixed waste that cannot be received at the Energy Solutions (Envirocare) site in Utah because of activity levels. He provided a summary of the waste acceptance criteria and the process sites must follow to be certified to ship. When the volume limit or time limit is met, the site will undergo a RCRA closure. Ms. Gelles summarized the status of the orphan issues, commercial options and the impact of the EM reorganization on her program. She also announced that there would be a follow-on meeting in 2006 to the very successful St. Louis meeting of last year. It will probably take place in Chicago in July. Details to be announced. Mr. McKenney discussed progress made at the Hanford Reservation regarding disposal of their mixed waste inventory. The news is good for the Hanford site but not good for the rest of the DOE complex since shipment for out of state of both low level and low level mixed waste will continue to be prohibited until the completion of a new NEPA study. This is anticipated to take several years. Bill Franz from Portsmouth and Dave Eaton representing the INL provided the audience with information regarding some of the problematic mixed waste streams at their respective sites. Portsmouth has some unique radiological issues with isotopes such as Tc-99 while the INL is trying to deal with mixed waste in the 10-100 nCi/g range. Kaylin Loveland spoke of the new,Energy Solutions organization and provided information on mixed waste treatment capabilities at the Clive site. Mike Lauer described the licensing activities at the WCS site in Texas where they are trying to eventually have disposal capabilities for Class A, B and C mixed waste from both DOE and the commercial sector. The audience included about 75 WM'06 attendees who asked some excellent questions and provided an active and informative exchange of information on the topic. (authors)

  14. Greenwood, Foster, and Romani: Archaeological Study of CA-VEN-110, California; and Roeder: Archaeological Study of CA-VEN-110, Ventura, California: Fish Remains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, John R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    procedures had been followed by Ventura County, the Corps ofStudy of CA-VEN-110, Ventura, California: Fish Remains. MarkLemos, and Jamie Karl V, Ventura County, et al,. Central

  15. Study of changes in the Solar Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M N Vahia

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that the local environment of the Sun is a complex one with the presence of several supernova shock bubbles and interstellar clouds. Even within this environment, the Sun is moving with a velocity of about 15 km/s toward the interior of the galaxy. We examine the changes in the local ISM environment experienced by the Sun in the past and then discuss the interaction of the Sun with these different environments. Lastly, we inquire how this must have changed the cosmic ray environment of the earth since this remains one of the few methods to test the changes in the local ISM environment over astronomical time scales. %

  16. Vertebrate remains from the Wilson-Leonard site (41WM235), Williamson County, Texas: Holocene animal exploitation in central Texas prehistory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Barry Wayne

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VERTEBRATE REMAINS FROM THE WILSON-LEONARD SITE (41WM235L WILLIAMSON COUNTY, TEXAS: HOLOCENE ANIMAL EXPLOITATION IN CENTRAL TEXAS PREHISTORY A Thesis by BARRY WAYNE BAKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 1994 Major Subject: Anthropology VERTEBRATE REMAINS FROM THE WILSON-LEONARD SITE (41WM235), WILLIAMSON COUNTY, TEXAS: HOLOCENE ANIMAL EXPLOITATION IN CENTRAL TEXAS...

  17. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  18. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  19. The Lyons Creek boat remains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Robert Stephen

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transportation. Only a few other American colonial-era small craft have as yet been studied, some of which are the Brown's P*y 1 'S*thC1', thEm'Lk Champlain, the Hart's Cove wzeck in New Hampshire, the J R' b t 1 V' g' ', d tl* ~Sk Massachusetts (Albright..., beginning at its mouth, is 9ust over a mile, while the drainage system extends for several miles east of Maryland Route 4. Near the mouth of Lyons Creek, the northern shore is a wetland that is reduced to a grassy mudflat at ebb tide. Only a slender...

  20. Diesel prices remain fairly stable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel prices continueU.S.DieselDiesel

  1. Environmental Change Institute Environmental Change Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Environmental Change Institute 2012/13 eci Environmental Change Institute #12;ii Environmental 06 Educating environmental leaders 08 Centre for interdisciplinary doctoral training 10 A thriving, Dumfriesshire (ECI) #12;1 The Environmental Change Institute has 21 years' experience in helping governments

  2. DEWEK Wind Energy Conference 2012 Category: 4. Simulation models BACKWARD EXTRAPOLATION OF SHORT-TIME MEASUREMENT DATA FOR A REMAINING SERVICE LIFE ESTIMATION OF WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    DEWEK Wind Energy Conference 2012 Category: 4. Simulation models 1 BACKWARD EXTRAPOLATION OF SHORT-TIME MEASUREMENT DATA FOR A REMAINING SERVICE LIFE ESTIMATION OF WIND TURBINES Dipl.-Ing. René Kamieth, Prof. Dr, Germany, Tel.: +49-(0)30-314-23603, Fax: +49-(0)30-314-26131 Summary Wind turbines built in the last

  3. Remaining FY13 Compensatory (COMP) Bank Balances in ITAMS This is to remind you that compensatory (COMP) hours may not be carried over from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Remaining FY13 Compensatory (COMP) Bank Balances in ITAMS This is to remind you that compensatory week that Fiscal Year 2013 COMP hours can be used via ITAMS. Approved timesheets for the June 9-15th University policy, hours may not be recorded in units of less than one-quarter hour. ITAMS only allows work

  4. Remaining FY14 Compensatory (COMP) Bank Balances in ITAMS This is to remind you that compensatory (COMP) hours may not be carried over from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Remaining FY14 Compensatory (COMP) Bank Balances in ITAMS This is to remind you that compensatory week that Fiscal Year 2014 COMP hours can be used via ITAMS. Approved timesheets for the June 8-14th that per University policy, hours may not be recorded in units of less than one-quarter hour. ITAMS only

  5. http://www.swissinfo.org/eng/search/detail/Bird_flu_ban_remains_despite_migration_shift.html?siteSect=881& sid=7420407&cKey=1168586962000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    , warmer than average temperatures in the Atlantic and Mediterranean ­ all pumping heat into the atmosphere_flu_ban_remains_despite_migration_shift.html?siteSect=881& sid=7420407&cKey=1168586962000 Monday 05.03.2007 Climate warning resonates in Switzerland weather heralded a bumper year for bugs and ticks. He said a cold snap in February or March would still

  6. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  7. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  8. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  9. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

  10. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  11. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 118-C-3:3, 105-C French Drains, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-016

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The 118-C-3:3 french drains received condensate from the steam heating system in the 105-C Reactor Building. The 118-C-3:3 french drain meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  12. Phased Construction Completion Report for Bldg. K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  13. Phased Construction Completion Report for Building K-1401 of the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland S.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phased Construction Completion Report documents the demolition of Bldg. K-1401, Maintenance Building, addressed in the Action Memorandum for the Remaining Facilities Demolition Project at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2003a) as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 non-time-critical removal action. The objectives of the removal action (DOE 2003a) - to eliminate the source of potential contamination, to eliminate the threat of potential future releases, and/or to eliminate the threats to the general public and the environment - were met. The end state of this action is for the slab to remain with all penetrations sealed and grouted or backfilled. The basement and pits remain open. There is residual radiological and polychlorinated biphenyl contamination on the slab and basement. A fixative was applied to the area on the pad contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. Interim land-use controls will be maintained until final remediation decisions are made under the Zone 2 Record of Decision (DOE 2005a).

  14. Spatio-temporal patterns of Holocene environmental change in southern Sicily Camilla Cal a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    Paleohydrology Holocene Climate change Paleoecology Few examples of natural forest remain near the Mediterranean Pasta e , Boris Vannière c , Willy Tinner a a Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research & Institute coast. Therefore, it is difficult to study how coastal forests respond to climatic change

  15. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  16. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 600-233 Waste Site, Vertical Pipe Near 100-B Electrical Laydown Area, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 600-233 waste site consisted of three small-diameter pipelines within the 600-232 waste site, including previously unknown diesel fuel supply lines discovered during site remediation. The 600-233 waste site has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  17. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  18. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F7, 141-M Building Septic Tank, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-040

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1607-F7, 141-M Building Septic Tank waste site was a septic tank and drain field that received sanitary sewage from the former 141-M Building. Remedial action was performed in August and November 2005. The results of verification sampling demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations support future unrestricted land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario. These results also show that residual concentrations support unrestricted future use of shallow zone soil and that contaminant levels remaining in the soil are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  19. Mainstreaming climate change adaptation into urban development : lessons from two South African cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Leanne A. (Leanne Andrea)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a risk that urban climate change adaptation planning - often led by city environmental agencies - will remain isolated from ongoing city decision-making processes, and thus irrelevant, unless adaptation is ...

  20. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  1. Change in historic buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Chien-Ni

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Change in historic buildings is inevitable. If these changes are not well-managed, the cityscape will be threatened because a city is composed of buildings. A good city should combine both growth and preservation. Controlling ...

  2. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  3. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  4. programs in climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

  5. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  6. Dynamics of the stratospheric circulation response to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamics of the stratospheric circulation response to climate change Michael Sigmond, University the world have employed chemistry climate models (CCMs) to predict the future stratospheric dynamical (Eyring et al., 2005). Despite the abundance of simula- tions, however, many dynamical issues remain

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, K.L.; Ramuhali, P.; Brenchley, D.L.; Coble, J.B.; Hashemian, H.M.; Konnick, R.; Ray, S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary [partial] The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, and NDE instrumentation development from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), universities, commercial NDE service vendors and cable manufacturers, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  9. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-C-9:1 Main Process Sewer Collection Line, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-C-9:1 main process sewer pipeline, also known as the twin box culvert, was a dual reinforced process sewer that collected process effluent from the 183-C and 190-C water treatment facilities, discharging at the 132-C-2 Outfall. For remedial action purposes, the 100-C-9:1 waste site was subdivided into northern and southern sections. The 100-C-9:1 subsite has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  10. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-44:2, Discovery Pipeline Near 108-F Building, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-F-44:2 waste site is a steel pipeline that was discovered in a junction box during confirmatory sampling of the 100-F-26:4 pipeline from December 2004 through January 2005. The 100-F-44:2 pipeline feeds into the 100-F-26:4 subsite vitrified clay pipe (VCP) process sewer pipeline from the 108-F Biology Laboratory at the junction box. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  11. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-D-9 site is the former location of an underground storage tank used for holding fuel for the 184-DA Boiler House. Results of soil-gas samples taken from six soil-gas probes in a rectangle around the site the tank had been removed from concluded that there were no volatile organic compounds at detectable levels in the area. The 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  12. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-B2 Septic System and 100-B-14:2 Sanitary Sewer System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-055

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1607-B2 waste site is a former septic system associated with various 100-B facilities, including the 105-B, 108-B, 115-B/C, and 185/190-B buildings. The site was evaluated based on confirmatory results for feeder lines within the 100-B-14:2 subsite and determined to require remediation. The 1607-B2 waste site has been remediated to achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  13. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Kansas: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of Kansas. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. Several major technical insights for state and Federal policymakers and regulators can be reached from this analysis. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to the nation`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, Kansas oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit the state of Kansas and the nation as a whole.

  14. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Kansas and Oklahoma. Volume 5, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the states of Kansas, Illinois and Oklahoma for five other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to Kansas` known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technology, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could have even greater benefits to the state and the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, and energy security will benefit both the state of Kansas, Illinois and Oklahoma and the nation as a whole.

  15. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Oklahoma: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the state of Oklahoma. Individual reports for seven other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. Several major technical insights for state and Federal policymakers and regulators can be reached from this analysis. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to Oklahoma`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, Oklahoma oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase and improvement in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit both the state of Oklahoma and the nation as a whole.

  16. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of die IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic, social, and political benefits of improved oil recovery to the nation as a whole. Individual reports for major oil producing states have been separately published. The individual state reports include California, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to the nation`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technoloy, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could leave even greater benefits to the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, domestic oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase and improvement in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, energy security will benefit the nation as a whole.

  17. CHANGING OUR WAYS SCOTLAND'S CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAMME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction 15 Overview of emission trends at sector level 15 Energy sector 18 Transport sector 29 Agriculture, forestry and land use sector 37 Business sector 44 Residential sector 51 Public sector 56 Waste management in light of sound scientific evidence that Scotland's climate will change significantly over the coming

  18. Change Control Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides a suggested approach and uniform guidance for managing project and contract changes through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3B. No cancellation.

  19. Climate Change and Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rottle, Nancy; Alberti, Marina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ments and infrastructure; water shortages and higher tem-changes will also affect water availability and depriveof mil- lions of people of water. Food security will also be

  20. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  1. Leadership Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For changing behavior among employees, leaders in Federal agencies should visibly communicate their own commitments to sustainability in the workplace. Such visible leadership will help achieve...

  2. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic, social, and political benefits of improved oil recovery to the nation as a whole. Individual reports for major oil producing states have been separately published. The individual state reports include California, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). TORIS is a tested and verified system maintained and operated by the Department of Energy`s Bartlesville Project Office. The TORTS system was used to evaluate over 2,300 major reservoirs in a consistent manner and on an individual basis, the results of which have been aggregated to arrive at the national total.

  3. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  4. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  5. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    net impact of climate change on agriculture in California,of Climate Change on California Agriculture. ” PresentationEffects of Climate Change on California Agriculture Positive

  6. Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

  7. Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management in Wisconsinin Wisconsin NASECA February 3, 2011 David S. Liebl #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing climate · Expected impacts · Adaptation strategies #12;Visible Light Energy in = Energy out Absorbed

  8. Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994 that will address climate change. Scientists tell us that the climate of the earth is warming, and that the warming into the foundation of the world economy and into the everyday things we do (driving) and use (electricity). Thus

  9. Configuration Change Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Nathaniel

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    significant benefit to a company. Changes come at various stages in the lifecycle of a product. Understanding the impact at the specific stage in a product lifecycle will minimize the impact to the business. Change should be approached as a planned...

  10. The climate change and energy security nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Marcus Dubois [George Washington University; Gulledge, Jay [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the impacts of climate change on national and interna-tional security has grown as a research field, particularly in the last five years. Within this broad field, academic scholarship has concentrated primarily on whether climate change is, or may become, a driver of violent conflict. This relationship remains highly contested. However, national security policy and many non-governmental organizations have identified climate change as a threat multiplier in conflict situations. The U.S. Department of Defense and the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defense have incorporated these findings into strategic planning documents such as the Quadrennial Defense Review and the Strategic Defence and Security Review. In contrast to the climate-conflict nexus, our analysis found that academic scholarship on the climate change and energy security nexus is small and more disciplinarily focused. In fact, a search of social science litera-ture found few sources, with a significant percentage of these works attribut-able to a single journal. Assuming that policymakers are more likely to rely on broader social science literature than technical or scientific journals, this leaves a limited foundation. This then begged the question: what are these sources? We identified a body of grey literature on the nexus of climate change and energy security of a greater size than the body of peer-reviewed social science literature. We reviewed fifty-eight recent reports, issue briefs, and transcripts to better understand the nexus of climate change and energy security, as well as to gain insight about the questions policymakers need answered by those undertaking the research. In this article, we describe the nature of the sources reviewed, highlight possible climate change and energy security linkages found within those sources, identify emerging risks, and offer conclusions that can guide further research.

  11. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  12. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  13. Sample Changes and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EIA-914 Survey and HPDI. Figure 2 shows how this could change apparent production. The blue line shows the reported sample production as it would normally be reported under the...

  14. Lights, Conformational Change... Action!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the flashes, they collected the x-ray scattering data. Analysis of the data revealed the build-up of large conformational changes between the two structures at the nanometer...

