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1

HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator R&D Stewardship HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier...

2

Snowmass P5 process | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snowmass / P5 Snowmass / P5 Planning Process High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The high energy physics research community is currently engaged in

3

HEP Advisory Committees | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advisory Committees High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About HEP HEP Research HEP Facilities HEP Science Highlights Benefits of HEP HEP Funding Opportunities HEP Advisory...

4

Snowmass 2013 Young Physicists Science and Career Survey Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From April to July 2013 the Snowmass Young Physicists (SYP) administered an online survey collecting the opinions and concerns of the High Energy Physics (HEP) community. The aim of this survey is to provide input into the long term planning meeting known as the Community Summer Study (CSS), or Snowmass on the Mississippi. In total, 1112 respondents took part in the survey including 74 people who had received their training within HEP and have since left for non-academic jobs. This paper presents a summary of the survey results including demographic, career outlook, planned experiments and non-academic career path information collected.

J. Anderson; J. Asaadi; B. Carls; R. Cotta; R. Guenette; B. Kiburg; A. Kobach; H. Lippincott; B. Littlejohn; J. Love; B. Penning; M. Soares Santos; T. Strauss; A. Szelc; E. Worcester; F. Yu

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Computing for the Energy Frontier: Snowmass Study 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Contribution for the Computing for the Energy Frontier as part of the Snowmass study is discussed.

Fisk, Ian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Computing for the Energy Frontier: Snowmass Study 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Contribution for the Computing for the Energy Frontier as part of the Snowmass study is discussed.

Ian Fisk; Jim Shank

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier: Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing has become a major component of all particle physics experiments and in many areas of theoretical particle physics. Progress in HEP experiment and theory will require significantly more computing, software development, storage, and networking, with different projects stretching future capabilities in different ways. However, there are many common needs among different areas in HEP, so more community planning is advised to increase efficiency. Careful and continuing review of the topics we studied, i.e., user needs and capabilities of current and future technology, is needed.

Gregory Bell; Michael Ernst

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Neutron-Antineutron Oscillations: A Snowmass 2013 White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes discussions of the theoretical developments and the studies performed by the NNbarX collaboration for the 2013 Snowmass Community Summer Study.

K. Babu; S. Banerjee; D. V. Baxter; Z. Berezhiani; M. Bergevin; S. Bhattacharya; S. Brice; T. W. Burgess; L. Castellanos; S. Chattopadhyay; M-C. Chen; C. E. Coppola; R. Cowsik; J. A. Crabtree; P. Das; E. B. Dees; A. Dolgov; G. Dvali; P. Ferguson; M. Frost; T. Gabriel; A. Gal; F. Gallmeier; K. Ganezer; E. Golubeva; V. B. Graves; G. Greene; T. Handler; B. Hartfiel; A. Hawari; L. Heilbronn; C. Johnson; Y. Kamyshkov; B. Kerbikov; M. Kitaguchi; B. Z. Kopeliovich; V. B. Kopeliovich; W. Korsch; V. Kuzmin; C-Y. Liu; P. McGaughey; M. Mocko; R. Mohapatra; N. Mokhov; G. Muhrer; P. Mumm; L. Okun; R. W. Pattie Jr.; D. G. Phillips II; C. Quigg; E. Ramberg; A. Ray; A. Roy; A. Ruggles; U. Sarkar; A. Saunders; A. P. Serebrov; H. M. Shimizu; R. Shrock; A. K. Sikdar; S. Sjue; W. M. Snow; A. Soha; S. Spanier; S. Striganov; L. Townsend; R. Tschirhart; A. Vainshtein; R. Van Kooten; Z. Wang; B. Wehring; A. R. Young

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will present a uniform technical assessment of the benefits of the three approaches. The draft report will be presented and extensively discussed during the July meeting, leading to a final report. This report will provide critical fusion community input to the decision process of FESAC and DOE in 2002-2003, and to the review of burning plasma science by the National Academy of Sciences called for by FESAC and Energy Legislation which was passed by the House of Representatives [H.R. 4]. Members of the fusion community are encouraged to participate in the Snowmass working groups.

N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Snowmass Energy Frontier Simulations using the Open Science Grid (A Snowmass 2013 whitepaper)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snowmass is a US long-term planning study for the high-energy community by the American Physical Society's Division of Particles and Fields. For its simulation studies, opportunistic resources are harnessed using the Open Science Grid infrastructure. Late binding grid technology, GlideinWMS, was used for distributed scheduling of the simulation jobs across many sites mainly in the US. The pilot infrastructure also uses the Parrot mechanism to dynamically access CvmFS in order to ascertain a homogeneous environment across the nodes. This report presents the resource usage and the storage model used for simulating large statistics Standard Model backgrounds needed for Snowmass Energy Frontier studies.

Avetisyan, A; Narain, M; Padhi, S; Hirschauer, J; Levshina, T; McBride, P; Sehgal, C; Slyz, M; Rynge, M; Malik, S; Stupak, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Snowmass Energy Frontier Simulations using the Open Science Grid (A Snowmass 2013 whitepaper)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snowmass is a US long-term planning study for the high-energy community by the American Physical Society's Division of Particles and Fields. For its simulation studies, opportunistic resources are harnessed using the Open Science Grid infrastructure. Late binding grid technology, GlideinWMS, was used for distributed scheduling of the simulation jobs across many sites mainly in the US. The pilot infrastructure also uses the Parrot mechanism to dynamically access CvmFS in order to ascertain a homogeneous environment across the nodes. This report presents the resource usage and the storage model used for simulating large statistics Standard Model backgrounds needed for Snowmass Energy Frontier studies.

A. Avetisyan; S. Bhattacharya; M. Narain; S. Padhi; J. Hirschauer; T. Levshina; P. McBride; C. Sehgal; M. Slyz; M. Rynge; S. Malik; J. Stupak III

2013-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Snowmass Points and Slopes: Benchmarks for SUSY Searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ``Snowmass Points and Slopes'' (SPS) are a set of benchmark points and parameter lines in the MSSM parameter space corresponding to different scenarios in the search for Supersymmetry at present and future experiments. This set of benchmarks was agreed upon at the 2001 ``Snowmass Workshop on the Future of Particle Physics'' as a consensus based on different existing proposals.

B. C. Allanach; M. Battaglia; G. A. Blair; M. Carena; A. De Roeck; A. Dedes; A. Djouadi; D. Gerdes; N. Ghodbane; J. Gunion; H. E. Haber; T. Han; S. Heinemeyer; J. L. Hewett; I. Hinchliffe; J. Kalinowski; H. E. Logan; S. P. Martin; H. -U. Martyn; K. T. Matchev; S. Moretti; F. Moortgat; G. Moortgat-Pick; S. Mrenna; U. Nauenberg; Y. Okada; K. A. Olive; W. Porod; M. Schmitt; S. Su; C. E. M. Wagner; G. Weiglein; J. Wells; G. W. Wilson; P. Zerwas

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D|...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic...

14

Connecting Accelerator RD to User Needs | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Connecting Accelerator R&D to User Needs High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier...

15

Proton Accelerator Physics Continued| U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Frontier More Information High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical...

16

Cosmic Frontier | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Cosmic Frontier High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Cosmic Frontier: More...

17

Energy Frontier | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Frontier High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced...

18

cosmicfrontiermoreinfo | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Cosmic Frontier: More Information High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Cosmic...

19

A Vision on the Status and Evolution of HEP Physics Software Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper represents the vision of the members of the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division's Computational Physics Department (SCD-CPD) on the status and the evolution of various HEP software tools such as the Geant4 detector simulation toolkit, the Pythia and GENIE physics generators, and the ROOT data analysis framework. The goal of this paper is to contribute ideas to the Snowmass 2013 process toward the composition of a unified document on the current status and potential evolution of the physics software tools which are essential to HEP.

Canal, P; Hatcher, R; Jun, S Y; Mrenna, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Snowmass Village, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snowmass Village, Colorado: Energy Resources Snowmass Village, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2130418°, -106.9378207° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2130418,"lon":-106.9378207,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Snowmass Benchmark Points and Three-Loop Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the full three-loop beta-functions for the MSSM generalised to include additional matter multiplets in 5, 10 representations of SU(5). We analyse in detail the effect of three-loop running on the sparticle spectrum for the MSSM Snowmass Benchmark Points. We also consider the effect on these spectra of additional matter multiplets (the semi-perturbative unification scenario).

I. Jack; D. R. T. Jones; A. F. Kord

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and built in a few years, it would make sense to wait for the results of each accelerator before planning the next one. Thus, we would wait for the results from the Tevatron before planning the LHC experiments, and wait for the LHC before planning any later stage. In reality accelerators require a long time to construct, and they require such specialized resources and human talent that delay can cripple what would be promising opportunities. In any event, we believe that the case for the linear collider is so compelling and robust that we can justify this facility on the basis of our current knowledge, even before the Tevatron and LHC experiments are done. The physics prospects for the linear collider have been studied intensively for more than a decade, and arguments for the importance of its experimental program have been developed from many different points of view. This book provides an introduction and a guide to this literature. We hope that it will allow physicists new to the consideration of linear collider physics to start from their own personal perspectives and develop their own assessments of the opportunities afforded by a linear collider.

Ronan (Editor), M.T.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

HEP Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights/ The Office of Science is the highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {271928DC-3A20-4D7E-97F4-DEC29F0C439B}http://science.energy.gov/hep/highlights/2013/hep-2013-08-a/ Patterns in the Cosmos Trace Evolution of the Universe Detection of subtle polarization patterns in the Cosmic Microwave Background opens a

24

Snowmass CF1 Summary: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

P. Cushman; C. Galbiati; D. N. McKinsey; H. Robertson; T. M. P. Tait; D. Bauer; A. Borgland; B. Cabrera; F. Calaprice; J. Cooley; T. Empl; R. Essig; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; R. Gaitskell; S. Golwala; J. Hall; R. Hill; A. Hime; E. Hoppe; L. Hsu; E. Hungerford; R. Jacobsen; M. Kelsey; R. F. Lang; W. H. Lippincott; B. Loer; S. Luitz; V. Mandic; J. Mardon; J. Maricic; R. Maruyama; R. Mahapatra; H. Nelson; J. Orrell; K. Palladino; E. Pantic; R. Partridge; A. Ryd; T. Saab; B. Sadoulet; R. Schnee; W. Shepherd; A. Sonnenschein; P. Sorensen; M. Szydagis; T. Volansky; M. Witherell; D. Wright; K. Zurek

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

25

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Committees of Committees of Visitors High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (170KB) HEP Budget HEP Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs University Research & National Labs Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » About HEP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) 2010 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (547KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (29KB)

26

HEP-NERSCWorkshop.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Samtaney (PPPL) ASCR Program Representatives BER BES FES HEP (Tech-X) (Emory University) Bas Braams Eric Bylaska (PNNL) (UC Berkeley) Thomas Miller David Beck (University of WA)...

27

NERSC/DOE HEP Requirements Workshop Reference Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) High Energy Physics (HEP) Final Workshop Reports Past ESnet...

28

Kinematics of Top Quark Final States: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the summary report of the Top Quark Kinematics working group prepared for Snowmass 2013. We survey the current state of theoretical predictions for top pair differential distributions, in both boosted and un-boosted regimes, and present an overview of uncertainties and prospects for top spin correlations. We study the prospects for measuring the inclusive SM top pair production asymmetry AFC at LHC 14 as a function of systematic error, and show that some improvement over current systematic uncertainties, as customarily handled, is required for observing a SM-size asymmetry. Cuts on top pair invariant mass and rapidity do not substantially alter this conclusion. We summarize the conclusions of contributed studies on alternate LHC measurements of the ttbar production asymmetry, in ttbar+jet final states and in forward top production at LHCb, both of which show good prospects for observing SM-size asymmetries in 50 fb-1 of data at LHC14.

Andreas Jung; Markus Schulze; Jessie Shelton

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

29

Report of the Snowmass 2013 energy frontier QCD working group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the summary report of the energy frontier QCD working group prepared for Snowmass 2013. We review the status of tools, both theoretical and experimental, for understanding the strong interactions at colliders. We attempt to prioritize important directions that future developments should take. Most of the efforts of the QCD working group concentrate on proton-proton colliders, at 14 TeV as planned for the next run of the LHC, and for 33 and 100 TeV, possible energies of the colliders that will be necessary to carry on the physics program started at 14 TeV. We also examine QCD predictions and measurements at lepton-lepton and lepton-hadron colliders, and in particular their ability to improve our knowledge of strong coupling constant and parton distribution functions.

J. M. Campbell; K. Hatakeyama; J. Huston; F. Petriello; J. Andersen; L. Barze; H. Beauchemin; T. Becher; M. Begel; A. Blondel; G. Bodwin; R. Boughezal; S. Carrazza; M. Chiesa; G. Dissertori; S. Dittmaier; G. Ferrera; S. Forte; N. Glover; T. Hapola; A. Huss; X. Garcia i Tormo; M. Grazzini; S. Hoche; P. Janot; T. Kasprzik; M. Klein; U. Klein; D. Kosower; Y. Li; X. Liu; P. Mackenzie; D. Maitre; E. Meoni; K. Mishra; G. Montagna; M. Moretti; P. Nadolsky; O. Nicrosini; F. Piccinini; L. Reina; V. Radescu; J. Rojo; J. Russ; S. Sapeta; A. Schwartzman; P. Skands; J. Smillie; I. W. Stewart; F. J. Tackmann; F. Tramontano; R. Van de Water; J. R. Walsh; S. Zuberi

2013-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

30

HEP Supported Workshops & Conferences | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEP HEP Sponsored Workshops and Conferences High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources SC Graduate Fellowship Program: HEP 2010 Awardees External link Quick Links DOE High Energy Physics Reports HEP Sponsored Workshops and Conferences Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources HEP Sponsored Workshops and Conferences Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Click on a link to learn more about a HEP-supported workshop or conference. Accelerators for America's Future External link

31

HEP Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Scientific and Technical Information Honors & Awards Jobs Contact Us You are here: SC Home Programs HEP Home About HEP HEP Budget High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP...

32

Stealth Stops and Spin Correlation: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stops with the mass nearly degenerate with the top mass, decaying into tops and soft neutralinos, are usually dubbed "stealth stops". Their kinematics looks very similar to that of the standard tops events, which leads to events with little or no excess of missing transverse energy. This complicates the probing of this region of the stop parameter space by hadron colliders, rendering the application of standard searching techniques challenging. In this Snowmass white paper we reanalyze the spin correlation approach to the search of stealth stops, focusing on the feasibility of this search at the 14 TeV LHC. We find, while the statistical limitations significantly shrink compared to the low-luminosity 8 TeV run, the systematic PDF uncertainties pose the main obstacle. We show that the current understanding of PDFs probably does not allow us to talk about top and stop discrimination via spin correlation in the inclusive sample. On the other hand the systematic uncertainties significantly shrink if only events with low center of mass energy are considered, rendering the search in this region feasible.

Zhenyu Han; Andrey Katz

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Printing out Particle Detectors with 3D-Printers, a Potentially Transformational Advance for HEP Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This white paper suggests posing a "grand challenge" to the HEP instrumentation community, i.e. the aggressive development of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, for the production of particle detectors in collaboration with industry. This notion is an outcome of discussions within the instrumentation frontier group during the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community. Improvements of current industrial 3D-printing capabilities by one to two orders of magnitude in terms of printing resolution, speed, and object size together with developing the ability to print composite materials could enable the production of any desired 3D detector structure directly from a digital model. Current industrial 3D-printing capabilities are briefly reviewed and contrasted with capabilities desired for printing detectors for particle physics, with micro-pattern gaseous detectors used as a first example. A significant impact on industrial technology could be expected if HEP were to part...

Hohlmann, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Printing out Particle Detectors with 3D-Printers, a Potentially Transformational Advance for HEP Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This white paper suggests posing a "grand challenge" to the HEP instrumentation community, i.e. the aggressive development of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, for the production of particle detectors in collaboration with industry. This notion is an outcome of discussions within the instrumentation frontier group during the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community. Improvements of current industrial 3D-printing capabilities by one to two orders of magnitude in terms of printing resolution, speed, and object size together with developing the ability to print composite materials could enable the production of any desired 3D detector structure directly from a digital model. Current industrial 3D-printing capabilities are briefly reviewed and contrasted with capabilities desired for printing detectors for particle physics, with micro-pattern gaseous detectors used as a first example. A significant impact on industrial technology could be expected if HEP were to partner with industry in taking on such a challenge.

M. Hohlmann

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

35

HEP-Tsung.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F. S. Tsung, HEP Workshop F. S. Tsung, HEP Workshop Project Summary -- Simulations of Plasma Based Accelerator Experiments Around the World. UCLA/IST is making a strong effort to quickly deploy simulation modeling to experimental teams - Laboratory frame simulations of LWFA's in OSIRIS - Boosted frame simulations of LWFA's in OSIRIS - Laboratory frame simulations of LWFA/PWFA's in QuickPIC Plasma based accelerators can achieve accelerating gradients 1,000 x that of those created by conventional accelerators. Recently, 2 plasma-based accelerator facilities have been approved. BELLA -- LBNL (ref. C. Geddes) FACET -- 25GeV e-/e+ beams for single-stage PWFA demonstration. * Simulations have played an important role in the understanding of current experiments. Our objective in the next 3-5 years is to help the

36

HEP data analysis using jHepWork and Java.  

SciTech Connect

A role of Java in high-energy physics (HEP) and recent progress in development of a platform-independent data-analysis framework, jHepWork, is discussed. The framework produces professional graphics and has many libraries for data manipulation.

Chekanov, S.; High Energy Physics

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

HepForge: A lightweight development environment for HEP software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Setting up the infrastructure to manage a software project can become a task as significant writing the software itself. A variety of useful open source tools are available, such as Web-based viewers for version control systems, "wikis" for collaborative discussions and bug-tracking systems, but their use in high-energy physics, outside large collaborations, is insubstantial. Understandably, physicists would rather do physics than configure project management tools. We introduce the CEDAR HepForge system, which provides a lightweight development environment for HEP software. Services available as part of HepForge include the above-mentioned tools as well as mailing lists, shell accounts, archiving of releases and low-maintenance Web space. HepForge also exists to promote best-practice software development methods and to provide a central repository for re-usable HEP software and phenomenology codes.

A. Buckley; J. M. Butterworth; E. Nurse; W. J. Stirling; B. Waugh; M. R. Whalley

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

Z' Discovery Reach at Future Hadron Colliders: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extra neutral gauge bosons are a feature of many models of physics beyond the standard model (BSM) and their discovery could possibly be the first evidence for new physics. In this Snowmass white paper we compare the discovery reach of the high energy hadron colliders considered by the Snowmass study for a broad range of BSM models. It is expected that the LHC should be able to see evidence for a Z' arising from a large variety of BSM models up to a mass of ~5 TeV when the LHC reaches its design energy and luminosity, and up to ~6 TeV with the high luminosity upgrade. Further into the future, the high energy LHC would substantially extend this reach to ~11 TeV, while the ~100 TeV VHE-LHC could see evidence for Z' 's up to ~30 TeV.

Stephen Godfrey; Travis Martin

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

Higgs Working Group Report of the Snowmass 2013 Community Planning Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $CP$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Our report includes projections of measurement capabilities from detailed studies of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), a Gamma-Gamma Collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Upgrade (HL-LHC), Very Large Hadron Colliders up to 100 TeV (VLHC), a Muon Collider, and a Triple-Large Electron Positron Collider (TLEP).

S. Dawson; A. Gritsan; H. Logan; J. Qian; C. Tully; R. Van Kooten; A. Ajaib; A. Anastassov; I. Anderson; D. Asner; O. Bake; V. Barger; T. Barklow; B. Batell; M. Battaglia; S. Berge; A. Blondel; S. Bolognesi; J. Brau; E. Brownson; M. Cahill-Rowley; C. Calancha-Paredes; C. -Y. Chen; W. Chou; R. Clare; D. Cline; N. Craig; K. Cranmer; M. de Gruttola; A. Elagin; R. Essig; L. Everett; E. Feng; K. Fujii; J. Gainer; Y. Gao; I. Gogoladze; S. Gori; R. Goncalo; N. Graf; C. Grojean; S. Guindon; H. Haber; T. Han; G. Hanson; R. Harnik; S. Heinemeyer; U. Heintz; J. Hewett; Y. Ilchenko; A. Ishikawa; A. Ismail; V. Jain; P. Janot; S. Kanemura; S. Kawada; R. Kehoe; M. Klute; A. Kotwal; K. Krueger; G. Kukartsev; K. Kumar; J. Kunkle; M. Kurata; I. Lewis; Y. Li; L. Linssen; E. Lipeles; R. Lipton; T. Liss; J. List; T. Liu; Z. Liu; I. Low; T. Ma; P. Mackenzie; B. Mellado; K. Melnikov; A. Miyamoto; G. Moortgat-Pick; G. Mourou; M. Narain; H. Neal; J. Nielsen; N. Okada; H. Okawa; J. Olsen; H. Ono; P. Onyisi; N. Parashar; M. Peskin; F. Petriello; T. Plehn; C. Pollard; C. Potter; K. Prokofiev; M. Rauch; T. Rizzo; T. Robens; V. Rodriguez; P. Roloff; R. Ruiz; V. Sanz; J. Sayre; Q. Shafi; G. Shaughnessy; M. Sher; F. Simon; N. Solyak; J. Strube; J. Stupak; S. Su; T. Suehara; T. Tanabe; T. Tajima; V. Telnov; J. Tian; S. Thomas; M. Thomson; K. Tsumura; C. Un; M. Velasco; C. Wagner; S. Wang; S. Watanuki; G. Weiglein; A. Whitbeck; K. Yagyu; W. Yao; H. Yokoya; S. Zenz; D. Zerwas; Y. Zhang; Y. Zhou

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networking) Les Cottrell, SLAC (Networking) Glen Crawford,Networking) Richard Mount, SLAC (HEP) Thomas Ndousse-Fetter,36 SLAC Experimental HEP

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High Energy Physics (HEP) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs » HEP Home Programs » HEP Home High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Higgs Boson Discovery Leads to Nobel Prize External link François Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics for their contributions to our understanding of the origin of mass, confirmed by the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.Read More External linkage US Participation in the Higgs Discovery External link

42

List of all HEP Institutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top 500 Top 500 HEP and Astrophysics Institutions by Country This document lists the 500 major high-energy physics and astrophysics institutions, sorted by country. Each listing will show a [SPIRES Entry] which gives the full address and phone/fax/url of the institution in addition to links to papers in HEP and people in HEPNAMES. The [Home page], where known, takes you directly to the departmental home page. Alternatively try our INSTITUTIONS search page. This list of the top 500 institutions is chosen by the number of papers from each institution in the past 5 years. Click here for the full list of HEP institutions. Please send any comments, corrections, updates or information on new institutions to: inst@slac.stanford.edu. Last modified at 17:12:32 on 06/30/04.

43

HEP data analysis using jHepWork and Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A role of Java in high-energy physics and recent progress in development of a platform-independent data-analysis framework, jHepWork, is discussed. The framework produces professional graphics and has many libraries for data manipulation.

Chekanov, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

HEP data analysis using jHepWork and Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A role of Java in high-energy physics and recent progress in development of a platform-independent data-analysis framework, jHepWork, is discussed. The framework produces professional graphics and has many libraries for data manipulation.

S. Chekanov

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

HEP Open Funding Opportunities  

Office of Science (SC) Website

- and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en 6E0BF60A-A50B-4201-AC3E-A...

46

Opportunities in Neutrino Theory -- a Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutrino masses are clear evidence for physics beyond the standard model and much more remains to be understood about the neutrino sector. We highlight some of the outstanding questions and research opportunities in neutrino theory. We show that most of these questions are directly connected to the very rich experimental program currently being pursued (or at least under serious consideration) in the United States and worldwide. Finally, we also comment on the state of the theoretical neutrino physics community in the U.S.

