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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Homeland Security | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security Homeland Security High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Medicine Homeland Security Industry Computing Sciences Workforce Development A Growing List Accelerators for Americas Future External link Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Benefits of HEP Homeland Security Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Homeland security: monitoring nuclear nonproliferation In nuclear reactors, the amount of plutonium builds up as the uranium fuel is used, and the number and characteristics of antineutrinos emitted by

2

Medicine | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicine Medicine High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Medicine Homeland Security Industry Computing Sciences Workforce Development A Growing List Accelerators for Americas Future External link Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Benefits of HEP Medicine Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Medicine: magnetic resonance imaging Magnetic resonance imaging, a fundamental technology of medical diagnosis, uses superconducting magnet technology that originated as a tool for

3

Homeland Security Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security Programs Homeland Security Programs SHARE Homeland Security Programs The Homeland Security Programs support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), other federal and state agencies, and commercial partners. Through the integration of a number of key competencies, ORNL is able to provide critical operational, technical, and scientific support to these sponsors. A key focus of this area is to translate the critical research into operational capability for the security, protection, response, and recovery of the nation against natural and man-made events. Research Areas detecting, preventing, and reversing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction deploying integrated systems for incident awareness, detection, and response providing technology for detecting explosives at the

4

Department of Homeland Security Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homeland Security Modeling and Simulation Workshop. Purpose: This workshop is a joint effort of US Department of Homeland ...

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

NIST Highlight about workshop on homeland security ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workshop on Homeland Security Standards. On ... Related Links: ANSI Homeland Security Standards Panel. Contact. General ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

HEP Advisory Committees | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advisory Committees High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About HEP HEP Research HEP Facilities HEP Science Highlights Benefits of HEP HEP Funding Opportunities HEP Advisory...

7

Computing | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Computing High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Medicine Homeland Security Industry Computing Sciences Workforce...

8

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSPD-12 Home HSPD-12 FAQs About the DOE HSPD-12 Badge HSPD-12 Reporting Metrics for OMB HSPD-12 Implementation Progress Guidance Related Links HSS Logo Homeland Security...

9

HEP-NERSCWorkshop.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Samtaney (PPPL) ASCR Program Representatives BER BES FES HEP (Tech-X) (Emory University) Bas Braams Eric Bylaska (PNNL) (UC Berkeley) Thomas Miller David Beck (University of WA)...

10

NIST Testimony on Homeland Security Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Testimony on Homeland Security Issues. 2012. 050912 Saunders House Testimony 050912 Saunders House Testimony ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

IT issues on homeland security and defense  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper surveys remarkable incidents that were related to the Homeland Security and Defense such as terrors, disasters and cyber-attacks and overviews the existing projects given by the department of Homeland Security and Defense of the US government. ... Keywords: and cyber threats, emergency readiness, homeland defense, homeland security, terror and disaster control

Kangbin Yim; Ilsun You

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Homeland Security Chemical/Biological/Radiological/Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information at NIST. Homeland Security Chemical/Biological/Radiological/ Nuclear/Explosives (CBRNE) Information at NIST. ...

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

13

Homeland Security Programs/Projects for the Intelligent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homeland Security Programs/Projects for the Intelligent Systems Division. Department of Homeland Security Urban Search ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

14

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Homeland Security Presidential Directive/Hspd-7 3 Homeland Security Presidential Directive/Hspd-7 For Immediate Release Office of the Press Secretary December 17, 2003 December 17, 2003 Homeland Security Presidential Directive/Hspd-7 Subject: Critical Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization, and Protection Purpose (1) This directive establishes a national policy for Federal departments and agencies to identify and prioritize United States critical infrastructure and key resources and to protect them from terrorist attacks. Background (2) Terrorists seek to destroy, incapacitate, or exploit critical infrastructure and key resources across the United States to threaten national security, cause mass casualties, weaken our economy, and damage public morale and confidence. (3) America's open and technologically complex society includes a wide array of critical infrastructure

15

HEP Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Scientific and Technical Information Honors & Awards Jobs Contact Us You are here: SC Home Programs HEP Home About HEP HEP Budget High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP...

16

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Benefits to Society | Homeland...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security Homeland security Homeland security: monitoring nuclear nonproliferation In nuclear reactors, the amount of plutonium builds up as the uranium fuel is used, and...

17

Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

18

Nonproliferation & Homeland Security Field Support | Global and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Homeland Security Field Support Group provides radiological assistance to federal and state agencies under the DOE Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), field support for...

19

HEP-Tsung.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F. S. Tsung, HEP Workshop F. S. Tsung, HEP Workshop Project Summary -- Simulations of Plasma Based Accelerator Experiments Around the World. UCLA/IST is making a strong effort to quickly deploy simulation modeling to experimental teams - Laboratory frame simulations of LWFA's in OSIRIS - Boosted frame simulations of LWFA's in OSIRIS - Laboratory frame simulations of LWFA/PWFA's in QuickPIC Plasma based accelerators can achieve accelerating gradients 1,000 x that of those created by conventional accelerators. Recently, 2 plasma-based accelerator facilities have been approved. BELLA -- LBNL (ref. C. Geddes) FACET -- 25GeV e-/e+ beams for single-stage PWFA demonstration. * Simulations have played an important role in the understanding of current experiments. Our objective in the next 3-5 years is to help the

20

HEP data analysis using jHepWork and Java.  

SciTech Connect

A role of Java in high-energy physics (HEP) and recent progress in development of a platform-independent data-analysis framework, jHepWork, is discussed. The framework produces professional graphics and has many libraries for data manipulation.

Chekanov, S.; High Energy Physics

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

HepForge: A lightweight development environment for HEP software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Setting up the infrastructure to manage a software project can become a task as significant writing the software itself. A variety of useful open source tools are available, such as Web-based viewers for version control systems, "wikis" for collaborative discussions and bug-tracking systems, but their use in high-energy physics, outside large collaborations, is insubstantial. Understandably, physicists would rather do physics than configure project management tools. We introduce the CEDAR HepForge system, which provides a lightweight development environment for HEP software. Services available as part of HepForge include the above-mentioned tools as well as mailing lists, shell accounts, archiving of releases and low-maintenance Web space. HepForge also exists to promote best-practice software development methods and to provide a central repository for re-usable HEP software and phenomenology codes.

A. Buckley; J. M. Butterworth; E. Nurse; W. J. Stirling; B. Waugh; M. R. Whalley

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

22

HEP Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights/ The Office of Science is the highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {271928DC-3A20-4D7E-97F4-DEC29F0C439B}http://science.energy.gov/hep/highlights/2013/hep-2013-08-a/ Patterns in the Cosmos Trace Evolution of the Universe Detection of subtle polarization patterns in the Cosmic Microwave Background opens a

23

Creative homeland security : imagining the next big solar storm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Creative Homeland Security: Imagining the next big solar storm aims to examine the use of creative practice within homeland security research. In this thesis, a (more)

Alfonso, Jonathan Rousseau

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networking) Les Cottrell, SLAC (Networking) Glen Crawford,Networking) Richard Mount, SLAC (HEP) Thomas Ndousse-Fetter,36 SLAC Experimental HEP

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Experts to Review Life-Saving Homeland Security Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experts to Review Life-Saving Homeland Security Standards. For Immediate Release: September 27, 2007. ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

U.S. Homeland Security R&D Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FY09 budgets for homeland security research and development programs in the U.S. are summarized. Homeland security policy developments that can influence future efforts are discussed. Initial indications of the new administration direction on homeland security R&D are summarized. An overview of the Optics and Photonics in Global Homeland Security V conference is presented.

Halvorson, C S

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Homeland Renewable Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Homeland Renewable Energy LLC Homeland Renewable Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Homeland Renewable Energy LLC Place Langhorne, Pennsylvania Zip 19047 Product Holding company for Fibrowatt LLC and its subsidiaries, which develop poultry litter-fuelled power plants in the US. Coordinates 40.176396°, -74.918884° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.176396,"lon":-74.918884,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

List of all HEP Institutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top 500 Top 500 HEP and Astrophysics Institutions by Country This document lists the 500 major high-energy physics and astrophysics institutions, sorted by country. Each listing will show a [SPIRES Entry] which gives the full address and phone/fax/url of the institution in addition to links to papers in HEP and people in HEPNAMES. The [Home page], where known, takes you directly to the departmental home page. Alternatively try our INSTITUTIONS search page. This list of the top 500 institutions is chosen by the number of papers from each institution in the past 5 years. Click here for the full list of HEP institutions. Please send any comments, corrections, updates or information on new institutions to: inst@slac.stanford.edu. Last modified at 17:12:32 on 06/30/04.

29

HEP data analysis using jHepWork and Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A role of Java in high-energy physics and recent progress in development of a platform-independent data-analysis framework, jHepWork, is discussed. The framework produces professional graphics and has many libraries for data manipulation.

Chekanov, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

HEP data analysis using jHepWork and Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A role of Java in high-energy physics and recent progress in development of a platform-independent data-analysis framework, jHepWork, is discussed. The framework produces professional graphics and has many libraries for data manipulation.

S. Chekanov

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

31

Homeland Security vs. the Madisonian Impulse: State Building and Anti-Statism after September 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeland Security vs. the Madisonian Impulse: State Buildingstate pursue homeland security. Jay Stowsky is Adjunctcritics of US homeland security policy have consistently

Stowsky, Jay; Kroenig, Matthew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Policies: Homeland Security Presidential Directive/Hspd-7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... appropriate systems, mechanisms, and procedures to share homeland security information relevant ... (a) commercial nuclear reactors for generating ...

33

NERSC/DOE HEP Requirements Workshop Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements for Science: Target 2014 High Energy Physics (HEP) Logistics Workshop Logistics Workshop Location Hilton Washington...

34

NERSC/DOE HEP 2012 Review Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC HPC Achievement Awards Home Science at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews High Energy Physics (HEP) Logistics Hotel Information Location The review will be held at...