  15. Changing gender role attitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the Netherlands, Italy, Ireland and Spain). Third, the ISSP data pro- vides a sufficient time span (14 years, with surveys in 1988, 1994 and 2002) for the systematic investigation of the underlying causes of attitudinal change. Attitudinal Changes in Great Britain... and Spain. Unfortunately, in both Italy and Spain survey participation was only for two of the three waves, with Italy not participating in 2002 and Spain not participating in 1988. The per- centages reflect the combined attitudes of men and women, although...

  16. Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

  17. Debating Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Debating Climate Change explores, both theoretically and empirically, how people argue about climate change and link to each other through various elements in their arguments. As science is a central issue in the debate, the arguments of scientists and the interpretations and responses of non-scientists are important aspects of the analysis. The book first assesses current thinking about the climate change debate and current participants in the debates surrounding the issue, as well as a brief history of various groups’ involvements. Chapters 2 and 3 distill and organize various ways of framing the climate change issue. Beginning in Chapter 4, a modified classical analysis of the elements carried in an argument is used to identify areas and degrees of disagreement and agreement. One hundred documents, drawn from a wide spectrum of sources, map the topic and debate space of the climate change issue. Five elements of each argument are distilled: the authority of the writer, the evidence presented, the formulation of the argument, the worldview presented, and the actions proposed. Then a social network analysis identifies elements of the arguments that point to potential agreements. Finally, the book suggests mechanisms by which participants in the debate can build more general agreements on elements of existing agreement.

  18. Sea level change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, M.F. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) 1995 Scientific Assessment, Chapter 7. Sea Level Change, presents a modest revision of the similar chapter in the 1990 Assessment. Principal conclusions on observed sea-level change and the principal terms in the sea-level equation (ocean thermal expansion, glaciers, ice sheets, and land hydrology), including our knowledge of the present-day (defined as the 20th Century) components of sea-level rise, and projections of these for the future, are presented here. Some of the interesting glaciological problems which are involved in these studies are discussed in more detail. The emphasis here is on trends over decades to a century, not on shorter variations nor on those of the geologic past. Unfortunately, some of the IPCC projections had not been agreed at the time of writing of this paper, and these projections will not be given here. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  20. Global climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, R.A.; Woodwell, G.M.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. It discusses the expected changes from the increases in trace gases and the extent to which the expected changes can be found in the climate record and in the retreat of glaciers. The use of ice cores in correlating atmospheric composition and climate is discussed. The response of terrestrial ecosystems as a biotic feedback is discussed. Possible responses are discussed, including reduction in fossil-fuel use, controls on deforestation, and reforestation. International aspects, such as the implications for developing nations, are addressed.

  1. Status of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status of Climate Change 2013 CaTee Conference San Antonio 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Menu for Today • IPCC 2013: Assessment Report #5 • Facts about Climate Change... • Who will Win, Who will Lose • What Needs to be Done ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 IPCC #5 • No great surprises - Sharper language • Uncertainties are still large • Essentially...

  2. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

  3. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  4. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  5. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Griffen, Charles W. (Mason, OH)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  6. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  7. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  8. Strategies for Achieving Institutional Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many strategies—including those derived from Institutional Change Principles–may be used to effect institutional change in support of energy and sustainability objectives.

  9. The Bridges of Social Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    between disciplines to create new solutions and promote social change. Masthead RICHARD J. GELLES, PH

  10. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  11. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  12. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  13. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    climate and cultural changes are observed in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East [e.g., Bookman et1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 112 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2012) 112:769-789 DOI

  14. Climate Change Response

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEAN AIR ACT §CleantechClimate ChangeInterior

  15. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean0ClimateClimate Change

  16. Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yannan

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

  17. Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yannan

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

  18. Animal representations and animal remains at Çatalhöyük

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Nerissa; Meece, Stephanie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Level VII). Volcano above town plan, leopard skin above geometric design, or other representations? Level VI paintings lack fully convinc­ ing animal depictions. A patch of painting on the east wall of building VIA.66 includes a number of geomet­ ric... the centrepieces of the north walls of two rather similar buildings. In a sense they parallel the situation in the faunal assemblage, where cattle are not terribly common, but figure prominently in cer­ emonial consumption (see Russell & Martin, Volume 4...

  19. TIPS TO REMAIN SLIM * Set realistic goals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    a week. * Aerobic exercise like jogging, swimming, cycling, running accelerates weight loss. Consult in the morning. * Go for skimmed milk. * As far as possible avoid weight loss supplements. * When you have a physician before starting any weight loss program. Aerobic exercise combined with healthy eating

  20. Geothermal developers remain optimistic | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of a downhole wireline tool toEnergyWhile

  1. Los Alamos supercomputer remains fastest in world

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwardspublicexceedsScientists monitorNano 50

  2. Today`s world of FPSOs changes quickly. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovie, P.M. [Bluewater Offshore Production Systems Ltd., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global fleet of Floating Production, Storage and Offloading units (FPSOs) has grown dramatically in recent years. Technical innovations and shifts in contracting strategy typify recent FPSO fleet additions in the North Sea, implying similar changes for the rest of the world. FPSOs are being developed to handle higher pressures and more wells. One example of FPSO versatility is the ability to accommodate a large range of water depths. Recent advances have resulted in increased storage efficiency and improved overall value. Ways of calculating comparisons are proposed here. The effects of these shifts in capabilities and changes in contracting philosophy all contribute to FPSO fleet growth, but a major stimulant for unit additions remains the acceleration of time to first oil that FPSOs offer. This article identifies the world`s FPSO fleet, and discusses recent technical and business changes.

  3. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron-Gafford, Greg

    PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS BE USED TO PREDICT in photosynthesis, and thus substrate supply, influence the rate of ecosystem respiration (Re). Further- more in photosynthesis might result in concomitant changes in both the rate, and temperature-sensitivity, of Re. Re

  4. Oceanic oxygen changes as a bellwether of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Oceanic oxygen changes as a bellwether of climate change Term paper in Biogeochemistry@ethz.ch] Tutor: Prof. Dr. Nicholas Gruber [nicholas.gruber@env.ethz.ch] Abstract The response of oceanic oxygen of climate change. Recent publications indicate that the oceanic oxygen outgassing is substaintially larger

  5. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  6. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Climate Change Climate Change September 16, 2014 C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers Women clean energy leaders convene in Boston for the Women in Clean Energy...

  7. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of climate change, energy security and economic stability.DoD is improving U.S. energy security and national security.www.greenpacks.org • Energy Security & Climate Change:

  8. Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Thomas R.

    Whether the characteristics of tropical cyclones have changed or will change in a warming climate — and if so, how — has been the subject of considerable investigation, often with conflicting results. Large amplitude ...

  9. [The Journal of Geology, 2004, volume 112, p. 91110] No copyright is claimed for this article. It remains in the public domain. Geochemical Discrimination of Five Pleistocene Lava-Dam Outburst-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poreda, Robert J.

    . It remains in the public domain. 91 Geochemical Discrimination of Five Pleistocene Lava-Dam Outburst- Flood@usgs.gov) A B S T R A C T Pleistocene basaltic lava dams and outburst-flood deposits in the western Grand Canyon outburst-flood deposit came from a common source, a lava dam. With these data, it is possible

  10. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  11. 4, 28752899, 2007 Climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 4, 2875­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Climate change impact­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  12. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  13. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  14. January 28, 2010 Romania: Twenty Years after History Changed its Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    January 28, 2010 Romania: Twenty Years after History Changed its Course "Romania is not free," said Ambassador Simona Mirela Miculescu, Permanent Representative of Romania to the United Nations will always remain faithful to that environment." Miculescu discussed Romania's transition after the fall

  15. Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLIMS HIGH ICE Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change Development and population of a digital glacier data inventory #12;Skeletal remains of what was a debris-covered glacier near Mt. Everest J.S. Kargel, April 2001 #12;#12;#12;Global Land Ice Measurements

  16. Changes in Snag Populations in Northern Arizona Mixed-Conifer and Ponderosa Pine Forests, 19972002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changes in Snag Populations in Northern Arizona Mixed-Conifer and Ponderosa Pine Forests, 1997 (Pinus ponderosa, n 60 plots) forests in north-central Arizona from 1997 to 2002. Of 2,240 snags marked in 1997, at least 76% remained standing in 2002, 17% had fallen and were relocated as logs, 0.5% were cut

  17. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts on California’s Water Supply Source Medellin-AzuaraClimate Change on Yields and Water use of Major Californiawith Less: Agricultural Water Conservation and Efficiency in

  18. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    across California’s electricity sector, nor will changes inDWR, 2005). As in the electricity sector, financing andin California. The electricity sector itself is a small

  19. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Changes in Hydropower Production from Globalon high elevation hydropower generation in California’s7 reduction in the state’s hydropower resources, which last

  20. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make theworld leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, has beenexperimenting with "in situ" gasification, where the coal is

  1. Social Empowerment Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By creating a context in which workers feel empowered to take action, Federal agencies can promote behaviors and behavior changes that support their sustainability goals. When individuals and...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research effort. Created to help resolve scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, ARM focuses on studying the role of clouds and aerosols in atmospheric and...

  3. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make thethe world leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, haswill not occur. If not coal gasification, then perhaps fuel

  4. Changing times, changing places: AIDS orphans in Kisumu District, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Changing times, changing places: AIDS orphans in Kisumu District, Kenya Prevalence of AIDS orphans in Kenya (2.6 million) had been orphaned by AIDS. In 1999, 46,732 children (17 years old care. Although Kenya has clear policies on prevention and management of HIV, it lacks a policy

  5. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  6. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  7. Global Environmental Change and Human Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with human rights, human security or environmental change ifEnvironmental Change and Human Security By Matthew, RichardChange and Human Security. Cambridge, Massachusetts &

  8. Climate Change Science Institute | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Science Institute SHARE Climate Change Science Institute To advance understanding of the Earth system, describe the consequences of climate change, and evaluate and...

  9. change in the indian mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    climate change awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and policy support in India. The results make very Change Communication in collaboration with GlobeScan Incorporated. Fieldwork in India was conducted by C and should inform stakeholders across India. Dr. Leiserowitz has asked the Indian public a series

  10. PI & Project Team PAF Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    Proposal Management PI & Project Team PAF Changes Step-By-Step Procedures Last updated: 4/1/2013 1 of 10 http://eresearch.umich.edu PAF Changes This procedure details how the PI & Project Team can: Make. Page 9 Important Information Before a PAF is routed for approval, the PI & Project Team can make

  11. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes that the most genetically diverse populations are the ones most at risk from climate change, so that global warming will erode the species' genetic variability faster than it curtails the species' geographic

  12. Climate Change and Place Roundtable Discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Urban Development and Climate Change,” 2007. The fullThink about what runaway climate change would mean where youWorld Changing Seattle, WA Climate change is global in scale

  13. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  14. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

  15. Changes in precipitation characteristics and extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    changes in two different climate scenarios. In the Mediterranean region, precipitation amount, frequencyChanges in precipitation characteristics and extremes Comparing Mediterranean to change Swiss with climate change, with potentially severe impacts on human society and ecosystems. This study analyses

  16. Forestry and ClimateForestry and Climate ChangeChange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    and Forests:Climate Change and Forests: The GoodThe Good ·Forests as carbon sinks ·Longer growing season · CO2 · Reduced emissions ­ DNR too! · Enhanced sequestration · Bio-energy #12;What to Do?What to Do

  17. The impact of climate change changes over time Cleo Bertelsmeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    the species' niche to future climatic sce- narios, based on different combinations of CO2 emission scenarios to a subsequent reduction or vice versa, depending on the date projected to. In some cases, these changes were

  18. Ideological change in nuclear witnesses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Bahne, B.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examines factors associated with atomic veterans maintaining or changing their ideology in relation to their radiation exposure as a function of having witnessed nuclear weapons testing. The study also examined inconsistency (incongruence between physician ratings of self-reported symptoms and perceived health), and current attitudes towards the government. Data were collected with atomic veterans through 16 interviews and a questionnaire with 128 respondents. Three hypotheses were formulated. (1) Ideological change is associated with a high need for structure and high openness; low ideological change with low openness and a high need for structure. Findings failed to substantially support this hypothesis. (2) High ideological change is associated with a high need for structure and high acknowledgement; least ideological change, with a high need for structure and low acknowledgement. Findings failed to substantially support this hypothesis. (3) High ideological change and a high need for structure are both expected with high openness and inconsistency. Low ideological change and a high need for structure are associated with low openness and inconsistency. Current faith in the government is associated with low openness and inconsistency. Findings confirmed the third part. Trends and significant supplementary variables are discussed.

  19. PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National...

  20. Social Network and Communications Institutional Change Principle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Network and Communications Institutional Change Principle Social Network and Communications Institutional Change Principle Federal agencies can use social networks and...

  1. QER- Comment of Claire Chang

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    on proposed Kinder Morgan gas pipeline through MA. — The pipeline is not needed. This pipeline is being touted as filling in a "shortfall" in fuel needed for electricity generation. The "shortfall" in energy has only occurred during very cold snaps when more of the current gas supply is used for heating instead of electric generation. This occasional "shortfall" can be cut by 1/3 just by fixing the leaks in the current gas infrastructure in the state. The remaining 2/3 can easily be made up by expanding current energy efficiency programs like MassSave. — Caps on clean energy need to be removed. A further boost to fill in the occasional "shortfall" in the grid could be achieved removing the cap on the amount of independently generated clean energy (small-scale wind and solar), that can be sold back to the grid. These are systems are already in place and would allow more power into the grid without any additional infrastructure investments needed. — Gas is also intended for export. The pipeline being proposed brings in many times more gas than would be needed to fill in the "shortfall" even if it was a constant need. According to Kinder Morgan's own memo, this extra capacity is slated to go toward increased gas use along newly proposed lateral distribution lines, which works against the state's own greenhouse gas emissions goals, and for export to the Canadian Maritimes, which does not benefit the people of Massachusetts or the country and drives up the price of gas, negating any claims of the project providing cheaper energy. — Ratepayers bear the costs & risks with no benefit. Having electric rate payers fund the pipeline through the proposed tariff is unfair. The pipeline is a private venture, yet the general public is expected to foot the bill and bear the health, safety and environmental risks, while Kinder Morgan and Tennessee Gas Pipeline stockholders reap the benefits. — More gas makes us more dependent. The state's electric generation is already approx 2/3 natural gas. Increasing this makes us even more vulnerable to swings in fuel prices, especially in rapidly changing geo political climate and as this finite resource becomes increasingly rare. — State & ratepayer funds could be better spent. If these kinds of funds are going to be raised on rate payers, they should go toward expanding energy efficiency programs, increased incentives for decentralized roof-top wind and solar generation, more efficient electric transmission lines, more effective energy storage from big wind and solar generation installations. — Pipeline carries financial burden for landowners. The payment for the easement on your land is a one-time deal and is not much money when weighed against the costs to property value. The presence of gas pipelines has historically had a severe negative impact on property values, rendering the properties it crosses virtually unsellable, no longer eligible for a mortgage, and often negating any insurance policies. — Health and safety are at risk. The bad track record for safety of the gas industry, and Kinder Morgan in particular, does not bode well for the health and safety of the people of the Commonwealth. Leaks are frequent, and they can happen even in underground and underwater sections of this buried pipeline. Off-gassing of carcinogens, neurotoxins and endocrine disrupting chemicals at compressor stations every 40-50 miles are constant. Explosions of a pipeline this size and at this high pressure are catastrophic and the fires are fed by many, many miles worth of fuel between shut-off stations, leading to prolonged, extremely high temperature burn. — Pipeline construction and presence pose unwarranted damage and risks. The track of this proposed pipeline cuts through over 900 personal properties, farms, watersheds, major rivers and protected wetlands and forests, leaving all of them to deal with the presence of a toxic mix of chemicals for the decades its in use and the decaying infrastructure for decades after it's no longer in use. — The boost to local taxes is not enough. Any taxe

  2. EVALUATION OF ACTIVATION PRODUCTS IN REMAINING IN REMAINING K-, L- AND C-REACTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.; Webb, R.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic model and calculational methodology was previously developed for P-reactor and R-reactor to quantify the radioisotopes present in Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor tanks and the surrounding structural materials as a result of neutron activation of the materials during reactor operation. That methodology has been extended to K-reactor, L-reactor, and C-reactor. The analysis was performed to provide a best-estimate source term input to the Performance Assessment for an in-situ disposition strategy by Site Decommissioning and Demolition (SDD). The reactor structure model developed earlier for the P-reactor and R-reactor analyses was also used for the K-reactor and L-reactor. The model was suitably modified to handle the larger Creactor tank and associated structures. For all reactors, the structure model consisted of 3 annular zones, homogenized by the amount of structural materials in the zone, and 5 horizontal layers. The curie content on an individual radioisotope basis and total basis for each of the regions was determined. A summary of these results are provided herein. The efficacy of this methodology to accurately predict the radioisotopic content of the reactor systems in question has been demonstrated and is documented in Reference 1. As noted in that report, results for one reactor facility cannot be directly extrapolated to other SRS reactors.