Andre de Gouvea; Alexander Friedland; Patrick Huber; Irina Mocioiu

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

47

NERSC/DOE HEP Requirements Workshop Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements for Science: Target 2014 High Energy Physics (HEP) Logistics Workshop Logistics Workshop Location Hilton Washington...

48

NERSC/DOE HEP 2012 Review Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC HPC Achievement Awards Home Science at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews High Energy Physics (HEP) Logistics Hotel Information Location The review will be held at...

49

cet091110-hep_hpc.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detector Simulation Detector Simulation and Analysis Craig E. Tull, Ph.D. Staff Scientist/Group Leader Science Software Systems Group Computational Research Division Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences November 12, 2009 Rockville, MD HEP-HCG | Rockville | November 12, 2009 1. Detector Simulation and Analysis Overview Summarize the projects in your science area and their scientific objectives for the next 3-5 years * Current and past users of NERSC: - ATLAS - LHC accelerator at CERN, Geneva (PI: Ian Hinchliff) - Daya Bay - Nuclear reactor Neutrino detector in China (PI: Kam-Biu Luk) - CDF - Tevatron accelerator at FNAL (PI: Wei Min Yao) - BOSS - Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey - JDEM/SNAP - Supernova satellite (PI: Saul Perlmutter) - BaBar - PEP-II collider at SLAC, Stanford - SNF - SuperNova Factory (PI: Greg Alderige)

50

HEP Conference Funding Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Conferences Conferences High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search Peer Merit / Review Policies Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy Physics Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory Guidelines Comparative Review Annual Solicitation Progress Reports and Final Report Conferences Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Guidelines Conferences Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page These guidelines are in addition to, not in lieu of, the official DOE

51

HEP-Req_SLAC.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Accelerator Modeling For Accelerator Modeling Finite Element Approach Lie-Quan Lee SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics NERSC/ASCR/HEP Workshop, Washington D.C., November 12-13, 2009 NERSC Project * Project name: Advanced Modeling for Particle Accelerators * Principle Investigator: Kwok Ko * Participating institutions: - SLAC, BNL, FNAL, ORNL, TJNAF - CW09 Users * ANL * CERN * Cornell University * Los Alamos Lab * Michigan State University * Paul Scherrer Institut * Royal Holloway U London Scientific Objectives * Summarize your projects and its scientific objectives for the next 3-5 years * Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) * Simulating wakefield and evaluate HOM damping in Accelerating Structures (AS) and Power Extract and Transfer Structures (PETS)

52

Quarkonium at the Frontiers of High Energy Physics: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Snowmass White Paper, we discuss physics opportunities involving heavy quarkonia at the intensity and energy frontiers of high energy physics. We focus primarily on two specific aspects of quarkonium physics for which significant advances can be expected from experiments at both frontiers. The first aspect is the spectroscopy of charmonium and bottomonium states above the open-heavy-flavor thresholds. Experiments at e^+ e^- colliders and at hadron colliders have discovered many new, unexpected quarkonium states in the last 10 years. Many of these states are surprisingly narrow, and some have electric charge. The observations of these charged quarkonium states are the first definitive discoveries of manifestly exotic hadrons. These results challenge our understanding of the QCD spectrum. The second aspect is the production of heavy quarkonium states with large transverse momentum. Experiments at the LHC are measuring quarkonium production with high statistics at unprecedented values of p_T. Recent theoretical developments may provide a rigorous theoretical framework for inclusive production of quarkonia at large p_T. Experiments at the energy frontier will provide definitive tests of this framework. Experiments at the intensity frontier also provide an opportunity to understand the exclusive production of quarkonium states.

Geoffrey T. Bodwin; Eric Braaten; Estia Eichten; Stephen Lars Olsen; Todd K. Pedlar; James Russ

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

Projected Performance of an Upgraded CMS Detector at the LHC and HL-LHC: Contribution to the Snowmass Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics reach of the CMS detector achievable with 300(0) inverse femtobarns of proton-proton collisions recorded at sqrt(s)=14 TeV is presented. Ultimate precision on measurements of Higgs boson properties, top quark physics, and electroweak processes are discussed, as well as the discovery potential for new particles beyond the standard model. In addition, the potential for future heavy ion physics is presented. This document has been submitted as a white paper to the Snowmass process, an exercise initiated by the American Physical Society's Division of Particles and Fields to assess the long-term physics aspirations of the US high energy physics community.

CMS Collaboration

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

54

HEP-v2-for-dist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3D QuickPIC) Plasma-based acceleration is rich in science: Computer modeling has been essential to the progress of this field F. S. Tsung, HEP Workshop Facilities for...

55

Amber_HEP-NERSC.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory is typically compute intensive. We recognize that computing infrastructure and facilities are essential to fulfill our research mission * Data storage and compute...

56

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEP HEP Committees of Visitors High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home HEP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) 2013 HEPAP COV Charge .pdf file (486KB) 2010 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (547KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (29KB) 2007 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (516KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (16KB) 2004 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (2.4MB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (98KB) Last modified: 9/9/2013 4:01:05 PM

57

HEP education and outreach activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student's Story Student's Story At Brookhaven National Laboratory, we have many opportunities for interaction with students and the public. An unusual opportunity arose in the summer of 1995. A high school student, Erica Sanders, wrote to the Lab asking for a chance to do research. Her exceptional resume indicated that she had completed calculus as a sophomore and possessed a strong interest in science. We interviewed her and found her quite poised and interested. Her first project involved analyzing test beam data from the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeter, destined for use at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. She learned the tools of the particle physicists' trade: Unix, PAW, tex, etc. But Erica wanted to have a project of her own. We eventually selected development of Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) for medical imaging. (We used

58

HEP Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Theory HEP Guidelines Comparative Review Annual Solicitation Progress Reports and Final Report Conferences Peer Merit Review Policies For Reviewers: Find your Proposal...

59

HEP Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

HEP HEP Budget Budget Budget Home About Budget by Program ASCR Budget BES Budget BER Budget FES Budget HEP Budget NP Budget WDTS Budget SLI & SS Budget SCPD Budget GAO Audit Reports External Links Contact Information Budget U.S. Department of Energy SC-41/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3541 F: (301) 903-9524 More Information » Budget by Program HEP Budget Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The following links contain HEP's budget request to Congress for current and prior years: FY2014 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (921KB) FY2013 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (629KB) FY2012 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (600KB) FY2011 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (547KB) FY2010 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (551KB)

60

Do hep neutrinos affect the solar neutrino energy spectrum?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If the low energy cross section for 3He + p goes to 4He + e + nu_e, the `hep' reaction, is > 20 times larger than the best (but uncertain) theoretical estimates, then this reaction could significantly influence the electron energy spectrum produced by solar neutrino interactions and measured in the SuperKamiokande, SNO, and ICARUS experiments. We compare predicted energy spectra for different assumed hep fluxes and different neutrino oscillation scenarios with the observed SuperKamiokande spectrum. The spectra with enhanced hep contributions provide better fits to the SuperKamiokande data.

John Bahcall; Plamen Krastev

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Architecture and applications of the HEP multiprocessor computer system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HEP computer system is a large scale scientific parallel computer employing shared-resource MIMD architecture. The hardware and software facilities provided by the system are described, and techniques found useful in programming the system are discussed. 3 references.

Smith, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Wide area network monitoring system for HEP experiments at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centers. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system.

Grigoriev, Maxim; /Fermilab; Cottrell, Les; Logg, Connie; /SLAC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Report of the Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory -- Lattice field theory for the energy and intensity frontiers: Scientific goals and computing needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

Blum, T; Holmgren, D; Brower, R; Catterall, S; Christ, N; Kronfeld, A; Kuti, J; Mackenzie, P; Neil, E T; Sharpe, S R; Sugar, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Report of the Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory -- Lattice field theory for the energy and intensity frontiers: Scientific goals and computing needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

T. Blum; R. S. Van de Water; D. Holmgren; R. Brower; S. Catterall; N. Christ; A. Kronfeld; J. Kuti; P. Mackenzie; E. T. Neil; S. R. Sharpe; R. Sugar

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

HEP/ Particle Astrophysics Special Seminar | Princeton Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

69

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Carey Creek, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

University Research National Labs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

About » University About » University Research & National Labs » University Research National Labs Alpha Listing High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (170KB) HEP Budget HEP Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs University Research & National Labs University Research National Labs Alpha Listing Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » University Research & National Labs University Research National Labs Alpha Listing Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds

73

Monte Carlo tools for studies of non-standard electroweak gauge boson interactions in multi-boson processes: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Snowmass 2013 white paper, we review the effective field theory approach for studies of non-standard electroweak interactions in electroweak vector boson pair and triple production and vector boson scattering. We present an overview of the implementation of dimension six and eight operators in MadGraph5, VBFNLO, and WHIZARD, and provide relations between the coefficients of these higher dimensions operators used in these programs and in the anomalous couplings approach. We perform a tuned comparison of predictions for multi-boson processes including non-standard electroweak interactions with MadGraph5, VBFNLO, and WHIZARD. We discuss the role of higher-order corrections in these predictions using VBFNLO and a POWHEG BOX implementation of higher-order QCD corrections to WWjj production. The purpose of this white paper is to collect useful tools for the study of non-standard EW physics at the LHC, compare them, and study the main physics issues in the relevant processes.

Celine Degrande; Oscar Eboli; Bastian Feigl; Barbara Jger; Wolfgang Kilian; Olivier Mattelaer; Michael Rauch; Jrgen Reuter; Marco Sekulla; Doreen Wackeroth

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

White Paper on DOE-HEP Accelerator Modeling Science Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toward the goal of maximizing the impact of computer modeling on the design of future particle accelerators and the development of new accelerator techniques & technologies, this white paper presents the rationale for: (a) strengthening and expanding programmatic activities in accelerator modeling science within the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) and (b) increasing the community-wide coordination and integration of code development.

Vay, Jean-Luc; Koniges, Alice; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P; Bruhwiler, David L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Solar pp and hep Processes in Effective Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strategy of modern effective field theory is exploited to pin down accurately the flux $S$ factors for the $pp$ and $hep$ processes in the Sun. The technique used is to combine the high accuracy established in few-nucleon systems of the "standard nuclear physics approach" (SNPA) and the systematic power counting of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) into a consistent effective field theory framework. Using highly accurate wave functions obtained in the SNPA and working to \

T. -S. Park; K. Kubodera; D. -P. Min; M. Rho

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

HEP Conference Funding Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Theory HEP Guidelines Comparative Review Annual Solicitation Progress Reports and Final Report Conferences Peer Merit Review Policies For Reviewers: Find your Proposal...

77

Accelerator R&D Stewardship | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Accelerator Accelerator R&D Stewardship High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Mission Background HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise Connecting Accelerator R&D to User Needs Workshop Reports Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Accelerator R&D Stewardship

78

Connecting Accelerator RD to User Needs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connecting Accelerator R&D to User Needs Connecting Accelerator R&D to User Needs High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Mission Background HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise Connecting Accelerator R&D to User Needs Workshop Reports Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Accelerator R&D Stewardship

79

Workshop Reports | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Reports Workshop Reports High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Mission Background HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise Connecting Accelerator R&D to User Needs Workshop Reports Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Accelerator R&D Stewardship Workshop Reports

80

Mission | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mission Mission High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Mission Background HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise Connecting Accelerator R&D to User Needs Workshop Reports Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Accelerator R&D Stewardship Mission Print Text Size: A A A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-28, 2012 Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC-HEP Requirements Review 1 Science C ase S tudies d rive d iscussions Program R equirements R eviews ...

82

Review and Selection of Research Projects | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Review and Selection of Research Projects Review and Selection of Research Projects High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search Peer Merit / Review Policies Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy Physics Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory Guidelines Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Peer Merit / Review Policies Review and Selection of Research Projects Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page All research projects supported by the Office of High Energy Physics (HEP)

83

Questions for the Universe | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Universe Universe High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces The Particle World The Birth of the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Questions for the Universe Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

84

Accomplishments | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accomplishments High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Accomplishments INDX Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Accomplishments Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Click on a Year 2007 2008 2009 2010 Click on a year at the right to learn about some of the accomplishments the

85

Advanced Technology R&D continued| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

More Information More Information High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Advanced Technology R&D More Information Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page High energy physics research is strongly dependent on the use of

86

Advanced Technology R&D | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Advanced Technology R&D High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Research Advanced Technology R&D Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page In pursuit of scientific discoveries, physicists develop new tools that

87

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D| U.S. DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Advanced Technology R&D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Print

89

Intensity Frontier: More Information | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intensity Intensity Frontier » Intensity Frontier: More Information High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier: More Information Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Experiments at the Intensity Frontier aim to transform our understanding of

90

The birth of the universe - universe origins | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

birth of the universe birth of the universe High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces The Particle World The Birth of the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Questions for the Universe The birth of the universe Print Text Size: A A A

91

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Theoretical Physics| U.S. DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theoretical Physics Unique Aspects Theoretical Physics Unique Aspects High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Theoretical Physics Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

92

Birth of Universe-Antimatter | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

What happened to antimatter? What happened to antimatter? High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces The Particle World The Birth of the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Questions for the Universe Birth of Universe Print Text Size: A A A

93

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Cosmic Frontier: More Information Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Cosmic Frontier Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges

94

Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces - principles | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces The Particle World The Birth of the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Questions for the Universe Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces

95

The Particle World Dark Matter | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Dark Matter Dark Matter High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces The Particle World The Birth of the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Questions for the Universe Dark Matter Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

96

The Birth of the Universe | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

The Birth of the Universe The Birth of the Universe High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces The Particle World The Birth of the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Questions for the Universe The Birth of the Universe Print Text Size: A A A

97

cosmicfrontiermoreinfo | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Cosmic Frontier: More Information Cosmic Frontier: More Information High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Cosmic Frontier: More Information Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Cosmic Frontier Cosmic Frontier: More Information Print Text Size: A A A

98

Theoretical Physics continued | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

More Information More Information High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Theoretical Physics More Information Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Though they are typically not directly involved in the planning,

99

Accomplishments INDX | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Accomplishments » Accomplishments INDX High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Accomplishments Accomplishments INDX Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Accomplishments Accomplishments INDX Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page 2007 At the Energy Frontier . . .

100

The Particle World | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

The Particle World The Particle World High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass / P5 Planning Process Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the Universe Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces The Particle World The Birth of the Universe Accomplishments Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Questions for the Universe The Particle World Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Calispell Creek Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Calispell Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in February 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Calispell Creek Project provides a total of 138.17 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 5.16 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Grassland provides 132.02 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 0.99 HUs for yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Calispell Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

104

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

Ashley, Paul

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Confidentiality of Research Proposals and Peer Reviews | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Confidentiality of Research Proposals and Confidentiality of Research Proposals and Peer Reviews High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search Peer Merit / Review Policies Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy Physics Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory Guidelines Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Peer Merit / Review Policies Confidentiality of Research Proposals and Peer Reviews Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

106

Early Career Research Opportunities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy Physics Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy Physics High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search Peer Merit / Review Policies Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy Physics Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory Guidelines Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Funding Opportunities Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy Physics Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

107

West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Performance study of GPUs in real-time trigger applications for HEP experiments  

SciTech Connect

Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) have evolved into highly parallel, multi-threaded, multicore powerful processors with high memory bandwidth. GPUs are used in a variety of intensive computing applications. The combination of highly parallel architecture and high memory bandwidth makes GPUs a potentially promising technology for effective real-time processing for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. However, not much is known of their performance in real-time applications that require low latency, such as the trigger for HEP experiments. We describe an R and D project with the goal to study the performance of GPU technology for possible low latency applications, performing basic operations as well as some more advanced HEP lower-level trigger algorithms (such as fast tracking or jet finding). We present some preliminary results on timing measurements, comparing the performance of a CPU versus a GPU with NVIDIA's CUDA general-purpose parallel computing architecture, carried out at CDF's Level-2 trigger test stand. These studies will provide performance benchmarks for future studies to investigate the potential and limitations of GPUs for real-time applications in HEP experiments.

Ketchum, W.; /Chicago U.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Bastieri, D.; Bauce, M.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Catastini, P.; /Fermilab; Gelain, S.; /Padua U.; Hahn, K.; /Fermilab; Kim, Y.K.; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Liu, T.; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Urso, G.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for the Wildlife Management Areas; and (2) Evaluation of the simplified YN HEP methodologies as a means of measuring mitigation progress.

Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma Creek South Project, Technical Report 2003-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Tacoma Creek South property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in June 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Tacoma Creek South Project provides a total of 190.79 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetlands provide 20.51 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Grassland provides 1.65 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 11.76 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 139.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forest also provides 19.15 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Tacoma Creek South Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, 2004-2006 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Management Area (LMWA) in May 2005. The 2005 HEP assessment resulted in a total of 647.44 HUs, or 0.76 HUs/acre. This is an increase of 420.34 HUs (0.49 HUs/acre) over 2001 HEP survey results. The most significant increase in HUs occurred on the Wallender and Simonis parcels which increased by 214.30 HUs and 177.49 HUs respectively. Transects were established at or near 2001 HEP analysis transect locations whenever possible. ODFW staff biologists assisted the RHT re-establish transect locations and/or suggested areas for new surveys. Since 2001, significant changes in cover type acreage and/or structural conditions have occurred due to conversion of agriculture cover types to emergent wetland and grassland cover types. Agricultural lands were seeded to reestablish grasslands and wetlands were restored through active management and manipulation of extant water sources including natural stream hydrology/flood regimes and available irrigation. Grasslands increased on the Wallender parcel by 21% (65 acres), 23% (71 acres) at the Simonis site, and 39% (62 acres) at Conley Lake. The emergent wetland cover type also changed significantly increasing 60% (184 acres) at Wallender and 59% (184 acres) on the Simonis tract. Today, agriculture lands (crop and grazed pasture) have been nearly eliminated from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation project lands located on the LMWA.

Ashley, Paul; Wagoner, Sara

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; North Eaton Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

HEP Early Career Research Opportunities | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Essig, Rouven Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY Particle Physics at the Cosmic Intensity, and Energy Frontiers Hartnoll, Sean Stanford University Palo Alto, CA...

120

arXiv:hep-ex/0406012v12Jun2004 EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2003 Search for fermiophobic Higgs bosons in final states with photons at LEP 2 DELPHI Collaboration Abstract Higgs boson production with subsequent decay to photons was searched for in the data), the decay of the Higgs boson to photons is mediated by heavy charged particles (namely W± bosons and top

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121

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Willow Creek, Technical Report 1993-1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Willow Creek site is one of the most significant remaining areas of typical native Willamette Valley habitats, with a variety of wetlands, grasslands, and woodlands. A diverse array of native flora and fauna, with significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Wildlife diversity is high, and includes species of mammals, songbirds, raptors, reptiles, amphibians, and one rare invertebrate. Over 200 species of native plants have been identified (including populations of six rare, threatened, or endangered species), along with significant remnants of native plant communities. Willow Creek is located in Lane County, Oregon, on the western edge of the City of Eugene (see Figure 1). The city limit of Eugene passes through the site, and the site is entirely within the Eugene Urban Growth Boundary (UGB). At present, only lands to the east and northeast of the site are developed to full urban densities. Low density rural residential and agricultural land uses predominate on lands to the northwest and south. A partially completed light industrial/research office park is located to the northwest. Several informal trails lead south from West 18th at various points into the site. The area encompasses a total of approximately 349 acres under several ownerships, in sections 3 and 4 of Township 18 South, Range 4 West. wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. The BPA is considering exercising their option to purchase the Bailey Hill property, acquiring additional properties now owned by The Nature Conservancy, and/or funding enhancement activities for the entire site in order to receive credit under the Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin.

Beilke, Susan

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Reply to arXiv:0711.4930[hep-th] by Ito and Seiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent note (arXiv:0711.4930[hep-th]) Ito and Seiler claim that there is a 'missing link' in the derivation in arXiv:0707.2179[hep-th] by the present author; namely, that no proof of a certain inequality used there is given at weak coupling. Here it is pointed out that in fact no such missing link is present. The argument in 0707.2179 is, among other things, specifically constructed so that the inequality in question is invoked {\\it only} at strong coupling, where it is easily proven. Underlying the mangling of the argument in 0707.2179 by Ito and Seiler are their incorrect statements concerning the dependence of the potential-moving decimation procedures used in 0707.2179 on space-time dimensionality and other decimation parameters.

Tomboulis, E T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Reply to arXiv:0711.4930[hep-th] by Ito and Seiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent note (arXiv:0711.4930[hep-th]) Ito and Seiler claim that there is a 'missing link' in the derivation in arXiv:0707.2179[hep-th] by the present author; namely, that no proof of a certain inequality used there is given at weak coupling. Here it is pointed out that in fact no such missing link is present. The argument in 0707.2179 is, among other things, specifically constructed so that the inequality in question is invoked {\\it only} at strong coupling, where it is easily proven. Underlying the mangling of the argument in 0707.2179 by Ito and Seiler are their incorrect statements concerning the dependence of the potential-moving decimation procedures used in 0707.2179 on space-time dimensionality and other decimation parameters.

E. T. Tomboulis

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

124

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Priest River, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 105.41 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 26.95 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland habitat provides 23.78 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scmb-shrub vegetation provides 54.68 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

Cochran, Brian

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Beilke, Susan

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Scaling HEP to Web size with RESTful protocols: The frontier example  

SciTech Connect

The World-Wide-Web has scaled to an enormous size. The largest single contributor to its scalability is the HTTP protocol, particularly when used in conformity to REST (REpresentational State Transfer) principles. High Energy Physics (HEP) computing also has to scale to an enormous size, so it makes sense to base much of it on RESTful protocols. Frontier, which reads databases with an HTTP-based RESTful protocol, has successfully scaled to deliver production detector conditions data from both the CMS and ATLAS LHC detectors to hundreds of thousands of computer cores worldwide. Frontier is also able to re-use a large amount of standard software that runs the Web: on the clients, caches, and servers. I discuss the specific ways in which HTTP and REST enable high scalability for Frontier. I also briefly discuss another protocol used in HEP computing that is HTTP-based and RESTful, and another protocol that could benefit from it. My goal is to encourage HEP protocol designers to consider HTTP and REST whenever the same information is needed in many places.

Dykstra, Dave; /Fermilab

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Forrest Conservation Area, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the 4,232-acre Forrest Conservation Area managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribe) in Grant County, Oregon. The habitat evaluation is required as part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration. Representatives from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tribes conducted the field surveys for the HEP. The survey collected data for habitat variables contained in habitat suitability index (HIS) models for wildlife species; the key species were black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), California Quail (Callipepla californica), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types surveyed were grassland, meadow grassland, conifer forest, riparian tree shrub, shrub steppe, juniper forest, and juniper steppe. Other cover types mapped, but not used in the models were open water, roads, gravel pits, corrals, and residential.

Smith, Brent

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

arXiv:hep-ph/0110320 v3 18 Sep 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 November 2001 Detecting and Studying Higgs Bosons in Two-Photon Collisions at a Linear Collider David M. Asner, Jeffery B. Gronberg, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California John F. Gunion University of California at Davis Davis, California November 2001 Abstract: We examine the potential for detecting and studying Higgs bosons in two-photon collisions at a future linear collider. Our study incorporates realistic two-photon spectra based on the most probable available laser technology. Results include detector simulations. We study the cases of: a) an SM-like Higgs boson; b) the heavy MSSM Higgs bosons; c) a Higgs boson with no WW/ZZ couplings from a general two Higgs doublet model. arXiv:hep-ph/0110320 v3 18 Sep 2002

135

Use of Checkpoint-Restart for Complex HEP Software on Traditional Architectures and Intel MIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process checkpoint-restart is a technology with great potential for use in HEP workflows. Use cases include debugging, reducing the startup time of applications both in offline batch jobs and the High Level Trigger, permitting job preemption in environments where spare CPU cycles are being used opportunistically and efficient scheduling of a mix of multicore and single-threaded jobs. We report on tests of checkpoint-restart technology using CMS software, Geant4-MT (multi-threaded Geant4), and the DMTCP (Distributed Multithreaded Checkpointing) package. We analyze both single- and multi-threaded applications and test on both standard Intel x86 architectures and on Intel MIC. The tests with multi-threaded applications on Intel MIC are used to consider scalability and performance. These are considered an indicator of what the future may hold for many-core computing.