35

Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program | Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination (HSEMC) Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Planning for Emergencies > Homeland Security and Emergency Management Coordination

36

Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security By: Edward R. Simpson, Director, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management, Office of Management Subject: Cost-Plus Award Fee 8-3-09_Final_Testimony_(Simpson).pdf More Documents & Publications GAO-05-123 Department of Energy: Further Actions Are Needed to Strengthen

37

ICE Press Office U.S. Department of Homeland Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICE Press Office U.S. Department of Homeland Security December 19, 2003 Contact: SEVP Fact Sheet) at (202) 353-3049. www.ice.gov #12;

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

38

Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Workforce, and the District of Columbia Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Workforce, and the District of Columbia Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Workforce, and the District of Columbia By: John Bashista, Deputy Director, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management, Office of Management Subject: Strengthening the Federal Acquisition Workforce: Government-wide Leadership and Initiatives 8-5-09_Final_Testimony_(Bashista).pdf More Documents & Publications Special Report: IG-RA-09-02 Before Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

39

HEP-Req_SLAC.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Accelerator Modeling For Accelerator Modeling Finite Element Approach Lie-Quan Lee SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics NERSC/ASCR/HEP Workshop, Washington D.C., November 12-13, 2009 NERSC Project * Project name: Advanced Modeling for Particle Accelerators * Principle Investigator: Kwok Ko * Participating institutions: - SLAC, BNL, FNAL, ORNL, TJNAF - CW09 Users * ANL * CERN * Cornell University * Los Alamos Lab * Michigan State University * Paul Scherrer Institut * Royal Holloway U London Scientific Objectives * Summarize your projects and its scientific objectives for the next 3-5 years * Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) * Simulating wakefield and evaluate HOM damping in Accelerating Structures (AS) and Power Extract and Transfer Structures (PETS)

40

HEP-v2-for-dist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3D QuickPIC) Plasma-based acceleration is rich in science: Computer modeling has been essential to the progress of this field F. S. Tsung, HEP Workshop Facilities for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A knowledge sharing framework for homeland security modeling and simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling and simulation (M&S) tools and capabilities can enable understanding of the complex nature of systems in various homeland security domains. A coordinated effort across government, industry, and academia would advance capabilities in this important ...

Sanjay Jain; Charles W. Hutchings; Y. Tina Lee; Charles R. McLean

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Recommended practices for homeland security modeling and simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper recommends practices for development and deployment of modeling, simulation, and analysis (MS&A) tools for homeland security applications. The proposed set of recommended practices applicable to any MS&A application includes: software engineering ...

Sanjay Jain; Charles R. McLean

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Homeland Security Challenges Facing Small Water Systems in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes Homeland Security issues that affect Texas and the nation. It includes an overview of some of the key water resource issues associated with preventing intentional contamination of water supplies served by small water systems.

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator R&D Stewardship HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier...

45

ORISE: California Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) California Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) Training The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) and the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services) have revised the next generation Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) course to create a balance between learning exercise methodology and using Web-based toolkit activities to plan and develop exercises. The revised HSEEP training course is a four-day, interactive course with computer-based activities that maximize use of the HSEEP Toolkit. The course is focused on hands-on, toolkit activities that provide participants with valuable practice and training. The course also allows participants to use their own jurisdictional information to complete course activities,

46

The Department of Homeland Security Energy Management Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Homeland Security Homeland Security Energy Management Program May 2, 2007 DHS Energy Program Overview Steven W. White, CEM May 2, 2007 2 Policy "It is the policy of the United States that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy- related activities under the law in support of their respective missions in an environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continuously improving, efficient, and sustainable manner." (Executive Order 13423, Section 1 - Policy) DHS Energy Program Overview Steven W. White, CEM May 2, 2007 3 Program Foundation  Comply with requirements of Laws, Regulations and Executive

47

Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services, and International Security Services, and International Security Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security By: Edward R. Simpson, Director, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management, Office of Management Subject: Cost-Plus Award Fee 8-3-09_Final_Testimony_(Simpson).pdf More Documents & Publications Major Management Challenges and Program Risks : Department of Energy GAO/OCG-99-6 GAO-05-123 Department of Energy: Further Actions Are Needed to Strengthen Contract Management for Major Projects

48

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEP HEP Committees of Visitors High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home HEP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) 2013 HEPAP COV Charge .pdf file (486KB) 2010 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (547KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (29KB) 2007 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (516KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (16KB) 2004 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (2.4MB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (98KB) Last modified: 9/9/2013 4:01:05 PM

49

Northwest Regional Technology Center, December 2012 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office's Operations Support Directorate supports state Security December 2012 The Northwest Regional Technology Center (NWRTC) is a virtual resource center, response, and recovery. The center enables homeland security solutions for emergency responder communities

50

Watch What I Do, Not What I Say: The Unintended Consequences of the Homeland Investment Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact on firm behavior of the Homeland Investment Act of 2004, which provided

Dhammika, Dharmapala

51

HEP Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Theory HEP Guidelines Comparative Review Annual Solicitation Progress Reports and Final Report Conferences Peer Merit Review Policies For Reviewers: Find your Proposal...

52

NERSC/DOE HEP Requirements Workshop Reference Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) High Energy Physics (HEP) Final Workshop Reports Past ESnet...

53

Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense  

SciTech Connect

Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

James L. Jones

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Alternatives to 3He for Neutron Detection for Homeland Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron detection is an essential aspect of interdiction of radiological threats for national security purposes, since plutonium, a material used for nuclear weapons, is a significant source of fission neutrons. Radiation portal monitoring systems, of which there are thousands deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation purposes, currently use 3He gas-filled proportional counters for detecting neutrons. Because of the high usage of 3He for neutron scattering science and national security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. Consequently, a replacement technology for neutron detection is required in the very near future.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Conlin, Kenneth E.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Stromswold, David C.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

55

HEP Budget | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

HEP HEP Budget Budget Budget Home About Budget by Program ASCR Budget BES Budget BER Budget FES Budget HEP Budget NP Budget WDTS Budget SLI & SS Budget SCPD Budget GAO Audit Reports External Links Contact Information Budget U.S. Department of Energy SC-41/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3541 F: (301) 903-9524 More Information » Budget by Program HEP Budget Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The following links contain HEP's budget request to Congress for current and prior years: FY2014 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (921KB) FY2013 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (629KB) FY2012 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (600KB) FY2011 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (547KB) FY2010 Budget Request to Congress .pdf file (551KB)

56

JOM-e: The Role of Universities in Homeland Defense - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Todd Stewart is director of the Program for International and Homeland Security at the Ohio State University (OSU). Jim Williams is dean of the College of...

57

Turning Ideas into Practice: How to Access Homeland Security R&D ...  

IBD-PO-10/01 Turning Ideas into Practice: How to Access Homeland Security R&D from Public Institutions September 16, 2003 Belinda Padilla Technology Commercialization ...

58

Before the House Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence- Committee on Homeland Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Implications of Refinery Closures for U.S. Homeland Security and Critical Infrastructure Safety By: Howard Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator of the Energy Information Administration

59

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Committees of Committees of Visitors High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Staff Organization Chart .pdf file (170KB) HEP Budget HEP Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs University Research & National Labs Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » About HEP Committees of Visitors Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) 2010 HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (547KB) HEP Response to HEPAP COV Report on HEP Program .pdf file (29KB)

60

cet091110-hep_hpc.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detector Simulation Detector Simulation and Analysis Craig E. Tull, Ph.D. Staff Scientist/Group Leader Science Software Systems Group Computational Research Division Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences November 12, 2009 Rockville, MD HEP-HCG | Rockville | November 12, 2009 1. Detector Simulation and Analysis Overview Summarize the projects in your science area and their scientific objectives for the next 3-5 years * Current and past users of NERSC: - ATLAS - LHC accelerator at CERN, Geneva (PI: Ian Hinchliff) - Daya Bay - Nuclear reactor Neutrino detector in China (PI: Kam-Biu Luk) - CDF - Tevatron accelerator at FNAL (PI: Wei Min Yao) - BOSS - Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey - JDEM/SNAP - Supernova satellite (PI: Saul Perlmutter) - BaBar - PEP-II collider at SLAC, Stanford - SNF - SuperNova Factory (PI: Greg Alderige)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Do hep neutrinos affect the solar neutrino energy spectrum?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If the low energy cross section for 3He + p goes to 4He + e + nu_e, the `hep' reaction, is > 20 times larger than the best (but uncertain) theoretical estimates, then this reaction could significantly influence the electron energy spectrum produced by solar neutrino interactions and measured in the SuperKamiokande, SNO, and ICARUS experiments. We compare predicted energy spectra for different assumed hep fluxes and different neutrino oscillation scenarios with the observed SuperKamiokande spectrum. The spectra with enhanced hep contributions provide better fits to the SuperKamiokande data.

John Bahcall; Plamen Krastev

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

HEP Supported Workshops & Conferences | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEP HEP Sponsored Workshops and Conferences High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources SC Graduate Fellowship Program: HEP 2010 Awardees External link Quick Links DOE High Energy Physics Reports HEP Sponsored Workshops and Conferences Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources HEP Sponsored Workshops and Conferences Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Click on a link to learn more about a HEP-supported workshop or conference. Accelerators for America's Future External link

63

Architecture and applications of the HEP multiprocessor computer system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HEP computer system is a large scale scientific parallel computer employing shared-resource MIMD architecture. The hardware and software facilities provided by the system are described, and techniques found useful in programming the system are discussed. 3 references.

Smith, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and results of the HEP analysis are included in this report.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Enhanced homeland security and disaster emergency operations based on biometrics and RFID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods that enhance homeland security and disaster emergency operations through biometrics and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) were studied. Biometrics can be used in visas and e-passports for border security, identity verification at airports, ...

Lidong Wang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Critical reflection in a digital media artwork - Playas: homeland mirage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The introduction of digital media into the working practice of artists has produced challenges previously unknown to the field of art. This inquiry follows an atypical model of artist-driven research derived from disciplines such as social science and education. Here, an artwork functions as a model that is self-reflective, integrating methodologies in a form that benefits art and science. Using Naturalistic Inquiry, including semi-structured interviews of fifteen participants, the work illustrates a process of creation, analysis and evaluation that places the values of the artist on equal footing with the needs of science. Recently, artists have begun using video game engines as a tool to produce 3D navigable spaces. Using the hybrid video game/installation Playas: Homeland Mirage as a case study, this research examines the impact of technology on the artwork and identifies a number of key issues related to the function of critical reflection in this environment. Rules-of-play were a fundamental pre-requisite to the stimulation of critically reflective experience. The human interface with software and hardware was also a primary factor in reflective experience. Based on participant evaluation and observation, the interface was altered in response to its effect on critical reflection, illustrating how choices in this area impact aesthetic experience. Those with experience in visual art were more likely to engage the work in a critically reflective manner than seasoned video game players who tended to be more interested in scoring and winning. These findings and others inform our understanding of the stimulation of critical reflection in immersive environments and show how we can sensitively integrate technology with meaningful evaluative methods. By repurposing a video game in this manner, we learn about the nature of the video game and the nature of art. This research enables artists to gain a better understanding of the medium to more fully integrate technology within a meaningful practice. Conversely, other fields will benefit from a better understanding of the stimulation of meaning in immersive spaces and gain a comprehensive view of a work that strives to contribute to our culture on a deeper level than as simple entertainment. Ultimately, more fully understanding critical reflection in virtual environments will enable us to create enriched experiences that transcend space to create real or virtual place.