  3. Nature Climate Change features Los

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research February 27, 2013 New print edition of journal tags tree-stress project for cover story LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 27, 2013-The print...

  4. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  5. Offshoring and Directed Technical Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acemoglu, Daron

    2012-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the short-run and long-run implications on wage inequality, we introduce directed technical change into a Ricardian model of offshoring. A unique final good is produced by combining a skilled and an unskilled ...

  6. A Taulation o£ Significant Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Source CAPS) Between February 1986 and March 1987 Martin Knott LS-92 5487 NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR REFERENCE ONLY LS-92 5487 A Taulation o Significant Changes Made to the...

  7. Multiple Motivations Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The multiple motivations principle suggests that a portfolio approach—rather than a single strategy—may be required to achieve change. Research demonstrates that people and institutions adopt new...

  8. Open seminar: Clinical Behaviour Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Professor Susan Michie Centre for Outcomes Research and Effectiveness Department of Clinical, Educational Framework Professor Susan Michie Centre for Outcomes Research and Effectiveness Department of ClinicalOpen seminar: Clinical Behaviour Change ­ Application of the Theoretical Domains Framework

  9. Changing Trends in Telecommunications Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyanarayanan, Ramachandran

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile telecommunication industry is one of the fastest growing and continually changing markets in the world today. The greatest achievement of wireless technology is that it has made communications possible in the ...

  10. Effects of Gain Changes on RPM Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lousteau, Angela L [ORNL; York, Robbie Lynn [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's (DOE/NNSA's) Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) is to strengthen the capability of foreign governments to deter, detect, and interdict the illicit trafficking of special nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime shipping system. The goal of this mission is to reduce the probability of these materials being fashioned into a weapon of mass destruction or radiological dispersal device that could be used against the United States or its international partners. This goal is achieved primarily through the installation and operation of radiation detection equipment at border crossings, airports, seaports, and other strategic locations around the world. In order to effectively detect the movement of radioactive material, the response of these radiation detectors to various materials in various configurations must be well characterized. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated two aspects of Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) settings, based on a preliminary investigation done by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL): source-to-detector distance effect on amplifier gain and optimized discriminator settings. This report discusses this investigation. A number of conclusions can be drawn from the ORNL testing. First, for increased distance between the source and the detector, thus illuminating the entire detector rather than just the center of the detector (as is done during detector alignments), an increase in gain may provide a 5-15% increase in sensitivity (Fig. 4). However, increasing the gain without adjusting the discriminator settings is not recommended as this makes the monitor more sensitive to electronic noise and temperature-induced fluctuations. Furthermore, if the discriminators are adjusted in relation to the increase in gain, thus appropriately discriminating against electronic noise, the sensitivity gains are less than 5% (Fig. 6). ORNL does not consider this slight increase in sensitivity to be a worthwhile pursuit. Second, increasing the ULD will increase sensitivity a few percent (Fig. 7); however, it is not clear that the slight increase in sensitivity is worth the effort required to make the change (e.g., reliability, cost, etc.). Additionally, while the monitor would be more sensitive to HEU, it would also be more sensitive to NORM. Third, the sensitivity of the system remains approximately the same whether it is calibrated to a small source on contact or a large source far away (Fig. 6). This affirms that no changes to the existing calibration procedure are necessary.

  11. Renewable Energy and Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chum, H. L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued the Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) at http://srren.ipcc-wg3.de/ (May 2011 electronic version; printed form ISBN 978-1-107-60710-1, 2012). More than 130 scientists contributed to the report.* The SRREN assessed existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change within a portfolio of mitigation options including energy conservation and efficiency, fossil fuel switching, RE, nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS). It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies - bioenergy, direct solar, geothermal, hydropower, ocean and wind, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems. It also takes into consideration the environmental and social consequences associated with these technologies, the cost and strategies to overcome technical as well as non-technical obstacles to their application and diffusion.

  12. Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government A Resource Guide June 2011 Jenny Fraser, Adaptation to Climate Change Team, Simon Fraser University #12;Page 1 of 26 Climate Change Adaptation for Local: RESOURCES THAT SUPPORT CLIMATE CHANGE ASSESSMENT 3. Past and Future Climate Change and Its Impacts 4

  13. CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction Richard Allan, Department of Meteorology r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk #12;Text Books and References · Henson, B., Rough Guide to Climate Change http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climate-Change-Guides-Reference- Titles/dp/1858281059 · Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2007, www

  14. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  15. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of disturbances caused by climate change (e.g., Ojima et al. 1991).Yet modeling studies indicate the im- portance of climate effects on disturbance regimes (He et al. 1999). Local, regional, and global changes in temperature and precipitation can influence... circulation models (GCMs)—one de- veloped by the Hadley Center in the United Kingdom (HADCM2SUL) and one by the Canadian Climate Center (CGCM1)—have been selected for this national assessment (MacCracken et al. 2000). These transient GCMs simulate at...

  16. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about Global Climate Change. Public Understanding of ScienceFoundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter of SurvivalFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  17. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture in2006). Climate Change Impacts on Water for Agriculture infuture climate change impacts on water for agriculture and

  18. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON FLOODING IN WISCONSIN Ken Potter and Zach Schuster flood scenarios in Wisconsin · Potential impact of climate change on Wisconsin flooding · Ongoing #12;WISCONSIN INITIATIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS · Partnership between the University of Wisconsin

  19. Challenges of Adapting to a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Brian H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Global Climate Change on Agriculture: An Interpretiveon U.S. Agriculture, in THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THEclimate change and the potential roles for adaptation are more severe for ecosystems than they are for managed systems like agriculture.

  20. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal needs, funding opportunities, and more.

  1. UNIVERSITY HOUSING ASSIGNMENT CHANGE REQUEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    UNIVERSITY HOUSING ASSIGNMENT CHANGE REQUEST TODAY'S DATE YOUR INFORMATION NAME OSU EMAIL Last until this request has been reviewed by the University Housing administrative office, and (2) until I(s) listed above? Yes No Please e-mail this completed form to housing@osu.edu. #12;

  2. Crisis Aftermath: Economic policy changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisis Aftermath: Economic policy changes in the EU and its Member States 8th-9th March, 2012 University of Szeged, Hungary Fabian Zuleeg Chief Economist, European Policy Centre, Brussels, Belgium Professor Masahiko Yoshii Kobe University, EU Institute, Kobe, Japan Gabriele Cipriani Director, European

  3. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    Change (2012) 112:901­923 DOI 10.1007/s10584-011-0264-9 Y. Ashkenazy (*) :H. Yizhaq Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, The J. Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben Gurion University and Environmental Development, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel Author's personal copy #12

  4. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  5. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  6. Quick-change filter cartridge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  7. Climate Change Major information sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ipcc.ch/ Vital Climate Graphics, at http://www.grida.no/climate/vital/ Climate Change Impacts on US, at http://www.gcrio.org/NationalAssessment/ Greenhouse Warming Prediction #12;Energy Predictions 2 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA); International Energy Agency (IEA) 2% growth per year, or doubling in 35 years (shortcut: 70/%=doubling) Fossil

  8. TA-55 change control manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, T.W.; Selvage, R.D.; Courtney, K.H.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is the guide for initiating change at the Plutonium Facility, which handles the processing of plutonium as well as research on plutonium metallurgy. It describes the change and work control processes employed at TA-55 to ensure that all proposed changes are properly identified, reviewed, approved, implemented, tested, and documented so that operations are maintained within the approved safety envelope. All Laboratory groups, their contractors, and subcontractors doing work at TA-55 follow requirements set forth herein. This manual applies to all new and modified processes and experiments inside the TA-55 Plutonium Facility; general plant project (GPP) and line item funded construction projects at TA-55; temporary and permanent changes that directly or indirectly affect structures, systems, or components (SSCs) as described in the safety analysis, including Facility Control System (FCS) software; and major modifications to procedures. This manual does not apply to maintenance performed on process equipment or facility SSCs or the replacement of SSCs or equipment with documented approved equivalents.

  9. Hanford site operator changes management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is a brief discussion of management changes at the Westinghouse Hanford Corporation. A. LeMar Trego has relieved Thomas Anderson as president of WHC. This was in response to recent shortcomings in Westinghouse`s management of the environmental restoration and their failure to receive a $10M performance bonus.

  10. Climate Change Worksheet Energy Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    of distance from the equator). The tropics are net absorbers of energy as the amount of absorbed solar energyClimate Change Worksheet «» Energy Budget For any balanced budget, what comes in must equal what goes out. In the case of planets orbiting the Sun, this means that the incoming solar radiation must

  11. Climate Change and Indiana Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contribute to changes in global climate patterns. Global warming can occur from a variety of causes, both, rainfall or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Global Warming: An increase in the average natural and human induced. #12;7/23/2009 3 A Brief History of "Global Warming" Source: National Center

  12. New phase-change thermal energy storage materials for buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.K.; Christensen, C.B.; Burrows, R.W.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of phase-change thermal energy storage materials is under development at SERI. These materials are unusual in two ways. They reversibly absorb large amounts of heat during a solid-state, crystal transformation more than 70/sup 0/C below their melting temperatures, and their solid-state transformation temperatures may be adjusted over a range from 7/sup 0/C to 188/sup 0/C by varying the ratios of binary mixtures of the components. Because these storage materials remain solid throughout the range of their service temperatures, unique opportunities exist for incorporating them into building materials. Composites have been made with ordinary, porous construction materials such as wood, gypsum board, and lightweight concrete as the matrix and with the solid-state phase change materials (SS PCM) filling the void space. The thermal storage capacities of such composites are thereby increased by more than 100% without changing the basic nature and workability of the matrix, construction material. Parametric analyses have been conducted to determine what combination of properties would be optimum for certain solar and energy conserving building applications including Trombe wall, direct gain, and distributed cool storage (combined with night ventilation).

  13. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 600-111, P-11 Critical Mass Laboratory Crib, and UPR-600-16, Fire and Contamination Spread Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-045

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The UPR-600-16, Fire and Contamination Spread waste site is an unplanned release that occurred on December 4, 1951, when plutonium contamination was spread by a fire that ignited inside the 120 Experimental Building. The 120 Experimental Building was a laboratory building that was constructed in 1949 and used for plutonium criticality studies as part of the P-11 Project. In November 1951, a criticality occurred in the 120 Experimental Building that resulted in extensive plutonium contamination inside the building. The confirmatory evaluation supports a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of the extensive radiological survey of the surface soil and the confirmatory and verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  14. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  15. Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds Released: October 20, 2011 Scientists show how sunlight alters optical, chemical properties of atmospheric...

  16. Irradiation Effects on Microstructure Change in Nanocrystalline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects on Microstructure Change in Nanocrystalline Ceria - Phase, lattice Stress, Grain Size and Boundaries. Irradiation Effects on Microstructure Change in Nanocrystalline Ceria...

  17. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

  18. Policy Context: Behaviour Change 1 | Forestry, sustainable behaviours and behaviour change: Policy context | 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Context: Behaviour Change 1 | Forestry, sustainable behaviours and behaviour change: Policy context | 2012 Policy context: influencing and changing behaviours1 Contents Policy context: influencing .............................................................................................3 3. Behaviour change in government policy

  19. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom [St.-Petersburg State University, Physics Faculty, Ulianovskaya 1, Peterhof, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  20. CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    Year CO2concentration(ppm) 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 320 340 360 380 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 underlies much of the assessment of climate change over the industrial period. #12;INCREASES IN CO2 OVER THE INDUSTRIAL PERIOD #12;ATMOSPHERIC CO2 EMISSIONS Time series 1700 - 2003 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0

  1. Phase change material storage heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goswami, D. Yogi (Gainesville, FL); Hsieh, Chung K. (Gainesville, FL); Jotshi, Chand K. (Gainesville, FL); Klausner, James F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

  2. Late Holocene Climate Change on Isla Isabela, Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englebrecht, Amy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar activity on climate variations remains unclear, this data represents a convergence of model output

  3. Dalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    University Climate Change Plan 2010 -- 4 Campus Energy Systems Green Buildings Sustainable TransportDalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010 #12;Dalhousie University Climate Change Plan 2010 -- 2 The Climate Change Plan was prepared by The Dalhousie Office of Sustainability with advice from

  4. Advanced Review Social change to avert further

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    (mostly, these are changes in the mix of energy sources to power societies around the world) and those that reduce energy intensity (mostly, i.e., changes in the rate of energy consumption by human beings in dif recognize two broad types of social change-- changes that either reduce energy intensity or reduce carbon

  5. TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators Kris Wilson Ph.D. School of Journalism University. 2012) #12;TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators On-line survey (n=571) (52% response rate change more frequently in the future #12;TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators "As a TV

  6. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  7. Climate Change and Tourism Dr David Viner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Climate Change and Tourism éCLAT Dr David Viner Climatic Research Unit University of East Anglia d.viner@uea.ac.uk Tourism has a strong international dimension and is sensitive to any changes of climate that alter to attract visitors are likely to be vulnerable to climate change and the implementation of climate change

  8. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  9. The changing structure of the electric power industry: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. electric power industry today is on the road to restructuring a road heretofore uncharted. While parallels can be drawn from similar journeys taken by the airline industry, the telecommunications industry, and, most recently, the natural gas industry, the electric power industry has its own unique set of critical issues that must be resolved along the way. The transition will be from a structure based on a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to one equipped to function successfully in a competitive market. The long-standing traditional structure of the electric power industry is the result of a complex web of events that have been unfolding for over 100 years. Some of these events had far-reaching and widely publicized effects. Other major events took the form of legislation. Still other events had effects that are less obvious in comparison (e.g., the appearance of technologies such as transformers and steam and gas turbines, the invention of home appliances, the man-made fission of uranium), and it is likely that their significance in the history of the industry has been obscured by the passage of time. Nevertheless, they, too, hold a place in the underpinnings of today`s electric industry structure. The purpose of this report, which is intended for both lay and technical readers, is twofold. First, it is a basic reference document that provides a comprehensive delineation of the electric power industry and its traditional structure, which has been based upon its monopoly status. Second, it describes the industry`s transition to a competitive environment by providing a descriptive analysis of the factors that have contributed to the interest in a competitive market, proposed legislative and regulatory actions, and the steps being taken by the various components of the industry to meet the challenges of adapting to and prevailing in a competitive environment.