Arya, Kapil; Dotti, Andrea; Elmer, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Next generation input-output data format for HEP using Google's protocol buffers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a data format for Monte Carlo (MC) events, or any structural data, including experimental data, in a compact binary form using variable-size integer encoding as implemented in the Google's Protocol Buffers package. This approach is implemented in the so-called ProMC library which produces smaller file sizes for MC records compared to the existing input-output libraries used in high-energy physics (HEP). Other important features are a separation of abstract data layouts from concrete programming implementations, self-description and random access. Data stored in ProMC files can be written, read and manipulated in a number of programming languages, such C++, Java and Python.

S. V. Chekanov

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Snowmass Computing Frontier I2: Distributed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allocation) Cosmology 53 M Accel 23 M (32 M including BES & NP) DOE INCITE (ALCF, OLCF): 820 M Hours LQCD 400 M Supernova 230 M Cosmology 80 M NSF...

138

The Higgs Working Group at Snowmass 05  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report reviews the properties of Higgs bosons in the Standard Model (SM) and its various extensions. We give an extensive overview of the potential of the ILC operated at center-ofmass energies up to 1 TeV (including the ?? collider option) for the determination of the Higgs boson properties. This includes the measurement of the Higgs boson mass, its couplings to SM fermions and gauge bosons, and the determination of the spin and the CP quantum numbers of the Higgs. We also discuss extensions of the SM, including heavy SM-like Higgs bosons, heavy Higgs bosons in the framework of Supersymmetry (SUSY) and more exotic scenarios. We review recent theoretical developments in the field of Higgs boson physics, and the impact of Higgs boson physics on cosmology in several SUSY frameworks is considered. The important questions as to what the ILC can contribute to Higgs boson physics after the LHC, the LHC/ILC interplay and synergy, are addressed. The impact of the accelerator and detector performance on the precision of measurements are discussed in detail and we propose a strategy to optimize future analyses. Open questions arising for the various topics are listed, and further topics of study and corresponding roadmaps are suggested.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Higgs Working Group at Snowmass 05  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report reviews the properties of Higgs bosons in the Standard Model (SM) and its various extensions. We give an extensive overview about the potential of the ILC operated at centre-ofmass energies up to 1 TeV (including the ?? option) for the determination of the Higgs boson properties. This comprises the measurement of the Higgs boson mass, its couplings to SM fermions and gauge bosons, and the determination of the spin and the CP quantum numbers of the Higgs. The extensions of the SM that are analyzed in more detail are heavy SM-like Higgs bosons, heavy Higgs bosons in the framework of Supersymmetry (SUSY) and further exotic scenarios. We review recent theoretical developments in the field of Higgs boson physics. The important question what the ILC can contribute to Higgs boson physics after the LHC, the LHC/ILC interplay and synergy is discussed. The impact of Higgs boson physics on cosmology in several SUSY frameworks is analyzed. The impact of the accelerator and dector performance on the precision of measurements are discussed in detail. We propose a strategy to optimize future analyses. Open questions arising for the various topics are listed, further topics of study and corresponding roadmaps are suggested.

S. Heinemeyer A; S. Kanemura B; H. Logan C; A. Raspereza D; T. Tait E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Research Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) Office of Science Basic Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Other Phone Directories SLACspeak Glossary SPIRES HEP Preprints Database...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

Childs, Allen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Oroxylin A induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 was involved in its antitumor activity  

SciTech Connect

We previously reported that wogonin, a flavonoid compound, was a potent apoptosis inducer of human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells and murine sarcoma S180 cells. In the present study, the effect of oroxylin A, one wogonin structurally related flavonoid isolated from Scutellariae radix, on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 was examined and molecular mechanisms were also investigated. Oroxylin A inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner measured by MTT-assay. Treatment with an apoptosis-inducing concentration of oroxylin A caused typical morphological changes and apoptotic blebbing in HepG2 cells. DNA fragmentation assay was used to examine later apoptosis induced by oroxylin A. FACScan analysis revealed a dramatic increase in the number of apoptotic and G{sub 2}/M phase arrest cells after oroxylin A treatment. The pro-apoptotic activity of oroxylin A was attributed to its ability to modulate the concerted expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and pro-caspase-3 proteins. The expression of Bcl-2 protein and pro-caspase-3 protein was dramatically decreased after treatment with oroxylin A. These results demonstrated that oroxylin A could effectively induce programmed cell death and suggested that it could be a promising antitumor drug.

Hu Yang [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Yang Yong [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); You Qidong [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)]. E-mail: qdyou@cpu.edu.cn; Liu Wei [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gu Hongyan [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhao Li [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang Kun [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang Wei [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang Xiaotang [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Guo Qinglong [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)]. E-mail: qinglongguo@hotmail.com

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Expression of CAR in SW480 and HepG2 cells during G1 is associated with cell proliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a transcription factor to regulate the expression of several genes related to drug-metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that CAR protein accumulates during G1 in human SW480 and HepG2 cells. After the G1/S phase transition, CAR protein levels decreased, and CAR was hardly detected in cells by the late M phase. CAR expression in both cell lines was suppressed by RNA interference-mediated suppression of CDK4. Depletion of CAR by RNA interference in both cells and by hepatocyte growth factor treatment in HepG2 cells resulted in decreased MDM2 expression that led to p21 upregulation and repression of HepG2 cell growth. Thus, our results demonstrate that CAR expression is an early G1 event regulated by CDK4 that contributes to MDM2 expression; these findings suggest that CAR may influence the expression of genes involved in not only the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous substances but also in the cell proliferation.

Osabe, Makoto [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Sugatani, Junko [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Global COE Program, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka (Japan)], E-mail: sugatani@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp; Takemura, Akiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Ikari, Akira [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Kitamura, Naomi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Negishi, Masahiko [Pharmacogenetics Section, Laboratory of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miwa, Masao [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

arXiv:1206.2443v1[hep-ex]12Jun2012 EUROPEAN ORGANISATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (CERN)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 12.8 7.4 10.1 4.8 5.3 Uzbekistan 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 Azerbaijan 7.9 2.6 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.0 Georgia 10.3 0.5 0

146

IFUP-TH/2003/16 hep-th/0304098 A Torsion Correction to the RR 4-Form Fieldstrength  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shifted quantization condition of the M-theory 4-form G4 is well-known. The most naive generalization to type IIA string theory fails, an orientifold fourplane counterexample was found by Hori in hep-th/9805141. In this note we use D2-brane anomaly cancellation to find the corresponding shifted quantitization condition in IIA. Our analysis is consistent with the known O4-plane tensions if we include a torsion correction to the usual construction of G4 from C3, B and G2. The resulting Bianchi identities enforce that RR fluxes lift to K-theory classes.

Jarah Evslin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Proposal for Reviews | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

For Reviewers: Find your Proposal High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About HEP Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Award Search Early...

148

SciDAC HEP FAQ | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

for Teachers and Scientists Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Project Assessment Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National...

149

Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

Zhang Bo [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Huang Bo [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); He Xingpeng [School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Zhou Pingkun, E-mail: zhoupk@nic.bmi.ac.cn [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

HEP Conference Funding Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search Peer Merit Review Policies Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy...

152

arXiv:hep-ph/0207010v529Jan2003 UCD-2002-10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Peter Vanderveer--Biotron (BIOTRON) Tina Yao--Aquatic Sciences Center (ASC) #12;3 4 10 11 22 26 Cont Institute; ASC--Aquatic Sciences Center; BIOTECH--BioTechnology Center; BIOTRON--Biotron; GRAD Research Institute; ASC--Aquatic Sciences Center; BIOTECH--BioTechnology Center; BIOTRON--Biotron; GRAD

California at Santa Cruz, University of

153

arXiv:hep-ph/0105014v217May2001 A Light Higgs Boson Explanation for the g -2 Crisis a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arXiv:hep-ph/0105014v217May2001 A Light Higgs Boson Explanation for the g - 2 Crisis a A. Dedes1-even Higgs boson with a mass of around 10 GeV could explain the recent BNL measurement of the muon anomalous) the Upsilon mass. It may be possible to exclude or discover such a Higgs boson by fully analyzing the existing

California at Santa Cruz, University of

154

Agencies w Affiliation & Designated Field Instructors CPR Liability Insurance CWO Background Check Drug Screen PPD T/D Varicella Titer MMB Titer Hep B Titer Action Care R  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drug Screen PPD T/D Varicella Titer MMB Titer Hep B Titer Action Care R Adult Protective Services R *R 7/23/2012 Bienvivir Senior Health Services R R* R* R R R R R 7/2/2012 Big brothers Big Sisters R *R 7/23/2010 Border Childrens Mental health Collaborative R R 7/23/2012 CAFV R CASS (Center R 7

Ward, Karen

155

A Search for Neutrinos from the Solar hep Reaction and the DiffuseSupernova Neutrino Background with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

A search has been made for neutrinos from the hep reactionin the Sun and from the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB)using data collected during the first operational phase of the SudburyNeutrino Observatory, with an exposure of 0.65 kilotonne-years. For thehep neutrino search, two events are observed in the effective electronenergy range of 14.3 MeVhep neutrinos. For DSNB neutrinos, noevents are observed in the effective electron energy range of 21 MeVhep neutrino flux and by two orders of magnitude on theprevious upper limit on the nu e component of the DSNB flux.

Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Anthony, A.E.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive,A.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boulay, M.G.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chen,X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress,F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Drouin,P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Evans,H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway,R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jagam,P.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Krueger, A.; Kraus,C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.Lawson.I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin,R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis,K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Nickel, B.G.; Noble, A.J.; Norman,E.B.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O'Keeffe, H.M.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser,S.M.; Ott, R.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Sims, C.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van Berg, R.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue,C.J.; Walker, T.J.; Wall, B.L.; Waller, D.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark,D.L.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters,J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.

Sieglitz, Greg

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 by tanshinones in human HepG2 hepatoma cell line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diterpenoid tanshinones including tanshinone IIA (TIIA), cryptotanshinone (CTS), tanshinone I (TI) and dihydrotanshinone I (DHTI) are the major bioactive components from Danshen. The major aim of our present study was to investigate the induction potential of these four main components of tanshinones (TIIA, CTS, TI, and DHTI) on the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in HepG2 cells. Our results showed that all of these four tanshinones caused a significant time- and concentration-dependent increase in the amount of CYP1A1/2 expression in HepG2 cells. These induction effects were further characterized through transcriptional regulation: the induction of CYP1A1/2 mRNA level by tanshinones was completely blocked by the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D; the expression of CYP1A1/2 heterogeneous nuclear RNA was induced by tanshinone treatment; and CYP1A1 mRNA stability was not influenced by these tanshinones. Interestingly, tanshinones plus B[a]P produced additive/synergistic effect on CYP1A1/2 induction. In addition, the tanshinone-induced CYP1A1/2 expression was abolished by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonist resveratrol, suggesting an AhR dependent transcription mechanism. In the reporter gene assay, while TI and DHTI significantly induced AhR-dependent luciferase activity, TIIA and CTS failed to induce this activity. Collectively, the tanshinones could induce CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression through transcriptional activation mechanism and exert differential effects on activating AhR in HepG2 cells. Our findings suggest that rational administration of tanshinones should be considered with respect to their effect on AhR and CYP1A1/2 expression.

Zhang Rong [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Sun Jianguo, E-mail: jgsun_cpucn@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Ma Liping; Wu Xiaolan [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Pan Guoyu [Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics (MAP), Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research (NIBR), 250 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Hao Haiping; Zhou Fang; Jiye, A; Liu Changhui; Ai Hua; Shang Lili; Gao Haiyan; Peng Ying; Wan Ping; Wu Hui [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Wang Guangji, E-mail: guangjiwang@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Naturalness, Supersymmetry and Light Higgsinos: A Snowmass Whitepaper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the electroweak fine-tuning parameter \\Delta_{\\rm EW} derived from the well-known electroweak symmetry breaking condition written in terms of weak scale parameters leads to {\\it a bound on fine-tuning in the MSSM} and explain its utility for phenomenological analyses. We argue that a small magnitude of the mu parameter, and the concomitant presence of light higgsinos, is the most basic consequence of naturalness in SUSY models, and list the resulting implications of this for experiments at the LHC and at future e^+e^- colliders.

Howard Baer; Vernon Barger; Peisi Huang; Dan Mickelson; Azar Mustafayev; Xerxes Tata

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Advanced accelerator technologies - a snowmass `96 subgroup summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the collider physics issues, concepts and technologies of (e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}) colliders at a cm. energy of 5 TeV and a luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}.

Chattopadhyay, S.; Whittum, D.; Wurtele, J.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Snowmass White Paper CMS Upgrade: Forward Lepton-Photon System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This White Paper outlines a proposal for an upgraded forward region to extend CMS lepton (e, mu) and photon physics reach out to 2.2

Bilki, Burak; Onel, Yasar; Winn, David R; Yetkin, Taylan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electroweak Monopole Production at the LHC - a Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We maintain that the search for the electroweak monopole is a key issue in the advancement of our understanding of the standard model. Unlike the Dirac monopole in electrodynamics, which is optional, the electroweak monopole should exist within the framework of the standard model. The mass of the electroweak monopole is estimated to be 5 to 7 TeV, but could be as large as 15 TeV. Above threshold its production rate at the LHC is expected to be relatively large, (1/alpha(em)2) times bigger than that of W+W- pairs. The search for the electroweak monopole is one of the prime motivations of the newest LHC experiment, MoEDAL, which is due to start data taking in 2015.

Y. M. Cho; J. L. Pinfold

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Determining Top Quark Couplings at the LHC: Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Top quarks are a prime system for hunting for new physics. Nonetheless, two decades on from their discovery few of their couplings have been measured to high precision. We present an overview of current determinations and the expected sensitivities with 300 fb-1 and 3000 fb-1 of 14 TeV LHC data. In addition to direct limits on the top quark's renormalizable couplings to Standard Model bosons, we also explore what bounds can be set on the coefficients of higher-dimension operators, taking particular four-fermion operators that do not interfere with QCD as a test case. Every coupling we consider will benefit greatly from a dedicated study at the future LHC. Some measurements, like the irrelevant operators, are systematics-limited and will saturate in the near-term. Others, like the important ttbar+Higgs coupling, involve rare processes and thus demand as much data as possible.

Jahred Adelman; Matthew Baumgart; Aran Garcia-Bellido; Andrey Loginov

2013-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Geant4 - Current and Future : A Snowmass 2013 White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US involvement in Geant4 started with its adoption by the BaBar experiment at SLAC in 1997 and the subsequent creation of a group at SLAC supporting BaBar and contributing to Geant4 development. SLAC has provided the leadership of the international Geant4 Collaboration for the recent years and carries major responsibilities for evolutionary development of the existing code with work to implement multithreading and explore new application domains as well as new technologies such as GPUs. This paper presents the current and the future developments being carried by the SLAC Geant4 team.

Makoto Asai; Richard Mount

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

164

Reach in All Hadronic Stop Decays: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the discovery prospects for stops which decay to a top and a light neutralino. We consider fully hadronic decays of the tops and present an estimate for the reach at various future collider runs. Our results are summarized in Table 1.

Stolarski, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Reach in All Hadronic Stop Decays: A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the discovery prospects for stops which decay to a top and a light neutralino. We consider fully hadronic decays of the tops and present an estimate for the reach at various future collider runs. Our results are summarized in Table 1.

Daniel Stolarski

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

Computing for Perturbative QCD - A Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study on high-performance computing and large-scale distributed computing for perturbative QCD calculations.

Christian Bauer; Zvi Bern; Radja Boughezal; John Campbell; Neil Christensen; Lance Dixon; Thomas Gehrmann; Stefan Hoeche; Junichi Kanzaki; Alexander Mitov; Pavel Nadolsky; Fredrick Olness; Michael Peskin; Frank Petriello; Stefano Pozzorini; Laura Reina; Frank Siegert; Doreen Wackeroth; Jonathan Walsh; Ciaran Williams; Markus Wobisch

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

167

hep.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trieste, Helsinki, London, Cambridge, Cardiff, Munich, etc * Simulation & analysis of CMB data - Algorithm validation & verification - Implementation efficiency & scaling - Mission...

168

HEP Fugitive - Higgs Boson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOR DISCOVERY The Higgs Graphic of a plaid H Graphic made in 2001 Aliases: Higgs, Higgs Boson, H0, h0 DESCRIPTION Mass: at least 114 GeV ? Spin: Zero Charge: Netural Particle...

169

Review Literature in HEP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Masses and Mixings. III. Elementary Particle Physics - Beyond the Standard Model Higgs Boson Physics, Technicolor and Composite Higgs, Supersymmetry, Models with Extra Space...

170

Computing | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Computing High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Medicine Homeland Security Industry Computing Sciences Workforce...

171

Quick Links | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Quick Links High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources SC Graduate...

172

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Research Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Research Opportunities. ... NRC Postdoctoral Research Associateships Program; NIST NRC Program Description. ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Effect of Size, shape, and surface modification on cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles to human HEp-2 and canine MDCK cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been increasing interests in applying gold nanoparticles in biological research, drug delivery, and therapy. As the interaction of gold nanoparticles with cells relies on properties of nanoparticles, the cytotoxicity is complex and still under ...

Yinan Zhang; Dan Xu; Wenqin Li; Jun Yu; Yu Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Research - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our research is outlined our research proposals below. Samples of completed research may be found under "Sample Papers" and under "Project Highlights" on ...

176

Research Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industrial or academic partner perform joint research with outcomes ... these collaborations arise spontaneously and the researchers jointly pursue ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

PNNL: Research  

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Full Story Research at PNNL Home Featured Highlights Archive Research Directorates Energy & Environment Fundamental & Computational Sciences National Security Facilities...

178

Guest Researchers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... If confidentiality of cooperative research results are desired a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) may be appropriate. ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

179

ESNET requirements for physics research at the SSCL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy physics (HEP) research at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is a highly collaborative affair. Scientists participating in SSC research come from a worldwide distribution of institutions. The Solenoid Detector Collaboration (SDC) currently has more than 1100 members from 20 countries. Likewise, the Gamma, Electron, Muon (GEM) collaboration members number more than 1000 from 17 countries. Roughly half of the collaborators on these experiments are from outside the US Communications, in general, and data transmission, in particular, are crucial to the success of the collaborations and to the ultimate success of the SSC. The bulk of data transmission to and from the Laboratory is over the Energy Science NETwork (ESNET). The purpose of this document is to describe the anticipated network capacity needed to provide adequate communication among these widespread collaborations.

Cormell, L.; Johnson, T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Research Home  

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Cancer & Radiation Radiochemistry & Instrumentation Genome Dynamics BioenergyGTL Technology Centers Resources Research Research in the Life Sciences Division contributes to...

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181

Research Gallery  

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Research Gallery Research Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element Research Gallery Science serving society The Laboratory conducts leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems related to energy, the environment, infrastructure, and health. Basic research conducted here enhances national defense and economic security. Exhibits you'll find in this gallery: Understanding Radiation LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Space Science Research Viewspace Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience

182

Research Highlight  

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Research Highlights Summaries Modeling the Sensitivity of Convection to Tropospheric Humidity Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: General...

183

Research Library  

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LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

184

Research Highlight  

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Effective Diameter in Ice Clouds and Its Application to Terrestrial Radiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research:...

185

Research Facilities  

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FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

186

Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors for Charged-Particle Tracking and Muon Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community, this white paper outlines a roadmap for further development of Micro-pattern Gas Detectors for tracking and muon detection in HEP experiments. We briefly discuss technical requirements and summarize current capabilities of these detectors with a focus of operation in experiments at the energy frontier in the medium-term to long-term future. Some key directions for future R&D on Micro-pattern Gas Detectors in the U.S. are suggested.

M. Hohlmann; V. Polychronakos; A. White; J. Yu

2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Agile Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of agile software development methods in software-based research environments.

Cunningham, Hamish

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Research Highlights  

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Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

189

Photon Physics and Plasma Research, WILGA 2012; EuCARD Sessions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments, astroparticle physica and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. This paper is the third part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with Photon Physics and Plasma Research. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the Jubilee XXXth SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET tokamak and pi-of-the sky experiments ...

Romaniuk, R S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NREL: Biomass Research - Research Staff  

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Research Staff Research Staff NREL's biomass research staff includes: Management team Technology and research areas Research support areas. Search the NREL staff directory to contact any of the research staff listed below. Management Team The biomass management team is composed of: Thomas Foust, National Bioenergy Center Director Robert Baldwin, Principal Scientist, Thermochemical Conversion Phil Pienkos, Applied Science Principal Group Manager Kim Magrini, Catalysis and Thermochemical Sciences and Engineering R&D Principal Group Manager Jim McMillan, Biochemical Process R&D Principal Group Manager Rich Bain, Principal Engineer, Thermochemical Sciences Mark Davis, Thermochemical Platform Lead Richard Elander, Biochemical Platform Lead Dan Blake, Emeritus Back to Top Technology and Research Areas

191

RESEARCH TITLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Wilmington 35 Eidgenssische Technische Hochschule, Switzerland 36 Emory University School of Medicine 37 ExxonMobil Research and ...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

Neuroimaging Research  

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Neuroimaging Research Neuroimaging Research (NIAAA Intramural & NIH) Neuroimaging research at Brookhaven is a prime example of transdisciplinary research where the expertise of chemists, physicists, and biological and medical scientists blend to apply new imaging tools to problems in human health. Brookhaven has a network of complementary brain-imaging tools: PET Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Micro MRI MicroMRI Awake Animal Imaging Awake Animal Imaging Using these imaging tools, human neuroscience research has focused on understanding how the brain effects, and is affected by: obesity and eating disorders ADHD depression Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroimaging, and Neuropsychoimaging enrich investigations of the relationships between brain chemistry and behavior. Top of Page

193

hep-ph/971238815Dec1997 hep-ph/9712388  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a conventional monopole form for the cut­off form factor Fpn(t) = 2 /(2 - t) with = 1.2 GeV. We take the nucleon.1 GeV, relevant to the CLAS detector at CEBAF. We utilize the standard parameters. Electron Energy is that for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, an electron beam towards the lower end of the range (e.g. 5.5 GeV) appears

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

194

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con- nection, work is carried out on develop- ing advanced methods, as well as theory and computer simulation numerical simulation. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department The department carries out research

195

HEP education and outreach activities  

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from Students and Teachers Who Have Participated in Our Programs from Students and Teachers Who Have Participated in Our Programs First graders after a physicist visited their class (University of California, Riverside): "I liked the ruler that would not fall." (demo on parametric resonance) "I liked the thing that sent our vapor and when you put in the flower." (demo on properties of liquid nitrogen) K-1 teacher: "You and your students created a wonderful learning environment and intellectually stimulated and involved the children from start to finish. We've had a slew of inventions since you were here. Several parents commented the following day that conversations at dinner that night had been entirely devoted to what the 'people with the Physics Van (University of Ilinois at Urbana-Champaign) had done and said.' All of

196

HEP education and outreach activities  

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dark matter, and unified theories. While some aspects of particle physics may seem esoteric, they capture people's interest and lead them to learn much more about our scientific...

197

HEP education and outreach activities  

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Connection to Science and Technology As particle physicists develop detectors and accelerators, invariably they create new tools for science and technology. Particle physics has...

198

HEP education and outreach activities  

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in the universe and test the forces that affect them. Physicists use particle accelerators, many kilometers in length or circumference, to accelerate particles such as...