Stenner, Jack Eric

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Carey Creek, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Homeland security R&D roadmapping : risk-based methodological options.  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in the development and execution of a research and development (R&D) strategy to improve the nation's preparedness against terrorist threats. Current approaches to planning and prioritization of DHS research decisions are informed by risk assessment tools and processes intended to allocate resources to programs that are likely to have the highest payoff. Early applications of such processes have faced challenges in several areas, including characterization of the intelligent adversary and linkage to strategic risk management decisions. The risk-based analysis initiatives at Sandia Laboratories could augment the methodologies currently being applied by the DHS and could support more credible R&D roadmapping for national homeland security programs. Implementation and execution issues facing homeland security R&D initiatives within the national laboratories emerged as a particular concern in this research.

Brandt, Larry D.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

HOMELAND SECURITY A Selected Bibliography U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE LIBRARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This bibliography includes topics that reflect some of homeland security's many challenges: borders and immigration, cybersecurity, organization, policy, response capabilities, and resourcing. With certain exceptions, the materials in this bibliography are dated from 2006 to the present. For older materials, please see Homeland Security, compiled by Jeanette Moyer, May 2006. All items are available through the USAWC Library. For your convenience, we have added U.S. Army War College Library call numbers, Internet addresses, or database links at the end of each entry. Web sites were accessed March 2011. This bibliography and others compiled by our research librarians are available online through the Librarys home page at

Greta H. Andrusyszyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

White Paper on DOE-HEP Accelerator Modeling Science Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toward the goal of maximizing the impact of computer modeling on the design of future particle accelerators and the development of new accelerator techniques & technologies, this white paper presents the rationale for: (a) strengthening and expanding programmatic activities in accelerator modeling science within the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) and (b) increasing the community-wide coordination and integration of code development.

Vay, Jean-Luc; Koniges, Alice; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P; Bruhwiler, David L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Solar pp and hep Processes in Effective Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strategy of modern effective field theory is exploited to pin down accurately the flux $S$ factors for the $pp$ and $hep$ processes in the Sun. The technique used is to combine the high accuracy established in few-nucleon systems of the "standard nuclear physics approach" (SNPA) and the systematic power counting of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) into a consistent effective field theory framework. Using highly accurate wave functions obtained in the SNPA and working to \

T. -S. Park; K. Kubodera; D. -P. Min; M. Rho

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Survey of Operations Research Models and Applications in Homeland Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operations research has had a long and distinguished history of work in emergency preparedness and response, airline security, transportation of hazardous materials, and threat and vulnerability analysis. Since the attacks of September 11, 2001 and the ... Keywords: agencies, government, homeland security, planning

P. Daniel Wright; Matthew J. Liberatore; Robert L. Nydick

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Medicinal chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal chemistry Name: Jason A Stamm Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am a senior chemistry major interested in going to grad school, specifically for...

77

High Energy Physics (HEP) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs » HEP Home Programs » HEP Home High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Higgs Boson Discovery Leads to Nobel Prize External link François Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics for their contributions to our understanding of the origin of mass, confirmed by the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.Read More External linkage US Participation in the Higgs Discovery External link

78

HEP Conference Funding Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Theory HEP Guidelines Comparative Review Annual Solicitation Progress Reports and Final Report Conferences Peer Merit Review Policies For Reviewers: Find your Proposal...

79

Medicinal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal Plants Medicinal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 187 April 11, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDICINAL PLANTS In springtime, many years ago, grandma made her family drink gallons of tea made by boiling roots of the sassafras. That was supposed to thin and purify the blood. Children were sent out to gather dandelion, curly dock, wild mustard, pokeberry and other greens as soon as they appeared -- not only because they added welcome variety to the diet of bread, meat, potatoes and gravy, but because some of them were also laxatives. For a bad "cold on the lungs," she slapped a mustard plaster on the patient's back, and on his chest she put a square of red flannel soaked in goose grease. For whooping cough she used a syrup of red clover blossoms. She made cough medicine from the bloodroot plant, and a tea from the compass plant of the prairies was also used for fevers and coughs. She made a pleasant tea from the blossoms of the linden or basswood tree. For stomach aches she used tea from any of several aromatic herbs such as catnip, fennel, yarrow, peppermint, spearmint, sweetflag, wild ginger, bergamot and splice bush.

80

Gregory H. Friedman: Provided for the Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs U.S. Senate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Remote medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international oil industry, catalyzed by a surge in exploration and production projects in remote regions, is giving health care for its travelers and expatriates a high priority. L.R. Aalund, the Journal`s Managing Editor--Technology, reports on why and how this is happening now. He covers this in articles on: health care in Russia, air ambulance evacuations, and the deployment of remote paramedics. Aalund gathered the information during trips to Finland and Russia and interviews with oil industry personnel, physicians, and other medical professionals in North America, Europe, and Siberia. Titles of the four topics presented in this special section on remote medicine are as follows: Oil companies focus on emergency care for expats in Russia; Air ambulance plan can be critical; Remote paramedics have high level of training; and Other facets of remote medicine.

NONE

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Risk Assessment Using The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For over ten years, the Counterproliferation Analysis and Planning System (CAPS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a planning tool used by U.S. combatant commands for mission support planning against foreign programs engaged in the manufacture of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). CAPS is endorsed by the Secretary of Defense as the preferred counterproliferation tool to be used by the nation's armed services. A sister system, the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging CAPS expertise designed to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.

Durling, R L; Price, D E; Spero, K K

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Vulnerability And Risk Assessment Using The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For over ten years, the Counterproliferation Analysis and Planning System (CAPS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a planning tool used by U.S. combatant commands for mission support planning against foreign programs engaged in the manufacture of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). CAPS is endorsed by the Secretary of Defense as the preferred counterproliferation tool to be used by the nation's armed services. A sister system, the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging CAPS expertise designed to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities is presented.

Durling, Jr., R L; Price, D E; Spero, K K

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

84

Use of the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS) for Emergency Management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's expertise in weapons systems and in sparse information analysis to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.

Durling, Jr., R L; Price, D E

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

85

HEP Conference Funding Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Conferences Conferences High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search Peer Merit / Review Policies Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy Physics Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory Guidelines Comparative Review Annual Solicitation Progress Reports and Final Report Conferences Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Guidelines Conferences Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page These guidelines are in addition to, not in lieu of, the official DOE

86

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wide area network monitoring system for HEP experiments at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Large, distributed High Energy Physics (HEP) collaborations, such as D0, CDF and US-CMS, depend on stable and robust network paths between major world research centers. The evolving emphasis on data and compute Grids increases the reliance on network performance. Fermilab's experimental groups and network support personnel identified a critical need for WAN monitoring to ensure the quality and efficient utilization of such network paths. This has led to the development of the Network Monitoring system we will present in this paper. The system evolved from the IEPM-BW project, started at SLAC three years ago. At Fermilab this system has developed into a fully functional infrastructure with bi-directional active network probes and path characterizations. It is based on the Iperf achievable throughput tool, Ping and Synack to test ICMP/TCP connectivity. It uses Pipechar and Traceroute to test, compare and report hop-by-hop network path characterization. It also measures real file transfer performance by BBFTP and GridFTP. The Monitoring system has an extensive web-interface and all the data is available through standalone SOAP web services or by a MonaLISA client. Also in this paper we will present a case study of network path asymmetry and abnormal performance between FNAL and SDSC, which was discovered and resolved by utilizing the Network Monitoring system.

Grigoriev, Maxim; /Fermilab; Cottrell, Les; Logg, Connie; /SLAC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Improving the nuclear data base for non-proliferation and homeland security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the technical advances in non-proliferation and homeland security require calculations of transport of neutrons and gamma-rays through materials. The nuclear data base on which these calculations are made must be of high quality in order for the calculated responses to be credible. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, three spallation neutron sources are being used to provide high-quality cross section and structure data with reactions induced by neutrons. Neutron transmission, neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections, neutron emission in fission, and gamma-ray production by neutrons are principal areas of research. Furthermore, these sources are also being used to validate calculations of the characterization and response of new detectors and detection techniques. Current research activities are summarized here.

Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitteker, Leo J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fotiadis, Nikolaos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gavron, Avigdor [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Tony S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ronald O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O'donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taddeucci, Terry N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulmann, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Medicine and Medical Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;370 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2013­14 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers Vice President for Medical Affairs and the Raja N. Khuri Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Ziyad Ghazzal

90

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Calispell Creek Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Calispell Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in February 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Calispell Creek Project provides a total of 138.17 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 5.16 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Grassland provides 132.02 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 0.99 HUs for yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Calispell Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

HEP Committees of Visitors | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors Deputy Director for Science Programs Deputy Director Home Mission & Functions Deputy Director Biography Organization Staff Presentations & Testimony Federal Advisory Committees Committees of Visitors ASCR Committees of Visitors BES Committees of Visitors BER Committees of Visitors FES Committees of Visitors HEP Committees of Visitors NP Committees of Visitors WDTS Committees of Visitors Contact Information Deputy Director for Science Programs U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 F: (202) 586-4120 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-5316 F: (301) 903-7780 E: sc.science@science.doe.gov

93

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

Ashley, Paul

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Vision on the Status and Evolution of HEP Physics Software Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper represents the vision of the members of the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division's Computational Physics Department (SCD-CPD) on the status and the evolution of various HEP software tools such as the Geant4 detector simulation toolkit, the Pythia and GENIE physics generators, and the ROOT data analysis framework. The goal of this paper is to contribute ideas to the Snowmass 2013 process toward the composition of a unified document on the current status and potential evolution of the physics software tools which are essential to HEP.

Canal, P; Hatcher, R; Jun, S Y; Mrenna, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Evidence-based medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whether for the generation or application of evidence to guide healthcare decisions, the success of evidence-based medicine is grounded in principles common to engineering. In the Learning Healthcare System envisioned by the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) ...

J. Michael Mcginnis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Performance study of GPUs in real-time trigger applications for HEP experiments  

SciTech Connect

Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) have evolved into highly parallel, multi-threaded, multicore powerful processors with high memory bandwidth. GPUs are used in a variety of intensive computing applications. The combination of highly parallel architecture and high memory bandwidth makes GPUs a potentially promising technology for effective real-time processing for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. However, not much is known of their performance in real-time applications that require low latency, such as the trigger for HEP experiments. We describe an R and D project with the goal to study the performance of GPU technology for possible low latency applications, performing basic operations as well as some more advanced HEP lower-level trigger algorithms (such as fast tracking or jet finding). We present some preliminary results on timing measurements, comparing the performance of a CPU versus a GPU with NVIDIA's CUDA general-purpose parallel computing architecture, carried out at CDF's Level-2 trigger test stand. These studies will provide performance benchmarks for future studies to investigate the potential and limitations of GPUs for real-time applications in HEP experiments.

Ketchum, W.; /Chicago U.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Bastieri, D.; Bauce, M.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Catastini, P.; /Fermilab; Gelain, S.; /Padua U.; Hahn, K.; /Fermilab; Kim, Y.K.; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Liu, T.; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Urso, G.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for the Wildlife Management Areas; and (2) Evaluation of the simplified YN HEP methodologies as a means of measuring mitigation progress.

Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma Creek South Project, Technical Report 2003-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Tacoma Creek South property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in June 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Tacoma Creek South Project provides a total of 190.79 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetlands provide 20.51 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Grassland provides 1.65 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 11.76 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 139.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forest also provides 19.15 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Tacoma Creek South Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, 2004-2006 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Management Area (LMWA) in May 2005. The 2005 HEP assessment resulted in a total of 647.44 HUs, or 0.76 HUs/acre. This is an increase of 420.34 HUs (0.49 HUs/acre) over 2001 HEP survey results. The most significant increase in HUs occurred on the Wallender and Simonis parcels which increased by 214.30 HUs and 177.49 HUs respectively. Transects were established at or near 2001 HEP analysis transect locations whenever possible. ODFW staff biologists assisted the RHT re-establish transect locations and/or suggested areas for new surveys. Since 2001, significant changes in cover type acreage and/or structural conditions have occurred due to conversion of agriculture cover types to emergent wetland and grassland cover types. Agricultural lands were seeded to reestablish grasslands and wetlands were restored through active management and manipulation of extant water sources including natural stream hydrology/flood regimes and available irrigation. Grasslands increased on the Wallender parcel by 21% (65 acres), 23% (71 acres) at the Simonis site, and 39% (62 acres) at Conley Lake. The emergent wetland cover type also changed significantly increasing 60% (184 acres) at Wallender and 59% (184 acres) on the Simonis tract. Today, agriculture lands (crop and grazed pasture) have been nearly eliminated from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation project lands located on the LMWA.

Ashley, Paul; Wagoner, Sara

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; North Eaton Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Reply to arXiv:0711.4930[hep-th] by Ito and Seiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent note (arXiv:0711.4930[hep-th]) Ito and Seiler claim that there is a 'missing link' in the derivation in arXiv:0707.2179[hep-th] by the present author; namely, that no proof of a certain inequality used there is given at weak coupling. Here it is pointed out that in fact no such missing link is present. The argument in 0707.2179 is, among other things, specifically constructed so that the inequality in question is invoked {\\it only} at strong coupling, where it is easily proven. Underlying the mangling of the argument in 0707.2179 by Ito and Seiler are their incorrect statements concerning the dependence of the potential-moving decimation procedures used in 0707.2179 on space-time dimensionality and other decimation parameters.

Tomboulis, E T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Reply to arXiv:0711.4930[hep-th] by Ito and Seiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent note (arXiv:0711.4930[hep-th]) Ito and Seiler claim that there is a 'missing link' in the derivation in arXiv:0707.2179[hep-th] by the present author; namely, that no proof of a certain inequality used there is given at weak coupling. Here it is pointed out that in fact no such missing link is present. The argument in 0707.2179 is, among other things, specifically constructed so that the inequality in question is invoked {\\it only} at strong coupling, where it is easily proven. Underlying the mangling of the argument in 0707.2179 by Ito and Seiler are their incorrect statements concerning the dependence of the potential-moving decimation procedures used in 0707.2179 on space-time dimensionality and other decimation parameters.

E. T. Tomboulis

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Priest River, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 105.41 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 26.95 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland habitat provides 23.78 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scmb-shrub vegetation provides 54.68 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

Cochran, Brian

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Beilke, Susan

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Scaling HEP to Web size with RESTful protocols: The frontier example  

SciTech Connect

The World-Wide-Web has scaled to an enormous size. The largest single contributor to its scalability is the HTTP protocol, particularly when used in conformity to REST (REpresentational State Transfer) principles. High Energy Physics (HEP) computing also has to scale to an enormous size, so it makes sense to base much of it on RESTful protocols. Frontier, which reads databases with an HTTP-based RESTful protocol, has successfully scaled to deliver production detector conditions data from both the CMS and ATLAS LHC detectors to hundreds of thousands of computer cores worldwide. Frontier is also able to re-use a large amount of standard software that runs the Web: on the clients, caches, and servers. I discuss the specific ways in which HTTP and REST enable high scalability for Frontier. I also briefly discuss another protocol used in HEP computing that is HTTP-based and RESTful, and another protocol that could benefit from it. My goal is to encourage HEP protocol designers to consider HTTP and REST whenever the same information is needed in many places.

Dykstra, Dave; /Fermilab

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Printing out Particle Detectors with 3D-Printers, a Potentially Transformational Advance for HEP Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This white paper suggests posing a "grand challenge" to the HEP instrumentation community, i.e. the aggressive development of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, for the production of particle detectors in collaboration with industry. This notion is an outcome of discussions within the instrumentation frontier group during the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community. Improvements of current industrial 3D-printing capabilities by one to two orders of magnitude in terms of printing resolution, speed, and object size together with developing the ability to print composite materials could enable the production of any desired 3D detector structure directly from a digital model. Current industrial 3D-printing capabilities are briefly reviewed and contrasted with capabilities desired for printing detectors for particle physics, with micro-pattern gaseous detectors used as a first example. A significant impact on industrial technology could be expected if HEP were to part...

Hohlmann, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Printing out Particle Detectors with 3D-Printers, a Potentially Transformational Advance for HEP Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This white paper suggests posing a "grand challenge" to the HEP instrumentation community, i.e. the aggressive development of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, for the production of particle detectors in collaboration with industry. This notion is an outcome of discussions within the instrumentation frontier group during the 2013 APS-DPF Snowmass summer study conducted by the U.S. HEP community. Improvements of current industrial 3D-printing capabilities by one to two orders of magnitude in terms of printing resolution, speed, and object size together with developing the ability to print composite materials could enable the production of any desired 3D detector structure directly from a digital model. Current industrial 3D-printing capabilities are briefly reviewed and contrasted with capabilities desired for printing detectors for particle physics, with micro-pattern gaseous detectors used as a first example. A significant impact on industrial technology could be expected if HEP were to partner with industry in taking on such a challenge.

M. Hohlmann

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use patient and learn the importance of physical and pharmacologic stress in nuclear cardiology 3. Interpret

Ford, James

118

Diagnostic Imaging Emergency Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC Davis Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging Symposium Emergency Medicine May 15, 2011 Gladys Valley Hall devoted to triage, assessment, and imaging diagnostics in emergency medicine. Speakers in this year's symposium include specialists in diagnostic imaging, and emergency and critical care. Sunday May 15, 2011 8

Hammock, Bruce D.

119

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Large-Area Plasma-Panel Radiation Detectors for Nuclear Medicine Imaging to Homeland Security and the Super Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new radiation sensor derived from plasma panel display technology is introduced. It has the capability to detect ionizing and non-ionizing radiation over a wide energy range and the potential for use in many applications. The principle of operation is described and some early results presented.

Friedman, Peter S; Chapman, J Wehrley; Levin, Daniel S; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing; Benhammou, Yan; Etzion, Erez; Moshe, M Ben; Silver, Yiftah; Beene, James R; Varner, Robert L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Large-Area Plasma-Panel Radiation Detectors for Nuclear Medicine Imaging to Homeland Security and the Super Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new radiation sensor derived from plasma panel display technology is introduced. It has the capability to detect ionizing and non-ionizing radiation over a wide energy range and the potential for use in many applications. The principle of operation is described and some early results presented.

Peter S. Friedman; Robert Ball; J. Wehrley Chapman; Daniel S. Levin; Curtis Weaverdyck; Bing Zhou; Yan Benhammou; Erez Etzion; M. Ben Moshe; Yiftah Silver; James R. Beene; Robert L. Varner Jr.

2010-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

122

Most Viewed Documents - Biology and Medicine | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Most Viewed Documents - Biology and Medicine Most Viewed Documents - Biology and Medicine Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public Not Available (1988) Carbon Dioxide Sequestering Using Microalgal Systems Daniel J. Stepan; Richard E. Shockey; Thomas A. Moe; et al. (2002) Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis, Sensing, Drug Delivery and Gene Transfection Daniela Rodica Radu (2005) Tolerance doses for treatment planning Lyman, J.T. (1985) Preliminary Benchmarking Efforts and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security Robert Hayes (2008) Function and dynamics of aptamers: A case study on the malachite green aptamer Wang, Tianjiao (2008) Extremophiles 2004 Frank Robb (2004) Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber.

123

Biomarkers & Personalized Medicine Research and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomarkers & Personalized Medicine Research and Diagnostics. Purpose: SomaLogic is working to find biomarkers for ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

124

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

Ashley, Paul

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Forrest Conservation Area, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the 4,232-acre Forrest Conservation Area managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribe) in Grant County, Oregon. The habitat evaluation is required as part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration. Representatives from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tribes conducted the field surveys for the HEP. The survey collected data for habitat variables contained in habitat suitability index (HIS) models for wildlife species; the key species were black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), California Quail (Callipepla californica), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types surveyed were grassland, meadow grassland, conifer forest, riparian tree shrub, shrub steppe, juniper forest, and juniper steppe. Other cover types mapped, but not used in the models were open water, roads, gravel pits, corrals, and residential.

Smith, Brent

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Occupational Medicine Clinic | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Hours Monday-Friday 8:15am-5pm. Emergency coverage during the lunchtime hour (12-1pm) is available. The clinic is closed after 5pm and on weekends & holidays. Resources DOE Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICPA) Laser History and Eye Exam Form (doc) Location The Occupational Medicine Clinic is located in Building 490, 30 Bell Avenue. location map Get Maps and Directions One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and

128

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Workforce Development | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workforce Development Workforce Development High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Medicine Homeland Security Industry Computing Sciences Workforce Development A Growing List Accelerators for Americas Future External link Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Benefits of HEP Workforce Development Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Particle physics has a profound influence on the workforce. Basic science is a magnet that attracts inquisitive and capable students. In particle physics, roughly one sixth of those completing Ph.D.s ultimately pursue

131

Sciences | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences Sciences High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Medicine Homeland Security Industry Computing Sciences Workforce Development A Growing List Accelerators for Americas Future External link Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » Benefits of HEP Sciences Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Sciences: synchrotron light sources Particle physicists originally built electron accelerators to explore the fundamental nature of matter. At first, they looked on the phenomenon of

132

arXiv:hep-ph/0110320 v3 18 Sep 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 November 2001 Detecting and Studying Higgs Bosons in Two-Photon Collisions at a Linear Collider David M. Asner, Jeffery B. Gronberg, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California John F. Gunion University of California at Davis Davis, California November 2001 Abstract: We examine the potential for detecting and studying Higgs bosons in two-photon collisions at a future linear collider. Our study incorporates realistic two-photon spectra based on the most probable available laser technology. Results include detector simulations. We study the cases of: a) an SM-like Higgs boson; b) the heavy MSSM Higgs bosons; c) a Higgs boson with no WW/ZZ couplings from a general two Higgs doublet model. arXiv:hep-ph/0110320 v3 18 Sep 2002

133

Use of Checkpoint-Restart for Complex HEP Software on Traditional Architectures and Intel MIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process checkpoint-restart is a technology with great potential for use in HEP workflows. Use cases include debugging, reducing the startup time of applications both in offline batch jobs and the High Level Trigger, permitting job preemption in environments where spare CPU cycles are being used opportunistically and efficient scheduling of a mix of multicore and single-threaded jobs. We report on tests of checkpoint-restart technology using CMS software, Geant4-MT (multi-threaded Geant4), and the DMTCP (Distributed Multithreaded Checkpointing) package. We analyze both single- and multi-threaded applications and test on both standard Intel x86 architectures and on Intel MIC. The tests with multi-threaded applications on Intel MIC are used to consider scalability and performance. These are considered an indicator of what the future may hold for many-core computing.