  10. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  11. ARM - Climate Change Through History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to heargovInstrumentstdma Comments?History Organization ParticipantsChange

  12. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIES Thematerials |PhysicsClimate Change

  13. Behavioral Change and Building Performance: Strategies for Significant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Behavioral Change and Building Performance: Strategies for Significant, Persistent, and Measurable Institutional Change Behavioral Change and Building Performance: Strategies for...

  14. Overlooked Issues in theOverlooked Issues in the Climate Change DebateClimate Change Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the environment change as well. Decision makers need assessments of how climate vulnerability has changed. 2 of ClimateViews of Climate Change ScienceChange Science #12;Climate change including regional impacts can of rioting and nuclear war; Britain will be 'Siberian' in less than 20 years; Threat to the world is greater

  15. Climate change, migratory connectivity and changes in laying date and clutch size of the pied flycatcher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Climate change, migratory connectivity and changes in laying date and clutch size of the pied., Ahola, M., Eeva, T., Va¨isa¨nen, R. A. and Lehikoinen, E. 2006. Climate change, migratory connectivity Ficedula hypoleuca Pallas, and analysed whether potential changes were explained by changes in climatic

  16. Control of group velocity by phase-changing collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M. [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H. [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the influence of phase-changing collisions on the group velocities in Doppler-broadened, cycling, degenerate two-level systems where F{sub e}=F{sub g}+1 and F{sub g}>0, interacting with pump and probe lasers, that exhibit electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). Two model systems are considered: the N system where the pump and probe are polarized perpendicularly, and EIA is due to transfer of coherence (TOC), and the double two-level system (TLS) where both lasers have the same polarization, and EIA is due to transfer of population (TOP). For the case of Doppler-broadened EIA TOC, which occurs at low pump intensity, there is a switch from positive to negative dispersion and group velocity, as the rate of phase-changing collisions is increased. For the case of EIA TOP at low pump intensity, the dispersion and group velocity remain negative even when the collision rate is increased. Pressure-induced narrowing, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the negative dispersion and a decrease in the magnitude of the negative group velocity, occurs in both EIA TOC and EIA TOP, at low pump intensity. When the pump intensity is increased, a switch from negative to positive dispersion and group velocity, with increasing collision rate, also occurs in the double TLS system. However, the effect is far smaller than in the case of the N system at low pump intensity.

  17. Change in Hamiltonian General Relativity from the Lack of a Time-like Killing Vector Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Brian Pitts

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In General Relativity in Hamiltonian form, change has seemed to be missing, defined only asymptotically, or otherwise obscured at best, because the Hamiltonian is a sum of first-class constraints and a boundary term and thus supposedly generates gauge transformations. Attention to the gauge generator G of Rosenfeld, Anderson, Bergmann, Castellani et al., a specially tuned sum of first-class constraints, facilitates seeing that a solitary first-class constraint in fact generates not a gauge transformation, but a bad physical change in electromagnetism (changing E) or GR. The change spoils the Lagrangian constraints in terms of the physically relevant velocities rather than auxiliary canonical momenta. While Maudlin has defended change in GR much as G. E. Moore resisted skepticism, there remains a need to exhibit the technical flaws in the argument. Insistence on Hamiltonian-Lagrangian equivalence, a theme emphasized by Mukunda, Castellani, Sugano, Pons, Salisbury, Shepley and Sundermeyer among others, holds the key. Taking objective change to be ineliminable time dependence, there is change in vacuum GR just in case there is no time-like vector field satisfying Killing's equation. Throwing away the spatial dependence of GR for convenience, one finds that the time evolution from Hamilton's equations is real change just when there is no time-like Killing vector. Hence change is real and local even in the Hamiltonian formalism. The considerations here resolve the Earman-Maudlin standoff: the Hamiltonian formalism is helpful, and, suitably reformed, it does not have absurd consequences for change. Hence the classical problem of time is resolved, apart from the issue of observables, for which the solution is outlined. The quantum problem of time, however, is not automatically resolved due to issues of quantum constraint imposition.

  18. Long-term climate change impacts on agricultural productivity in eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavas, Daniel R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; Gao, Xuejie

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to induce significant climate change over the next century and beyond, but the impacts on society remain highly uncertain. This work examines potential climate change impacts on the productivity of five major crops in northeastern China: canola, corn, potato, rice, and winter wheat. In addition to determining domain-wide trends, the objective is to identify vulnerable and emergent regions under future climate conditions, defined as having a greater than 10% decrease and increase in productivity, respectively. Data from the ICTP RegCM3 regional climate model for baseline (1961-1990) and future (2071-2100) periods under A2 scenario conditions are used as input in the EPIC agro-ecosystem simulation model in the domain [30ºN, 108ºE] to [42ºN, 123ºE]. Simulations are performed with and without the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect. Results indicate that aggregate potential productivity (i.e. if the crop is grown everywhere) increases 6.5% for rice, 8.3% for canola, 18.6% for corn, 22.9% for potato, and 24.9% for winter wheat, although with significant spatial variability for each crop. However, absent the enhanced CO2 fertilization effect, potential productivity declines in all cases ranging from 2.5-12%. Interannual yield variability remains constant or declines in all cases except rice. Climate variables are found to be more significant drivers of simulated yield changes than changes in soil properties, except in the case of potato production in the northwest where the effects of wind erosion are more significant. Overall, in the future period corn and winter wheat benefit significantly in the North China Plain, rice remains dominant in the southeast and emerges in the northeast, potato and corn yields become viable in the northwest, and potato yields suffer in the southwest with no other crop emerging as a clear beneficiary from among those simulated in this study.

  19. a amework for change Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    october 2008 Pursuant to AB 32 e California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 Climate Change Proposed______________________________________________C-131 Green Buildings_____________________________________ C-138 Industrya amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources Board for the State of California

  20. a amework for change Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DECEMBER 2008 Pursuant to AB 32 e California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 Climate Change Scoping ____________________________ C-87 Water______________________________________________C-131 Green Buildings emission reductions of greenhouse gases and climate change activity in state government. This bill would

  1. a amework for change Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DECEMBER 2008 Pursuant to AB 32 e California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 Climate Change Scoping______________________________________________C-131 Green Buildings_____________________________________ C-138 Industry Protection is required to coordinate emission reductions of greenhouse gases and climate change activity

  2. Essays on climate change, energy, and independence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comerford, David

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis contains three separate papers. A balance of questions: what can we ask of climate change economics? is a critical analysis of the economics of climate change literature. It concludes that much more research ...

  3. Risk impact of maintenance program changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Credit, Kimberly A. (Kimberly April)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study quantifies the change in one measure of plant risk, the frequency of loss of long-term decay heat removal, due to changes in maintenance at the James A. Fitzpatrick (JAF) plant. Quantification is accomplished ...

  4. Response to changes in demand/supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes operating by some Korean paper companies for acquiring needed pulpwood as a first step for the construction

  5. The Top-Two, Take Two: Did Changing the Rules Change the Game in Statewide Contests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kousser, Thad

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing California’s Top-Two Primary and RedistrictingThe Top-Two, Take Two: Did Changing the Rules Change therules implemented by California’s top-two system change the

  6. LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (LOC) The Learning and Organizational Change concentration helps you explore how

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    LEARNING AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (LOC) CURRICULUM The Learning and Organizational Change change through learning and organizational design. The assessment, design and implementation of knowledge-based systems, involving people, technology and organizational structures and culture are a particular strength

  7. Internalizing Climate Change—Scientific Resource Management and the Climate Change Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dettinger, Michael D.; Culberson, Steven

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council. 2001. Climate change sci- ence: an analysis of someNWT, Dracup JA. 2004. Climate change impacts uncertainty forVR, Kusler J. 2000. Climate change: Potential impacts and

  8. Incorporating Behavior Change Efforts Into Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Into Energy Efficiency Programs Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Incorporating Behavior Change Efforts into Energy...

  9. Resources on Institutional Change for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers resources to help agencies achieve institutional change in their organizations.

  10. Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, J. G.

    Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities Jim Crawford Trane jim.crawford@trane.com www.trane.com Abstract Atmospheric scientists tell us that mankind is changing the climate, and is setting in motion forces that can... make essentially irreversible changes in the climate of the future. Naysayers dispute whether mankind is even capable of changing the climate. Today we are hearing more from the scientists and less from the naysayers. This presentation will review...

  11. Reporting on Climate Change: Understanding the Science, Third Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Morris A.; Parker, Elissa A.

    2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Law Institute, the grantee, in the final quarter of operation under Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-02ER63414, successfully completed the following tasks associated with the grant: (1) published ''Reporting on Climate Change: Understanding the Science'', the third edition of this resource intended primarily to help print and broadcast journalists report more effectively on scientific aspects of global climate change; (2) distributed the reporters guide directly to roughly 500 journalists and journalism educators participating in the annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Journalists in New Orleans, La.; (3) distributed the reporters guide to an additional 1,500 journalists and journalism educators by mail; (4) provided journalism educators bulk copies, upon specific request, for their use in upper-level science journalism and environmental journalism classes; (5) conducted outreach to science editors and environmental reporters on availability and use of the reporter's guide; (6) completed financial reporting associated with the reporter's guide grant. ELI has provided requested bulk numbers of copies of ''Reporting on Climate Change: Understanding the Science'' to the DOE Project Officer, David C. Bader, Ph.D., and to Jeffrey Amthor, Ph.D., in the Office of Science. ELI currently has a remaining inventory of roughly 500 copies from the original printing of more than 3,000 copies of the guide. These copies are used for responding to continuing requests from journalists and educators for the guide. ELI is currently exploring opportunities for reprinting additional copies to help meet the continuing demand from the educational and journalism communities.

  12. Kiran Maharjan Climate change and floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    management processes by providing many kinds of information. The level of vulnerability of people towardsKiran Maharjan Climate change and floods Climate change and floods Vulnerability analysis of people, in the livelihoods of people. Hence, climate change is making everyone vulnerable to its impacts. Most of the people

  13. Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012 Southwestern US trees face rising drought, and several other partner organizations. 3:01 Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connection Described in a paper published in Nature Climate Change this week, "Temperature as a potent driver of regional forest

  14. Distinguished Lecturer Series Understanding Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Distinguished Lecturer Series Understanding Climate Change: Opportunities and Challenges for Data A Climate change is the defining environmental challenge facing our planet, yet there is considerable.Anew and transformative approach is required to understand the potential impact of climate change. Data driven approaches

  15. Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

  16. Simulation of Recent Southern Hemisphere Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of Recent Southern Hemisphere Climate Change Nathan P. Gillett1 * and David W. J. Thompson2 Recent observations indicate that climate change over the high latitudes of the Southern's surface as well. Recent climate change in the Southern Hemi- sphere (SH) is marked by a strengthening

  17. Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis 2010 CTS Research Conference Carissa impact analysis (EIA) as a tool to address climate change ·! Consider approaches to measuring and addressing climate change at the project scale #12;Purpose ·! Funded by U of M Institute on the Environment

  18. An Overview of Changes to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    of grant proposals to the NSF. ­ Part I: Grant Proposal Guide (GPG) ­ Part II: Award and Administration Guide (AAG) #12;MAJOR CHANGES TO THE GRANT PROPOSAL GUIDE (GPG) #12;Major Changes to the GPG: Overview · Biographical Sketch · Facilities, Equipment and Other Resources #12;Major Changes to the GPG Merit Review

  19. APPLYING BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 APPLYING BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE Ricardo Mendes, João Mateus, Eduardo.mendes}@ceo.inesc.pt {jgm ,ejms}@mega.ist.utl.pt {jose.tribolet}@ceo.inesc.pt Abstract Organizational change can be regarded Modeling, Organizational Change, UML, Process Re-engineering, Process Improvement, Business Strategy

  20. NRE 501. 295 Managing Organizational Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    NRE 501. 295 Managing Organizational Change WINTER B 2006 Syllabus Class Meets: Professor Andrew; and an increasingly important component of management is the planning and control of organizational and behavioral change. Organizational change may be required by innovations in technology, materials, work processes

  1. Boston University Seminar Series on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Boston University Seminar Series on Climate Change Free and open to the public Thursdays, September for Societal Change Matthew Nisbet, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, Public Policy and Urban National Assessments of Climate Change Tony Janetos, Professor of Earth and Environment and Director

  2. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC Climate change will affect both sea level and the temporal and spatial distribution of runoff

  3. The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change Marie Lynn Miranda, Douglas A. Hastings to mitigate the severe impacts of climate change predicted to occur in the twenty-first century. Many with climate change. This study investigates the varying degrees to which developing and developed nations

  4. BIODIVERSITY The geography of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Nathan

    BIODIVERSITY REVIEW The geography of climate change: implications for conservation biogeography D. J. B. Kraft1 INTRODUCTION It is widely recognized that climate change poses a grave threat., 2007). The impacts of climate change are broadly detectable in many taxa, including shifts in phenology

  5. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  6. Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change: The Role of NOAA Sea Grant Extension years and generations about how to adapt to a changing climate. Effective preparation for possible effects of climate change includes engagement of resource managers, planners, public works officials

  7. Abrupt Climate Change R. B. Alley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Abrupt Climate Change R. B. Alley,1 J. Marotzke,2 W. D. Nordhaus,3 J. T. Overpeck,4 D. M. Peteet,5. Wallace8 Large, abrupt, and widespread climate changes with major impacts have occurred repeatedly in the past, when the Earth system was forced across thresholds. Although abrupt climate changes can occur

  8. The Chinese Chang'e Lunar Exploration Project and Its Management Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LU, Hanlu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010): 46. 14. “Project Apollo: A Retrospective Analysis,”Project Chang’e Megaproject Apollo Country China UnitedData sources: 1. “Project Apollo: A Retrospective Analysis,”

  9. Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve the sustainability goals you've identified, take into account the network of roles essential to make or maintain the desired changes. As a rule of thumb, it may help to think about what roles are necessary for determining what changes to make, implementing those changes, and supporting or abiding by those changes. One place to start is by identifying leaders in your organization who have the authority, resources, and influence to make change happen. Those leadership roles typically include: Senior management Policy and technology officers Facilities and operations managers.

  10. Pore-scale study of dissolution-induced changes in hydrologic properties of rocks with binary minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Li; Viswanathan, Hari S; Tao, Wenquan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pore-scale numerical model for reactive transport processes based on the Lattice Boltzmann method is used to study the dissolution-induced changes in hydrologic properties of a fractured medium and a porous medium. The solid phase of both media consists of two minerals, and a structure reconstruction method called quartet structure generation set is employed to generate the distributions of both minerals. Emphasis is put on the effects of undissolved minerals on the changes of permeability and porosity under different Peclet and Damkohler numbers. The simulation results show porous layers formed by the undissolved mineral remain behind the dissolution reaction front. Due to the large flow resistance in these porous layers, the permeability increases very slowly or even remains at a small value although the porosity increases by a large amount. Besides, due to the heterogeneous characteristic of the dissolution, the chemical, mechanical and hydraulic apertures are very different from each other. Further, sim...