199

COMP-1h.EPS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Did y Did y ou know most of this stuff come s from oil & na t ural gas? NAAW... Are you sure? Yes, it does...even these eyeglasses! C O M M O N P R O D U C T S M A D E F R O M O I L A N D N A T U R A L G A S * Air mattresses Ammonia Antifreeze Antihistamines Antiseptics Artificial turf Artificial limbs Aspirin Awnings Balloons Ballpoint pens Bandages Beach umbrellas Boats Cameras Candles Candies and gum Car battery cases Car enamel Cassettes Caulking CDs/computer disks Cellular phones Clothesline Coffee makers Cold cream Combs Computer keyboards Computer monitors Cortisone Crayons Credit cards Curtains Dashboards Denture adhesives Dentures Deodorant Detergent Dice Dishwashing liquid Drinking cups Dyes Electric blankets Electrical tape Enamel Epoxy paint Eyeglasses Fan belts Faucet washers Fertilizers Fishing boots Fishing lures Fishing rods

200

Research Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My research is in the area of network control and management, with a research goal of improving the robustness and manageability of networked systems, and contributing to the design of future network architectures. Benefiting from my cross-disciplinary background in electrical engineering, telecommunications, and computer science, I try to bring a comprehensive viewpoint in my contributions to networking research. My vision is to facilitate the design of networks that are scalable, evolvable, and can work smartly with minimal human involvement.

Hammad Iqbal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Research Highlight  

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Scientists then measured how the particles were distributed in the vapor using a mobility scanner that determined particle sizes. In the other approach, researchers...

202

Research Highlight  

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Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) and Sulfate Download a printable PDF Submitter: Martin, S. T., Harvard University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s):...

203

Research Projects  

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Beam Physics to simulate a next generation light sources based on x-ray free electron lasers. My research includes: Designing parallel algorithms for numerical optimization....

204

Research Highlight  

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The Brass Ring of Climate Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s):...

205

Research Highlight  

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Into Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Conditions Submitter: Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s):...

206

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Altering Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation Submitter: Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal...

207

Operations Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2005 ... Operations Research. Report 2005-01. On a closedness theorem. Mikls Ujvri. Marc 2005. Etvs Lornd University of Sciences. Department...

208

Research Highlight  

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of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

209

UNIRIB: Research  

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mission focus of the University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium is to perform nuclear physics research, and provide training and education. UNIRIB member universities...

210

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Analysis Results: 1998 Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes...

211

Research Highlight  

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A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference:...

212

Research Highlight  

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A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

213

Research Highlight  

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Contributor to Low-Level Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference:...

214

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Lee, S., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working...

215

Research Highlight  

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and validation of a black carbon mixing state resolved three-dimensional model: Aging processes and radiative impact." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ,...

216

Research Highlight  

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Small Ice Crystals on Ice Sedimentation Rates in Cirrus Clouds and GCM Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Rasch, P., Pacific...

217

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Arctic Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s):...

218

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Co-Existence of Water and Ice in Arctic Clouds Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

219

Research Highlight  

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Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s):...

220

Research Highlight  

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On Thin Ice: Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Clouds Examined for Improvements Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions...

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221

Research Highlight  

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Pollution + Storm Clouds Warmer Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation...

222

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-Funded Algorithms Lead to Marked Improvements in Global Weather Forecast Model Submitter: Morcrette, J. J., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Area of Research:...

223

Research Highlight  

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Many Forecast Errors Are Climate Errors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column...

224

PNNL: Research  

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Cutting Air Pollution Got Boost from Weather Cutting Air Pollution Got Boost from Weather View full sized image New research suggests that China's impressive feat of cutting...

225

PNNL: Research  

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by PNNL and researchers from the University of Washington and Oregon Health & Science University shows how using a relatively simple method for engineering nanoparticle...

226

PNNL: Research  

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To achieve higher power levels, researchers now are turning their attention to advanced fuel designs. PNNL is developing a new metal fuel for light water reactors intended...

227

Research Highlight  

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Black Carbon Aerosols and the Third Polar Ice Cap Submitter: Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

228

Research Highlight  

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Effects of Relative Humidity on Aerosols-Implications for Climate Submitter: Lacis, A. A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working...

229

Research Highlight  

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Chemical Diffusivity and Viscosity of Secondary Organic Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zelenyuk-Imre, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research:...

230

Research Highlight  

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A Dance of Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Song, C., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle...

231

Research Highlight  

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Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols Using MFRSR Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties...

232

Research Highlight  

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K-Distribution Method for a SW Radiative Transfer Model Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

233

Research Highlight  

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Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Earle, M., Environment Canada Liu, P., Environment Canada Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

234

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Boundary Detection and Analysis from Micro Pulse Lidar Submitter: Spinhirne, J., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working...

235

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico City Carbon-Containing Particle Composition Simulated Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation...

236

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facility sites. For many years now, vertically pointing ARM instruments in Oklahoma, Alaska, and Manus Island in the Pacific Ocean (in Papua New Guinea) have...

237

Operations research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Evita, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice wrote: Politics, the Art of the Possible. To those of us in the operations research community, we postulate: Operations Research, the Science of Better - (i.e. better processes, better systems and better decisions). ...

William P. Pierskalla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NREL: Wind Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Here you will find contact information for NREL's research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. To learn more about us and our expertise, view our organizational charts and read the staff's biographies. Below is a listing of the research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. View organizational charts. Lab Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Program Brian Smith Program Integration, Wind and Water Power Program Elise DeGeorge Albert LiVecchi Dana Scholbrock Teresa Thadison Director, National Wind Technology Center Fort Felker, Center Director Laura Davis Kim Domenico Deputy Center Director, National Wind Technology Center Jim Green, Acting Research Fellow Bob Thresher Chief Engineer Paul Veers Wind Technology Research and Development

239

Research projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

240

Basic Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 II Basic Research The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) office within the DOE Office of Science supports the DOE Hydrogen Program by providing basic, fundamental research in those technically challenging areas facing the Program, complementing the applied research and demonstration projects conducted by the Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Engineering, Science and Technology. In May 2005 Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the selection of over $64 million in BES research and development projects aimed at making hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and refueling stations available, practical and affordable for American consumers by 2020. A total of 70 hydrogen research projects were selected to focus on fundamental science and enable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3, doi:10.3390/atmos3040495. The 4STAR instrument. The 4STAR instrument (inset) is installed through the upper hull of the PNNL G-1 research aircraft, for in-flight sun-tracking and sky light-scanning. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, developed a next-generation

242

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

243

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 From the unassuming farmlands of north-central Oklahoma comes a milestone for the global climate research community. March 2004 marked the 10-year anniversary for an instrument that now holds the prestigious distinction of providing the longest set of continuous atmospheric interferometer data

244

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

245

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05/2007 05/2007 NitrogeN evolutioN aNd CorrosioN MeChaNisMs With oxyCoMbustioN of Coal Description Under a grant from the University Coal Research (UCR) program, Brigham Young University (BYU) is leading a three-year research effort to investigate the physical processes that several common types of coal undergo during oxy-fuel combustion. Specifically, research addresses the mixture of gases emitted from burning, particularly such pollutants as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and the potential for corrosion at the various stages of combustion. The UCR program is administered by the Advanced Research Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

246

Research Highlight  

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M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morrison H, G de Boer, G Feingold, J Harrington, M Shupe, and...

247

Research Highlight  

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Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Del Genio AD, J Wu, and Y Chen. 2012. "Characteristics of...

248

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Catch Aerosols in the Act Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life...

249

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Nucleation Link to Aerosols for Global Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: DeMott, P. J., Colorado State University Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research:...

250

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topics to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics on Twitter Bookmark...

251

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors  

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Mentors to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors on Twitter...

252

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals  

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Proposals on Twitter Bookmark EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals on Google Bookmark EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals on Delicious Rank EERE...

253

Research Highlight  

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Putting the Pieces Together Putting the Pieces Together Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fan J, S Ghan, M Ovchinnikov, X Liu, P Rasch, and A Korolev. 2011. "Representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T07, doi:10.1029/2010JD015375. PNNL's Arctic mixed-phase cloud research was augmented with field observations from the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in Northern Alaska. Photo courtesy of A. Korolev, Environment Canada. Vertical cross sections of (a) the vertical velocity (the contour lines)

254

Research Highlight  

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Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Mishra, S., NOAA - Coop. Inst. for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mitchell DL, S Mishra, and RP Lawson. 2011. "Representing the ice fall speed in climate models: Results from Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T03, doi:10.1029/2010JD015433. Relationship between De and Vm for all tropical cirrus cloud types (solid

255

Research Highlight  

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Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Submitter: Ferrare, R. A., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Ferrare, R., et al., Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor Made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D05S08, doi:10.1029/2005JD005836, 2006. Relative humidity profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol extinction profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol humidification factor f(RH) from Raman lidar measured profiles of aerosol extinction and relative humidity. Upgrades to the Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF)

256

Research Areas  

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Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

257

Research Highlight  

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ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: results from Phase I." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, doi:10.1029/2011JD016821. The total error of each participating radiation code for all LW (left) and SW (right) cases in the CIRC intercomparison. The identity of each participating code can be found in the paper; codes built due to ARM

258

Research Highlight  

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Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Song X, GJ Zhang, and JF Li. 2012. "Evaluation of microphysics parameterization for convective clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5." Journal of Climate, 25(24), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00563.1. Rainfall in the tropics. By improving an existing, sophisticated, global climate model, scientists can now simulate cloud and rainfall more accurately. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric System Research program, a research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and

259

Research Highlight  

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Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D04106, doi:10.1029/2011JD016440. The mean difference profiles (experiment minus control) for clear-sky longwave radiative heating (QRLC); shortwave clear-sky radiative heating (QRSC); the longwave cloud radiative forcing (QRLCF); the precipitation

260

For Researchers  

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Export Control Export Control Berkeley Lab policy is to comply with all applicable state and federal laws, including those relating to Export Control. Berkeley Lab's Export Control Program is designed to support Berkeley Lab's and the University of California's international activities by ensuring compliance with U.S. export laws and regulations in the context of our fundamental research mission. Much of the Lab's compliance with U.S. export laws and regulations is based on our remaining within the "fundamental research" exception, i.e. performing basic or applied research for which the resulting information is ordinarily published and shared broadly within the scientific community. Do not sign non-disclosure or confidentiality agreements. Contact Parul Jain at 495-2306 or the Tech Transfer Department if you need or are

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Research Highlight  

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Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Sun L, R Sun, XW Li, SL Liang, and RH Zhang. 2012. "Monitoring surface soil moisture status based on remotely sensed surface temperature and vegetation index information." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.015. Shown here is the SGP Central Facility, where the most comprehensive instrument suite is hosted. Moisture trapped in soil provides water necessary for vegetation and crops, but how much of that moisture makes its way into the atmosphere and influences regional meteorology? The poor understanding of the role of soil

262

Research Highlight  

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ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R. Shippert, and W.L. Smith. 2004. Journal of Atmospheric Science, 61, 2657-2675. Top panels: Examples of downwelling infrared radiance observed by the AERI for two different clear sky cases with different amounts of water vapor. Bottom panels: Differences between the AERI observations and calculations

263

Research Highlight  

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Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Chiu, J., University of Reading Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2009. "Spectral invariant behavior of zenith radiance around cloud edges observed by ARM SWS." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L16802, doi:10.1029/2009GL039366. (top) Time-wavelength color contour plot of ARM shortwave spectrometer (SWS) spectra measured from 21:35:24 to 21:40:24 UTC on 18 May 2007 at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in

264

Research Highlight  

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Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with SCAM, CAPT Forecasts and M-PACE Observations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Liu, X, S Xie, and SJ Ghan. 2007. "Evaluation of a new mixed-Phase cloud microphysics parameterization with the NCAR single column climate model (SCAM) and ARM M-PACE observations." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L23712, doi:10.1029/2007GL031446. Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press.

265

Research Focus  

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Focus Focus Work at FEERC is centered on three interrelated areas of research: fuels, engines, and emis- sions. FEERC scientists study the impacts of fuel properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes gaseous (natural gas) and liquid fuels from conventional and unconventional fossil- based sources, as well as non-petroleum fuels from synthetic and renewable sources. The FEERC conducts research on innovative internal combustion engine technologies and control systems for improved efficiency. Combining novel diagnostic and experimental methods with modeling, the Center's scientists also develop improved understanding of the functions and key mechanisms of emission control devices

266

Research Highlight  

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Classifying Cloud Phase Classifying Cloud Phase Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Shupe, MD. 2007. "A ground-based multisensory cloud phase classifier." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L22809, doi:10.1029/2007GL031008. Observations of (a) lidar backscatter, (b) lidar depolarization ratio, (c) radar reflectivity, (d) radar mean Doppler velocity, (e) radar Doppler spectrum width, (f) microwave radiometer-derived liquid water path, and (g) the resulting multisensor cloud-phase classification mask. Cloud phase identification is a necessary prerequisite to performing cloud property retrievals from remote sensor measurements. Most retrieval

267

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Research Staff  

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Research Staff Research Staff Our silicon group members have backgrounds in physics, chemistry, mathematics, materials science, and electrical engineering. Russell Bauer Howard Branz Sachit Grover Vincenzo LaSalvia Benjamin Lee William Nemeth Matt Page Lorenzo Roybal Pauls Stradins, (Acting Group Manager) Charles Teplin Qi Wang David Young Hao-Chih Yuan Photo of 21 people standing in front of a building with a silver, cylinder-shaped structure on one side. Photo of Pauls Stradins Pauls Stradins Senior Scientist II Group Manager Primary Research Interests High-efficiency silicon photovoltaics: advanced passivation techniques and industrially-relevant processes Interfacing Si cell with other materials for high-efficiency tandem Nanostructured semiconductor materials for photovoltaics: Si quantum

268

Research Highlight  

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Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, Z., University of Wyoming Zhang, D., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zhang D, Z Wang, A Heymsfield, J Fan, D Liu, and M Zhao. 2012. "Quantifying the impact of dust on heterogeneous ice generation in midlevel supercooled stratiform clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, L18805, doi:10.1029/2012GL052831. An example of dusty MSSC: (a) CALIOP TAB profiles at 532nm; (b) CALIOP depolarization profiles at 532nm; (c) CloudSat CPR radar reflectivity profiles; (d) Identified dust layers and MSSC; (e) Global distribution of

269

Research Highlight  

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Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Probing of Dense Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Davis, A. B., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Davis, AB. 2008. "Multiple-scattering lidar from both sides of the clouds: Addressing internal structure." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S10, doi:10.1029/2007JD009666. Figure 1. Lidar observations of a dense cloud. Left: standard (single-scattering/on-beam) lidar. Right: multiple-scattering/off-beam lidar. Note the extreme narrowness of the FOV in the standard case, as is required to restrict as much as possible the signal to a single backscatter. Also note the weak penetration, O(1) MFP, of the two-way

270

Research Highlight  

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Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mitchell, D.L., A.J. Baran, W.P. Arnott, C. Schmitt, 2006: Testing and comparing the anomalous diffraction approximation. J. Atmos. Sci., 63, 2948-2962. Comparison of MADA and T-matrix with measured Qext. Regions without data were contaminated by water vapor or CO2 absorption. MADA and T-matrix calculations are based on the measured PSD of hexagonal columns having an effective diameter of 14 microns. Comparison of the PSD weighted Qabs predicted by FDTD and MADA for a tunneling efficiency corresponding to aggregates. Cirrus clouds play a large role in the Earth's radiation budget and the way

271

Research Highlight  

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Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Chen, R., University of Maryland Wood, R., University of Washington Chang, F., Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Ferraro, R., NOAA/NESDIS, WWBG Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Chen, R, R Wood, Z Li, R Ferraro, and F Chang. 2008. "Studying the vertical variation of cloud droplet effective radius using ship and space-borne remote sensing data." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, doi:10.1029/2007JD009596. Figure 1. Coincident images of C-band radar reflectivity and MODIS cloud profile at UTC 15:55, Oct. 18, 2001. a) RHB C-band radar reflectivity

272

Research Highlight  

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Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Long, CN, and DD Turner. 2008. "A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D18206, doi:10.1029/2008JD009936. Comparison of clear-sky RT model calculations (black) and our estimates (gray) with detected LW effective clear-sky measurements from the ACRF SGP site from 1 March through 31 May 2003, showing that our LW estimates do as well as detailed model calculations in comparison with actual LW

273

Research Highlight  

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Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Time-height cross sections of water vapor mixing ratio, which is observed directly by the ARM Raman lidar at 10-min and approximately 100 m resolution, and relative humidity for 29 November through 2 December 2002. The bottom panel shows the comparison of the precipitable water vapor observed by the Raman lidar and the collocated microwave radiometer. The time-height cross sections, as well as the integrated field, show the large variability in water vapor that exists over the ARM Southern Great Plains site. After years of sustained research efforts into the accuracy of atmospheric

274

Research Highlight  

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ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu, and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D04211, doi:10.1029/2007JD009225. Time-height cross sections of active remote sensing cloud layer (ARSCL) cloud frequency (a) and modeled cloud fraction (b) CAM3, (c) AM2, and (d) CAM3LIU at Barrow during M-PACE. The unit is %. Liquid fraction as a function of cloud height. (a) UND citation data, (b)

275

Research Highlight  

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How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D15207, doi:10.1029/2012JD017668. Cloud mean ice crystal concentration Nice(D ≥ 50 micrometers) versus mean aerosol concentration (NPCASP) above cloud for all 41 vertical profiles

276

Research Highlight  

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CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences Submitter: Hudson, J. G., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Hudson JG and S Noble. 2013. "CCN and vertical velocity influences on droplet concentrations and supersaturations in clean and polluted stratus clouds." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, , . ACCEPTED. Figure 1. Effective cloud supersaturation (Seff) against CCN concentration at 1% S (N1%) for horizontal cloud penetrations, 50 for MASE and 34 for POST. Seff is the S for which nearby below cloud CCN spectra, NCCN(S), equals mean droplet concentration (Nc). Figure 2. One second droplet concentration, Nc, and vertical velocity

277

Research Highlight  

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ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: DeSlover, D. H. 1996. Analysis of Visible and Infrared Cirrus Cloud Optical Properties Using High Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing, M.S. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Ho, S.-P. 1997. Atmospheric Profiles From Simultaneous Observations of Upwelling and Downwelling Spectral Radiance, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Knuteson, R. O., F. A. Best, H. B. Howell, P. Minnett, H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith. 1997. "High Spectral Resolution Infrared Observations at the Ocean-Atmosphere Interface in the Tropical Western Pacific using a Marine

278

Research Highlight  

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Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zeng X, W Tao, SW Powell, RA Houze, P Ciesielski, N Guy, H Pierce, and T Matsui. 2013. "A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-050.1. The sun, seen through a dusty atmosphere, sets at Niamey, the capital of Niger, which is located in the African Sahara. Anvil clouds that accompany thunderstorms. Contrasts often provide unique perspectives, and scientists seize any such opportunity-when it arises. In a new research paper, published in the Journal of Atmospheric Sciences,

279

Research Highlight  

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Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Flynn, C. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Liu J, Z Li, Y Zheng, C Flynn, and M Cribb. 2012. "Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D00K38, doi:10.1029/2011JD016490. A team of scientists found that aerosols significantly alter the vertical profile of solar heating in the central Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China. Aerosols were identified from as far away as Mongolia and Siberia. These findings have considerable implications for atmospheric

280

Research Highlight  

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Invisible Giants in the Sky Invisible Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovink, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Photo courtesy of the U.S. National Park Service Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Research Highlight  

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Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ivanova, K., Pennsylvania State University Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ivanova K and TP Ackerman. 2009. "Tracking nucleation-growth-sublimation in cirrus clouds using ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , D06113, 10.1029/2008JD010271. Figure 1. Values of the drift and diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation derived from the MMCR radar reflectivity observations. The diffusion coefficient characterizes the small scale, fast

282

Research Highlight  

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Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Michalsky J, F Denn, C Flynn, G Hodges, P Kiedron, A Koontz, J Schlemmer, and SE Schwartz. 2010. "Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north-central Oklahoma: 1992-2008." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D07203, doi: 10.1029/2009JD012197. Box plots of each complete year\'s daily averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm. The dark horizontal line in each box plot is the median daily averaged AOD for the year; the top and bottom of the rectangular box spans the middle 50% of the data. The mean values for the year are plotted

283

Research Highlight  

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Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kishcha, P., Tel-Aviv University Starobinets, B., Tel-Aviv University Kalashnikova, O., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Alpert, P., Tel-Aviv University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Kishcha P, B Starobinets, O Kalashnikova, CN Long, and P Alpert. 2009. "Variations of meridional aerosol distribution and solar dimming." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D14, 10.1029/2008JD010975. The distribution of four-year aerosol differences (δAOT/δFAOT) between the last four years (March 2004 - February 2008) and the first four years

284

Errvironmentaf Research  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

online at www.sciencedirect.com online at www.sciencedirect.com Environmental Research 10 1 (2006) 3 4 4 1 Errvironmentaf Research Do scientists and fishermen collect the same size fish? Possible implications for exposure assessment Joanna urger^^^^', Michael ~ o c h f e l d ~ ~ ~ , Sean Christian W. ~ e i t n e r ~ . ~ , Stephen ~ e w e t t ~ , Daniel SnigarofP, Ronald snigarofff, Tim Starnrng, Shawn ~ a r ~ e f , Max ~ o b e r ~ * , Heloise chenelotd, Robert patrickh, Conrad D. volzi, James ~ e s t o d 'Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082, USA b~onsortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), and Environmental and Occupational Healrh Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ, USA CEnvironmental and Community Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

285

Research Highlight  

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Minimalist Approach to Modeling Complex Arctic Clouds Minimalist Approach to Modeling Complex Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shaw, R. A., Michigan Technological University - Physics Department Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Yang F, M Ovchinnikov, and RV Shaw. 2013. "Minimalist model of ice microphysics in mixed-phase stratiform clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 40(14), doi:10.1002/grl.50700. Nordic winter landscape. Mixed-phase stratiform clouds are common features in the Arctic environment. They contain a mix of ice and "supercooled" water that, despite the freezing temperatures, remains in liquid form. Scientists aren't sure why these clouds exist in the Arctic for long periods of time, even while steadily losing ice particles through precipitation.

286

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Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Avramov A, AS Ackerman, AM Fridlind, B van Diedenhoven, G Botta, K Aydin, J Verlinde, KV Alexei, W Strapp, GM McFarquhar, R Jackson, SD Brooks, A Glen, and M Wolde. 2011. "Towards ice formation closure in Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T08, doi:10.1029/2011JD015910. Ice number size distributions as simulated (dendrites in red, aggregates in

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TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, XQ Dong, BK Xi, C Schumacher, P Minnis, and M Khaiyer. 2011. "Top-of-atmosphere radiation budget of convective core/stratiform rain and anvil clouds from deep convective systems." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D23202, doi:10.1029/2011JD016451. An example of the hybrid classification process. (a) GOES IR temperature, (b) NEXRAD radar reflectivity at 2.5 km MSL, (c) cloud patch segmentation from GOES IR temperature (the color patches are identified as deep

288

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Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Liu, Z., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, SA, JH Mather, TP Ackerman, and Z Liu. 2008. "Effect of clouds on the vertical distribution of SW absorption in the Tropics." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press. Daily average all-sky and clear-sky calculated SW column absorption at Manus and Nauru. On average, there is little difference in absorption between the all-sky and clear-sky conditions because of the compensating

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Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, Vol. 45, 2006, pp. 210-235. Figure 1 Figure 2 Because surface reflection of solar radiation plays a fundamental role in the surface energy budget, knowledge of its spatial and temporal variability is important for understanding the weather and climate of a specific region. Research instrumentation at the U.S. Southern Great Plains site-one of three locales around the world managed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program-continuously collects these types of data to help scientist investigate differences in

290

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Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Inputs Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: McComiskey, A, SE Schwartz, B Schmid, H Guan, ER Lewis, P Ricchiazzi, and JA Ogren. 2008. "Direct aerosol forcing: Calculation from observables and sensitivities to inputs." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D09202, doi:10.1029/2007JD009170. Figure 1. The sensitivity of calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing to input parameters has been examined to determine the consequences of uncertainties in these input parameters on calculated radiative forcing and to identify areas where measurements might be most profitably improved. Input

291

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Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Probabilistic Distribution and Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Probabilistic Distribution and Dependence on Dry Air Sources Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, S Niu, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "Lateral entrainment rate in shallow cumuli: Dependence on dry air sources and probability density functions." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20812, doi:10.1029/2012GL053646. Probability density functions (PDFs) of entrainment rate (λ) for different dry air sources in eight cumulus flights. The rate at which cloud engulfs dry air (entrainment rate) has proven to be one of the strongest controls on the climate sensitivity of climate models;

292

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Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Measurements and Modeling Submitter: Marty, C., Swiss Federal Institute of Snow and Avalanche Research Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marty, C., R. Philipona, J. Delamere, E.G. Dutton, J. Michalsky, K. Stamnes, R. Storvold, T. Stoffel, S.A. Clough, and E.J. Mlawr, Downward longwave irradiance uncertainty under arctic atmospheres: Measurements and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D12), 4358, doi:10.1029/2002JD002937, 2003. IPASRC-II instruments deployed at ARM's Barrow Station. Members of 11 international institutions converged at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, to conduct the Second International Pyrgeometer and

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The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life in the Midlatitude Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, X Dong, B Xi, S McFarlane, A Kennedy, B Lin, and P Minnis. 2012. "Life cycle of midlatitude deep convective systems in a Lagrangian framework." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117(D23), D23201, doi:10.1029/2012JD018362. The life cycle of a convective system tracked by the automated tracking algorithm in the study domain. Time increases from the top left to the bottom right, and each image represents an hour. The colors represent regions given by the hybrid classification.