Arya, Kapil; Dotti, Andrea; Elmer, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Next generation input-output data format for HEP using Google's protocol buffers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a data format for Monte Carlo (MC) events, or any structural data, including experimental data, in a compact binary form using variable-size integer encoding as implemented in the Google's Protocol Buffers package. This approach is implemented in the so-called ProMC library which produces smaller file sizes for MC records compared to the existing input-output libraries used in high-energy physics (HEP). Other important features are a separation of abstract data layouts from concrete programming implementations, self-description and random access. Data stored in ProMC files can be written, read and manipulated in a number of programming languages, such C++, Java and Python.

S. V. Chekanov

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

Contact Info | Occupational Medicine Clinic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Contact Info Occupational Medicine Joseph Falco, M.D. 344-3666 OMC Manager/Supervising Physician Staff Physicians Carol Davis, D.O. 344-3667 Board Certified - Occupational Medicine Eva Erens, M.D. 344-3668 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Jaishree Subramani, M.D. MPH 344-3669 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Health Promotion Program Michael Thorn, RN, MBA 344-8612 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Program Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Nancy Losinno, LCSW, CEAP 344-4567 EAP Manager Linda DiPierro 344-2733 Senior Occupational Medicine Assistant

136

SAMPLING AND MASS SPECTROMETRY APPROACHES FOR THE DETECTION OF DRUGS AND FOREIGN CONTAMINANTS IN BREATH FOR HOMELAND SECURITY APPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homeland security relies heavily on analytical chemistry to identify suspicious materials and persons. Traditionally this role has focused on attribution, determining the type and origin of an explosive, for example. But as technology advances, analytical chemistry can and will play an important role in the prevention and preemption of terrorist attacks. More sensitive and selective detection techniques can allow suspicious materials and persons to be identified even before a final destructive product is made. The work presented herein focuses on the use of commercial and novel detection techniques for application to the prevention of terrorist activities. Although drugs are not commonly thought of when discussing terrorism, narcoterrorism has become a significant threat in the 21st century. The role of the drug trade in the funding of terrorist groups is prevalent; thus, reducing the trafficking of illegal drugs can play a role in the prevention of terrorism by cutting off much needed funding. To do so, sensitive, specific, and robust analytical equipment is needed to quickly identify a suspected drug sample no matter what matrix it is in. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) is a novel technique that has previously been applied to biological and chemical detection. The current work applies SPAMS to drug analysis, identifying the active ingredients in single component, multi-component, and multi-tablet drug samples in a relatively non-destructive manner. In order to do so, a sampling apparatus was created to allow particle generation from drug tablets with on-line introduction to the SPAMS instrument. Rules trees were developed to automate the identification of drug samples on a single particle basis. A novel analytical scheme was also developed to identify suspect individuals based on chemical signatures in human breath. Human breath was sampled using an RTube{trademark} and the trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were preconcentrated using solid phase microextraction (SPME) and identified using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Modifications to the sampling apparatus allowed for increased VOC collection efficiency, and reduced the time of sampling and analysis by over 25%. The VOCs are present in breath due to either endogenous production, or exposure to an external source through absorption, inhalation, or ingestion. Detection of these exogenous chemicals can provide information on the prior location and activities of the subject. Breath samples collected before and after exposure in a hardware store and nail salon were analyzed to investigate the prior location of a subject; breath samples collected before and after oral exposure to terpenes and terpenoid compounds, pseudoephedrine, and inhalation exposure to hexamine and other explosive related compounds were analyzed to investigate the prior activity of a subject. The elimination of such compounds from the body was also monitored. In application, this technique may provide an early warning system to identify persons of interest in the prevention and preemption stages of homeland security.

Martin, A N

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Federal technology transfer requirements :a focused study of principal agencies approaches with implications for the Department of Homeland Security.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides relevant information and analysis to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that will assist DHS in determining how to meet the requirements of federal technology transfer legislation. These legal requirements are grouped into five categories: (1) establishing an Office of Research and Technology Applications, or providing the functions thereof; (2) information management; (3) enabling agreements with non-federal partners; (4) royalty sharing; and (5) invention ownership/obligations. These five categories provide the organizing framework for this study, which benchmarks other federal agencies/laboratories engaged in technology transfer/transition Four key agencies--the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DoD)--and several of their laboratories have been surveyed. An analysis of DHS's mission needs for commercializing R&D compared to those agencies/laboratories is presented with implications and next steps for DHS's consideration. Federal technology transfer legislation, requirements, and practices have evolved over the decades as agencies and laboratories have grown more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their efforts to conduct technology transfer and as needs and opinions in the federal sector have changed with regards to what is appropriate. The need to address requirements in a fairly thorough manner has, therefore, resulted in a lengthy paper. There are two ways to find summary information. Each chapter concludes with a summary, and there is an overall ''Summary and Next Steps'' chapter on pages 57-60. For those readers who are unable to read the entire document, we recommend referring to these pages.

Koker, Denise; Micheau, Jill M.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Homeland Security Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Biological/Radiological/Nuclear/Explosives (CBRNE); Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP); Cybersecurity; National Construction Safety Team ...

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

139

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

Childs, Allen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

SC e-journals, Medicine  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Medicine Medicine ACM Transactions on Applied Perception (TAP) ACS Synthetic Biology Acta Biotheoretica Acta Neurochirurgica Acta Neuropathologica Administration and Policy in Mental Health American Journal of Hematology American Journal of Industrial Medicine American Journal of Infection Control American Journal of Medical Genetics Amino Acids Anatomical Record, The Angiogenesis Annals of Biomedical Engineering Annals of Hematology Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Annual Review of Genetics Annual Review of Immunology Annual Review of Medicine Annual Review of Microbiology Annual Review of Neuroscience Annual Review of Nutrition Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Nuclear Medicine | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Medicine Nuclear Medicine SHARE Nuclear Medicine The Medical Isotope Program is focused on the development of: improved reactor production and processing methods to provide medical radioisotopes; new radionuclide generator systems; design and evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for applications in nuclear medicine and oncology; and association with Medical Cooperative Programs throughout the world for the further pre-clinical testing and clinical evaluation of agents developed at ORNL. In the United States, only ORNL has the combined resources of a stable isotope inventory, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), hot cell processing capabilities, and a wide range of support functions required for such research. These collective resources provide unique capabilities for

142

Oroxylin A induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 was involved in its antitumor activity  

SciTech Connect

We previously reported that wogonin, a flavonoid compound, was a potent apoptosis inducer of human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells and murine sarcoma S180 cells. In the present study, the effect of oroxylin A, one wogonin structurally related flavonoid isolated from Scutellariae radix, on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 was examined and molecular mechanisms were also investigated. Oroxylin A inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner measured by MTT-assay. Treatment with an apoptosis-inducing concentration of oroxylin A caused typical morphological changes and apoptotic blebbing in HepG2 cells. DNA fragmentation assay was used to examine later apoptosis induced by oroxylin A. FACScan analysis revealed a dramatic increase in the number of apoptotic and G{sub 2}/M phase arrest cells after oroxylin A treatment. The pro-apoptotic activity of oroxylin A was attributed to its ability to modulate the concerted expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and pro-caspase-3 proteins. The expression of Bcl-2 protein and pro-caspase-3 protein was dramatically decreased after treatment with oroxylin A. These results demonstrated that oroxylin A could effectively induce programmed cell death and suggested that it could be a promising antitumor drug.

Hu Yang [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Yang Yong [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); You Qidong [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)]. E-mail: qdyou@cpu.edu.cn; Liu Wei [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gu Hongyan [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhao Li [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang Kun [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang Wei [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang Xiaotang [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Guo Qinglong [Department of Physiology, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)]. E-mail: qinglongguo@hotmail.com

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Expression of CAR in SW480 and HepG2 cells during G1 is associated with cell proliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a transcription factor to regulate the expression of several genes related to drug-metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that CAR protein accumulates during G1 in human SW480 and HepG2 cells. After the G1/S phase transition, CAR protein levels decreased, and CAR was hardly detected in cells by the late M phase. CAR expression in both cell lines was suppressed by RNA interference-mediated suppression of CDK4. Depletion of CAR by RNA interference in both cells and by hepatocyte growth factor treatment in HepG2 cells resulted in decreased MDM2 expression that led to p21 upregulation and repression of HepG2 cell growth. Thus, our results demonstrate that CAR expression is an early G1 event regulated by CDK4 that contributes to MDM2 expression; these findings suggest that CAR may influence the expression of genes involved in not only the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous substances but also in the cell proliferation.

Osabe, Makoto [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Sugatani, Junko [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Global COE Program, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka (Japan)], E-mail: sugatani@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp; Takemura, Akiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Ikari, Akira [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Kitamura, Naomi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Negishi, Masahiko [Pharmacogenetics Section, Laboratory of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miwa, Masao [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Politics and Emergency Medicine - An Essential Lesson for Every Resident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and guide the future of emergency medicine. Volume XII, no .s S ection Politics and Emergency Medicine - An EssentialMedicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Orange, CA Every

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Feedback in the Emergency Medicine Clerkships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

526. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Volume XII, NO .year medical student emergency medicine curriculum Med.Med. 2006;47:E1E7. emergency medicine resident interaction

Bernard, Aaron W; Kman, Nicholas E; Khandelwal, Sorabh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Opportunities Benefits Office • Work-Life Balance Programs • International Services • Occupational Medicine • Salaries & Awards • Training & Qualifications The Human Resources and Occupational Medicine Division handles scientific and non-scientific employment, benefits, employee and labor relations, staff development, salaries and awards, employee records, and occupational medicine. For more information, click on the one of the services listed above. Brookhaven National Laboratory has a long-standing commitment to a policy of equal opportunity and diversity. Our goal is equality of opportunity in all aspects of employment, including placement, development programs, job assignments, transfers and promotions, without regard to race, color,

148

IFUP-TH/2003/16 hep-th/0304098 A Torsion Correction to the RR 4-Form Fieldstrength  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shifted quantization condition of the M-theory 4-form G4 is well-known. The most naive generalization to type IIA string theory fails, an orientifold fourplane counterexample was found by Hori in hep-th/9805141. In this note we use D2-brane anomaly cancellation to find the corresponding shifted quantitization condition in IIA. Our analysis is consistent with the known O4-plane tensions if we include a torsion correction to the usual construction of G4 from C3, B and G2. The resulting Bianchi identities enforce that RR fluxes lift to K-theory classes.