  11. Climate Change Laws of the World Project Columbia Center for Climate Change Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Laws of the World Project Columbia Center for Climate Change Law Monica Molina, Columbia College '14 Supervisor Meredith Wilensky, J.D. Introduction The Climate Change Laws of the World Project is an ongoing effort at the Center for Climate Change Law (CCCL) to aggregate existing domestic

  12. Climate Change at the University of Wisconsin-Madison: What changed,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change at the University of Wisconsin-Madison: What changed, and did ADVANCE have. The climate for women in my department is good * Women Faculty Men Faculty Dept. Chairs * #12;Climate CHANGE climate indicates movement along stages of change contemplation, preparation and even action stage #12

  13. UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Sponsored By UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative Co Conference Description This conference will discuss the global issue of climate change in the regional

  14. A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century Miche`le B; accepted 30 November 2006; published 10 January 2007. [1] A Climate Change Index (CCI) is developed to a single index that is a measure for the strength of future climate change relative to today's natural

  15. Agriculture, Climate Change and Climate Change Mitigation Bruce A. McCarl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Agriculture, Climate Change and Climate Change Mitigation Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University mccarl@tamu.edu ageco.tamu.edu/faculty/mccarl Let's Let Climate Change Happen Let's Avoid Climate Change Mitigation Effects Presented at Texas Recycling

  16. Institutional Change Principles for Fostering Sustainability...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Principles for Fostering Sustainability Institutional Change Principles for Fostering Sustainability The following eight principles serve as the foundational building blocks for...

  17. Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    . Appreciate the main aspects of hydropower resource estimation, turbine design, deployment and environmental AND ASSESSMENTS Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society I am a Civil Hydraulic

  18. Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World www.wiley.com  The world’s ecosystems have always been 

  19. Approaches for Effective Climate Change Communication (NPS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register here. Join us for a webinar exploring the importance of effective communication strategies as a key component of climate change response. The presentation will highlight examples and...

  20. Measure and Evaluate Institutional Change for Sustainability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to ensure that institutional change efforts produce successful results in meeting sustainability goals. To measure success, an evaluation is needed. An effective evaluation:...

  1. Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM NCWM to address higher ethanol blends Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of...

  2. Climate - Monitoring changes in Alaskan permafrost ... | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLIMATE - Monitoring changes in Alaskan permafrost ... An Oak Ridge National Laboratory-led team is observing how thawing of permafrost, or frozen soil, affects the carbon cycle in...

  3. a amework for change Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................. 54 J. Impacts to Mineral Resources october 2008 Pursuant to AB 32 e California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 Climate Change Proposed

  4. Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is important to analyze formal and informal workplace rules governing the behavior of individuals and organizations to meet a Federal agency's institutional change goals for sustainability. It...

  5. Measure and Evaluate Institutional Change for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The measure and evaluation step is crucial to ensure that institutional change efforts produce successful results in meeting sustainability goals. To measure success, an evaluation is needed.

  6. Institutional Change Principles for Fostering Sustainability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is followed by a general strategy for how the principle can be translated into action. Social Network and Communications: Institutions and people change because they see or hear...

  7. Social Network and Communications Institutional Change Principle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies can use social networks and communications to spark and reinforce behavior change for meeting sustainability goals. This principle is based on research findings showing that people...

  8. BPA prepares for a changing climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    both generally and as part of events such as El Nio. Evidence of global and regional climate change is mounting. The recently released National Climate Assessment confirmed...

  9. Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After identifying institutional change rules and roles, a Federal agency should identify the tools that create the infrastructural context within which it can achieve its sustainability goals.

  10. Pursuing happiness: The architecture of sustainable change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyubomirsky, S; Sheldon, K M; Schkade, D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activity Set Point Architecture of Sustainable Happiness 46Circumstantial Change Architecture of Sustainable HappinessSage Foundation. Architecture of Sustainable Happiness 36

  11. Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning: A Guide for Practitioners Agency...

  12. Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industry Day - Energy Performance Contracting 24 February 2015 Key Points Up Front * Climate change is real and will have significant impacts * The emissions that drive the...

  13. Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

  14. Changes in Translational Efficiency is a Dominant Regulatory Mechanism in the Environmental Response of Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Ronald C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Serres, Margrethe H.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wiley, H. S.

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand how cell physiological state affects mRNA translation, we used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown under steady state conditions at either aerobic or suboxic conditions. Using a combination of quantitative proteomics and RNA-Seq, we generated high-confidence data on >1000 mRNA and protein pairs. By using a steady state model, we found that differences in protein-mRNA ratios were primarily caused by differences in the translational efficiency of specific genes. When oxygen levels were lowered, 28% of the proteins showed at least a 2-fold change in expression. Altered transcription levels appeared responsible for 26% of the protein changes, altered translational efficiency appeared responsible for 46% and a combination of both were responsible for the remaining 28%. Changes in translational efficiency were significantly correlated with the codon usage pattern of the genes and measurable tRNA pools changed in response to altered O2 levels. Our results suggest that changes in the translational efficiency of proteins, in part caused by altered tRNA pools, is a major determinant of regulated protein expression in bacteria.

  15. Annual Change Report 2006/2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of continuing compliance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide information on any change in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system since the most recent compliance application. This requirement is identified in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 194.4(b)(4), which states: "No later than six months after the administrator issues a certification, and at least annually thereafter, the Department shall report to the Administrator, in writing, any changes in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system that were not required to be reported by paragraph (b)(3) of this section and that differ from information contained in the most recent compliance application." In meeting the requirement, the DOE provides an annual report each November of all applicable changes under the above requirement. This annual report informs the EPA of changes to information in the most recent compliance recertification (the 2004 Compliance Recertification). Significant planned changes must be reported to the EPA prior to implementation by the DOE. In addition, Title 40 CFR, Section 194.4(b)(3) requires that significant unplanned changes be reported to the EPA within 24 hours or ten days, depending on the severity of the activity or condition. To date, there have been no significant unplanned changes to the certification basis. Planned changes have been submitted on an individual basis. All other changes are reported annually. Changes in activities or conditions are reviewed to determine if 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(3) reporting is necessary. As indicated above, no significant unplanned changes were identified for the time period covered by this report. The enclosed tables list those items identified for reporting under 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(4). The majority of the items described in this report are inspections, reports, and modifications to written plans and procedures for WIPP operations.

  16. President Obama on Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    President Obama on Climate Change President Obama on Climate Change Addthis Speakers President Barack Obama Duration 2:46 Topic Energy Sector Jobs Renewables Solar Climate Change...

  17. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalthe context of predicted climate change. Madroño 54(3):234–18–20. Dettinger MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to

  18. Water and the changing structure of zeolites | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the changing structure of zeolites Water and the changing structure of zeolites Released: March 27, 2015 Atoms crowd and abandon catalyst's internal channel surfaces, changing...

  19. Stakeholder Engagement in Climate Change Policymaking in American Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiack, Duran; Kamieniecki , Sheldon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the dimensions of climate change communication by conductingdynamics around climate change communication at thethe dimensions of climate change communication by conducting

  20. Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the affects of climate change on agriculture in irrigatedmarket impacts from climate change on US agriculture and onimpacts of climate change on US agriculture. The first set

  1. What is the Economic Cost of Climate Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W. Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact of Climate Change on Irrigated Agriculture,” Climaticclimate change yields positive benefits to US agriculture.that climate change will entail losses to US agriculture of

  2. Seawalls Are Not Enough: Climate Change & U.S. Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Jody; Guzman, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of climate change on agriculture, for example, isthe impacts of climate change on agriculture. The reasonsimpact of climate change on agriculture, forestry, coastal

  3. Climate change, insurance, and the buildings sector: Technological synergisms between adaptation and mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examining the intersection of risk analysis and sustainable energy strategies reveals numerous examples of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies that offer insurance loss-prevention benefits. The growing threat of climate change provides an added motivation for the risk community to better understand this area of opportunity. While analyses of climate change mitigation typically focus on the emissions-reduction characteristics of sustainable energy technologies, less often recognized are a host of synergistic ways in which these technologies also offer adaptation benefits, e.g. making buildings more resilient to natural disasters. While there is already some relevant activity, there remain various barriers to significantly expanding these efforts. Achieving successful integration of sustainable energy considerations with risk-management objectives requires a more proactive orientation, and coordination among diverse actors and industry groups.

  4. Wind JOC Conference - Wind Control Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Wind Control Changes JOC August 10, 2012 Presentation updated on July 30, 2012 at 11:00 AM B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 Wind Control Changes B O N...

  5. The Trade and Climate Change Joint Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Trade and Climate Change Joint Agenda CEPS Working Document No. 295/June 2008 Thomas L. Brewer Abstract Climate change, international trade, investment and technology transfer are all issues that have............................................................................ 6 3.2 Coverage of the Multilateral Climate and Trade Regimes

  6. Innovation That Matters Mapping Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    to implement emissions reduction measures, stabilisation at 450 ppmv CO2e is estimated to only provide between, with annual CO2 and greenhouse gas emission reductions of only 1% (excluding the increasing emissions from #12;Executive Summary Climate Change Climate change resulting from emissions of CO2 as well as other

  7. Fusing Integration Test Management with Change Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    - 1 - Infuse: Fusing Integration Test Management with Change Management Gail E. Kaiser* Dewayne E, NJ 07974 Murray Hill, NJ 07974 Infuse is an experimental software development environment focusing the change set into the baseline. We have previously described how Infuse enforces static consistency at each

  8. the ever changing face of business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    the ever changing face of business , lehigh.edu/cbestratplan Progress waits for no one. strategic Plan , College of Business and eConomiCs #12;,the business world is changing rap- idly and our graduates must be able to excel in an ever more competitive global marketplace, so the College of Business

  9. Self-adjoint extensions and Signature Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. L. Egusquiza

    1995-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the selfadjoint extensions of the spatial part of the D'Alembert operator in a spacetime with two changes of signature. We identify a set of boundary conditions, parametrised by U(2) matrices, which correspond to Dirichlet boundary conditions for the fields, and from which we argue against the suggestion that regions of signature change can isolate singularities.

  10. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Signature Service Oil Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    UNM Staff EMPLOYEE BENEFIT SERVICE Jiffy Lube Signature Service Oil Change Fast - No Appointment We change your oil with up to 5 quarts of major brand motor oil We install a new oil fi We visually inspect. ASE training programs · Jiffy Lube uses top quality products that meet or exceed vehicle warranty

  11. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  12. Developmental Changes in Responsivity to Threat are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Gordon A.

    Developmental Changes in Responsivity to Threat are Stimulus-Specific in Rats Christoph P 2000 ABSTRACT: During early ontogeny, stimuli that pose a threat to an animal change. Unrelated adult a threat only during a limited period of development, when the animal's particular developmental stage

  13. Propaganda about Climate Change: Is anyone really

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCready, Mark J.

    ://tierneylab.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/03/06/global-warming- payola/ http://www.opinionjournal.com/extra/?id=110008220 #12;mjm to uncontrolled forcings (solar changes, variations in orbit or changes in carbon dioxide levels) On the global available. #12;mjm@nd.edu What definitive things can be said about the climate? Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels

  14. Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olascoaga, Maria Josefina

    Forecasting sudden changes in environmental pollution patterns María J. Olascoagaa,1 and George of Mexico in 2010. We present a methodology to predict major short-term changes in en- vironmental River's mouth in the Gulf of Mexico. The resulting fire could not be extinguished and the drilling rig

  15. Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Saving Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE Edited by Lee Hannah ISLANDPRESS-in-Publication Data Saving a million species : extinction risk from climate change / edited by LeeHannah. p. cm. ISBN, extinction, extinction risk, biodiversity,freshwater, marine, biology, coral bleaching, species area

  16. Natural resources: the climate change challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Worldwide, agricultural soils are being heavily degraded by inappropriate cultivation and grazing practices a potential both to mitigate climate change and to adapt to its effects through good natural resource change by sustaining dry season flows downstream. n Good water management is of increasing importance

  17. Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem/survival #12;NE Pacific Ocean fisheries productivity, 200 BC to 2000 AD (by Finney et al. 2002 Nature) Main

  18. Smoothing out step changes of LMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fangxing

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The locational marginal pricing methodology may lead to a step change when system load grows, creating higher financial risk, especially for small and medium-sized market participants. A proposed continuous LMP method is a straightforward solution to eliminate these step changes when load grows. (author)

  19. OUR CHANGING CLIMATE Research that matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucarini, Valerio

    , for the benefit of society. The Institute spans a range of disciplines including weather and climate, agriculture | 3 The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has used results from our work, on the impacts key advice to the UK Government on avoiding dangerous climate change. Our input was based on research

  20. Implementing Fast Hierarchical Back Projection Jason Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    Implementing Fast Hierarchical Back Projection Jason Chang ECE 558 ­ Final Project Paper May 9, 2007 #12;Implementing Fast Hierarchical Back Projection Chang ii Abstract ­ Filtered back projection implemented in this project, called fast hierarchical back projection (FHBP), was proposed in [1] as a fast

  1. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

  2. Climate change: Update on international negotiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, L. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Policy

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the following: United Nations` framework convention on climatic change; the United States` climate change action plan; current issues to be resolved (targets/timetables, policies, advancing commitments of all parties, and compliance); and implications for clean coal technologies.

  3. Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change Robert Socolow Princeton University socolow should provide at least one wedge. #12;"The Wedge Model is the iPod of climate change: You fill/yr, 30 miles per gallon b) Fly 10,000 miles/yr c) Heat home Natural gas, average house, average climate d

  4. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change conference. The conference will share tribal strategies, plans, and regional, national, and international policies on climate change, energy and carbon emissions as well as discuss tribal needs and funding opportunities.

  5. Phenotypic Plasticity, Ecophysiology, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    9/24/2010 1 Phenotypic Plasticity, Ecophysiology, and Climate Change Loren Albert Image is plasticity?p y · Examples · Limitations to plasticity: Valladares et al. 2007 ·Ecophysiological when the habitat changes? Habitat Tracking Ackerly 2003 #12;9/24/2010 3 Evolution Plasticity #12

  6. Annual Change Report 2003/2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of continuing compliance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide any change in information since the most recent compliance application. This requirement is identified in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 194.4(b)(4), which states: “No later than six months after the administrator issues a certification, and at least annually thereafter, the Department shall report to the Administrator, in writing, any changes in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system that were not required to be reported by paragraph (b)(3) of this section and that differ from information contained in the most recent compliance application.” In meeting the requirement, the DOE provides an annual report of all changes applicable under the above requirement each November. This annual report informs the EPA of changes to information in the most recent compliance application, or for this report the 1996 Compliance Certification Application (CCA). Significant planned changes must be reported to the EPA prior to implementation by the DOE. In addition, Title 40 CFR, Section 194.4(b)(3) requires that significant unplanned changes be reported to the EPA within 24 hours or ten days, depending on the severity of the activity or condition. To date, there have been no significant unplanned changes to the certification basis. Planned changes have been submitted on an individual basis. All other changes are reported annually. The period covered by this Annual Change Report includes changes that occurred between July 1, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Changes in activities or conditions are reviewed to determine if 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(3) reporting is necessary. As indicated above, no significant unplanned changes were identified for the time period covered by this report. The enclosed tables list those items identified for reporting under 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(4). The majority of the changes described in this report are associated with modifications to written plans and procedures for WIPP operations.

  7. Occupancy change detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  8. Session Title Sick about Climate Change: How Changing Environmental Conditions Impact Emerging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Environmental Conditions Impact Emerging Disease Session Date to climate change environmental impacts on pathogen persistence and the food web documenting the significant impact of climate change on human and animal disease

  9. The pursuit of organizational change : becoming and being an agent for change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huising, Ruthanne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses two questions: How do employees become mobilized to initiate and drive change in organizations? How do managers draw on external and internal resources in introducing and sustaining change ...