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ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing Method Submitter: Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, J., P. Minnis, B. Lin, Y. Yi, T.-F. Fan, S. Sun-Mack, and J. K. Ayers, 2006: Determination of ice water path in ice-over-water cloud systems using combined MODIS and AMSR-E measurements. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21801, 10.1029/2006GL027038. Minnis, P., J. Huang, B. Lin, Y. Yi, R. F. Arduini, T.-F. Fan, J. K. Ayers, and G. G. Mace, 2007: Ice cloud properties in ice-over-water cloud systems using TRMM VIRS and TMI data. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D06206, doi:10.1029/2006JD007626. Figure 1. Comparison of the VISST and MCRS retrievals with simultaneous

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Precipitation Forecast Improved with a New Convective Triggering Mechanism Precipitation Forecast Improved with a New Convective Triggering Mechanism Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, and M Zhang. 2000. "Impact of the convective triggering function on single-column model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research 105: 14983-14996. Six-hour accumulated precipitation valid at 12 UTC 18 July 2005. (a) Radar Observation, (b) DCAPE, (c) GSM without the DCAPE trigger, and (d) GSM with the DCAPE trigger. Considerable improvement of precipitation forecast is obtained by the GSM with the new trigger compared to the radar observation.

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Strong Impacts of Vertical Velocity on Cloud Microphysics and Implications Strong Impacts of Vertical Velocity on Cloud Microphysics and Implications for Aerosol Indirect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, S Niu, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "Observed impacts of vertical velocity on cloud microphysics and implications for aerosol indirect effects." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L21808, doi:10.1029/2012GL053599. Joint probability density functions (PDF) of relative dispersion (ε) versus vertical velocity (w) along horizontal aircraft legs for each cumulus flight (date given in legend). The red lines denote weighted least

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Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Rotstayn, L., Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Rotstayn, L., and Y. Liu, Sensitivity of the First Indirect Aerosol Effect to an Increase in Cloud Droplet Spectral Dispersion with Droplet Number Concentration, Journal of Climate: Vol. 16, No. 21, pp.3476-3481, May 2003. Figure 1. Measurements of the relation between the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet spectrum and the cloud droplet number concentration (N). The lower, middle, and upper curves show the parameterizations used in the LOWER, MIDDLE, and UPPER simulations, respectively. A recent study by DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

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Giants in the Sky Giants in the Sky For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight A few large particles in a crowd of tiny ones have often been ignored when calculating the amount of sunlight bounced back into space in clean-sky conditions. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that these "giant" particles have a larger-than-expected impact on the amount of sunlight reflected away from Earth, by as much as 45 percent. They also showed that particles larger than one micron (0.000039 inch) occur much more frequently than expected, up to 85 percent of the time. "Many routine measurements are unable to sample large particles, thus they may overlook the residence of many 'Gullivers in the country of Lilliput,' said Dr. Evgueni

299

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ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Figs. 1a and 1b contain rms differences from 72 radiosondes for AERI retrievals (blue), GOES retrievals (black), and AERI+GOES retrievals (red) for temperature and mixing ratio respectively during the 1997 Water Vapor IOP. A measure of meteorological the variability of the temperature and water vapor is indicated by the green line. Figs. 1c and 1d show the TPW for the same cases from GOES, AERI+GOES, radiosonde, and the ARM SGP CART microwave radiometer and relative percent differences in TPW amounts. Figure 2. Four consecutive radiosonde, GOES, and AERI+GOES comparisons from

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Weather and Atmospheric Overview During Study of Natural and Urban Weather and Atmospheric Overview During Study of Natural and Urban Emissions (CARES) Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fast, J. ., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fast JD, WI Gustafson, LK Berg, WJ Shaw, M Pekour, M Shrivastava, JC Barnard, RA Ferrare, CA Hostetler, JA Hair, M Erickson, BT Jobson, B Flowers, MK Dubey, S Springston, RB Pierce, L Dolislager, J Pederson, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Transport and mixing patterns over central California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, 1759-1783. Aircraft sampling flight patterns are shown over central California in this aerial overlay. Researchers collected and analyzed measurements from

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Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Worldwide Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kafle, D. N., University of California, Riverside Coulter, R. L., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kafle DN and RL Coulter. 2013. "Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(13), 10.1002/jgrd.50536. Vertical profiles of multi-year annually averaged AOD (z) at different ARM sites: SGP, NSA, TWP, GRW, and FKB. Inset plots are the profiles of corresponding relative standard deviation, Srel (z). The corresponding 1-sigma measurement errors are given in horizontal bars.

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Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovchinnikov, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ovchinnikov M, A Korolev, and J Fan. 2011. "Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T06, doi:10.1029/2011JD015888. The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively delicate but has the power to tip the balance between ice and water in Arctic clouds. This image of an ice crystal was obtained from a Cloud Particle Imager during ISDAC. The imager was mounted on aircraft flying through clouds at a speed of 100 m/s.

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New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds Submitter: Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liou, K.N, S.C. Ou, Y. Takano, J. Roskovensky, G.G. Mace, K. Sassen, and M. Poellot, 2002: "Remote sensing of three-dimensional inhomogeneous cirrus clouds using satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data," Geophysical Research Letters 29(9): 1360. Figure 1 ARM Data Enables the Development and Verification of a New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds to Improve Climate Predictions Cirrus clouds cover about 30% of the Earth's surface. Because ice crystals both reflect sunlight and absorb thermal energy emitted from the earth

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Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

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The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, A, G Wen, JA Coakley, LA Remer, NG Loeb, and RF Cahalan. 2008. "A simple model of the cloud adjacency effect and the apparent bluing of aerosols near clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S17, doi: 10.1029/2007JD009196. (upper panel) A schematic two-layer model of a broken cloud field and Rayleigh scatterers. (lower panel) An example of the Poisson distribution of broken cloud fields with cloud fraction Ac = 0.3 for a 10 by 10 km area. For a cloud vertical thickness of 1 km, the left lower panel has cloud

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Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Delamere, J. S., Tech-X Corporation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Delamere JS, SA Clough, VH Payne, EJ Mlawer, DD Turner, and RR Gamache. 2010. "A far-infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D17106, 10.1029/2009JD012968. The mean AERI-ER radiances for a select set of cloud-free cases at NSA in 2007 are presented in the top panel. The bottom panel presents mean spectral differences between the measurements and model calculations. The red line demonstrates the differences when using the pre-RHUBC version of

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Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Truessel, B., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Ohmura, A., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Koenig-Langlo, G., Alfred Wegener Institute Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Tsvetkov, A. V., World Radiation Data Centre Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wild M, B Trüssel, A Ohmura, CN Long, G König-Langlo, EG Dutton, and A Tsvetkov. 2009. "Global dimming and brightening: An update beyond 2000." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D13, 10.1029/2008JD011382.

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Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Troposphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Turner DD and EJ Mlawer. 2010. "The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns (RHUBC)." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 91, doi:10.1175/2010BAMS2904.1. (a) Atmospheric transmittance at 1 cm-1 resolution in the far-infrared for three atmospheres that are representative of the ARM SGP site, NSA site, and RHUBC-II site in the Chajnantor plateau (CJC). (b) The transmittance

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Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Indirect Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Platnick, S., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Platnick, S, and L Oreopoulos. 2008. "Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 1. Theoretical analysis and examples from MODIS." Journal of Geophysical Research doi:10.1029/2007JD009654, in press. Oreopoulos, L., and S. Platnick. 2008. Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 2. Global analysis from MODIS, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2007JD009655, in press. Theoretical calculations with a shortwave broadband radiative transfer

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Probabilistic Approach Useful for Evaluating Cloud System Models Probabilistic Approach Useful for Evaluating Cloud System Models Submitter: Jakob, C., Monash University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Jakob, C., R. Pincus, C. Hannay, and K.M. Xu (2004). Use of cloud radar observations for model evaluation: A probabilistic approach, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D03202, doi:10.1029/2003JD003473. In evaluating climate models, time and space represent key challenges when extrapolating observations into simulations. Researchers supported by DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program have explored an alternative method based on "point series data" to arrive at model cloud predictions. Point series data are obtained over time through measurements

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The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern California Measured During CARES and CalNex Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cahill JF, K Suski, JH Seinfeld, RA Zaveri, and KA Prather. 2012. "The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in Northern and Southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-10989-2012. The CARES campaign took place in Sacramento in order to sample the city's urban plume. Photo courtesy of Jason Tomlinson. Researchers, including DOE scientists working at Pacific Northwest National

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Cloud Observations at Niamey During the AMF Deployment Cloud Observations at Niamey During the AMF Deployment Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Kollias, P. and M. A. Miller, 2007: Cloud and Precipitation Observations at Niamey During the 2006 ARM Mobile Facility Deployment. Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters. Daily observed cloud fraction in Niamey during the AMF deployment. The cloud fraction is derived using measurements from the 94-GHz radar, the MPL, and the ceilometer. The vertical resolution is 260 m, and a 5-day temporal filter is applied to the daily cloud fraction profiles. (a) Monthly-averaged cloud and precipitation fraction. The monthly mean and standard deviation of cirrus cloud top (white line), middle cloud tops

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Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Kay, JE, T L'Ecuyer, A Gettelman, G Stephens, and C O'Dell. "The contribution of cloud and radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice extent minimum." To appear in Geophysical Research Letters. Clouds and downwelling radiation 2007-2006 differences (June 15-Sept 15). a. Total cloud fraction differences based on radar and lidar data. b. Downwelling SW radiative flux difference. c. Downwelling LW radiative flux difference. The Western Arctic Ocean is outlined in brown. ARM ground-based radiation observations at Barrow, Alaska.

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Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Wang, T., State University of New York, Albany Duan, M., Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Min Q, T Wang, CN Long, and M Duan. 2008. "Estimating fractional sky cover from spectral measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D20208, doi:10.1029/2008JD010278. Retrieved and observed cloud fractions and corresponding TSI cloud imagers on 8 July 2005 at Pt. Reyes. Scatterplot of retrieved cloud fraction from spectral ratio method and SW

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Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Absorption Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. For seven AERI cases with 4-6 cm PWV: (a) average AERI radiances (black) and corresponding calculations using radiation code with previous version of MT_CKD continuum model (red); (b) residuals between AERI and calculations with older model; (c) residuals after the CO2 continuum in

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Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hanlon, C., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hanlon CJ, JB Stefik, AA Small, J Verlinde, and GS Young. 2013. "Statistical decision analysis for flight decision support: The SPartICus campaign." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , . ACCEPTED. In many atmospheric science field campaigns, investigators are budgeted some number of flight hours to collect data under specific, imperfectly forecastable atmospheric conditions. In such field campaigns, investigators must assess atmospheric conditions each day and make a resource-allocation decision: are conditions good enough to use some of our scarce flight hours

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Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Download a printable PDF Submitter: Varnai, T., University of Maryland, Baltimore County/JCEST Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Varnai T and A Marshak. 2009. "MODIS observations of enhanced clear sky reflectance near clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L06807, doi:10.1029/2008GL037089. Figure 1. Illustration of clouds enhancing the brightness of sky in nearby clear areas. In cloud-free areas light is scattered mainly by air molecules, but aerosols also contribute. Figure 2. Top: Average increase in MODIS clear-sky reflectivity (R) near clouds. The difference between areas near illuminated and shadowy cloud

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Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Simulations: Robust Results for Use in Climate Cloud-Resolving Model (CRM) Simulations: Robust Results for Use in Climate Model Development Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Smith-Mrowiec, A. A., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mrowiec AA, C Rio, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, AD Del Genio, OM Pauluis, AC Varble, and J Fan. 2012. "Analysis of cloud-resolving simulations of a tropical mesoscale convective system observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical fluxes and draft properties in convective and stratiform regions." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D19201, doi:10.1029/2012JD017759.

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A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gero, J., University of Wisconsin Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD and PJ Gero. 2011. "Downwelling infrared radiance temperature climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D08212, doi:10.1029/2010JD015135. The distribution of downwelling 10-micron infrared radiance observed at the SGP site by the AERI from June 1996 to May 2010, separated into all-sky (all samples) and the three distinct sky classifications.

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"Invisible" Giants in the Sky "Invisible" Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and their PM1.0 (red) and PM2.5 (green) counterparts at the CARES (left) T0 and (right) T1 sites.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Research Highlight  

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A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Zhang Y, CN Long, WB Rossow, and EG Dutton. 2010. "Exploiting diurnal variations to evaluate the ISCCP-FD flux calculations and radiative-flux-analysis-processed surface observations from BSRN, ARM, and SURFRAD." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D00K11, 10.1029/2009JD012812. Figure 1: Scatter plot for the column aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, measured at the surface (PSO) and used as input for the ISCCP-FD calculations (FD) at 10 ARM/SURFRAD/BSRN stations. The robust linear regression line is also shown.

322

Research Highlight  

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The Surprisingly Large Contribution of Small Marine Clouds to Cloud The Surprisingly Large Contribution of Small Marine Clouds to Cloud Fraction and Reflectance Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Feingold, G., NOAA - Earth System Research Laboratory Koren, I., Weizmann Institute of Science Remer, L., NASA - GSFC, Laboratory for Atmospheres Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Koren, I, L Oreopoulos, G Feingold, LA Remer, and O Altaratz. 2008. "How small is a small cloud?" Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Journal, in press Cloud mask for a sparse cumulus cloud field as inferred by using the same threshold at four different spatial resolutions. The upper-left panel is for the original Landsat resolution and the lower-right panel is for a

323

Research Highlight  

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Burning on the Prairies Burning on the Prairies Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fischer ML, MS Torn, DP Billesbach, G Doyle, B Northup, and SC Biraud. 2012. "Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.011. Pasture burning during the beginning of the experiment at the USDA Grazing Lands Research Laboratory in March 2005. What does it mean for the carbon cycle? The deep drought in the United States that fueled wildfires and damaged crops in 2012 has now continued well into 2013. However, long before the droughts and fires wreaked havoc, a team of

324

Research Highlight  

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Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Fire Study Reports Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: China S, C Mazzoleni, K Gorkowski, AC Aiken, and MK Dubey. 2013. "Morphology and mixing state of individual freshly emitted wildfire carbonaceous particles." Nature Communications, 4, 2122, doi:10.1038/ncomms3122. La Conchas fire, New Mexico Analyzing fresh, carbon-rich aerosols in smoke from the largest wildfire in New Mexico (2011), scientists report large impacts of wildfires on climate. A research study, published last week in Nature Communications, has revealed that smoke from wildfires, or biomass-burning events, contains

325

Research Highlight  

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Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds on Earth's Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Qian, Y., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Qian Y, CN Long, H Wang, JM Comstock, SA McFarlane, and S Xie. 2012. "Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12(4), doi:10.5194/acp-12-1785-2012. Clouds get in the way of the dawn light, perfectly framing the Raman lidar instrument at the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. This ground-based laser is a remote sensing instrument used for measuring

326

Research Highlight  

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Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ou, S., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of cirrus cloud vertical size profile using MODIS data." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D09205, doi:10.1029/2008JD011327. (a) MODIS true color composite images for March 6, 2001 at 1736UTC, (b) retrieved Τc; (c) retrieved Dt for selected domain; (d) retrieved Db for selected domain; (e) scatter plot for retrieved Τc versus MODIS Τc for selected domain; (f) scatter plot for retrieved De versus MODIS De for

327

Research Highlight  

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Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Botta, G., Pennsylvania State University Verlinde, J., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Botta G, K Aydin, J Verlinde, A Avramov, A Ackerman, A Fridlind, M Wolde, and G McFarquhar. 2011. "Millimeter wave scattering from ice crystals and their aggregates: Comparing cloud model simulations with X- and Ka-band radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T04, doi:10.1029/2011JD015909. Observational data sets are needed to drive and evaluate results from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations in order to improve parameterizations of the physical processes. Radar is one of the few

328

Research Highlight  

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Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hansell, R. A., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Hansell R, KN Liou, SC Ou, SC Tsay, Q Ji, and JS Reid. 2008. "Remote sensing of mineral dust aerosol using AERI during the UAE2: A modeling and sensitivity study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D18202, doi:10.1029/2008JD010246. BT sensitivity to dust optical depth at 962 cm-1 with markers denoting locations of AERI subbands 1-17 from left to right. (a) Volz compact hexagon model spectra for four optical depths with best fit AERI spectrum. (b) Same as (a) but for a kaolinite/50% calcium carbonate mixturedust model.

329

Research Highlight  

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The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties in Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock JM, R Lin, DO Starr, and P Yang. 2008. "Understanding ice supersaturation, particle growth, and number concentration in cirrus clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D23211, doi:10.1029/2008JD010332. Vertical velocity (Vm) derived from millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) Doppler velocity measurements in cirrus clouds observed over the ACRF SGP site. Cloud model simulations of cirrus clouds using large-scale forcing (left panel) and cloud-scale forcing (right panel).

330

Research Highlight  

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Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fischer, M. L., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Salamanca F, S Tonse, S Menon, V Garg, KP Singh, M Naja, and ML Fischer. 2012. "Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: Experimental verification and model-based evaluation." Environmental Research Letters, 7(4), 044007, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044007. True color image of light (PW1, PW2) and unpainted tar (PD1), and concrete (PD2) roofs at the Pantnagar, India site taken on October 21, 2011. We note that the concrete roof is considerably more reflective than the tar roof

331

Research Highlight  

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Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Satellite and ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, Y, SA Klein, C Liu, B Tian, RT Marchand, JM Haynes, RB McCoy, Y Zhang, and TP Ackerman. 2008. "On the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level cloud, and upper troposphere water vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D16105, doi:10.1029/2008JD009905. Figure 1: Diurnal anomalies for tropical (left) ocean and (right) land: (top) the precipitation index (PI), high-level cloud (CLD) and upper

332

Research Highlight  

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Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Penner, J.E., S.Y. Zhang, and C.C. Chuang, Soot and smoke aerosol may not warm climate, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D21), 4657, doi:10.1029/2003JD003409, 2003. New research results from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program suggest that fossil fuel soot emissions and biomass smoke may actually have a negligible warming effect and, in some cases, may even result in a net cooling effect. Black carbon is the absorbing component of smoke aerosols that result from the incomplete combustion of various fuels, the most significant sources being fossil fuel

333

Research Highlight  

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Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, S Niu, S Krueger, and T Wagner. 2013. "Exploring parameterization for turbulent entrainment-mixing processes in clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(1), doi:10.1029/2012JD018464. Relationships between the three microphysical measures of homogeneous mixing degree (ψ1, ψ2, ψ3) and the two transition scale numbers (NLa, NL0), respectively. The results shown here are from the EMPM simulations.

334

Research Highlight  

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Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, EI Kassianov, CN Long, and DL Mills. 2011. "Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the ARM SGP." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D01202, 10.1029/2010JD014593. Histogram of hourly average shortwave CRF (black) and longwave CRF (red) for all periods with shallow cumuli. (a) Hourly average shortwave CRF (circles), binned shortwave CRF (squares); (b) total number of hourly averages for each sky cover bin; and (c) the change in shortwave TED as a function of sky cover for all hours with

335

Research Highlight  

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Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, J Barnard, LK Berg, CN Long, and C Flynn. 2011. "Shortwave spectral radiative forcing of cumulus clouds from surface observations." Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L07801, doi:10.1029/2010GL046282. Figure 1. Normalized total cloud radiative forcing and its direct and diffuse components as a function of wavelength. Typically, under cloudy conditions, radiative transfer parameterizations in climate models have been evaluated by calculating the total cloud impact on

336

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Postdoctoral Research Awards...  

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Postdoctoral Research Awards: Investing in Innovative Clean Energy Technologies to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Postdoctoral Research Awards:...

337

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Research Briefs  

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Research Briefs The annually published Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center Research Briefs highlights recent accomplishments supporting our missions. Our research focuses...

338

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

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Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

339

Human Subjects Research, Office of Research Administration  

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research includes a wide variety of activities such as in vivo and in vitro studies, research on medical records, collection of data through surveys or observation, research...

340

Advanced Research  

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Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum Ductility EnhancEmEnt of molybDEnum PhasE by nano-sizED oxiDE DisPErsions Description Using computational modeling techniques, this research aims to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of molybdenum (Mo), chromium (Cr), and other high-temperature structural materials to enable these materials to withstand the harsh environments of advanced power generation systems, such as gasification-based systems. These types of materials are essential to the development of highly efficient, clean energy technologies such as low-emission power systems that use coal or other fossil fuels.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Advanced Research  

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Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and Super HigH-TemperaTure alloyS and CompoSiTeS From nb-W-Cr SySTemS Description The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE-FE) has awarded a three-year grant to the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to jointly explore the high-temperature properties of alloys composed of niobium (Nb), tungsten (W), and chromium (Cr). The grant is administered by the Advanced Research (AR) program of the National

342

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...  

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Geoscience Materials Science Nanodevices and Microsystems Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Geoscience Geoscience photo The Geoscience Research...

343

Biological and Environmental Research User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BER User Facilities BER User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 BER User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Biological & Environmental Research program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL): External link The mission of the EMSL at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) External link in Richland, Washington, is to provide integrated experimental and

344

Advanced Scientific Computing Research User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

ASCR User Facilities ASCR User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 ASCR User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Advanced Scientific Computing Research program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: Energy Sciences Network (ESnet): External link The Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet External link , is the Department of Energy's high-speed network that provides the high-bandwidth, reliable connections that link scientists at national laboratories, universities and

345

Microanalysis Research Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Microanalysis Research Group Staff. ... Joseph M. Conny, Research Chemist. Jeff M. Davis, Materials Research Engineer. ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Preserving research data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consortium for Political and Social Research. Ann Arbor, MI;Access to Publicly Funded Research Data. The Public Domainof the products of scientific research. Meanwhile, research

Jacobs, James A; Humphrey, Charles

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

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Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

348

CPC(HEP & NP), 2010, 34(6): 16 Chinese Physics C Vol. 34, No. 6, Jun., 2010 Recent results from the KEDR detector*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia 3 Novosibirsk State Technical and infrared light Compton backscat- tering. The accuracy of VEPP-4M energy measurement with the resonant by the interpolation between the succes- Received 25 January 2010 * Supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research

349

CPC(HEP & NP), 2010, 34(6): 15 Chinese Physics C Vol. 34, No. 6, Jun., 2010 Measurement of J/ c at KEDR*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Russia 2 Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia 3 Novosibirsk the cor- Received 26 January 2010 * Supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grants 08- ergy determination are used: resonant depolarization with accuracy of 8 ÷ 30 keV and IR-light Compton

350

Research Highlight  

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Ground-Based Cloud Measurements Utilized to Evaluate the Simulation of Ground-Based Cloud Measurements Utilized to Evaluate the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM4 Download a printable PDF Submitter: de Boer, G., University of Colorado, Boulder/CIRES Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Boer G, W Chapman, JE Kay, B Medeiros, MD Shupe, S Vavrus, and JE Walsh. 2011. "A characterization of the present-day Arctic atmosphere in CCSM4." Journal of Climate, 25(8), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00228.1. Time-height cross-sections of simulated (top) and observed (second row) cloud phase at Barrow, Alaska. The difference between the frequencies of occurrence of each phase is indicated in the third row. Monthly distributions of liquid (dark) and ice (light) water paths at

351

Research Highlight  

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Modeled Compared to Measured O:C and H:C Elemental Ratios of Secondary Modeled Compared to Measured O:C and H:C Elemental Ratios of Secondary Organic Material Download a printable PDF Submitter: Martin, S., Pierce Hall School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Chen Q, Y Liu, N Donahue, J Shilling, and S Martin. 2011. "Particle-phase chemistry of secondary organic material: modeled compared to measured O:C and H:C elemental ratios provide constraints." Environmental Science & Technology, , 10.1021/es104398s. Figure 1. Measurements and predictions. The first row shows particle mass yields at 298 K. The second row shows the modeled and measured particle-average O:C and H:C ratios for increasing particle mass concentrations.