Jarah Evslin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Measurements of activity in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurements of activity in nuclear medicine. National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) develop the standards of activity measurement ...

150

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Willow Creek, Technical Report 1993-1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Willow Creek site is one of the most significant remaining areas of typical native Willamette Valley habitats, with a variety of wetlands, grasslands, and woodlands. A diverse array of native flora and fauna, with significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Wildlife diversity is high, and includes species of mammals, songbirds, raptors, reptiles, amphibians, and one rare invertebrate. Over 200 species of native plants have been identified (including populations of six rare, threatened, or endangered species), along with significant remnants of native plant communities. Willow Creek is located in Lane County, Oregon, on the western edge of the City of Eugene (see Figure 1). The city limit of Eugene passes through the site, and the site is entirely within the Eugene Urban Growth Boundary (UGB). At present, only lands to the east and northeast of the site are developed to full urban densities. Low density rural residential and agricultural land uses predominate on lands to the northwest and south. A partially completed light industrial/research office park is located to the northwest. Several informal trails lead south from West 18th at various points into the site. The area encompasses a total of approximately 349 acres under several ownerships, in sections 3 and 4 of Township 18 South, Range 4 West. wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. The BPA is considering exercising their option to purchase the Bailey Hill property, acquiring additional properties now owned by The Nature Conservancy, and/or funding enhancement activities for the entire site in order to receive credit under the Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin.

Beilke, Susan

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Advanced Topics in Emergency Medicine: Curriculum Development and Initial Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

student emergency medicine curriculum guide. Acad Emeg Med.Medicine ATEM: An Honors Curriculum Kman et al 4. Pacellain Emergency Medicine: Curriculum Development and Initial

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

SIGN HERE : informed consent in personalized medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The next era of medicine will be one of personalization, scientists and physicians promise. Personalized medicine is a refined clinical approach in which clinicians will utilize your genomic information to help you prevent ...

Ahmed, Abdul-Kareem H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Family Medicine essays, creative prose, or poetry, the Creative Writing Award stories, poems, essays; second,

Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Medical Consultation Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Continuing Medical Education Radiation Emergency Medicine Advanced Radiation Medicine Health Physics in Radiation...

156

Society of Nuclear Medicine Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this guideline is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing, interpreting, and reporting the results of lung scintigraphy for pulmonary embolism. II. Background Information and Definitions A. Aerosol Ventilation Scintigraphy A diagnostic imaging test that records the bronchopulmonary distribution of an inhaled radioactive aerosol within the lungs. B. Gas Ventilation Scintigraphy A diagnostic imaging test that records the pulmonary distribution of a radioactive gas during breathing maneuvers. C. Pulmonary Perfusion Scintigraphy A diagnostic imaging test that records the distribution

Guideline For Lung Scintigraphy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Agencies w Affiliation & Designated Field Instructors CPR Liability Insurance CWO Background Check Drug Screen PPD T/D Varicella Titer MMB Titer Hep B Titer Action Care R  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drug Screen PPD T/D Varicella Titer MMB Titer Hep B Titer Action Care R Adult Protective Services R *R 7/23/2012 Bienvivir Senior Health Services R R* R* R R R R R 7/2/2012 Big brothers Big Sisters R *R 7/23/2010 Border Childrens Mental health Collaborative R R 7/23/2012 CAFV R CASS (Center R 7

Ward, Karen

158

arXiv:hep-ph/0105014v217May2001 A Light Higgs Boson Explanation for the g -2 Crisis a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arXiv:hep-ph/0105014v217May2001 A Light Higgs Boson Explanation for the g - 2 Crisis a A. Dedes1-even Higgs boson with a mass of around 10 GeV could explain the recent BNL measurement of the muon anomalous) the Upsilon mass. It may be possible to exclude or discover such a Higgs boson by fully analyzing the existing

California at Santa Cruz, University of

159

A Search for Neutrinos from the Solar hep Reaction and the DiffuseSupernova Neutrino Background with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

A search has been made for neutrinos from the hep reactionin the Sun and from the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB)using data collected during the first operational phase of the SudburyNeutrino Observatory, with an exposure of 0.65 kilotonne-years. For thehep neutrino search, two events are observed in the effective electronenergy range of 14.3 MeVhep neutrinos. For DSNB neutrinos, noevents are observed in the effective electron energy range of 21 MeVhep neutrino flux and by two orders of magnitude on theprevious upper limit on the nu e component of the DSNB flux.

Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Anthony, A.E.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive,A.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boulay, M.G.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chen,X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress,F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Drouin,P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Evans,H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway,R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jagam,P.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Krueger, A.; Kraus,C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.Lawson.I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin,R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis,K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Nickel, B.G.; Noble, A.J.; Norman,E.B.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O'Keeffe, H.M.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser,S.M.; Ott, R.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Sims, C.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van Berg, R.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue,C.J.; Walker, T.J.; Wall, B.L.; Waller, D.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark,D.L.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters,J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

An input-output procedure for calculating economy-wide economic impacts in supply chains using homeland security consequence analysis tools.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed several models to analyze potential consequences of homeland security incidents. Two of these models (the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics, N-ABLE{trademark}, and Loki) simulate detailed facility- and product-level consequences of simulated disruptions to supply chains. Disruptions in supply chains are likely to reduce production of some commodities, which may reduce economic activity across many other types of supply chains throughout the national economy. The detailed nature of Sandia's models means that simulations are limited to specific supply chains in which detailed facility-level data has been collected, but policymakers are often concerned with the national-level economic impacts of supply-chain disruptions. A preliminary input-output methodology has been developed to estimate national-level economic impacts based upon the results of supply-chain-level simulations. This methodology overcomes two primary challenges. First, the methodology must be relatively simple to integrate successfully with existing models; it must be easily understood, easily applied to the supply-chain models without user intervention, and run quickly. The second challenge is more fundamental: the methodology must account for both upstream and downstream impacts that result from supply-chain disruptions. Input-output modeling typically estimates only upstream impacts, but shortages resulting from disruptions in many supply chains (for example, energy, communications, and chemicals) are likely to have large downstream impacts. In overcoming these challenges, the input-output methodology makes strong assumptions about technology and substitution. This paper concludes by applying the methodology to chemical supply chains.

Smith, Braeton J.; Vugrin, Eric D.; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Federal technology transfer requirements :a focused study of principal agencies approaches with implications for the Department of Homeland Security.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides relevant information and analysis to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that will assist DHS in determining how to meet the requirements of federal technology transfer legislation. These legal requirements are grouped into five categories: (1) establishing an Office of Research and Technology Applications, or providing the functions thereof; (2) information management; (3) enabling agreements with non-federal partners; (4) royalty sharing; and (5) invention ownership/obligations. These five categories provide the organizing framework for this study, which benchmarks other federal agencies/laboratories engaged in technology transfer/transition Four key agencies--the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DoD)--and several of their laboratories have been surveyed. An analysis of DHS's mission needs for commercializing R&D compared to those agencies/laboratories is presented with implications and next steps for DHS's consideration. Federal technology transfer legislation, requirements, and practices have evolved over the decades as agencies and laboratories have grown more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their efforts to conduct technology transfer and as needs and opinions in the federal sector have changed with regards to what is appropriate. The need to address requirements in a fairly thorough manner has, therefore, resulted in a lengthy paper. There are two ways to find summary information. Each chapter concludes with a summary, and there is an overall ''Summary and Next Steps'' chapter on pages 57-60. For those readers who are unable to read the entire document, we recommend referring to these pages.

Koker, Denise; Micheau, Jill M.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Improved Meteorological Input for Atmospheric Release Decision support Systems and an Integrated LES Modeling System for Atmospheric Dispersion of Toxic Agents: Homeland Security Applications  

SciTech Connect

When hazardous material is accidently or intentionally released into the atmosphere, emergency response organizations look to decision support systems (DSSs) to translate contaminant information provided by atmospheric models into effective decisions to protect the public and emergency responders and to mitigate subsequent consequences. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)-led Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC) is one of the primary DSSs utilized by emergency management organizations. IMAAC is responsible for providing 'a single piont for the coordination and dissemination of Federal dispersion modeling and hazard prediction products that represent the Federal position' during actual or potential incidents under the National Response Plan. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), locatec at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), serves as the primary operations center of the IMAAC. A key component of atmospheric release decision support systems is meteorological information - models and data of winds, turbulence, and other atmospheric boundary-layer parameters. The accuracy of contaminant predictions is strongly dependent on the quality of this information. Therefore, the effectiveness of DSSs can be enhanced by improving the meteorological options available to drive atmospheric transport and fate models. The overall goal of this project was to develop and evaluate new meteorological modeling capabilities for DSSs based on the use of NASA Earth-science data sets in order to enhance the atmospheric-hazard information provided to emergency managers and responders. The final report describes the LLNL contributions to this multi-institutional effort. LLNL developed an approach to utilize NCAR meteorological predictions using NASA MODIS data for the New York City (NYC) region and demonstrated the potential impact of the use of different data sources and data parameterizations on IMAAC/NARAC fate and transport predictions. A case study involving coastal sea breeze circulation patterns in the NYC region was used to investigate the sensitivity of atmospheric dispersion results on the source of three-dimensional wind field data.

Arnold, E; Simpson, M; Larsen, S; Gash, J; Aluzzi, F; Lundquist, J; Sugiyama, G

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Novel Bioceramic Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Novel Bioceramic Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine ... Composite Powder from Zro2-B2O3/B System by High-Energy Ball-Milling and...

164

BMC Medicine BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Gender perspective in medicine: a vital part of medical scientific rationality. A useful model for comprehending structures and hierarchies within medical science

Gunilla Risberg; Katarina Hamberg; Eva E Johansson; Eva E Johansson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Homeland Security Issues for Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The events of September 11, 2001, along with the Oklahoma City bombing and Washington, DC area sniper attacks have forever changed America's sense of security. Federal, state, and local governments, businesses, and individual homeowners have become more aware of safety, security, and protecting property and people should similar incidents occur in the future. The initial steps in facility protection are identifying potential threats and evaluating the condition of existing building infrastructure and systems. After assessments are complete, the results should be compared with guidelines and recommendations produced by government agencies or professional organizations. Areas to address to enhance security and safety include ventilation, control systems, air filtration, alarm systems, building access, and surveillance. This paper will look at the objectives of task forces, sources of information, and measures owners can take in schools and other facilities. Although actions involving increased awareness, structural reinforcement, and emergency water supplies are important, this discussion will focus on mechanical and security systems and related items. The authors' experiences in assisting Texas school districts will also be shared.