  10. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  11. Environmental policy at all levels of government remains fragmented and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shortages around the world are exacerbated in many places by biofuels production. 2010­2020: GREEN MARk this time frame. Rather, they are plausible combinations of real-world forces that allow us to evaluate major constant will be that water supply issues will worsen. Finally, national population growth rates

  12. THE SUPPLY OF ENERGY TO fuel economic development remains a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    processes, the energy supply also has a high potential as a polluter of the environ- ment, with catastrophes consumption). Local air pollu- tion, discharges to the soil and water, acid rain, and the risk of climate

  13. angiography remains controversial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    published in "Digital library as a controversy: Gallica vs Google, Dubrovnik : Croatia (2009)" 12;Digital library as a controversy Abstract Paris-Sud XI, Universit de...

  14. arthritis remains constant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We show that the only value of n for which the late-time matter energy density to dark energy density ratio (rmrhomrhoLambda) is constant (which could...

  15. A study investigating copper smelting remains from San Bartolo, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alunni, Antonella I

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Research on the metallurgy of archaeological artifacts has focused primarily on the examination of objects to reveal their design, their composition, the properties of the material people selected to achieve ...

  16. Miguel Angel Perez Angon: what is that really remains?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, J. G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Merida, A. P. 73 Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Laudatio in honor of Dr. Miguel Angel Perez Angon, co-recipient of the 2008 Medal of the Division of Particles and Fields of the Mexican Physical Society.

  17. United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E AmbassadorsUS-EU-Japan-JapanHighly Enriched Uranium from

  18. INTRODUCTION Large uncertainties remain on the extent and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    to isoclinal and recumbent to gently inclined folds. Parallel and harmonic-like folds are present, but most deforming thrusts out of the southern Kara Sea. The lowermost facies of the Kara diamicton is a stratified, recumbent folds, small-scale boudinage structures,

  19. United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    removed HEU under this effort are Austria, Chile, Czech Republic, Libya, Mexico, Romania, Serbia, Taiwan, Turkey, Ukraine, and Vietnam. To date, the Department has removed or...

  20. FAL 2006-04, Financial Assistance Letters Remaining in Effect

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of Energy 088:Energy FACT SHEET: Department2 FAIR

  1. Recommendation 215: Recommendation on Remaining Legacy Materials on the Oak

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuringDepartment ofRecentDepartment of4:DepartmentRidge

  2. U.S. gasoline prices remain steady (long version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices continueshort version) The U.S.

  3. U.S. gasoline prices remain steady (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices continueshort version) The U.S.gasoline

  4. ORISE: Study finds foreign doctorate recipients' stay rates remain high

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627Homeland SecurityJonathan Mbah and Kiara MoorerStudy

  5. Questions remain on funding for cleanup of Oak Ridge Reservation |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy Small Team Oversight ActivitiesNOTEnergySeason?Reportingbelow

  6. RCW - 68.50 Human Remains | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevada < RAPID‎ |EnergyControl

  7. UC 9-8-309 - Human Remains | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B:7-15:Web Site:07304 -- Human

  8. 1 | Forestry, sustainable behaviours and behaviour change: Discussion paper |2012| Discussion Paper: Behaviour Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 | Forestry, sustainable behaviours and behaviour change: Discussion paper |2012| Discussion Paper: Behaviour Change Forestry, sustainable behaviours and behaviour change ­ a discussion paper1 Introduction This discussion paper explores what the current focus on behaviour means for the forestry sector, using evidence

  9. HOUSING/LIVING ARRANGEMENT CHANGE DO NOT USE THIS FORM TO CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    HOUSING/LIVING ARRANGEMENT CHANGE DO NOT USE THIS FORM TO CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS. Go online to onestop, select the appropriate housing option. If you live in off-campus housing (without parents), you must have, state, ZIP code, country) PART 2. Housing Information Please change my housing/living arrangements

  10. Towards Solid IT Change Management: Automated Detection of Conflicting IT Change Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemper, Alfons

    Infrastructure Library (ITIL), is concerned with the management of changes to networks and services to satisfy Change Management [1], a core process of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) [2 of confidence and optimization. To ensure this, ITIL proposes a Change Management process comprising

  11. Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global Biodiversity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global subordinate species less intelligent than us, at risk of extinction. In other words, anthropogenic activities have made other species sensitive to changes in climate and habitat vulnerable to extinction [Parry et

  12. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  13. Stormwater ManagementStormwater Management and Climate Change:and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater ManagementStormwater Management and Climate Change:and Climate Change: Implications for · Wisconsin's changing climate · Stormwater management · Impacts and adaptation #12;WICCI Identifying impacts as weather #12;High water impacts June 1-15, 2008 38 River gauges broke records 810 Square miles of land

  14. How will changes in global climate influence California?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weare, B C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    future climate change impacts on water for agriculture andclimate change that will be important for California agriculture

  15. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  16. Time changes in gradient and observed winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ronald Dale

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - cal purposes, represents the changes in the components of the gradient wind speed, as calculated from Eqs. (9) and (10). Equations (9) and (10) were solved by the use of finite dif- ference methods. Due to the long incremental time steps, 3 to 12... hours, the changes in the components of the gradient wind speed obtained numerically from Eqs. (9) and (10) may differ slightly from the changes observed due to the numerical techniques employed. How- ever, the patterns obtained by the two methods...

  17. Time changes in gradient and observed winds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ronald Dale

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD DALE CARLSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillm=n of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1972 Major Subject...: Meteorology TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD D. CARLSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co , ee) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT Time Changes in Gradient and Observed Winds. (May 1972) Ronald Dale...

  18. Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolkov, Benjamin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Galya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options. Below are a new definition of what doctrine meant in 2000 and an outline of the 2000 doctrine. An overview of the 2000 doctrine is: (1) The 2000 doctrine was a return to a more defensive posture; the threat of nuclear retaliation, rather than that of preemptive force, would be its deterrence; (2) In order to strengthen its nuclear deterrence, Russia extended and redefined the cases in which nuclear weapons could be used to include a wider range of conflict types and a larger spectrum of attackers; and (3) Russia's threats changed to reflect its latest fear of engaging in a limited conflict with no prospect of the use of nuclear deterrence. In 2006, the defense minister and deputy prime minister Sergei Ivanov announced that the government was starting on a draft of a future doctrine. Four years later, in 2010, the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation was put into effect with the intent of determining Russian doctrine until 2020. The 2010 doctrine, like all previous doctrines, was a product of the times in which it was written. Gone were many of the fears that had followed Russia for the past two decades. Below are an examination of the 2010 definition of doctrine as well as a brief analysis of the 2010 doctrine and its deviations from past doctrines. An overview of the 2010 doctrine is: (1) The new doctrine emphasizes the political centralization of command both in military policy and the use of nuclear weapons; (2) Nuclear doctrine remains the same in many aspects including the retention of first-use; (3) At the same time, doctrine was narrowed to using nuclear weapons only when the Russian state's existence is in danger; to continue strong deterrence, Russia also opted to follow the United States by introducing precision conventional weapons; (4) NATO is defined as Russia's primary external threat because of its increased global presence and its attempt to recruit states that are part of the Russian 'bloc'; and (5) The 2000 doctrine's defensive stance was left out of the doctrine; rumored options for use of nuclear weapons in local wars and in preemptive strikes were also left out.

  19. CHANGING THE SAFETY CULTURE IN HANFORD TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERRIOCHOA MV; ALCALA LJ

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000 the Hanford Tank Farms had one of the worst safety records in the Department of Energy Complex. By the end of FY08 the safety performance of the workforce had turned completely around, resulting in one of the best safety records in the DOE complex for operations of its kind. This paper describes the variety of programs and changes that were put in place to accomplish such a dramatic turn-around. The U.S. Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford Site in Washington State was established during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project to develop nuclear materials to end the war. For the next several decades it continued to produce plutonium for the nation's defense, leaving behind vast quantities of radioactive and chemical waste. Much of this waste, 53,000,000 gallons, remains stored in 149 aging single-shell tanks and 28 newer double-shell tanks. One of the primary objectives at Hanford is to safely manage this waste until it can be prepared for disposal, but this has not always been easy. These giant underground tanks, many of which date back to the beginning of the Manhattan Project, range in size from 55,000 gallons up to 1.1 million gallons, and are buried beneath 10 feet of soil near the center of the site. Up to 67 of the older single-shell tanks have leaked as much as one million gallons into the surrounding soil. Liquids from the single-shell tanks were removed by 2003 but solids remain in the form of saltcake, sludges and a hardened heel at the bottom of some tanks. The Department of Energy's Office of River Protection was established to safely manage this waste until it could be prepared for disposal. For most of the last seven years the focus has been on safely retrieving waste from the 149 aging single-shell and moving it to the newer double-shell tanks. Removing waste from the tanks is a difficult and complex task. The tanks were made to put waste in, not take it out. Because of the toxic nature of the waste, both chemically as well as radiologically, all retrieval operations must be performed using remote-controlled equipment which has to be installed in each tank, then removed when retrieval is completed. This process involves a variety of potentially hazardous construction activities including crane and rigging, excavation, electrical and piping work. It also requires strong attention to safety to avoid injuries to personnel and contamination of the environment.

  20. Characterization of dynamic change of Fan-delta reservoir properties in water-drive development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Shenghe; Xiong Qihua; Liu Yuhong [Univ. of Petroleum Changping, Beijing (China)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fan-delta reservoir in Huzhuangji oil field of east China, is a typical highly heterogeneous reservoir. The oil field has been developed by water-drive for 10 years, but the oil recovery is less than 12%, and water cut is over 90%, resulting from high heterogeneity and serious dynamic change of reservoir properties. This paper aims at the study of dynamic change of reservoir properties in water-drive development. Through quantitative imaging analysis and mercury injection analysis of cores from inspection wells, the dynamic change of reservoir pore structure in water-drive development was studied. The results show that the {open_quotes}large pore channels{close_quotes} develop in distributary channel sandstone and become larger in water-drive development, resulting in more serious pore heterogeneity. Through reservoir sensitivity experiments, the rock-fluid reaction in water-drive development is studied. The results show the permeability of some distal bar sandstone and deserted channel sandstone becomes lower due to swelling of I/S clay minerals in pore throats. OD the other hand, the permeability of distributary channel and mouth bar sandstone become larger because the authigenic Koalinites in pore throats are flushed away with the increase of flow rate of injection water. Well-logging analysis of flooded reservoirs are used to study the dynamic change of reservoir properties in various flow units. The distribution of remaining oil is closely related to the types and distribution of flow units.

  1. 9/25/10 12:27 PMLEED certification efforts remain strong -Dallas Business Journal Page 1 of 2http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/stories/2010/08/02/story3.html?s=industry&b=1280721600%5E3731231&t=printable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    want LEED-certified buildings to save money on energy costs and to attract the nation's top talent9/25/10 12:27 PMLEED certification efforts remain strong - Dallas Business Journal Page 1 of 2http Larger Dallas Business Journal - August 2, 2010 /dallas/stories/2010/08/02/story3.html

  2. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  3. Social sensing for epidemiological behavior change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madan, Anmol Prem Prakash

    An important question in behavioral epidemiology and public health is to understand how individual behavior is affected by illness and stress. Although changes in individual behavior are intertwined with contagion, ...

  4. Impacts of Climate Change on Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M. [Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research project was to improve and use our biogeochemistry model, TEM, to simulate the effects of climate change and other environmental changes on the production of biofuel feedstocks. We used the improved version of TEM that is coupled with the economic model, EPPA, a part of MIT’s Earth System Model, to explore how alternative uses of land, including land for biofuels production, can help society meet proposed climate targets. During the course of this project, we have made refinements to TEM that include development of a more mechanistic plant module, with improved ecohydrology and consideration of plant-water relations, and a more detailed treatment of soil nitrogen dynamics, especially processes that add or remove nitrogen from ecosystems. We have documented our changes to TEM and used the model to explore the effects on production in land ecosystems, including changes in biofuels production.

  5. Climate change and the conservation of marmots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Climate change, an indirect human impact, threatens marmot survival through global warming and extreme weather events. Most marmot species occupy a harsh environment characterized by a short growing season and a long, cold season without food. Marmots cope...

  6. Case for Change National and World Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    sustainable solutions. Workforce requirements have changed demanding a higher degree of technological address university goals of student retention, graduation rates, flexibility, learning, and responsive student services. We prepare learners for civic leadership and professions to sustainably manage

  7. Oil Shortages, Climate Change and Collective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newbery, David

    strategies, all provide tools to guide policy analysis. Stern (2006) took over 600 pages to both quantify and analyse the economics of climate change, specifically asking how to estimate the social cost of carbon and the benefits of mitigating climate...

  8. Decadal changes in the equatorial Pacific circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urizar, S. Cristina

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ocean general circulation model with data assimilation is used to analyze the decadal changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean circulation. Results indicate that the variability in the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) and subtropical cells (STC) have...

  9. ACEEE Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), the Behavior, Energy, and Climate Change Conference is a three-day event focused on understanding individual and...

  10. Towards a sciart prospectus for climate change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ormston, Andrew

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross disciplinary collaboration and exchange between scientists and artists has grown rapidly over the last twenty years and is providing material and evidence employed in the understanding of, and responses to climate change. The sciart field...

  11. Executive Summary Mitigation of Climate Change through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Executive Summary Mitigation of Climate Change through Land Reclamation with Biosolids: Carbon storage in reclaimed mine soils, life cycle analysis of biosolids reclamation, and ecosystem services; Pacala and Socolow, 2004). · Land reclamation with municipal wastewater solids (biosolids) can play

  12. Plug Load Behavioral Change Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Kandt, A.; VanGeet, O.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the methods and results of a plug load study of the Environmental Protection Agency's Region 8 Headquarters in Denver, Colorado, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The study quantified the effect of mechanical and behavioral change approaches on plug load energy reduction and identified effective ways to reduce plug load energy. Load reduction approaches included automated energy management systems and behavioral change strategies.

  13. regional climate change impacts Kathie Dello

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    ;agriculture impacts #12;Impacts on agriculture Milk%and%dairy,%%$3.1%% Ca1le%and%calves,%%$2.9%% Fruits%crops%% and%hay,%%$1.9%% Nursery,%% $1.4%% Other%products,%%$0.6%% Poultry%and%eggs,%%$0.3%% · Direct%heat%stress%effects%on% the%animals% · Changes%in%forage%quality% · Heat%and%drought%stress,% changes

  14. The hedge value of international emissions trading under uncertainty Mort Webster n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The hedge value of international emissions trading under uncertainty Mort Webster n , Sergey Keywords: Climate change Emissions trading Uncertainty a b s t r a c t This paper estimates the value of international emissions trading, focusing on a here-to-fore neglected component; its value as a hedge against

  15. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

  16. animal drugs change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to many antibiotics. In an increasing number of cases, vancomycin is the only treatment drug that remains effective. Because E. faecium was untreatable with practically all...

  17. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  18. The land use climate change energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

  19. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  20. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    while reducing air and water pollutants. Individualclimate change, rivers and water, forests, land health andand cooling, 11.1% from water heating, 7.5% from appliances,

  1. “Let there be Light”… but what comes next? Changing energy needs and the ability of decentralised solar energy to provide sustainable solutions to urban slum communities in Bangalore, India. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, Rebecca

    ; such as the application of solar PV technology is often presented as a win-win strategy by which to tackle the dual problems of energy poverty and climate change in developing countries such as India. Yet there remains limited research on the social implications...