352

Research Highlight  

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Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Droplets and Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2012. "On spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 113, 715-720. The ratio of ω0λ(r)/ω0λ(r0) plotted against ω0λ(r) for four wavelengths, λ=0.86, 1.65, 2.13 and 3.75 um. An example for the aggregates ice crystal habits is shown (see Yang et al. 2000. "Parameterization of

353

Research Highlight  

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Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Processes, and Intraseasonal Dynamic Variations Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Stephens, Graeme L., Webster, Peter J., Johnson, Richard H., Engelen, Richard, L'Ecuyer, Tristan. 2004: Observational Evidence for the Mutual Regulation of the Tropical Hydrological Cycle and Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures. Journal of Climate: Vol. 17, No. 11, pp. 2213-2224. The "humidistat" feedback mechanism suggests that the hydrological cycle and sea surface temperatures mutually regulate each other in phases: the destabilization phase, the convective phase, and the restoring phase. These

354

Research Highlight  

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Unique Properties of the Arctic Stratiform Cloud-Top Region Unique Properties of the Arctic Stratiform Cloud-Top Region Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Sedlar J, MD Shupe, and M Tjernström. 2011. "On the relationship between thermodynamic structure and cloud top, and its climate significance in the Arctic." Journal of Climate, 25(7), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00186.1. Occurrence frequency of low-level, stratiform cloud cases used in the analysis (black), percentage of these cases where the cloud top was identified to occur within the inversion (CII, gray), and percentage where the cloud top was observed to be capped by the inversion (CCI, white) for the ASCOS, SHEBA, and Barrow locations. The total number of cases analyzed

355

Research Highlight  

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First Measurements of Neutral Atmospheric Cluster and 1-2 Nm Particle First Measurements of Neutral Atmospheric Cluster and 1-2 Nm Particle Number Distributions During Nucleation Events Download a printable PDF Submitter: McMurry, P. ., University of Minnesota Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Jiang J, J Zhao, M Chen, J Scheckman, BJ Williams, FL Eisele, and PH McMurry. 2011. "First measurements of neutral atmospheric cluster and 1-2 nm particle number distributions during nucleation events." Aerosol Science and Technology, 45, doi:10.1080/02786826.2010.546817. Jiang J, M Chen, C Kuang, M Attoui, and PH McMurry. 2011. "Electrical mobility spectrometer using a diethylene glycol condensation particle counter for measurement of aerosol size distributions down to 1 nm."

356

Research Highlight  

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Integrated Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Water at MCTEX Integrated Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Water at MCTEX Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water measurements were obtained during the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (MCTEX) by Eugene Clothiaux and Tom Ackerman of Penn State University using an ARM microwave radiometer. The radiometer was deployed at Pularumpi, Melville Island (11.55 S, 130.56 E) off the north coast of Australia for November-December 1995. Time series of these results are shown in Figure 1. Time series of integrated or "precipitable" water vapor (PWV) and liquid

357

Research Highlight  

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Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Download a printable PDF Submitter: Naud, C. M., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Del Genio, A. D., NASA Mace, G., Utah State University Benson, S., Utah State University Clothiaux, E. E., Pennsylvania State University Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Naud, C, A Del Genio, GG Mace, S Benson, EE Clothiaux, and P Kollias. "Impact of dynamics and atmospheric state on cloud vertical overlap." Journal of Climate 218: 1758-1770. Mean overlap parameter α as a function of separation: (a,b) at SGP for all winter months of 2002-2004 and for 4 subsets of increasing 500 mb ω such

358

Research Highlight  

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Addressing the "Light Precipitation Problem" in the ECMWF Global Model Addressing the "Light Precipitation Problem" in the ECMWF Global Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ahlgrimm, M., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ahlgrimm M and R Forbes. 2013. "Improving the representation of low clouds and drizzle in the ECMWF model based on ARM observations from the Azores." Monthly Weather Review, , . ACCEPTED. Monthly mean cloud and precipitation occurrence from observations (red), the control version of the single column model (green) and the SCM experiment (blue). (a) Total cloud occurrence. (b) Low cloud (solid) and deep boundary layer (dashed) cloud occurrence. (c) Precipitation occurrence

359

Research Highlight  

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Production Flux of Sea-Spray Aerosol Production Flux of Sea-Spray Aerosol Download a printable PDF Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Leeuw G, EL Andreas, MD Anguelova, ER Lewis, C O'Dowd, M Schulz, and SE Schwartz. 2011. "Production flux of sea-spray aerosol." Reviews of Geophysics, 49, RG2001, doi:10.1029/2010RG000349. Lewis ER and SE Schwartz. 2004. Sea Salt Aerosol Production: Mechanisms, Methods, Measurements, and Models-A Critical Review. Washington DC: American Geophysical Union. Parameterizations of size-dependent SSA production flux evaluated for wind speed U10 = 8 m s-1. Also, central values (curves) and associated uncertainty ranges (bands) from Lewis and Schwartz (2004). Abscissa denotes

360

Research Highlight  

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Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Submitter: Lovejoy, S., McGill University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Lovejoy, S., D. Schertzer, J. D. Stanway, 2001: "Direct Evidence of planetary scale atmospheric cascade dynamics," Phys. Rev. Lett. 86(22): 5200-5203. Left: Power spectrum of the 5 different aircraft measured liquid water data sets from the FIRE experiment (averaged over 10 equally logarithmically spaced points on the k-axis and vertically offset). The absolute slopes with Β = 1.45 is indicated (straight line on top of graph) for reference. The number of sets used to compute the average from top to bottom: 4, 3, 1, 2, 5. A constant aircraft speed of 100m/s has been assumed. Right: Ensemble

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

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A Tall Order: Climate Models Fall Short in Predicting African Sahel A Tall Order: Climate Models Fall Short in Predicting African Sahel Rainfall Download a printable PDF Submitter: Roehrig, R., Meteo-France CNRM/GMME/MOANA Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Roehrig R, D Bouniol, F Guichard, F Hourdin, and JL Redelsperger. 2013. "The present and future of the West African Monsoon: A process-oriented assessment of CMIP5 simulations along the AMMA transect." Journal of Climate, 26(17), doi:10.1175/jcli-d-12-00505.1. The wealth of data available from field campaigns between the Gulf of Guinea and the Sahara Desert allowed scientists to evaluate the ability of climate models to accurately predict rainfall in the area.

362

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Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Grabowski, W., NCAR Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Grabowski WW and H Morrison. 2011. "Indirect impact of atmospheric aerosols in idealized simulations of convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium. Part II: Double-moment microphysics." Journal of Climate, 24, 1897-1912. This paper extends the previous cloud-resolving modeling study concerning the impact of cloud microphysics on convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium (CRQE) over a surface with fixed characteristics and prescribed solar input, both mimicking the mean conditions on Earth. The current study

363

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Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-Based Daytime Color All-Sky Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-Based Daytime Color All-Sky Images Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Long, C. N., J. M. Sabburg, J. Calbo, and D. Pages, (2006): Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-based Daytime Color All-sky Images, JTech, 23, No. 5, 633–652. Long, C. N., J. M. Sabburg, J. Calbo, and D. Pages, (2006): Papers of Note: Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-based Daytime Color All-sky Images, BAMS, 87, No. 6, 743–744. Figure 1. Sky image (left) from 1300 LST Sept 4, 2004, and corresponding cloud decision image (right) denoting originally retrieved clear sky (blue), thin cloud (gray), and opaque cloud (white). Black denotes masked

364

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Weather Forecasting in the Tropics with Climate Models Is Feasible Weather Forecasting in the Tropics with Climate Models Is Feasible Submitter: Boyle, J., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Climate Model Forecast Experiments for TOGA-COARE. J. Boyle,S. Klein,G. Zhang,S. Xie,X. Wei. Accepted by Monthly Weather Review Figure 1. Profiles of the apparent heat source (Q1) at the TOGA-COARE central site for the observations and day-two forecasts of the CAM, CAM with Zhang modification (ZMO), and AM2 averaged over the entire TOGA-COARE period are shown. Units are degrees Kelvin day. The CAM with the Zhang modified deep convection produced the best fit to the observations. Proper simulation of both the magnitude and level of maximum heating were shown to

365

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Development of a New Method for Estimating Evapotranspiration Using ARM Development of a New Method for Estimating Evapotranspiration Using ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wang, K., P. Wang, Z. Li, M. Cribb, and M. Sparrow (2007). A simple method to estimate actual evapotranspiration from a combination of net radiation, vegetation index, and temperature, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15107, doi:10.1029/2006JD008351. Wang, K., Z. Li, and M. Cribb (2006). Estimation of evaporative fraction from a combination of day and night land surface temperature and NDVI: A new method to determine the Priestley-Taylor parameter. Remote Sensing of Environment, 102, 293-305. Time series of the measured (dot) and predicted ET (line) using equation

366

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Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation of Surface Models Submitter: Robock, A., Rutgers University Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Robock, A., Luo, L., Wood, E. F., Wen, F., Mitchell, K. E., Houser, P. R., Schaake, J. C., Lohmann, D., Cosgrove, B., Sheffield, J., Duan, Q., Higgins, R. W., Pinker, R. T., Tarpley, J. D., Basara, J. D., Crawford, K. C., Evaluation of the North American Land Data Assimilation System over the Southern Great Plains during the warm season, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D22), 8846, doi:10.1029/2002JD003245, 2003 An example of the model discrepancies is shown in a comparison of monthly mean diurnal cycle data from July 1999 at the ARM Southern Great Plains

367

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New Insights Into Deep Convective Core Vertical Velocities Using ARM UHF New Insights Into Deep Convective Core Vertical Velocities Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, S Collis, J Straka, A Protat, C Williams, and S Krueger. 2013. "A summary of convective core vertical velocity properties using ARM UHF wind profilers in Oklahoma." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, , . ACCEPTED. ARM UHF profiler observations of reflectivity Z (top) and retrieved storm vertical velocity (bottom); overlaid contours bound regions of updrafts greater than 1.5 m/s. Summary median (diamond), 90th (triangle), and 95th (star) percentile data set properties of Oklahoma convective core updrafts including: (A)

368

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The Significance of Multilayer Cloud Systems in Tropical Convection The Significance of Multilayer Cloud Systems in Tropical Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Stephens, GL, and NB Wood. 2007. "Properties of tropical convection observed by millimeter-wave radar systems." Monthly Weather Review 135: 821-842. Storm classifications (derived from k-means clustering analysis) applied to MWR observations from (a) Manus during MJO, (b) Manus during MJO transition, (c) Indian Ocean (JASMINE experiment) during monsoon, and (d) tropical convection off the Florida coast (CRYSTAL-FACE experiment) of cloud and precipitation echo top heights. The relative frequencies of

369

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The Role of Microphysics Parameterization in Simulating Tropical Mesoscale The Role of Microphysics Parameterization in Simulating Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Download a printable PDF Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, AM Vogelmann, W Lin, EP Luke, AT Cialella, P Minnis, MM Khaiyer, ER Boer, and MP Jensen. 2013. "The role of cloud microphysics parameterization in the simulation of mesoscale convective system clouds and precipitation in the Tropical Western Pacific." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(4), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0104.1. The spatial distribution of cloud types at 3 UTC on 27 December 2003 as observed by GOES-9 and as simulated by the three commonly used microphysics

370

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Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Jeong, M.-J., Z. Li, E. Andrews, and S.-C. Tsay (2007). Effect of aerosol humidification on the column aerosol optical thickness over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D10202, doi:10.1029/2006JD007176. (a)-(j) Column-mean aerosol humidification factor as functions of the weighted column mean RH, . The ambient RH at one of the ten level-legs of the In-situ Aerosol Profile (IAP) measurements is replaced with RH equals 99%. Comparison of estimated column R(RH) following six different methods (M1~M6). Gray solid lines and black dashed lines are linear fit and

371

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Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2011. "Spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(12), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-060.1. Ratio of reflectance Rλ plus transmittance Tλ over single scattering albedo ω0λ plotted against the sum Rλ+Tλ for two cloud optical depths: 5 and 10. The aerosol optical depth at 0.55 μm is 0.2 (rural type of aerosol). Different dots correspond to different wavelengths from 0.4 to

372

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Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., B. Xi, and P. Minnis, 2006: Observational Evidence of Changes in Water vapor, Clouds, and Radiation at the ARM SGP site. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L19818,doi:10.1029/2006GL027132. Figure 1. This plot shows that atmospheric precipitable water vapor and downwelling infrared radiation decreased, but solar radiation increased at the SGP site from 1997 to 2004. The amount of water vapor, the dominant greenhouse gas, has a greater effect on infrared radiation than on solar. Figure 2. This plot shows that solar radiation at the surface increased

373

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Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhao Y, GG Mace, and JM Comstock. 2011. "The occurrence of particle size distribution bimodality in midlatitude cirrus as inferred from ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(6), doi:10.1175/2010JAS3354.1. Figure 1. Frequency distribution of ice water content (top), effective radius (middle), and crystal concentration (bottom) derived from 313 h of cloud property retrievals using the bimodal algorithm. The distributions are shown as a function of the layer-mean temperature shown in the legend.

374

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Surface Characterization Data for the ARM SGP CART Site Surface Characterization Data for the ARM SGP CART Site Submitter: Cialella, A. T., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 The ARM External Data Center (XDC) is continually searching for surface characterization data for the ARM CART sites. These data can provide a better understanding of geophysical parameters, allowing for more accurate parameterization within General Circulation Models (GCMs), thus improving their preditive power. Below are a sample of surface characterization data available and their sources: The land use/land cover map above was provided by Oklahoma State University (Figure 1). Eighty-eight covertypes, interpreted from county orthophotos, were generalized to 25 cover types. The resolution of the data is 200m by

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Cloud Regimes in the TWP and Their Evolution over the MJO Cloud Regimes in the TWP and Their Evolution over the MJO Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Chen, Y, and AD Del Genio. 2008. "Evaluation of tropical cloud regimes in observations and a general circulation model." Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-008-0386-6. Mean highest cloud-top vertical profiles from ARSCL (solid) and ISCCP (dashed) for each ISCCP cloud regime at Manus. Relative frequency of occurrence of each cloud regime as a function of lag in pentads relative to the MJO peak for eight MJO events covering November-April of 1999-2003. Red = deep convective, orange = anvil, yellow = congestus, green = thin cirrus, blue = shallow cumulus, violet =

376

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Improved Simulation of Boundary Layer Clouds Improved Simulation of Boundary Layer Clouds Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Comparison of Boundary Layer Clouds Schemes in Climate Models with Satellite Observations Key Contributors: James McCaa, as part of his Ph.D. dissertation at University of Washington Chris Bretherton, University of Washington Dennis Hartmann, University of Washington Steven Ghan, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine boundary layer clouds are among the most difficult clouds to represent in climate models. A team of atmospheric scientists from the University of Washington (UW) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

377

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Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Ice-Precipitating Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, and AS Ackerman. 2011. "Influence of humidified aerosol on lidar depolarization measurements below ice-precipitating Arctic stratus." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(10), doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-037.1. Correlated MMCR radar reflectivities and DABUL lidar depolarizations below cloud base calculated with a reasonably low number of large, coarse-mode

378

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Vertical Air Motion Measurements in Large-Scale Precipitation Vertical Air Motion Measurements in Large-Scale Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Luke, E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, EP Luke, and P Kollias. 2010. "Automated retrievals of precipitation parameters using non-Rayleigh scattering at 95-GHz." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 27(9), 10.1175/2010JTECHA1343.1. Time-height mapping of the retrieved vertical air motion for the 1 May 2007 event at SGP. Simultaneous measurements of vertical air motion and raindrop size distribution parameters in precipitation are challenging. The ARM W-band radars (95-GHz), despite being used primarily for cloud sensing, offer

379

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An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative Transfer Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Pincus, R., H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette, A fast, flexible approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogenous cloud fields, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 108, No. D13, 4376, doi:10.1029/2002JD003322, 2003 Key Contributors: H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette Cloud radiative feedback-the amount of solar radiation that is absorbed by clouds before it reaches the earth and bounces back into the atmosphere-is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climate responses to human activity. However, cloud properties

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Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Slingo, A., T.P. Ackerman, R.P. Allan, E.I. Kassianov, S.A. McFarlane, G.J. Robinson, J.C. Barnard, M.A. Miller, J.E. Harries, J.E. Russell , S. Dewitte, 2006: Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth's radiation budget. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L24817, doi:10.1029/2006GL027869. In March 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility recorded the strongest Saharan dust storm to reach the Niamey area in two years. The storm lasted several days, and visibility was reduced to 15 percent of normal. Observations (solid lines and star symbols) and results from two models

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381

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Statistics of Vertical Velocities from Monsoonal Convection with Statistics of Vertical Velocities from Monsoonal Convection with Verification Download a printable PDF Submitter: Collis, S. M., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Collis S, A Protat, PT May, and C Williams. 2013. "Statistics of storm updraft velocities from TWP-ICE including verification with profiling measurements." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 52(8), 10.1175/jamc-d-12-0230.1. A scatter plot of profiler-derived vertical velocities versus the scanning radar-retrieved vertical velocities. Dots represent minimum values, triangles represent mean values, and diamonds represent maximum values. The solid line is a fit to all maximum, mean, and minimum values, while the

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Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Radiative Heating Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman (2007), Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D14218, doi:10.1029/2006JD008290. Comparison of the distributions of cloud condensate for the ACRF TWP site at Manus using a) retrievals from the ACRF remote sensors, b) the CAM, c) all MMF columns, and d) MMF columns that do not contain precipitation. Note that the ARM observations do not include precipitation. Each panel consists

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Splitting the Solar Spectrum: Sometimes Less Is Better Than More Splitting the Solar Spectrum: Sometimes Less Is Better Than More Submitter: Pawlak, D. T., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pawlak, DT, EJ Clothiaux, MF Modest, and JNS Cole. 2004. Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Distribution for Shortwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 61: 2588-2601. Of all the physical and dynamical calculations required in numerical weather prediction and climate modeling, radiation calculations consume the most computational time. This is because the radiation transfer physics of the atmosphere involve molecular absorption that occurs in narrowly defined absorption bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The exact location in the

384

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Detangling Convective Oscillations at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Detangling Convective Oscillations at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus Submitter: Wang, Y., Department of Geography Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Liu, X., Institute of Earth Environment Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang Y, C Long, J Mather, and X Liu. 2010. "Convective signals from surface measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific site: Manus." Climate Dynamics, , doi:10.1007/s00382-009-0736-z. Figure 1: (A) The time series includes the clear-sky shortwave (SW) flux (blue) and the all-sky SW flux (black) over Manus. The green line indicates a 60-day running mean. (B) Wavelet power (WP) of CRF (color shading) with

385

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Anthropogenic Aerosols: a Clearer Understanding Anthropogenic Aerosols: a Clearer Understanding Submitter: Daum, P., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Liu, Y., and P. H. Daum, 2002: "Indirect warming effect from dispersion forcing," Nature 419(6872):580-581. Figure 1. Key = Green symbols: triangle - FIRE, northeastern Pacific; Crossed circles - SOCEX, Southern Ocean; Filled circle - ACE1, Southern Ocean; Blue symbols: Filled circles - ASTEX 8, northeastern Atlantic; Diamonds - SCMS 8, Florida coast; Filled triangles - Sounding 9, ASTEX; Filled squares - horizontal 9, ASTEX; Open inverted triangles - level 1; Open upright triangles - level 2; Open circles - level 3, all from southwest of San Diego 10; open diamonds - SCMS 11; stars - vertical, ASTEX

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Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Submitter: Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony; Wiscombe, Warren; Ridgway, William; Cahalan, Robert; 1998: "Biases in Shortwave Column Absorption in the Presence of Fractal Clouds," J. Climate 11(3):431-446. Figure 1: Water vapor transmission spectra for solar zenith angle of 60 degree. From the top: from TOA to 5 km, from TOA to 1 km, from TOA to 0.5 km and, finally, from TOA to surface. Figure 2: Fractional cloudiness N = 0.777. (a) Horizontal distribution of optical depth, the same for both models. (b) Horizontal distribution of cloud height for optical model. Constant cloud top and cloud base; thus

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More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cappa CD, TB Onasch, P Massoli, DR Worsnop, TS Bates, ES Cross, P Davidovits, J Hakala, KL Hayden, BT Jobson, KR Kolesar, DA Lack, BM Lerner, SM Li, D Mellon, I Nuaaman, JS Olfert, T Petaja, PK Quinn, C Song, R Subramanian, EJ Williams, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Radiative absorption enhancements due to the mixing state of atmospheric black carbon." Science, 337(6098), doi:10.1126/science.1223447. Black to the core: Scientists are combining field and laboratory measurements to understand more about the physical properties of aerosols

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Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Sednev, I., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: I Sednev, S Menon, and G McFarquhar. 2008. "Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion 8: 11755-11819. The vertical structure and radiative properties of persistent low-level Arctic clouds depend on their microphysics, and thus, estimation of the relative significance of the microphysical processes that occur in these

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A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and Temperature Dependent Ice Ch Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lin Y and BA Colle. 2011. "A new bulk microphysical scheme that includes riming intensity and temperature dependent ice characteristics." Monthly Weather Review, 139(3), 10.1175/2010MWR3293.1. (a) Coefficients of area-diameter (A-D) relationship in the new scheme. (b) Same as (a), except for the mass-diameter (M-D) relationship. (c) Same as (a), but for the velocity-diameter (V-D) relationship. (d) Same as (c), but each line shows the variation with Ri. More details of the figure are

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New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part I: theoretical development." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-040.1. Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part II: parcel model corroboration." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0152.1. A close-up of ice crystals. Ever noticed the different shapes of snowflakes sticking on the windowpane

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Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Submitter: Sassen, K., University of Alaska, Fairbanks Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sassen, K., P.J. DeMott, J.M. Propsero, and M.R. Poellot, Saharan Dust Storms and Indirect Aerosol Effects on Clouds: CRYSTAL-FACE Results, Geophys. Res. Ltt., 30(12), 1633, doi:10/1029/2003GL017371, 2003. PDL linear depolarization ratio (color scale on top) and relative returned power (in gray scale) of height versus time displays obtained on July 29, 2002, during the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment. Depicted are strong depolarizing upper tropospheric clouds (~10km), aerosols (δ ~.10 to .15) extending up to ~5.5km, and at lower right (scale adjusted to account for signal

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Heating Up the Arctic: Most Complete Data Set Ever Collected Helps Heating Up the Arctic: Most Complete Data Set Ever Collected Helps Scientists Understand Aerosol Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarquhar GM, S Ghan, J Verlinde, A Korolev, JW Strapp, B Schmid, JM Tomlinson, M Wolde, SD Brooks, D Cziczo, MK Dubey, JW Fan, C Flynn, I Gultepe, J Hubbe, MK Gilles, A Laskin, P Lawson, WR Leaitch, P Liu, XH Liu, D Lubin, C Mazzoleni, AM Macdonald, RC Moffet, H Morrison, M Ovchinnikov, MD Shupe, DD Turner, SC Xie, A Zelenyuk, K Bae, M Freer, and A Glen. 2011. "Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: the impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds." Bulletin of the American Meteorological

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Ice Nuclei and Global Warming Ice Nuclei and Global Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zeng, X., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Hou, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lang, S. E., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Li, X., University of Maryland, Baltimore County Starr, D. O., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zeng X, WK Tao, M Zhang, AY Hou, S Xie, S Lang, X Li, DO Starr, and X Li. 2009. "A contribution by ice nuclei to global warming." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, EARLY VIEW, doi:10.1002/qj.449.