McClure, J. D.; Fisher, D.; Fenter, T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Fluid Mechanics and Homeland Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Exploring further, the user may wish to understand why, for example, plutonium is so strongly related reference system. If users click on plutonium, they receive a list of explanations of how nuclear power and plutonium are related, a list that includes the above explanation. #12;power. By clicking on plutonium

Settles, Gary S.

167

What Is Complementary and Alternative Medicine?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for health purposes typically combine physical postures, breathing techniques, and meditation or relaxation a component of energy medicine, manipulative and body-based practices, and traditional Chinese medicine. #12 a traditional healer (usage varied for the seven specific types of healers identified in the survey). Some CAM

Bandettini, Peter A.

168

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.

Sieglitz, Greg

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Symes Hotel and Medicinal Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hotel and Medicinal Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Symes Hotel and Medicinal Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Hot...

170

Pulse - Accelerator Science in Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t he future of accelerator physics isn’t just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow’s discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology. t he future of accelerator physics isn’t just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow’s discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology. Breakthroughs in the technology of superconducting magnets, nanometer beams, laser instrumentation and information technology will give high-energy physicists new accelerators to explore the deepest secrets of the universe: the ultimate structure of matter and the nature of space and time. But breakthroughs in accelerator science may do more than advance the exploration of particles and forces. No field of science is an island. Physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology, medicine— all interact in the continuing human endeavor to explore and understand our world and ourselves. Research at high-energy physics laboratories will lead to the next generation of particle accelerators—and perhaps to new tools for medical science.

171

AN ADMINISTRATIVE CHALLENGE: NUCLEAR MEDICINE  

SciTech Connect

The development of nuclear medicine facilities in hospitals in the United States is discussed, particularly in relation to the problems presented to hospital administration for understanding, organizing, and planning such facilities. The increase in the number of hospital radioisotope departments from 1952 to 1958 was 300%, a growth unparalleled by any other major hospital service. Today, 20%, of the hospitals in the U. S. maintain radioisotope departments. Reasons for the relative lag among smaller hospitals are discussed. Responsibilities of administrations, in seeing that A.E.C. licensing requirements for the use of radioisotopes in general hospitals are maintained, are outlined. Organization of a hospital isotopes committee and appointment of a safety officer is commented on. After an outline of the various radioisotope techniques most useful to the general hospital, the cost of the necessary equipment and other laboratory facilities is estimated. Other problems discussed in relation to responsibilities of hospital administrators include laundry decontamination, shielding, training of nursing personnel, information programs for personnel, legalities arising over radiation exposure claims, and the corresponding need for the keeping of records, autopsies, insurance, waste disposal, public fears and misconceptions, sanitation, and film badge monitoring. (H.H.D.)

Hellman, J.S.

1961-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 by tanshinones in human HepG2 hepatoma cell line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diterpenoid tanshinones including tanshinone IIA (TIIA), cryptotanshinone (CTS), tanshinone I (TI) and dihydrotanshinone I (DHTI) are the major bioactive components from Danshen. The major aim of our present study was to investigate the induction potential of these four main components of tanshinones (TIIA, CTS, TI, and DHTI) on the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in HepG2 cells. Our results showed that all of these four tanshinones caused a significant time- and concentration-dependent increase in the amount of CYP1A1/2 expression in HepG2 cells. These induction effects were further characterized through transcriptional regulation: the induction of CYP1A1/2 mRNA level by tanshinones was completely blocked by the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D; the expression of CYP1A1/2 heterogeneous nuclear RNA was induced by tanshinone treatment; and CYP1A1 mRNA stability was not influenced by these tanshinones. Interestingly, tanshinones plus B[a]P produced additive/synergistic effect on CYP1A1/2 induction. In addition, the tanshinone-induced CYP1A1/2 expression was abolished by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonist resveratrol, suggesting an AhR dependent transcription mechanism. In the reporter gene assay, while TI and DHTI significantly induced AhR-dependent luciferase activity, TIIA and CTS failed to induce this activity. Collectively, the tanshinones could induce CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression through transcriptional activation mechanism and exert differential effects on activating AhR in HepG2 cells. Our findings suggest that rational administration of tanshinones should be considered with respect to their effect on AhR and CYP1A1/2 expression.

Zhang Rong [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Sun Jianguo, E-mail: jgsun_cpucn@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Ma Liping; Wu Xiaolan [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Pan Guoyu [Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics (MAP), Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research (NIBR), 250 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Hao Haiping; Zhou Fang; Jiye, A; Liu Changhui; Ai Hua; Shang Lili; Gao Haiyan; Peng Ying; Wan Ping; Wu Hui [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Wang Guangji, E-mail: guangjiwang@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Key Unit of SATCM for Pharmacokinetics Methodology of TCM Complex Prescription, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative Owen Lowe  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative Owen Lowe Office of Isotopes for Medicine and Science Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology October 1, 2002 Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Lowe/Oct01_02 ANMI to NERAC.ppt (2) Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative 6 Sponsor nuclear medical science research using a peer-review selection process * 9 three-year research grants awarded 6 Sponsor the training of individuals in nuclear medical science * 5 three-year education grants awarded 6 Continue research and education programs to completion; however, no additional funds for new grants is in the FY 2003 budget Isotopes for Life Isotopes for Life

174

Visualization in Medicine: Theory, Algorithms, and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visualization in Medicine is the first book on visualization and its application to problems in medical diagnosis, education, and treatment. The book describes the algorithms, the applications and their validation (how reliable are the results?), ... Keywords: Computer Graphics

Bernhard Preim; Dirk Bartz

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

ORISE: Radiation Emergency Medicine - Continuing Medical Education...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Emergency Medicine Dates Scheduled Register Online February 4-7, 2014 March 18-21, 2014 April 29-May 2, 2014 June 3-6, 2014 August 12-15, 2014 Fee: 175 Maximum...

176

Report on Department of Homeland Security Sponsored Research Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Preparation for an Improvised Nuclear Device Event  

SciTech Connect

Following the events of September 11th, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. My summer 2008 internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory afforded me the opportunity to look in depth at the preparedness process and the research that has been conducted on this issue. While at the laboratory I was tasked to collect, combine, and process research on how cities and the federal government can best prepare for the horrific prospect of an IND event. Specific projects that I was involved with were meeting reports, research reviews, and a full project report. Working directly with Brooke Buddemeier and his support team at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, I was able to witness first hand, preparation for meetings with response planners to inform them of the challenges that an IND event would pose to the affected communities. In addition, I supported the Homeland Security Institute team (HSI), which was looking at IND preparation and preparing a Congressional report. I participated in meetings at which local responders expressed their concerns and contributed valuable information to the response plan. I specialized in the psycho-social aspects of an IND event and served as a technical advisor to some of the research groups. Alongside attending and supporting these meetings, I worked on an independent research project which collected information from across disciplines to outline where the state of knowledge on IND response is. In addition, the report looked at meetings that were held over the summer in various cities. The meetings were attended by both federal responders and local responders. The meetings explored issues regarding IND preparation and how to mitigate the effects of an IND detonation. Looking at the research and current preparation activity the report found that the state of knowledge in responding and communicating is a mixed bag. Some aspects of an IND attack are well understood, some are not, but much is left to synthesize. The effects of an IND would be devastating, yet much can be done to mitigate those effects through education, preparation, and research. A major gap in current knowledge is how to effectively communicate with the public before an attack. Little research on the effectiveness of public education has been done, but it is likely that educating the public about the effects of an IND and how to best protect oneself could save many lives.

A., B

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

In-Training Practice Patterns of Combined Emergency Medicine/Internal Medicine Residents, 2003-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medicine residents during training. Ann Int Med. 2006;145:et al Table 3. Perceived training deficits of current (2008)specialty elective training during residency Administrative

Kessler, Chad S; Gonzalez, Andrew A; Stallings, Leonard A; Templeman, Todd A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

HEP Open Funding Opportunities  

Office of Science (SC) Website

- and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en 6E0BF60A-A50B-4201-AC3E-A...

179

HEP Fugitive - Higgs Boson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOR DISCOVERY The Higgs Graphic of a plaid H Graphic made in 2001 Aliases: Higgs, Higgs Boson, H0, h0 DESCRIPTION Mass: at least 114 GeV ? Spin: Zero Charge: Netural Particle...

180

Review Literature in HEP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Masses and Mixings. III. Elementary Particle Physics - Beyond the Standard Model Higgs Boson Physics, Technicolor and Composite Higgs, Supersymmetry, Models with Extra Space...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

hep.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trieste, Helsinki, London, Cambridge, Cardiff, Munich, etc * Simulation & analysis of CMB data - Algorithm validation & verification - Implementation efficiency & scaling - Mission...

182

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Medicine Assistant PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medicine Medicine - Assistant PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Deparlment of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT iDafe 'Depauwerltal El.ment& iSlte June 10, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name :of,lnfonnation Systetnol"'ITiPtoJect Occupational Medicine - Assistant Exhlblt;ProJect UID Indirect funded Occupational Safety and Health NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email System Owner Local Privacy Act Offtcer

184

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.57,"lon":-121.57,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

Biology & Medicine Highlights | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology & Medicine Biology & Medicine SHARE Biology and Medicine Highlights 1-8 of 8 Results SNS researchers overcome the freezing sample problem in biostudies October 01, 2012 - Studying biosamples at supercold temperatures, such as 200 Kelvin (-73.15°C), has been impossible in the past, as the water in such solutions inevitably freezes, and with it, the biosample's dynamic interactions. How to keep biosamples from freezing at very low temperatures has been an ongoing research problem-until now. Martha "cow-laborates" to help unravel protein structure in milk March 01, 2012 - Casein micelles, a family of related phosphorus-containing proteins, make up 80% of the protein in cow milk. They are the building blocks of dairy products such as yogurt and cheese, supplying amino acids, calcium, and phosphorus to the body. More important,

186

LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY 900 VETERAN AVENUE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 AND DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This manuscript is a contribution to the monograph edited by Daniel S. Berman and Dean Mason, entitled "Clinical Nuclear Cardiology". These studies were supported by Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF THE HEART Heinrich R. Schelbert, M.D., Michael E. Phelps, Ph.D. and David E. Kuhl, M.D. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the

187

DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Nobels in Medicine Associated  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Nobels in Medicine Associated with the DOE and Predecessors Nobels in Medicine Associated with the DOE and Predecessors Information about affiliations: Office of Science DOE Nobel Laureates Alphabetical Listing Chronological Listing A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 2003 1997 1983 1979 1962 1958 1946 1934 Name Year Nobel Prize In Year Nobel Prize In B 2003 George Wells Beadle 1958 Physiology or Medicine Sir Peter Mansfield Physiology or Medicine C 1997 Allan M. Cormack 1979 Physiology or Medicine Stanley Prusiner Physiology or Medicine M 1983 Sir Peter Mansfield 2003 Physiology or Medicine Barbara McClintock Physiology or Medicine Barbara McClintock 1983 Physiology or Medicine

188

Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Medicine Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.57,"lon":-121.57,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Purpose The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers' compensation, and much more. This training will advance DOE's mission as follows: By providing medical and allied health professionals (eg, Industrial Hygiene) and their management with updates regarding medical services and

192

Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medicinal plants are increasingly recognized worldwide as an alternative source of efficacious and inexpensive medications to synthetic chemo-therapeutic compound. Rapid declining wild stocks of medicinal plants accompanied by adulteration and species substitutions reduce their efficacy, quality and safety. Consequently, the low accessibility to and non-affordability of orthodox medicine costs by rural dwellers to be healthy and economically productive further threaten their life expectancy. Finding comprehensive information on medicinal plants of conservation concern at a global level has been difficult. This has created a gap between computing technologies' promises and expectations in the healing process under complementary and alternative medicine. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System addressing these concerns. Medicinal plants' details for designing the system were collected through semi-structured interviews and databas...