  2. The dilemma of fossil fuel use and global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Fulkerson, W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Sanghvi, M.K. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of fossil fuels and relationship to climate change is discussed. As the use of fossil fuels has grown, the problems of protecting the environment and human health and safety have also grown, providing a continuing challenge to technological and managerial innovation. Today that challenge is to control atmospheric emissions from combustion, particularly those emissions that cause acidic deposition, urban pollution, and increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Technology for reducing acidic deposition is available and needs only to be adopted, and the remedies for urban pollution are being developed and tested. How effective or expensive these will be remains to be determined. The control of emissions of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}, seems possible only be reducing the total amounts of fossil fuels used worldwide, and by substituting efficient natural gas technologies for coal. Long before physical depletion forces the transition away from fossil fuels, it is at least plausible and even likely that the greenhouse effect will impose a show-stopping constraint. If such a transition were soon to be necessary, the costs would be very high because substitute energy sources are either limited or expensive or undesirable for other reasons. Furthermore, the costs would be unevenly felt and would be more oppressive for developing nations because they would be least able to pay and, on average, their use rates of fossil fuels are growing much faster than those of many industrialized countries. It is prudent, therefore, to try to manage the use of fossil fuels as if a greenhouse constraint is an important possibility.

  3. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There is strong evidence that the lower atmosphere has been warming at an unprecedented rate during the last 50 years, and it is expected to further increase at least for the next 100 years. Warmer air mass implies a higher capacity to hold water vapor and an increased likelihood of an acceleration of the global water cycle. This acceleration is not validated and considerable new research has gone into understanding aspects of the water cycle (e.g. Miller et al. 2003). Several significant findings on the hydrologic response to climate change can be reported. It is well understood that the observed and expected warming is related to sea level rise. In a recent seminar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, James Hansen (Director of the Institute for Space Studies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration) stressed that a 1.25 Wm{sup -2} increase in radiative forcing will lead to an increase in the near surface air temperature by 1 C. This small increase in temperature from 2000 levels is enough to cause very significant impacts to coasts. Maury Roos (Chief Hydrologist, California Department of Water Resources) has shown that a 0.3 m rise in sea level shifts the San Francisco Bay 100-year storm surge flood event to a 10-year event. Related coastal protection costs for California based on sea level rise are shown. In addition to rising sea level, snowmelt-related streamflow represents a particular problem in California. Model studies have indicated that there will be approximately a 50% decrease in snow pack by 2100. This potential deficit must be fully recognized and plans need to be put in place well in advance. In addition, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor and result in more intense warm winter-time precipitation events that result in flooding. During anticipated high flow, reservoirs need to release water to maintain their structural integrity. California is at risk of water shortages, floods, and related ecosystem stresses. More research needs to be done to further improve our ability to forecast weather events at longer time scales. Seasonal predictions have been statistical and only recently have studies begun to use ensemble simulations and historical observations to constrain such predictions. Understanding the mechanisms of large-scale atmospheric dynamics and its local impacts remain topics of intensive research. The ability to predict extreme events and provide policy makers with this information, along with climate change and hydrologic response information, will help to guide planning to form a more resilient infrastructure in the future.

  4. Couplings between changes in the climate system and biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Denman, Kenneth L.; Brasseur , Guy; Chidthaisong, Amnat; Ciais, Philippe; Cox, Peter M.; Dickinson, Robert E.; Hauglustaine, Didier; Heinze, Christoph; Holland, Elisabeth; Jacob , Daniel; Lohmann, Ulrike; Ramachandran, Srikanthan; Leite da Silva Dias, Pedro; Wofsy, Steven C.; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth's climate is determined by a number of complex connected physical, chemical and biological processes occurring in the atmosphere, land and ocean. The radiative properties of the atmosphere, a major controlling factor of the Earth's climate, are strongly affected by the biophysical state of the Earth's surface and by the atmospheric abundance of a variety of trace constituents. These constituents include long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs) such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), as well as other radiatively active constituents such as ozone and different types of aerosol particles. The composition of the atmosphere is determined by processes such as natural and anthropogenic emissions of gases and aerosols, transport at a variety of scales, chemical and microphysical transformations, wet scavenging and surface uptake by the land and terrestrial ecosystems, and by the ocean and its ecosystems. These processes and, more generally the rates of biogeochemical cycling, are affected by climate change, and involve interactions between and within the different components of the Earth system. These interactions are generally nonlinear and may produce negative or positive feedbacks to the climate system. An important aspect of climate research is to identify potential feedbacks and assess if such feedbacks could produce large and undesired responses to perturbations resulting from human activities. Studies of past climate evolution on different time scales can elucidate mechanisms that could trigger nonlinear responses to external forcing. The purpose of this chapter is to identify the major biogeochemical feedbacks of significance to the climate system, and to assess current knowledge of their magnitudes and trends. Specifically, this chapter will examine the relationships between the physical climate system and the land surface, the carbon cycle, chemically reactive atmospheric gases and aerosol particles. It also presents the current state of knowledge on budgets of important trace gases. Large uncertainties remain in many issues discussed in this chapter, so that quantitative estimates of the importance of the coupling mechanisms discussed in the following sections are not always available. In addition, regional differences in the role of some cycles and the complex interactions between them limit our present ability to provide a simple quantitative description of the interactions between biogeochemical processes and climate change.

  5. Model building for flavor changing Higgs couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avital Dery; Aielet Efrati; Yosef Nir; Yotam Soreq; Vasja Susi?

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    If $t\\rightarrow hq$ ($q=c,u$) or $h\\rightarrow\\tau\\ell$ ($\\ell=\\mu,e$) decays are observed, it will be a clear signal of new physics. We investigate whether natural and viable flavor models can saturate the present direct upper bounds without violating the indirect constraints from low energy loop processes. We carry out our analysis in two theoretical frameworks: minimal flavor violation (MFV) and Froggatt-Nielsen symmetry (FN). The simplest models in either framework predict flavor changing couplings that are too small to be directly observed. Yet, in the MFV framework, it is possible to have lepton flavor changing Higgs couplings close to the bound if spurions related to heavy singlet neutrinos play a role. In the FN framework, it is possible to have large flavor changing couplings in both the up and the charged lepton sectors if supersymmetry plays a role.

  6. NIH Portfolio Analysis on Climate Change and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madey, Gregory R.

    NIH Portfolio Analysis on Climate Change and Health Total studies that in some way relate to climate change 1,357 > Directly relate to climate change 7 > Examine the climate variables on health 85 response to climate change By David Taylor Climate change and its relationship to health research

  7. University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    University of Florida Change, Petty Cash, and Research Stipend Funds Change to Existing Fund EXISTING FUND INFORMATION CHANGES TO FUND Complete all areas that are applicable for your fund request. CHANGE IN FUND LOCATION CHANGE IN CUSTODIANSHIP New Custodian InformationExisting Custodian Information

  8. Introducing the climate change effects on Mediterranean forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gracia, Carlos

    357 Introducing the climate change effects on Mediterranean forest ecosystems: observation, Joan LLUSIÃ? & Jordi SARDANS Current and projected climate change trends in the Mediterranean region of climate change in the frame of global change If the combination of climate change, asso- ciated

  9. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, W.F.

    1980-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor is described for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device that comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  10. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  11. Regulation changes create opportunities for pipeline manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santon, J.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Transportation`s (DOT) Research and Special Programs Administration (RSPA) is proposing to change its safety standards for the repair of corroded or damaged steel pipe in gas and hazardous liquid pipelines. For pipeline operators, the expected revisions will allow new flexibility in approaches to pipeline repair. Less costly and less disruptive procedures will be acceptable. For manufacturers, the changes will open opportunities for development of corrosion repair technology. A highly competitive market in new repair technology can be expected to arise. Current regulations, new technologies, and proposed safety standards are described.

  12. Changing the Equation in STEM Education

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Editor's Note: This is a cross post of an announcement that the White House featured on its blog last week. Check out the video below for Secretary Chu's thoughts on how an education in math and science helps students understand the world and deal with the pressing issues of our time. Today, President Obama announced the launch of Change the Equation, a CEO-led effort to dramatically improve education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), as part of his “Educate to Innovate” campaign. Change the Equation is a non-profit organization dedicated to mobilizing the business community to improve the quality of STEM education in the United States.

  13. Update on Climate Change Climate Change: Resetting Plant-Insect Interactions1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    . Ecologically, the acceleration of plant phenology by warming is generating mismatches between plants and insect of generations per year, thus increasing damage to plant communities. The suitability of plant tissues as foodUpdate on Climate Change Climate Change: Resetting Plant-Insect Interactions1 Evan H. De

  14. While future changes in emission are the largest uncertainty on future climate change, another

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    specify concentrations and that lead to varying degrees of heating (or cooling) in the future and work outWhile future changes in emission are the largest uncertainty on future climate change, another. Above, the thick lines show different possible future scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways

  15. How predictable : modeling rates of change in individuals and populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumme, Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops methodologies to measure rates of change in individual human behavior, and to capture statistical regularities in change at the population level, in three pieces: i) a model of individual rate of change ...

  16. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Communication. IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change).climate change are planned, but not yet under way (Knowles, personal communication.Communication. Greg Fishman and Dave Hawlkins. California Climate Change

  17. Climate Change Adaptation: A Collective Action Perspective on Federalism Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.; Levy, Richard E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    adaptation to minimize the adverse effects of climate change. Climate change adaptation is designed to increase the resilience of natural and human ecosystems to the threats posed by a changing environment. Although an extensive literature concerning...

  18. Stakeholder Engagement in Climate Change Policymaking in American Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiack, Duran; Kamieniecki , Sheldon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008) State and Municipal Climate Change Plans: The Firstand the governing of climate change in Germany and the UK.Local action plan for climate change. City of Philadelphia,

  19. Truths We Must Tell Ourselves to Manage Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1455 Truths We Must Tell Ourselves to Manage Climate Change By Robert H. Socolow I. INTRODUCTION............................................................ 1455 II. COMMUNICATING CLIMATE CHANGE .............................. 1458 III. DEMAND of climate change (see Figure 1). The curve oscillates and rises. The annual oscillations (whose details

  20. Water resources planning under climate change and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    costs from climate change exist in agriculture becauseagriculture studies for calculating costs associated with climate changeClimate change adaptation studies have been undertaken in sectors as diverse as agriculture (

  1. Responding to Changing Workforce Needs and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Responding to Changing Workforce Needs and Challenges Dennis Ray Deputy Director Power Systems · Future Grid for Enabling Sustainable Energy Systems · Almost industry members,13 universities, 50 workers. Mid-career gap. Source: Gaps in the Energy Workforce Pipeline, Center for Energy Workforce

  2. Proposed QUIET System Design Changes Mircea Bogdan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be the time to make changes. · Manufacturing of one kind of a board is cheaper than for 3 different boards. · Chances to have to go through an additional (Rev.B) prototype stage are greater. · Will concentrate efforts for design, circuit breadboarding, manufacturing and testing to one institution only. · Will need

  3. IDENTIFYING AND OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Studies A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center and for policy-makers. To fulfill these goals, an in-depth study of five California case studies in the San, but still very limited activities in the case studies. Institutional and attitudinal barriers dominate

  4. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  5. 2013ANNUAL REPORT inCHANGING TIMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    and Impact in Mental Health University of Maryland eCare -- a Virtual Safety Net for Hospital Patients 50 Leadership CONTENTS ThE POwEr Of ParTNErShiP Changes in science, public policy and the economy have forced us to make hard choices. We are not alone in this. This series of adverse actions

  6. Arnold Schwarzenegger DATA SOURCES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    funding efforts are focused on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies The California Climate Change Center (CCCC) is sponsored by the PIER program and coordinated by its Energy

  7. ACQUIRED EQUIVALENCE CHANGES STIMULUS REPRESENTATIONS , D. SHOHAMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shohamy, Daphna

    ACQUIRED EQUIVALENCE CHANGES STIMULUS REPRESENTATIONS M. MEETER 1 , D. SHOHAMY 2 , AND C.E. MYERS 3 UNIVERSITY 3 DEPT. OF PSYCHOLOGY, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Acquired equivalence is a paradigm in which of feature salience. A different way of conceptualizing acquired equivalence is in terms of strategic

  8. Partners for Change Fellowship Program Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    for Change Fellowship is a yearlong community-based research fellowship designed to harness the energy Interest · Economic Development Focus Area- Rosa Franco, Director of Lending, Neighborhood Trust Federal food options in NYC. · Served as health advocates connecting patients to local social service agencies

  9. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concerns about rising energy demand and cost, diminishing oil reserves, and climate change, Central to prioritize enhancing national legislation, developing risk prevention plans, creating supply and demand side depend exclu- sively on oil products, gasoline and diesel. Oil is imported mostly from the Middle East

  10. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  11. Waste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste prevention, recycling and reuse, biological treatment with land use of products, energy recoveryWaste and Climate Change ISWA WHITE PAPER #12;Preface 3 Re-evaluating waste: ISWA key messages 4 ISWA Commitments 6 Introduction 7 Technologies 8 Material recovery 14 Organic recovery 16 Energy

  12. Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Toward Predictions that Incorporate, Pocatello, Idaho 83209, USA; 2 Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA; 3, and debris flows) and shift distributions of terrestrial ecosystems on a global basis. Although

  13. Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate Craig R. Allen Nebraska Cooperative Fish ecosystems for critical services #12;What Do Species Do? · regulate biogeochemical cycles ­ e.g., moose.g., predation / herbivory · provide ecological services ­ e.g., pollination #12;Ecosystem Services - Supporting

  14. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  15. Phase change thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

  16. Understanding Climate Change: The Global Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew D. Brown

    events in Japan) of our total fuel production. #12;http (along with Solar Intensity and Orbital Changes). (From Mann and Kump, 2009) As Mary Schweitzer Showed Us CO2, human activities (e.g., fossil fuel burning, deforestation) have increased levels > 100 ppm

  17. Ohio Farmer Attitudes About Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    of Academics, Office of Energy and the Environment The Ohio State University Moore.11@osu.edu 3rd National5/16/2014 1 Ohio Farmer Attitudes About Climate Change Thursday, May 15, 2014 Byrd Polar Research://www.camelclimatechange.org/ SPEED SCIENCE VIDEOS BACKGROUND ON OHIO's AGRICULTURE #12;5/16/2014 6 Ohio Agricultural Crop Values

  18. A climate of change Radoslav Dimitrov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    A climate of change Radoslav Dimitrov University ofWestern Ontario October 25, 2013 Balsillie neutral 2030" Russia" 20-25 percent" Switzerland" 20-30 percent" United States" Extension of the Kyoto Protocol Ã? Launch of the Green Climate Fund Ã? New negotiating mandate 9 #12;New

  19. Advanced Review Greenland climate change: from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    Advanced Review Greenland climate change: from the past to the future Val´erie Masson-Delmotte,1 cores in and around Greenland allow us to place the current trends in regional climate, ice sheet lake sediments in southern Greenland document major environmental and climatic conditions during

  20. CHANGE-POINT METHODS Douglas M. Hawkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Peihua

    been proposed as tools for following up signals given by other charting methods, when their likelihood: Change-point, LRT, GLR, Phase I, Phase II, SPC. 1 #12;1 INTRODUCTION Statistical process control methods will assume is unknown. If both 0 and 1 are known, then the SPC diagnostic of choice is generally

  1. RANDOM WALK IN DETERMINISTICALLY CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liverani, Carlangelo

    RANDOM WALK IN DETERMINISTICALLY CHANGING ENVIRONMENT DMITRY DOLGOPYAT AND CARLANGELO LIVERANI Abstract. We consider a random walk with transition probabilities weakly dependent on an environment of the environment the walk satisfies the CLT. 1. Introduction The continuing interest in the limit properties

  2. Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

  3. Dietary Changes for Persons with Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Dietary Changes for Persons with Diabetes #12;Reference Guide HANDOUT Working with Persons Who Have Diabetes Follow these guidelines to work with consumers who request nutrition information on preventing or treating diabetes. Without Written Prescriptions If a client with diabetes seeks assistance

  4. 1 Global Change Research for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    , ecological zones are shifting, the seas are warming and ice caps are melting. Forced adaptation to climate several countries or regions of the world are affected. Most promi- nent among these processes is climate change, which is often perceived as today's most important global threat, affecting the environment

  5. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  6. Perception of climate change James Hansena,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    the significance of human- made global warming. Actions to stem emissions of the gases that cause global warming the season when climate change will have its biggest impact on humanity. Global warming causes spring warmth global warming. The distribution of seasonal mean temperature anomalies has shifted toward higher tempera

  7. Climate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    Science Global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide have increased from ice cores spanning many thousands of years. The global increases in carbon dioxide concentrationClimate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation with a Family Forest Perspective Baylor

  8. Our Changing Climate 2012 Vulnerability & Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /EPA, Natural Resources Agency, Department of Water Resources, Energy Commission, Air Resources Board, Ocean of climate change on the California economy. Cal/EPA entrusted the California Energy Commission and its insights for the energy, water, agriculture, public health, coastal, transportation, and ecological

  9. Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: The Elusive Component particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation (the "aerosol direct climatic effect"). Aerosols also affect clouds by acting as the seed for droplet

  10. Scientists in a Changed Institutional Environment: Subjective Adaptation and Social Responsibility Norms in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, T P; Ball, D Y

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    How do scientists react when the institutional setting in which they conduct their work changes radically? How do long-standing norms regarding the social responsibility of scientists fare? What factors influence whether scientists embrace or reject the new institutions and norms? We examine these questions using data from a unique survey of 602 scientists in Russia, whose science system experienced a sustained crisis and sweeping changes in science institutions following the collapse of the Soviet Union. We develop measures of how respondents view financing based on grants and other institutional changes in the Russian science system, as well as measures of two norms regarding scientists social responsibility. We find that the majority of scientists have adapted, in the sense that they hold positive views of the new institutions, but a diversity of orientations remains. Social responsibility norms are common among Russian scientists, but far from universal. The main correlates of adaptation are age and current success at negotiating the new institutions, though prospective success, work context, and ethnicity have some of the hypothesized associations. As for social responsibility norms, the main source of variation is age: younger scientists are more likely to embrace individualistic rather than socially-oriented norms.