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"Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde "Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde Observations in the Upper Troposphere Submitter: Soden, B. J., University of Miami Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Soden, B.J., D.D. Turner, B.M. Lesht, and L.M. Miloshevich (2004), An analysis of satellite, radiosonde, and lidar observations of upper tropospheric water vapor from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D04105, doi:10/1029/2003JD003828. Time-average relative humidity profiles from both original (black) and radiance-adjusted (blue) radiosonde soundings compared to the lidar (red) retrievals from field campaigns in 1996, 1997, 1999, and 2000.

395

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Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Halthore R. N., Schwartz, S. E., Michalsky, J. J., Anderson, G. P., Ferrare R. A., Holben B. N., and ten Brink H. M. 1997. "Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance," J. Geophys. Res. 102(D25): 29991-30002 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, Figure 1, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the

396

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Continuous Dataset of Water Vapor Measurements Throws Water on Assumptions Continuous Dataset of Water Vapor Measurements Throws Water on Assumptions of Cirrus Cloud Formation Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock, J. M., T. P. Ackerman, and D. D. Turner, 2004: Evidence of high ice supersaturation in cirrus clouds using ARM Raman lidar measurements. Geophys. Res. Letters, doi:10.1029/2004GL019705. To illustrate their findings, a continuous nine-hour segment of Raman lidar measurements showed upper tropospheric RHI measurements ranging from 120% near cloud tops and decreasing to about 70% at cloud base. To study the link between water vapor, cirrus cloud formation (homogenous and heterogenous) mechanisms, and their potential climatic impacts,

397

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All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in Continental Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fang, M., University of Miami Albrecht, B. A., University of Miami Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fang M, BA Albrecht, VP Ghate, and P Kollias. 2013. "Turbulence in continental stratocumulus, Part I: External forcings and turbulence structures." Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 149(454), doi:10.1007/s10546-013-9873-3. Coherent structures of the vertical velocity (left panels) and the energy dissipation rate (right panels) in updraft region during the day (a, b), night (c, d), and for entire 16 hours (e, f) of continental stratocumulus. Continental stratocumulus clouds are frequently observed in the cold side

398

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Preferred States of the Winter Arctic Atmosphere, Surface, and Sub-Surface Preferred States of the Winter Arctic Atmosphere, Surface, and Sub-Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Stramler K, AD Del Genio, and WB Rossow. 2011. "Synoptically driven Arctic winter states." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3817.1. SHEBA winter hourly surface net (down - up) longwave radiation flux versus surface temperature. Blue circles indicate times when a combined radar-lidar cloud detection indicated clear skies, and red plus signs indicate times when clouds were detected. Time series of SHEBA winter hourly temperatures at the atmospheric temperature inversion altitude (magenta), surface (black), snow-sea ice

399

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Seasonal Variation of the Physical Properties of Marine Boundary Clouds Seasonal Variation of the Physical Properties of Marine Boundary Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Lin W, M Zhang, and NG Loeb. 2009. "Seasonal variation of the physical properties of marine boundary layer clouds off the California coast." Journal of Climate, 22(10), doi:10.1175/2008JCLI2478.1. Image (a). Seasonal contrast of marine boundary-layer clouds between (a) summer (above) and (b) winter (below) off the California coast. Shown are cloud amount in the shaded box, cloud top and base heights and lifting condensation level (LCL) to the left, and cloud thickness and adiabatic

400

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The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

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New Characterization of Organic Aerosol Evolution Will Help Improve Models New Characterization of Organic Aerosol Evolution Will Help Improve Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Jimenez, J., University of Colorado Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Jimenez JL and . et al. 2009. "Evolution of organic aerosols in the atmosphere." Science, 326, doi: 10.1126/science.1180353. Total mass concentration (in micrograms per cubic meter) and mass fractions of non-refractory inorganic species and organic components in submicrometer aerosols measured with the AMS at multiple surface locations in the Northern Hemisphere. Inset: Distributions of O:C for the OA components identified at the different sites. Relationship between O:C and hygroscopicity (k, or equivalently the

402

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Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Properties Using ARM Data Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Properties Using ARM Data Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., P. Minnis, B. Xi, S. Sun-Mack, and Y. Chen, 2007: Validation of CERES-MODIS stratus cloud properties using ground-based measurements at the DOE ARM SGP site. Accepted by J. Geophys. Res. Wielicki, B. A. and Co-authors (2000), CERES Validation Plan Overview, Release 4, 10/20/00, 58 pp. (Available at http://asd-www.larc.nasa.gov/ceres/validation/ ceresval_r4.0_over.pdf) Figure 1. Time series of surface-derived cloud-base and -top heights and temperatures (1-hour average) and matched MODIS-derived effective cloud heights and temperatures (30-km x 30-km box) for daytime single-layer and

403

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Single-Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Plates Single-Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Plates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2009. "Single-scattering properties of aggregates of plates." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 135(639), 10.1002/qj.378. Aggregates of plates imaged by Cloud Particle Imager (left panel) and idealized geometry of aggregates of plates with AI=0.61 (right panel). Asymmetry parameter (g) at λ=0.55 μm of 80 different aggregates of seven 100 μm plates attached together, as functions of (a) AI, (b) 1-AR, and (c) An. The correlation coefficient and constants for a fitting equation,

404

Research Highlight  

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A Finer Mesh to Improve Cloud Representation in Climate Models? A Finer Mesh to Improve Cloud Representation in Climate Models? Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Boutle IA, SJ Abel, PG Hill, and CJ Morcrette. 2013. "Spatial variability of liquid cloud and rain: observations and microphysical effects." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, , doi:10.1002/qj.2140. Different sizes of water droplets as well as varying water content dramatically alter cloud properties-often at a resolution finer than is currently in use by most climate models. Although clouds can extend for several kilometers, their properties-for example, liquid and rainwater content-can change dramatically over very

405

Research Highlight  

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Different Strokes for Different Folks-Not Any More, Say Scientists at the Different Strokes for Different Folks-Not Any More, Say Scientists at the UK Met Office Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morcrette CJ, EJ O'Connor, and JC Petch. 2012. "Evaluation of two cloud parametrization schemes using ARM and Cloud-Net observations." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 138(665), doi:10.1002/qj.969. Integrating different metrics-and their errors and biases-used in weather and climate models may improve predictions by both types of models. What works for the weather models does not for climate models. Devising a common language, which translates into integrating the slew of metrics that the weather and climate science community uses, could be a way to improve

406

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A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Michalsky, J. J., C. Gueymard, P. Kiedron, L. J. B. McArthur, R. Philipona, and T. Stoffel, 2007: A proposed working standard for the measurement of diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D16112, doi:10.1029/2007JD008651. The three pyranometers proposed for the international standard for diffuse flux are shown here in action during the 2006 campaign at the ACRF SGP site. Of note are the shadows of the blocking balls on the domes of each pyranometer. The blocking balls are moved by a solar tracker to continuously shade the pyranometers.

407

Research Highlight  

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Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Submitter: Zhang, Q., University of California, Davis Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Setyan A, Q Zhang, M Merkel, WB Knighton, Y Sun, C Song, J Shilling, TB Onasch, S Herndon, D Worsnop, JD Fast, R Zaveri, LK Berg, A Wiedensohler, BA Flowers, MK Dubey, and R Subramanian. 2012. "Characterization of submicron particles influenced by mixed biogenic and anthropogenic emissions using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: Results from CARES." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-8131-2012. High-resolution mass spectra (colored by ion category) and elemental ratios of the OA factors. Average contribution of ion categories to the total

408

Research Highlight  

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Laboratory-Measured Optical Properties of Primary Organic Aerosol for Laboratory-Measured Optical Properties of Primary Organic Aerosol for Humidities Up to 95% Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bond, T., University of Illinois, Urbana Rood, M. J., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Brem BT, FC Mena Gonzalez, SR Meyers, TC Bond, and MJ Rood. 2011. "Laboratory-measured optical properties of inorganic and organic aerosols at relative humidities up to 95%." Aerosol Science and Technology, 46(2), doi:10.1080/02786826.2011.617794. Optical properties of the nigrosin benchmark aerosol as a function of relative humidity (RH). Measured extinction (σep) and scattering (σsp) for 467 nm, 530 nm and 660 nm are shown in 1a), 1b) and 1c); calculated

409

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Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shupe MD, OG Persson, IM Brooks, M Tjernstrom, J Sedlar, T Mauritsen, S Sjogren, and C Leck. 2013. "Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea ice in late summer." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, doi:10.5194/acp-13-9379-2013. Figure 1. Normalized profiles of (a) vertical velocity skewness and (b) variance, (c) turbulent dissipation rate, and (d) potential temperature. Black curves are all data, while red and green are for decoupled and coupled cases, respectively. Normalization is relative to the cloud top

410

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Tackling Tropical Convection in Climate Models Tackling Tropical Convection in Climate Models Submitter: Zhang, G. J., University of California, San Diego Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, G. J., and H. Wang, 2006. Toward mitigating the double ITCZ problem in NCAR CCSM3, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L06709, doi:10.1029/2005GL025229 (23 March 2006). Figure 1. Climate models commonly suffer from a problem known as the double-ITCZ, which is illustrated here via observed and model-simulated rainfall at the surface. The error is seen in the region circled where, compared to observations (Image A), the original climate model (Image B) produces a second, erroneous equatorial ITCZ band southward from the one

411

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Shallow Clouds Make the Case for Remote Sensing Instrumentation Shallow Clouds Make the Case for Remote Sensing Instrumentation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., and W. W. Grabowski (2007). Optical properties of shallow tropical cumuli derived from ARM ground-based remote sensing, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L06808, doi:10.1029/2006GL028767. In this figure, the lines indicate theoretical calculations of cloud droplet size for clouds with various droplet concentrations in which no mixing occurs. The cloud droplet size shows significant variability with height. Traditionally, observations of air mixing and cloud droplet size come from in situ aircraft probes, which collect data at very high horizontal

412

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First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing Across China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean annual shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) averaged across China. Spatial variation of the annual mean SW aerosol radiative forcing. Heavy loading of aerosols in China is widely known, but little is known about their impact on regional radiation budgets, which is often expressed as aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Depending on their composition, aerosols can absorb a substantial amount of solar radiation, leading to a warming of the atmosphere and cooling of the surface. Many investigations have been made to characterize atmospheric aerosols and their radiative

413

Center Research  

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5 5 Center Research ... Supports Electric Utility Restructuring Winds of change in the U.S. power sector: factors listed in the left column have created a gap between the prices utilities must charge to recover their embedded costs and the lower rates they would have to charge in a competitive environment. Possible responses to these pressures are listed to the right. The electricity industry in the U.S. is being dramatically restructured by state regulatory commissions and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Efforts are underway to create a wholesale market for electricity, with wholesale prices to distributing utility companies no longer being regulated. Discussions in several states and at the FERC are aimed at revising the regulation of the structure, operation, and pricing of the

414

Research Highlight  

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Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McComiskey A and G Feingold. 2012. "The scale problem in quantifying aerosol indirect effects." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-1031-2012. Differing values: Values derived from aircraft and surface observations, which represent disaggregated data, differ from those derived from satellite-based data, which represent data aggregated at a range of levels. Currently, many climate change models treat the two types of data the same. Aerosols-tiny airborne particles from sources like pollution or desert

415

Research Highlight  

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Aerosol Experiment Results Featured in Technical Journal Aerosol Experiment Results Featured in Technical Journal Submitter: Sheridan, P., U.S. Department of Commerce/NOAA Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sheridan, P, W Arnott, J Ogren, E Andrews, D Atkinson, D Covert, H Moosmuller, A Petzold, B Schmid, A Strawa, R Varma, and A Virkkula. 2005. "The Reno Aerosol Optics Study: An evaluation of aerosol absorption measurement methods." Aerosol Science and Technology 39(1):1-16. This magnification shows the size of aerosol particles relative to the pore size of the filter used during one of the study's sampling runs. Aerosol particles are gaining increasing scientific attention as a key factor in climate change. Through scattering and absorption of solar radiation, or by altering cloud properties, aerosols have the potential to

416

Research Highlight  

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Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., 2007: Improved ground-based liquid water path retrievals using a combined infrared and microwave approach. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15204, doi:10.1029/2007JD008530. Turner, D.D., A.M. Vogelmann, R. Austin, J.C. Barnard, K. Cady-Pereira, C. Chiu, S.A. Clough, C.J. Flynn, M.M. Khaiyer, J.C. Liljegren, K. Johnson, B. Lin, C.N. Long, A. Marshak, S.Y. Matrosov, S.A. McFarlane, M.A. Miller, Q. Min, P. Minnis, W. O'Hirok, Z. Wang, and W. Wiscombe, 2007: Thin liquid water clouds: Their importance and our challenge. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,

417

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Bouniol D, F Couvreux, PH Kamsu-Tamo, M Leplay, F Guichard, F Favot, and EJ O'Connor. 2012. "Diurnal and seasonal cycles of cloud occurrences, types, and radiative impact over West Africa." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51(3), doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-051.1. Clouds occurring at different levels in the sky have varying impacts on Earth's energy budget. Clouds with bases between five and seven kilometers above the Earth's surface, also known as mid-level clouds, occur over West Africa all year-round and may have major impacts on the Earth's energy budget,

418

Research Highlight  

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Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Submitter: Lubin, D., National Science Foundation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lubin, D., and A.M. Vogelmann, 2006: A climatologically significant aerosol longwave indirect effect in the Arctic, Nature, 439, 26 January, 453-456, doi:10.1038/nature04449 In a process known as the first aerosol indirect effect, enhanced aerosol concentrations cause the droplets in a cloud to be smaller and more numerous within a cloud of fixed water amount. This study found that this process can make many clouds more opaque and emit more thermal energy to the surface. The warming of the Arctic climate and decreases in sea ice area and thickness observed over recent decades are believed to result from

419

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, and P. Yang, 2003: "Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA," Journal of Applied Meteorology 42(6):701-715. The SHEBA experiment in Barrow, Alaska used data collected by the ground-based radiation observations from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). (Photo Credit: SHEBA Project Office) Key Contributors: S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, P. Yang, In the frigid environs of the Acrtic, ARM scientists at the North Slope of

420

Research Highlight  

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An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar Processing Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, R McGraw, and L Lei. 2013. "An application of linear programming to polarimetric radar differential phase processing." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, , . ACCEPTED. C-band scanning ARM precipitation radar fields of radar reflectivity factor Z and processed specific differential phase KDP for a section of a Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) convective event as output from LP methods implemented for the ARM PyART processing suite. Detailed microphysical insights from weather radar systems are in demand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Research Highlight  

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Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-train Satellite Data Submitter: Yuan, J., University of Washington Houze, R., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Yuan J and RA Houze. 2010. "Global variability of mesoscale convective system anvil structure from A-train satellite data." Journal of Climate, 23, 5864-5888. Figure. 1 Annual mean (2007) climatology of anvil clouds associated with (a) small separated MCSs (<12000 km^2, the smallest 25%), (b) large separated MCSs (>40000 km^2, the largest 25%), and (c) connected MCSs. The color indicates percentage of area covered by MCS anvil clouds for each 5°x5° grid. In the tropics, upper-level clouds containing ice and mixtures of ice and

422

Research Highlight  

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Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Tridon F, A Battaglia, P Kollias, E Luke, and C Williams. 2013. "Signal post-processing and reflectivity calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915 MHz wind profilers." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 30(6), doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-12-00146.1. Because ARM's wind profilers (foreground) can take vertical as well as horizontal measurements, the instruments can be used with appropriate processing and calibration to help study rainfall. For more than two decades, radar wind profilers of the U.S. Department of

423

Research Highlight  

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Seasonal Case Studies Reveal Significant Variance in Large-Scale Forcing Seasonal Case Studies Reveal Significant Variance in Large-Scale Forcing Data Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, R.T Cederwall, M. Zhang, and J.J. Yio, Comparison of SCM and CSRM forcing data derived from the ECMWF model and from objective analysis at the ARM SGP site, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D16), 4499, doi:10.1029/2003JD003541, 2003. Observed (left) and ECMWF-derived (right) forcing fields of time-height distributions of the derived (top) vertical velocity, (middle) total advective tendency and temperature, and (bottom) total advective tendency of moisture during the selected strong precipitation period during summer

424

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Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Cadeddu, M. P., Argonne National Laboratory Crewell, S., University of Cologne Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner DD, MP Cadeddu, U Loehnert, S Crewell, and A Vogelmann. 2009. "Modifications to the water vapor continuum in the microwave suggested by ground-based 150 GHz observations." IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 47(10), 3326-3337. Figure 1: The top panel shows downwelling microwave brightness temperature

425

Research Highlight  

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Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the ACRF SGP Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Matrosov, S. Y., CIRES/NOAA/ESRL/University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A An example of MMCR (a) and WACR (b) ARM radar measurements of a stratiform precipitating event and the corresponding estimates of mean rain rate (c) and cloud IWP and LWP (d). A comprehensive characterization of all hydrometeors in the vertical column is an important task, which is crucial for model parameterization and validation purposes. For many years, the remote sensing efforts within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were focused primarily on either non-precipitating or only weakly-precipitating (e.g., drizzling)

426

Research Highlight  

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Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Submitter: Kirchstetter, T. W., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hadley OL and TW Kirchstetter. 2012. "Black carbon reduction of snow albedo." Nature Climate Change, , doi:10.1038/nclimate1433. Spectrally weighted snow albedo over the 300-2,500 nm solar spectrum: derived from our experiments (dots, 1 standard deviation) and modelled using SNICAR (shaded bands). Upper and lower boundaries of the shaded bands correspond to modelled albedo assuming BC mass absorption cross-sections, at 550 nm, of 7.5 and 15 m2/g, respectively. Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and

427

Research Highlight  

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Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2013. "Optimal numerical methods for determining the orientation averages of single-scattering properties of atmospheric ice crystals." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 127, doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.05.020. Fig.1. Idealized shapes of ice crystals used in this study: (a) Gaussian random sphere (GS), (b) droxtal (DX), (c) budding Bucky ball (3B), and (d) column (COL). All models are visualized with dipoles. For (b), (c), and (d)

428

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Characterizing Mixed-Phase Clouds from the Ground: a Status Report Characterizing Mixed-Phase Clouds from the Ground: a Status Report Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Shupe, MD, JS Daniel, G De Boer, EW Eloranta, P Kollias, E Luke, CN Long, DD Turner, and J Verlinde. 2008. "A focus on mixed-phase clouds: The status of ground-based observational methods." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, accepted for publication in October 2008 issue. Figure 1. Retrieved cloud properties for 9 October 2004 at Barrow: (a) Multisensor cloud phase classification, (b) radar Doppler spectra cloud phase classification, (c) ice water content, (d) ice particle effective radius, (e) adiabatic liquid water content scaled to the microwave

429

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Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Morrison H and WW Grabowski. 2011. "Cloud-system resolving model simulations of aerosol indirect effects on tropical deep convection and its thermodynamic environment." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11(20), doi:10.5194/acp-11-10503-201. Profiles of ensemble- and horizontally averaged a) cloud water mixing ratio, b) rain mixing ratio, c) ice mixing ratio, d) cloud droplet concentration, e) rain number concentration, and f) ice number concentration, Ni, for pristine (blue), polluted (green), and highly

430

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A Bulk Parameterization of Giant Cloud Condensation Nuclei A Bulk Parameterization of Giant Cloud Condensation Nuclei Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kogan, Y., University of Oklahoma - CIMMS Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Mechem, D. B., and Y. L. Kogan, 2007: A bulk parameterization of giant CCN. J. Atmos. Sci., conditionally accepted. Mean quantities as a function of GCCN concentration for polluted (squares) and clean (diamonds) background CCN conditions. Radiative quantities as a function of GCCN concentration for polluted and clean background CCN conditions shown in (a) optical depth; (b) albedo; (c) susceptibility; and (d) susceptibility relative to the control simulations without GCCN. A parameterization for giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN), suitable for

431

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Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and ARM Data Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and ARM Data Submitter: Somerville, R. C., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Randall, D.A., K.-M. Xu, R.C.J. Somerville, and S. Iacobellis, 1996: "Single-Column Models and Cloud Ensemble Models as Links between Observations and Climate Models," J. Climate 9(8)1683-1697. Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 We have developed a Single-Column Model (SCM) to validate GCM cloud-radiation parameterizations against ARM observational data. The SCM is a computationally efficient one-dimensional representation of the atmospheric column overlying a single GCM grid cell. The SCM is integrated

432

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Five-Year Statistics of Shallow Clouds at the ACRF SGP Site Five-Year Statistics of Shallow Clouds at the ACRF SGP Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Berg, LK, and EI Kassianov. 2008. "Temporal variability of fair-weather cumulus statistics at the ARM SGP site." Journal of Climate 21, 3344-3358. Figure 1. Five-year mean ARSCL VAP values of cloud fraction (black), cloud-base height (orange circles), cloud-top height (red), cloud thickness (blue), and cloud-chord length (green), and their average daily bias for each year (B) and low-altitude moisture (C). While fair-weather clouds (FWC) are small in size, they are ubiquitous,

433

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Using Copulas to Model Complex Clouds Using Copulas to Model Complex Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Norris, P. M., NASA - GMAO/UMBC - GEST Hou, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Zeng, X., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Norris PM, L Oreopoulos, AY Hou, WK Tao, and X Zeng. 2008. "Representation of 3D heterogeneous cloud fields using copulas: Theory for water clouds." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 134(636), doi:10.1002/qj.321. Contours containing (brown-80%, orange-60%, cyan-40%, and blue-20%) of the joint inter-layer S probability, such that the probability densities within each contour are larger than those outside. Thick contours are from the GCE

434

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When Pollution Gets a Whiff of Trees When Pollution Gets a Whiff of Trees Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shilling, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shilling JE, RA Zaveri, JD Fast, L Kleinman, M Alexander, MR Canagaratna, E Fortner, JM Hubbe, JT Jayne, A Sedlacek, A Setyan, S Springston, DR Worsnop, and Q Zhang. 2013. "Enhanced SOA formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic emissions during the CARES campaign." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, doi:10.5194/acp-13-2091-2013. Organic aerosols from tree emissions increase when mixed with manmade sources, impacting the climate. It's easy to visualize particles and gases from vehicle exhaust or burning trash wafting into the atmosphere. It's harder to envision similar gases

435

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Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Submitter: Solomon, A., NOAA/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Solomon A, MD Shupe, O Persson, and H Morrison. 2011. "Moisture and dynamical interactions maintaining decoupled Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in the presence of a humidity inversion." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, doi:10.5194/acp-11-10127-2011. Soundings of mid-day decoupled stratocumulus at Barrow, Alaska. (A) Measured 17:34Z 8 April 2008 at (71.33N,156.61W). (B) 50-m LES simulation 20Z 8 April 2008 at (71.33N,156.91W). Gray shading marks the extent of the

436

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Case Closed on Nauru Island Effect Case Closed on Nauru Island Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Long CN and SA McFarlane. 2012. "Quantification of the impact of Nauru Island on ARM measurements." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51(3), 628-636. McFarlane SA, CN Long, and DM Flynn. 2005. "Impact of island-induced clouds on surface measurements: analysis of the ARM Nauru Island Effect Study data." Journal of Applied Meteorology, 44, 1045-1065. Conceptual model of the Nauru Island Effect and production of cloud plume. Approximate ARM Nauru site location is shown on the western side of the

437

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Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kablick III, G. P., University of Maryland Ellingson, R. G., Florida State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kablick III GP, RG Ellingson, EE Takara, and J Gu. 2011. "Longwave 3D benchmarks for inhomogeneous clouds and comparisons with approximate methods." Journal of Climate, 24, doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3752.1. The respective flux and heating rate errors (model-3DMC) for (a),(b) ATEX and (c),(d) GATE A. The error profiles in (a) and (c) are to be interpreted as ICA, solid lines; MRO, dashed lines; RO, dotted lines. (b) and (d) also show the differences between MRO and RO. The horizontal lines are the