  11. Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6 Re-direct Destination: The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical...

  12. EIS-0463: Notice of Public Meeting Location Change | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Location Change EIS-0463: Notice of Public Meeting Location Change Presidential Permit Application for Northern Pass Transmission, New Hampshire On September 6, 2013, DOE...

  13. Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector Online Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for...

  14. advanced phase change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change will affect the ability of developing counties to achieve their poverty reduction and sustainable development strategies. Projections of climate change point to...

  15. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

  16. Building America Webinar: Opportunities to Apply Phase Change...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Building America Webinar: Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures This webinar,...

  17. Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Develop an Institutional Change Action Plan for Sustainability Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from Determine...

  18. Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for...

  19. Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants...

  20. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Dec 2010 Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

  1. Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar Slides from the Building...

  2. Oregon: DOE Advances Game-Changing EGS Geothermal Technology...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Advances Game-Changing EGS Geothermal Technology at the Newberry Volcano Oregon: DOE Advances Game-Changing EGS Geothermal Technology at the Newberry Volcano April 9, 2013 -...

  3. Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    updated "National Action Plan Vision for 2025: A Framework for Change." Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy Efficient Future, November 18, 2008...

  4. NERSC Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving Data...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving Data Environment NERSC Implements Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving Data Environment February 23, 2015...

  5. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

  6. The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence...

  7. Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon. Substrate Changes Associated with the Chemistry of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon....

  8. Terra Sigillata: Evolution of Roman Ceramics Reflect Changes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terra Sigillata: Evolution of Roman Ceramics Reflect Changes in Technology, Life Terra Sigillata: Evolution of Roman Ceramics Reflect Changes in Technology, Life Print Wednesday,...

  9. Registration for the 3rd Annual Climate Change and Indigenous...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Registration for the 3rd Annual Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Conference Registration for the 3rd Annual Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Conference December 2, 2014...

  10. The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state solar cell Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state...

  11. Spiraling Laser Pulses Could Change Nature of Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spiraling Laser Pulses Could Change Nature of Graphene Spiraling Laser Pulses Could Change Nature of Graphene Simulations Run at NERSC Show It Could Transform from Metal to...

  12. Carbon Disclosure Project Webinar: Climate Change: A Challenge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Disclosure Project Webinar: Climate Change: A Challenge for Bond Analysts Carbon Disclosure Project Webinar: Climate Change: A Challenge for Bond Analysts April 8, 2015...

  13. Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options 2003 DEER Conference...

  14. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  15. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  16. Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector 2002 DEER Conference...

  17. Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on...

  18. Vietnam-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Sub National Planning for Climate Change (cities, states, districts)...

  19. Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change as Recorded in Earth Surface Processes Not surprisingly significant changes in climate leave their imprint on the landscape. During the last glacial maximum, 20,000...

  20. Uganda-UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP Territorial Approach to Climate Change (TACC) in Eastern Uganda AgencyCompany...

  1. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides...

  2. Platelet Proteome Changes Associated with Diabetes and During...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Platelet Proteome Changes Associated with Diabetes and During Platelet Storage for Transfusion. Platelet Proteome Changes Associated with Diabetes and During Platelet Storage for...

  3. avoid climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes 12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature 12; Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing...

  4. EIS-0359: Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EIS-0359: Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project Notice of Change in...

  5. Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia,...

  6. Effect of Lumpectomy Cavity Volume Change on the Clinical Target Volume for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Deformable Registration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Leonard H., E-mail: lkim@beaumonthospitals.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); DeCesare, Sam; Vicini, Frank; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that lumpectomy cavity volumes can change significantly in the weeks following surgery. The effect of this volume change on the surrounding tissue that constitutes the clinical target volume (CTV) for accelerated partial breast irradiation and boost treatment after whole breast irradiation has not been previously studied. In the present study, we used deformable registration to estimate the effect of lumpectomy cavity volume changes on the CTV for accelerated partial breast irradiation and discuss the implications for target construction. Methods and Materials: The data from 13 accelerated partial breast irradiation patients were retrospectively analyzed. Deformable registration was used to propagate contours from the initial planning computed tomography scan to a later computed tomography scan acquired at the start of treatment. The changes in cavity volume and CTV, distance between cavity and CTV contours (i.e., CTV margin), and CTV localization error after cavity registration were determined. Results: The mean {+-} standard deviation change in cavity volume and CTV between the two computed tomography scans was -35% {+-} 23% and -14% {+-} 12%, respectively. An increase in the cavity-to-CTV margin of 2 {+-} 2 mm was required to encompass the CTV, and this increase correlated with the cavity volume change. Because changes in the cavity and CTV were not identical, a localization error of 2-3 mm in the CTV center of mass occurred when the cavity was used as the reference for image guidance. Conclusion: Deformable registration suggested that CTV margins do not remain constant as the cavity volume changes. This finding has implications for planning target volume and CTV construction.

  7. Preparing the Way for New Policy Regarding Adaptation of US Electricity Infrastructure to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following pages represent the status of policy regarding adaptation of the electric grid to climate change and proposed directions for new policy development. While strides are being made to understand the current climate and to predict hazards it may present to human systems, both the science and the policy remain at present in an analytical state. The policy proposed in this document involves first continued computational modeling of outcomes which will produce a portfolio of options to be considered in light of specific region-related risks. It is proposed that the modeling continue not only until reasonable policy at various levels of jurisdiction can be derived from its outcome but also on a continuing basis so that as improvements in the understanding of the state and trajectory of climate science along with advancements in technology arise, they can be incorporated into an appropriate and evolving policy.

  8. In situ changes in the moisture content of heated, welded tuff based on thermal neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Carlson, R.C.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal neutron logs were collected to monitor changes in moisture content within a welded tuff rock mass heated from a borehole containing an electrical heater which remained energized for 195 days. Thermal neutron measurements were made in sampling boreholes before, during and after heating. The results generally corroborated our conceptual understanding of hydrothermal flow as well as most of the numerical modeling conducting for this study. Conceptual models have been developed in conjunction with the numerical model calculations to explain differences in the drying and re-wetting behavior above and below the heater. Numerical modeling indicated that the re-wetting of the dried-out zone was dominated by the binary diffusion of water vapor through fractures. Saturation gradients in the rock matrix resulted in relative humidity gradients which drove water vapor (primarily along fractures) back to the dried-out zone where it condensed along the fracture walls and was imbibed by the matrix. 4 refs., 28 figs.

  9. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  10. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  11. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dubey, Manvendra K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lesins, Glen [DALLHOUSIE U; Wang, Muyin [NOAA/JISAO

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  12. Changing nature of equipment and parts qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucci, R.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideally, the original supplier of a piece of nuclear safety-related equipment has performed a qualification program and will continue to support that equipment throughout the lifetime of the nuclear power plants in which in equipment is installed. The supplier's nuclear quality assurance program will be maintained and he will continue to offer all necessary replacement parts. These parts will be identical to the original parts, certified to the original purchase order requirements, and the parts will be offered at competitive prices. Due to the changing nature of the nuclear plant equipment market, however, one or more of those ideal features are frequently unavailable when safety-related replacement equipment or parts are required. Thus, the process of equipment and parts qualification has had to adjust in order to ensure obtaining qualified replacements when needed. This paper presents some new directions taken in the qualification of replacement equipment and parts to meet changes in the marketplace.

  13. The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliff, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16... Electricity Business Model • Observations on the Future and Conclusions Presentation overview 2 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights...

  14. Resistivity changes in carbon-implanted Teflon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW April 2004 Major: Nuclear Engineering RESISTIVITY CHANGES IN CARBON-IMPLANTED TEFLON A Senior Honors Thesis by MATTHEW R. JACKSON Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University... In partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW Approved as to style and content by: Ron Hart (Fellows Advisor) April 2004 Edward A. Funkhouser (Executive Director) Major: Nuclear Engineering ABSTRACT...

  15. Framing a Comprehensive Approach to Climate Change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boggs, Jay W.; Chellinsky, Andrew; Ege, David; Hodges, Allen; Reynolds, Tripp; Williams, Andy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ohio State University in 2004 with a B.A. in International Relations. Between his junior and senior years, Andrew spent the summer in Tomsk, Russia, studying the Siberian environment and transition economies. In addition to concentrating... in international political discourse. Despite the net positive effect on the U.S. due to climate change in 2025, the devastating climate effects across Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia; the beginnings of a resurgent Russia regaining great power...

  16. Free Energy Changes, Fluctuations, and Path Probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We illustrate some of the static and dynamic relations discovered by Cohen, Crooks, Evans, Jarzynski, Kirkwood, Morriss, Searles, and Zwanzig. These relations link nonequilibrium processes to equilibrium isothermal free energy changes and to dynamical path probabilities. We include ideas suggested by Dellago, Geissler, Oberhofer, and Schoell-Paschinger. Our treatment is intended to be pedagogical, for use in an updated version of our book: Time Reversibility, Computer Simulation, and Chaos. Comments are very welcome.

  17. Magnetic changes observed in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, R.L.; Hurford, G.J.; Jones, H.P.; Kane, S.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of a fairly large impulsive flare (1B/M4, starting 17:22 UT, 1980 April 10). Observations of the microwave/hard X-ray burst show the time development of the impulsive energy release. Chromospheric (H..cap alpha..) and photospheric (Fe I lambda5324) filtergrams and photospheric (Fe I lambda8688) magnetograms, intensitygrams, and velocitygrams show magnetic strucutre, flare emission, mass motion, and magnetic changes. From these observations, we conclude: 1. The flare was triggered by a small emerging magnetic bipole. 2. The peak impulsive energy release occurred in the explosive eruption of a filament from over the magnetic inversion line. Hence: a) The filament eruption was the magnetic transient in the heart of the primary energy release in the chromosphere and corona. b) The primary energy release did not occur in approximately stationary magnetic loops, but on field lines undergoing violet motion and drastic changes in direction. 3. In the photospheric magnetograph lines. Fe I lambda5324 and Fe I lambda8688, the impulsive peak of the flare produced emission in a unipolar area of a sunspot. In synchrony with the emission, the polarity of this area transiently reversed in the lambda8688 magnetigrams; apparently, this was an artifact of the line emission. 4. Within a few minutes after the explosive filament eruption. a) A permanent decrease in magnetic flux accompanied the truncation of an umbra. b) A permanent increase in magnetic flux accompanied the severance of the penumbral bridge to a satellite sunspot. Apparently, thee genuine photospheric magnetic changes were consequences of strong flare-wrought magnetic changes in the chromospher and corona.

  18. How Can We Avert Dangerous Climate Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent analyses indicate that the amount of atmospheric CO2 required to cause dangerous climate change is at most 450 ppm, and likely less than that. Reductions of non-CO2 climate forcings can provide only moderate, albeit important, adjustments to the CO2 limit. Realization of how close the planet is to "tipping points" with unacceptable consequences, especially ice sheet disintegration with sea level rise out of humanity's control, has a bright side. It implies an imperative: we must find a way to keep the CO2 amount so low that it will also avert other detrimental effects that had begun to seem inevitable, e.g., ocean acidification, loss of most alpine glaciers and thus the water supply for millions of people, and shifting of climatic zones with consequent extermination of species. Here I outline from a scientific perspective actions needed to achieve low limits on CO2 and global warming. These changes are technically feasible and have ancillary benefits. Achievement of needed changes requires overcoming t...

  19. Climatic change at high elevation sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Henry F. Diaz

    1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A Workshop on climatic change at high elevation sites was held September 11-15, 1995 in Wengen, Switzerland. The meeting was sponsored by both U.S. (Department of Energy, National Science Foundation and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) and European (Swiss National Science Foundation, European Science Foundation, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) agencies. The goals of the workshop were to (1) focus the attention of the world climate community on the existence of unique high elevation geophysical records around the world, (2) highlight the value of these observing sites for climate change detection efforts and to help insure the continued support of governments and of relevant institutions in the maintenance of these high elevation data gathering efforts, (3) discuss and evaluate climatic trends that may be present in these records, and to compare the information with available paleoenvironmental records of glaciers, tree-rings and varved sediments from the alpine zones, and (4) discuss and evaluate information about elevational differences in current and projected greenhouse-gas induced climatic changes in coupled General Circulation Models.

  20. Human factors engineers as change agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, B.P.; Harbour, G.L.; Caccamise, D.J.; Francis, L.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes a case study and the lessons learned when a Human Factors Engineering (HFE) Department was enlisted as technical experts but gradually assumed a much larger role as change agents in transforming outdated job practices into streamlined processes that promoted a safety culture. At Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons processing plant in Colorado, a workforce of over 7000 people support or directly operate a myriad of processes that range from laboratory analysis to typical foundry activities, greatly complicated by the presence of fissile, radioactive materials. Safe handling of these materials was governed by detailed discussions contained in Nuclear Material Safety limits (NMSLs). In spite of this rather extensive documentation, operators were committing an unacceptable number of safety infractions. Analysis revealed NMSLs were difficult to comprehend and not practical for use in operational settings. New job performance aids, called Criticality Safety Operating Limits (CSOLs) were developed to solve these problems. However, the solution involved more than applying good human factors principles to this job-aid. Following the classic Lewin Force Field Model of Change, safety infractions made change imperative; the forces operating against it were tradition, and perceived irrelevance of new expertise. Historically, Criticality Engineering dictated safety limits to Operations. In the course of Human Factoring'' the CSOLs, the HFE, through an iterative process, became the team integrator of this development process. Using Quality concepts such as buy-in, empowerment, and ownership, HFE was able to instantiate and receive enthusiastic acceptance of their products.