438

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Modeling of Scattering and Absorption by Nonspherical Cirrus Modeling of Scattering and Absorption by Nonspherical Cirrus Submitter: Dong, Q., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Fu, Q., W.B. Sun, and P. Yang, 1999: "Modeling of Scattering and Absorption by Nonspherical Cirrus Ice Particles at Thermal Infrared Wavelengths," J. Atmos. Sci. 56(16): 2937-2947. We examined a number of commonly used methods for the calculation of the scattering and absorption properties of nonspherical ice crystals at thermal infrared wavelengths. It is found that, for randomly oriented nonspherical particles, Mie theory using equivalent ice spheres tends to overestimate the absorption efficiency while the anomalous diffraction

439

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Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Matthews, S., J. M. Hacker, J. Cole, J. Hare, C. N. Long, and R. M. Reynolds, (2007): Modification of the atmospheric boundary layer by a small island: observations from Nauru, MWR, Vol. 135, No. 3, pages 891–905. Figure 1. Illustration of daytime heating producing a thermal internal boundary layer effect over Nauru, which in turn produces cumulous clouds above the boundary layer. Figure 2. Illustration of Nauru heat-island produced by convective rolls forming cloud streets. Figure 3. Satellite images of Nauru on December 13, 2000 showing the cloud

440

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Progress Towards Climate Projections of Central U.S. Rainfall Using a Progress Towards Climate Projections of Central U.S. Rainfall Using a Global Model with Embedded Explicit Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Pritchard, M. S., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Pritchard MS, MW Moncrieff, and RC Somerville. 2011. "Orogenic propagating precipitation systems over the US in a global climate model with embedded explicit convection." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68, doi:10.1175/2011JAS3699.1. Characteristic time-longitude structure of central U.S. summer diurnal convection (35-45 N) (a) as observed in 2005 from space-borne infrared imagers, and as simulated by (b) the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) v3.5

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

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Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Overlap Assumptions Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pincus, R., R. Hemler, and S.A. Klein, 2006: Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev., 134, 3644-3656. As shown by the difference between the two panels, the standard way (AM2, top panel) of mixing solar reflection and transmission differs systematically from the Independent Column Approximation approach. Because cloud-radiation interactions depend critically on the vertical amount of clouds, different assumptions about how this alignment occurs

442

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Characterizing Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories Characterizing Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shupe MD, VP Walden, E Eloranta, T Uttal, JR Campbell, SM Starkweather, and M Shiobara. 2011. "Clouds at Arctic atmospheric observatories, part I: occurrence and macrophysical properties." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(3), 626-644. Shupe MD. 2011. "Clouds at Arctic atmospheric observatories, part II: thermodynamic phase characteristics." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(3), 645-661. Figure 1: (a) Annual cycles of monthly mean cloud occurrence fraction at six Arctic atmospheric observatories. The average cloud fraction for all

443

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Increased Accuracy for Sky Imager Retrievals Increased Accuracy for Sky Imager Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Long CN. 2010. "Correcting for circumsolar and near-horizon errors in sky cover retrievals from sky images." The Open Atmospheric Science Journal, 4, doi:10.2174/1874282301004010045. Long CN, JM Sabburg, J Calbo, and D Pages. 2006. "Retrieving cloud characteristics from ground-based daytime all-sky images." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 23, 633-652. Sample sky image (left) and corresponding cloud decision image (right) showing an example of the over-estimating problem. White and gray in the

444

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When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour Download a printable PDF Submitter: Penide, G., Laboratoire d\\\'Optique Atmospherique Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Penide G, V Kumar, A Protat, and P May. 2013. "Statistics of drop size distribution parameters and rain rates for stratiform and convective precipitation during the North Australian wet season." Monthly Weather Review, 141(9), 10.1175 /mwr-d-12-00262.1. Measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement facility at Darwin, Australia, helped scientists determine how drop size distribution and rain rates are affected by larger-scale weather patterns. Rainfall comes in a variety of forms: mist, drizzle, showers, downpours. The type and frequency of rainfall usually depends on the season and

445

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Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter over Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, and B Cairns. 2012. "Evaluation of hydrometeor phase and ice properties in cloud-resolving model simulations of tropical deep convection using radiance and polarization measurements." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(11), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-0314.1. Liquid index (LI) values are directly derived from multi-directional polarized reflectances. POLDER measurements (dashed line envelop) show

446

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New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer Calculations Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarlane SA, K Gaustad, E Mlawer, C Long, and J Delamere. 2011. "Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility." Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 4, 1713-1733. Time series of daily percent vegetation derived from MFR measurements for (top) 2001-2008 at 10-m tower, which is located over an unmanaged pasture; (middle) 2001-2004 at 25-m tower, which is located over a managed field; and (bottom) 2005-2008 at 25-m tower. The different seasonal cycles at the

447

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Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean profiles of (first column) total precipitation normalized Q1, (second column) convective precipitation normalized convective heating, (third column) stratiform heating, and (fourth column) convective mass flux for the (top) wet, (middle) dry, and (bottom) break period from models and available observational estimates. Dashed lines are fine resolution model results. Note the different x axis scale for the third and fourth columns. An intercomparison of global atmospheric model simulations of tropical

448

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Parameterization of Riming Intensity and Its Impact on Ice Fall Speed Using Parameterization of Riming Intensity and Its Impact on Ice Fall Speed Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lin Y, DJ Leo, and BA Colle. 2011. "Parameterization of riming intensity and its impact on ice fall speed using ARM data." Monthly Weather Review, 139(3), 10.1175/2010MWR3299.1. (a) Scatter plot of the observed Doppler velocities from the MMCR against the ice fall velocities derived using the Heymsfield and Donner (1990) formula. (b) Same as (a), but shows the ice fall velocities derived using Eq. 4 with RMF_para. Annual long-term mean precipitation in mm day-1 for: (a) GPCPv2, (b) CTL

449

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Can Ice-Nucleating Aerosols Affect Arctic Seasonal Climate? Can Ice-Nucleating Aerosols Affect Arctic Seasonal Climate? Submitter: Prenni, A. J., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Prenni, A. J., J. Y. Harrington, M. Tjernstrom, P. J. DeMott, A. Avramov, C. N. Long, S. M. Kreidenweis, P. Q. Olsson, and J. Verlinde, (2006): Can Ice-Nucleating Aerosols Affect Arctic Seasonal Climate?, BAMS, Vol.88, Iss. 4; pg. 541-550. ACIA, 2004: Impacts of a Warming Arctic: Arctic Climate Impact Assessment. Cambridge University Press, 1020pp. Additional Key Contact: Long, C. N. , Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Figure 1. Time series for the 2-day simulation plotted over Oliktok Point for Standard IN and M-PACE IN concentrations: (a) liquid water path (g

450

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Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Submitter: Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Westwater, E.R., B.B. Stankov, D.Cimini, Y. Han, J.A. Shaw, B.M. Lesht, C.N. Long, 2003, Radiosonde Humidity Soundings and Microwave Radiometers during Nauru99, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, Vol. 21. ARM's Nauru99 campaign provided a rare opportunity to compare original and corrected land-based radiosonde temperature and humidity measurements with those obtained at sea. (ARM photo) Key Contributors: B. B. Stankov, D. Cimini, Y. Han, J. A Shaw, B. M. Lesht, C. N. Long Along the equator in the Central Pacific, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation

451

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Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. Radiative cooling across the full infrared spectrum: The far-infrared (the left half of the figure, from 15 to 1000 microns) plays a key role in heat transfer in the atmosphere, but scientists could not measure it, and model calculations were consequently very uncertain. Field observations from

452

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Validating Single Column Models with ARM Data Validating Single Column Models with ARM Data Submitter: Somerville, R. C., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Iacobellis, S.F., McFarquhar, G.M., Mitchell, D.L., and Somerville, R.C.J., 2003: "The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics," J. Climate 16(18): 2979-2996. Scientists validated the results of both models by comparing them with the solar radiation as measured by the ARM instruments in the same grid cell. Scientists compared predictions of two models (red and blue lines) with measurements taken by ARM instruments (yellow line) at the same location. The models predict the amount and optical properties of clouds and the

453

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Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mace GG, S Houser, S Benson, SA Klein, and QL Min. 2011. "Critical evaluation of the ISCCP simulator using ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3517.1. Figure 1. Comparison of actual cloud top pressure from ARM remote sensors compared to ISCCP (top) and after the ICARUS algorithm has been used to convert the measured cloud top pressures to ISCCP-like quantities (bottom). Figure 2. Comparison of various measures of optical depth. Top left shows

454

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Cloud Tomography: a Novel Method for Determining 3D Cloud Liquid Water Cloud Tomography: a Novel Method for Determining 3D Cloud Liquid Water Distribution Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, D., Y. Liu, and W. Wiscombe, 2007a: Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography. J. Geophys. Res., submitted. Cloud tomography is a novel method for determining cloud water distribution by measuring cloud microwave emission from multiple directions. The upper plot shows a 2D cross-sectional snapshot of the liquid water structure of a stratocumulus cloud simulated by a large-eddy model. It also shows the four scanning microwave radiometers used to retrieve the cloud liquid water

455

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Quantifying the Number of Independent Pieces of Information in Profiles Quantifying the Number of Independent Pieces of Information in Profiles Download a printable PDF Submitter: Crewell, S., University of Cologne Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ebell, K., University of Cologne Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lohnert U, DD Turner, and S Crewell. 2009. "Ground-based temperature and humidity profiling using spectral infrared and microwave observations. Part I: Simulated retrieval performance in clear-sky conditions." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 48(5), 1017-1032. Crewell S, K Ebell, U Loehnert, and DD Turner. 2009. "Can liquid water profiles be retrieved from passive microwave zenith observations?"

456

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Modeling Cloud Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Modeling Cloud Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Submitter: Kiehl, J., NCAR Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Petch, J.C., and J.T. Kiehl, 1997: "Investigating Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Using a Single Column Model." In Proceedings from the Seventh ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Here is summary of the poster "Investigating Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Using a Single Column Model" (Petch and Kiehl) presented at the ARM 7th Science Team Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, March 1997. SCCM3, a single-column version of CCM3, has been forced with TOGA-COARE

457

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"Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle "Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Taking place during the arid Arctic winter, the RHUBC will obtain measurements in the far-infrared (15-40 microns), when the so-called "Arctic" infrared window between 16 and 40 microns is semi-transparent. Between February and March 2007 at the ACRF North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, high-spectral-resolution observations will be collected by three state-of-the-art Fourier Transform Spectrometers sampling at different bands in the far-infrared. The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign, or RHUBC (pronounced "roobik"), will make detailed observations

458

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Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Keppel-Aleks, G., University of Michigan Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Keppel-Aleks G, JT Randerson, K Lindsay, BB Stephens, JK Moore, SC Doney, PE Thornton, NM Mahowald, FM Hoffman, C Sweeney, PP Tans, PO Wennberg, and SC Wofsy. 2013. "Atmospheric carbon dioxide variability in the Community Earth System Model: evaluation and transient dynamics during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries." Journal of Climate, 26(13), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00589.1. How models, such as the Community Earth System Model, simulate the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere will likely hold the key to monitoring climate

459

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Tropical Clouds: from Jekyll to Hyde Tropical Clouds: from Jekyll to Hyde Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hagos SM and R Leung. 2012. "Large-scale environmental variables and transition to deep convection in cloud resolving model simulations: A vector representation." Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, 4(M11001), 2012MS000155, doi:10.1029/2012MS000155. The relationship between the mean 400hPa heating (Khr-1437 ) at time = 0 and the projection onto the favorable large-scale moisture profile at time = -1 hr. From Jekyll to Hyde, this anvil cloud is an example of tropical clouds that evolve from fair-weather to stormy. Scientists at PNNL used observational

460

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Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Properties from M-PACE Microphysical Retrievals Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Properties from M-PACE Microphysical Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: de Boer, G., University of Colorado, Boulder/CIRES Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Boer G, WD Collins, S Menon, and CN Long. 2011. "Using surface remote sensors to derive radiative characteristics of mixed-phase clouds: An example from M-PACE." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, doi: 10.5194/acp-11-11937-2011. Measured and retrieved cloud properties on 10 October 2004. Included are (top to bottom) AHSRL bacscatter cross-section, AHSRL depolarization ratio, MMCR reflectivity, and profiles of liquid water content (LWC), ice water content (IWC), and liquid (r_{e,liq}) and ice (r$_{e,ice}$) effective

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep research snowmass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

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Profiling Capability of High-Resolution Oxygen A-band Spectroscopy for Profiling Capability of High-Resolution Oxygen A-band Spectroscopy for Stratus Cloud Cover Submitter: Davis, A. B., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Davis AB, IN Polonsky, and A Marshak. 2009. Space-Time Green Functions for Diffusive Radiation Transport, in Application to Active and Passive Cloud Probing. In Light Scattering Reviews, Volume 4, pp. 169-292. Ed. by A.A. Kohkanovsky, Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. Transmission: (a) Ratio of mean path Τ to cloud thickness Η times (1-g)τ plotted versus cosine of SZA μ0 and cloud optical depth τ; asymmetry factor g was set to 0.85, then delta-rescaled to 0.46. Given this ratio (>1/2) and Η or τ, one can infer the other cloud parameter.

462

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Satellite Retrievals of Mixed-phase Cloud Properties Satellite Retrievals of Mixed-phase Cloud Properties Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ou, S., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ou SS, KN Liou, XJ Wang, A Dybdahl, M Mussetto, LD Carey, J Niu, JA Kankiewicz, S Kidder, and TH Von der Haar. 2009. "Retrievals of mixed-phase cloud properties during the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System." Applied Optics, 48(8), 1452-1462. Images of mixed-phase retrieved (a) τi, (b) De, (c) τw, and (d) re for the Terra/MODIS scene of 14 October 2001 over North Platte, Nebraska. Also shown are (e) retrieved τi and τw versus MODIS τ within the pink box and (f) retrieved De and re versus MODIS re within the pink box.

463

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Estimating the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics Estimating the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zeng, X., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zeng X, W Tao, T Matsui, S Xie, S Lang, M Zhang, DO Starr, and X Li. 2011. "Estimating the ice crystal enhancement factor in the tropics." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(7), doi:10.1175/2011JAS3550.1. Figure 1. Twenty-day mean vertical profiles of IWC from the ARM-SGP observations and the three simulations using low, moderate, and high ice crystal concentrations, respectively. Figure 2. Eight-day mean vertical profiles of IWC from the TWP-ICE

464

Research Highlight  

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Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance Buffering of Ice Crystal Number Concentration to Ice Nucleus Abundance Above Arctic Stratus Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fridlind AM, B van Diedenhoven, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, A Mrowiec, H Morrison, P Zuidema, and MD Shupe. 2012. "A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA case study of mixed-phase Arctic boundary-layer clouds: Entrainment rate limitations on rapid primary ice nucleation processes." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(1), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-052.1. Observed and simulated histograms of MMCR radar reflectivity (left) and

465

Research Highlight  

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A Comparison of Integrated Water Vapor Sensors: WVIOP-96 A Comparison of Integrated Water Vapor Sensors: WVIOP-96 Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 The 1996 Water Vapor Intensive Operations Period (WVIOP-96) was conducted at the SGP CART central facility in September in order to assess the skill of a wide variety of sensors in measuring atmospheric water vapor. Here we present a comparison of radiometric brightness temperatures (TB) and vertically-integrated or "precipitable" water vapor (PWV) amounts derived from eight collocated ARM microwave radiometers, as well as microwave radiometers from the NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory

466

Research Highlight  

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New Technique Successful for Measuring Thickness of Broken Clouds New Technique Successful for Measuring Thickness of Broken Clouds Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Marshak, A, Y Knyazikhin, K.D. Evans, and W.J. Wiscomb, (2004): The "RED versus NIR" Plane to Retrieve Broken-Cloud Optical Depth from Ground-Based Measurements, Journal of Atmospheric Sciences , 61, 1911-1925. In the "lookup table," vertical lines within the curves show calculated values of cloud optical depth. Observed data points show actual RED and NIR values; the cloud cover and optical depth are read from the overlaid lines. Cloud optical depth (or thickness) is a fundamental property for calculating the amount of solar radiation entering and leaving earth's

467

Research Highlight  

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General Formulation for Representing Cloud-to-Rain Transition in General Formulation for Representing Cloud-to-Rain Transition in Atmospheric Models Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol, Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liu, Y., P. H. Daum, R. McGraw, M. Miller, and S. Niu, 2007: Theoretical formulation for autoconversion rate of cloud droplet concentration. Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L116821, doi:10.1029/2007GL030389 Figure 1. The typical drop radius r* as a function of the volume-mean radius r3 derived from the new theoretical formulation. Note that a constant r* corresponds to the commonly used assumption that the autoconversion rate for droplet concentration is linearly proportional to

468

Research Highlight  

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Intercomparison of Longwave Radiative Heating Algorithms Intercomparison of Longwave Radiative Heating Algorithms Submitter: Baer, F., University of Maryland Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Baer, F., N. Arsky, J. J. Charney, and R. G. Ellingson. 1996. "Intercomparison of Heating Rates Generated by Global Climate Model Longwave Radiation Codes." J. Geoph. Res., 101, D21, 26589-26603. 30 levels of longwave heating rates for all algorithms tested at the five locations for the high cloud Same as Figure 1 but with the clouds removed (clear sky assumption). Same as Figure 1 but a different view. Averaged heating rates and heating rates of averaged. Same as Figure 3 but with the clouds removed (clear sky assumption).

469

Research Highlight  

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Measurement of Convective Entrainment Using Lagrangian Particles Measurement of Convective Entrainment Using Lagrangian Particles Download a printable PDF Submitter: Romps, D., University of California, Berkeley Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Yeo K and DM Romps. 2013. "Measurement of convective entrainment using Lagrangian particles." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(1), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0144.1. Trajectories of seven particles that are entrained at the cloud base and transported to the cloud top. Colors denote the mixing ratio of condensed water. Previous work by Romps (2010) found large entrainment rates of ~100% per kilometer for deep convection using a new technique for large-eddy simulations (LES) called "Eulerian direct measurement". These results

470

Research Highlight  

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a Cloud-Resolving Model to Identify the Role of Aerosols on Clouds a Cloud-Resolving Model to Identify the Role of Aerosols on Clouds and Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol, Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Tao, W.-K., X. Li, A. Khain, T. Matsui, S. Lang, and J. Simpson, 2007: The role of atmospheric aerosol concentration on deep convective precipitation: Cloud-resolving model simulations. J. Geophy. Res., (accepted). Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Lang, A. Y. Hou, M. Zhang, and J. Simpson, 2007: On the sensitivity of atmospheric ensemble states to cloud microphyics in long-term cloud-resolving model simulations. J. Meteor. Soc. Jpn., (submitted). Figure 1. Dirty environment (or high CCN) enhances precipitation in a

471

Research Facility,  

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Collecting and Delivering the Data Collecting and Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Preliminary data may be shared among field campaign participants during and shortly following the campaign. To facilitate sharing of preliminary data, the ARM Data Archive establishes restricted access capability, limited to participants and data managers.

472

Research Highlight  

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Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR Wm-2) signals in the tropics averaged between 10°S and 10°N from (a) a regional simulation with moisture constrained by observations and (b) NOAA-CPC satellite observations. The lines mark the eastward MJO propagation speed of 4 m/s. The constrained model is able to reproduce the key OLR features in the observations. Originating over the Indian Ocean, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an equatorial planetary-scale envelope of complex multi-scale cloud systems

473

Research Highlight  

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Comparisons Between Radiosondes and Remote Sensors During the 2004 NSA Comparisons Between Radiosondes and Remote Sensors During the 2004 NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment Submitter: Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mattioli, V, ER Westwater, D Cimini, JS Liljegren, BM Lesht, SI Gutman, and FJ Schmidlin. 2007. "Analysis of radiosonde and ground-based remotely sensed PWV data from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 243: 415-431. Description of radiosondes launched during the 2004 NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment. Dual-radiosonde launch of the Vaisala RS90 and Chilled Mirror radiosondes is pictured here.

474

Research Highlight  

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Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Surface Radiation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S.A., Long, C.N., and Flynn, D., Nauru Island Effect Study, Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, March 22 to 26, 2004, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Nauru Island, about 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea in the western South Pacific, is one of three instrumented island sites that comprise ARM's Tropical Western Pacific locale. A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to identify interactions between the processes that determine the radiative properties of an atmospheric column, including

475

Research Highlight  

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Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear and Cloudy Regions Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Chiu, J., University of Reading Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Pilewskie, P., University of Colorado Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Chiu C, A Marshak, Y Knyazikhin, P Pilewskie, and W Wiscombe. 2009. "Physical interpretation of the spectral radiative signature in the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy regions." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(4), 1419-1430. (a) Total sky images on 18 May 2007, and (b) plot of SWS normalized zenith radiances. In (b), arrows pointed at the time axis correspond to the times

476

Research Highlight  

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Evaluation of Microwave Radiometer Performance in Alaska Evaluation of Microwave Radiometer Performance in Alaska Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 In order to determine the extent to which the ARM microwave radiometers would need to be modified to accommodate Arctic operations, an instrument designed for the Tropical Western Pacific was deployed at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks and continuously operated from 14 December 1995 through 20 June 1996 with the assistance of North Slope Site Scientist Knut Stamnes and Deputy Site Scientist Abdul Alkezweeny. Time series plots of the data are presented in Figure 1.

477

Research Highlight  

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A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Aircraft Measurements A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Aircraft Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Li, Z., A.P. Trishchenko, H.W. Barker, G.L. Stephens, and P. Partain, 1999: "Analyses of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) multiple data sets for studying cloud absorption," J. of Geophys. Res. 104(D16):19127-19134 Figure 1. Comparisons of TOA albedos inferred from measurements made by TSBR, GOES-8, and SSP. Two sets of GOES-based estimates are shown for an aircraft along the Egrett's flight path: one for an aircraft skimming the cloud tops (dotted lines); and another for one at 14 km (thin solid lines).

478

Research Highlight  

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A Simple Stochastic Model for Generating Broken Cloud Optical Depth and A Simple Stochastic Model for Generating Broken Cloud Optical Depth and Cloud Top Height Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Prigarin, S, and A Marshak. 2008. "A simple stochastic model for generating broken cloud optical depth and cloud top height fields." Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, in press. Fig. 1. A 68-km by 68-km region in Brazil centered at 17o S and 42o W collected on August 9, 2001, at 1015 local time. The solar zenith angle 410; the solar azimuth angle 23o (from the top). (a) moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) true color red, green, blue (RGB) 1-km

479

Research Highlight  

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To Rain or Not to Rain...Aerosols May Be the Answer To Rain or Not to Rain...Aerosols May Be the Answer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Niu F and Z Li. 2012. "Systematic variations of cloud top temperature and precipitation rate with aerosols over the global tropics." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-8491-2012. Cloud-top temperature (A, C) and ice water path (B, D) as functions of AI/AOT for warm (blue dots) and cold (red dots) base mixed-phase clouds and liquid clouds (green dots) over the ocean (upper panels) and land (lower panels). The right-hand axes of (A) and (C) are for liquid clouds. Precipitation rate as a function of AI for mixed-phase (blue dots) and

480

Research Highlight  

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AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Tobin, D.C., F.A. Best, P.D. Brown, S.A. Clough, R.G. Dedecker, R.G. Ellingson, R.K. Garcia, H.B. Howell, R.O. Knuteson, E.J. Mlawer, H.E. Revercomb, J.F. Short, P.F.W. van Delst, and V.P. Walden, 1999. "Downwelling spectral radiance observations at the SHEBA ice station: Water vapor continuum measurements from 17 to 26μm," JGR 104(D2): 2081-2092 Figure 1. Comparison of clear sky downwelling radiance spectra measured with the University of Wisconsin AERI system at the SGP CART site near Lamont, Oklahoma and with the extended range AERI at the SHEBA Ice Station,

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