Omogbadegun, Zacchaeus; Ayo, Charles; Mbarika, Victor; Omoregbe, Nicholas; Otofia, Efe; Chieze, Frank

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mapping Fractures In The Medicine Lake Geothermal System Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A major challenge to energy production in the region has been locating high-permability fracture zones in the largely impermeable volcanic host rock. An understanding of the fracture networks will be a key to harnessing geothermal resources in the Cascades Author(s): Steven Clausen, Michal Nemcok, Joseph Moore, Jeffrey Hulen, John Bartley Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mapping_Fractures_In_The_Medicine_Lake_Geothermal_System&oldid=388927

194

Ichnology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, and trace fossil-permeability relationships in the Upper Cretaceous Medicine Hat Member, Medicine Hat gas field, southeast Alberta, Canada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper Cretaceous Medicine Hat Member (Niobrara Formation) in western Canada contains abundant reserves of biogenic natural gas. In the Medicine Hat gas field area (more)

La Croix, Andrew David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Stepout-Deepening Wells At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Stepout-Deepening Wells At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

196

National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Student Health Professionals  

SciTech Connect

Familiarize students affiliated with the Student National Medical Association with the National Library of Medicine's online resources that address medical conditions, health disparities, and public health preparedness needs.

Womble, R.

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Survey of Graduating Emergency Medicine Residents Experience with Cricothyrotomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States anesthesiology training programs. J Clin Anesth. 21.Medicine complete EM training programs in 2011, yielding aoutside their EM training programs. Since cricothyrotomy is

Makowski, Andrew L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1978-1979  

SciTech Connect

Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. Subject areas include research medicine, cancer research, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics, and structural biophysics. (ACR)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Simulation in Medical School Education: Review for Emergency Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to training within emergency medicine residency programs,of PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2004. emergency care providersfor cardiac emergencies. Int J Emerg Med. 4. Okuda Y, Bryson

Chakravarthy, Bharath; ter Haar, Elizabeth; Bhat, Srinidhi Subraya; McCoy, Christopher Erik; Denmark, T. Kent; Lotfipour, Shahram

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Air Kerma Calibrations in Radiation Protection Level 137Cs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Such instruments are used by radiation workers and users in the field of radiation protection, emergency response, homeland security, medicine ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

Zhang Bo [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Huang Bo [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); He Xingpeng [School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Zhou Pingkun, E-mail: zhoupk@nic.bmi.ac.cn [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCCUPATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL SUVEILLANCE SYSTEM (OMSS) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Dllte DepartmentAll Element~&Slte 06-16-2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building Number: WCB Building Name: WCB Name of Information System!«)r IT Project Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) ExhlbllProJect UIO 72 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - OMSS Finallxw.doc

203

Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985  

SciTech Connect

This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Fully three-dimensional tomographic evolutionary reconstruction in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3-D reconstruction in Nuclear Medicine imaging using completeMonte-Carlo simulation of trajectories usually requires high computingpower. We are currently developing a Parisian Evolution Strategy in order toreduce the computing cost of reconstruction ... Keywords: artificial evolution, compton scattering, computer tomography, emission tomography, flyalgorithm, nuclear medicine, parisian evolution

Aurlie Bousquet; Jean Louchet; Jean-Marie Rocchisani

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Emergency Medicine in Guyana: Lessons from Developing the Countrys First Degree-conferring Residency Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emergency medicine training program at the University ofterm emergency medicine training programs in low and middle-medicine residency training program. Residency development

Forget, Nicolas Pierre; Rohde, John Paul; Rambaran, Navindranauth; Rambaran, Madan; Wright, Seth Warren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) March 17-18, 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW): Registration, Directions, Lodging, and Access REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE SYSTEM The 2014 DOE Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar will be held March 17-18 in Room 4A-104 of the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, DC. Register for the 2014 OMWW at http://hsspublic.energy.gov/Workshops/CMO/2014/Registration.aspx. The deadline for registration will be January 17, 2014 in order to comply with conference system requirements. Upon completing the registration, you will immediately receive a confirmatory email. An additional confirmatory email will be sent to registrants shortly after January 17th (once all

207

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 - Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

208

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 - Frequently Asked...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

209

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 - Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

210

The Engineer's Role in Homeland Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... information security and critical infrastructure protection; Second, the safety of structures ... biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

Homeland Security/Forensics/Human Identity News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Humans spend greater than 90 percent of their time indoors, but we ... Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis ...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Bioscience & Health Homeland Security/Forensics/Human ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vehicle Experts Recommend Measures to Reduce Human Error in Fingerprint Analysis. 13DO003_oles_fingerprintmap_CS ...

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

Homeland Security and Disaster Resilience News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Over 46 million residential structures in the United ... Wind conditions at a fire scene can ... collected data following Joplin, Missouri, tornado Release ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Homeland Security Applications (Sensors and Instrumentation and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plume at 60 m from a liquid nitrogen dewar for initial testing, and the other with a propane leak from a 50-L cylinder at 720 m from the radar. Because of condensation, the cold...

215

Department of Homeland Security Transition Team  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Detection technologies Wide-area surveillance Ballast water verification Page 16. 16 An effective deterrent against CBRN threats ...

216

Argonne TDC: Technologies for Homeland Defense  

Emergency Response. Engineering. Environmental Research. Fuel Cells. Imaging Technology. Material Science. Nanotechnology. Physical Sciences. Sensor ...

217

InSAR At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006)...

218

Procedural Skills Training During Emergency Medicine Residency: Are We Teaching the Right Things?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no . 3 : August 2009 Western Journal of Emergency MedicineDruck, MD, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department ofBinder LS, Marsden J. The emergency physician and knowledge

Druck, Jeffrey; Valley, Morgan A; Lowenstein, Steven R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Birth of the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: WestJEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13. Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the UnitedDepartments. Medicine. Emergency medical services: at the2006). cfm? Department=EMERGENCY%20MEDICINE. 8. Editorial

Langdorf, Mark I; Henderson, Sean O.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Chart Smart: A Need for Documentation and Billing Education Among Emergency Medicine Residents?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adequate training in Emergency Medicine Residency?. AnnConcerns. ACEP News, Emergency Medicine Connect Career andsurvey of hospital emergency department administrators. 10.

Dawson, Brian C; Carter, Kelly; Brewer, Kori; Lawson, Luan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

hep-ph/971238815Dec1997 hep-ph/9712388  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a conventional monopole form for the cut­off form factor Fpn(t) = 2 /(2 - t) with = 1.2 GeV. We take the nucleon.1 GeV, relevant to the CLAS detector at CEBAF. We utilize the standard parameters. Electron Energy is that for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, an electron beam towards the lower end of the range (e.g. 5.5 GeV) appears

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

222

Mercury Vapor At Medicine Lake Area (Kooten, 1987) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kooten, 1987) Kooten, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Medicine Lake Area (Kooten, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown References Gerald K. Van Kooten (1987) Geothermal Exploration Using Surface Mercury Geochemistry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mercury_Vapor_At_Medicine_Lake_Area_(Kooten,_1987)&oldid=386431" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

223

Seismic imaging of the Medicine Lake Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50 km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. The USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. This experiment had two purposes: To produce high-quality velocity and attenuation images of the young magma body presumed to be the source for the young volcanic features, and to collect a dataset that can be used to develop and test seismic imaging methods that may be useful for understanding other geothermal systems. Eight large explosions were detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano, a distance chosen to produce strong upward traveling signals through the area of interest. The data were inverted using Aki's method to produce three-dimensional velocity and attenuation images of the sub-surface. Preliminary interpretation shows low velocity and attenuation on the flanks of the volcano, and coincident high attenuation values and low velocities (-20%) from 3 to 5 km beneath the center of the caldera. This zone may be a region of partial melt which fed the youngest eruptions.

Zucca, J.J.; Evans, J.R.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

New Mexico Center for Isotopes in Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the New Mexico Center for Isotopes in Medicine (NMCIM) is to support research, education and service missions of the UNM College of Pharmacy Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Program (COP RSP) and the Cancer Research and Treatment Center (CRTC). NMCIM developed and coordinated unique translational research in cancer radioimaging and radiotherapy agents based on novel molecules developed at UNM and elsewhere. NMCIM was the primary interface for novel radioisotopes and radiochemistries developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for SPECT/PET imaging and therapy. NMCIM coordinated the use of the small animal imaging facility with the CRTC provided support services to assist investigators in their studies. NMCIM developed education and training programs that benefited professional, graduate, and postdoctoral students that utilized its unique facilities and technologies. UNM COP RSP has been active in writing research and training grants, as well as supporting contract research with industrial partners. The ultimate goal of NMCIM is to bring new radiopharmaceutical imaging and therapeutic agents into clinical trials that will benefit the health and well being of cancer and other patients in New Mexico and the U.S.

Burchiel, Scott W.

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

Nadeau, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest Research Institute] [Pacific Northwest Research Institute

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

226

HEP education and outreach activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Students and Teachers Who Have Participated in Our Programs from Students and Teachers Who Have Participated in Our Programs First graders after a physicist visited their class (University of California, Riverside): "I liked the ruler that would not fall." (demo on parametric resonance) "I liked the thing that sent our vapor and when you put in the flower." (demo on properties of liquid nitrogen) K-1 teacher: "You and your students created a wonderful learning environment and intellectually stimulated and involved the children from start to finish. We've had a slew of inventions since you were here. Several parents commented the following day that conversations at dinner that night had been entirely devoted to what the 'people with the Physics Van (University of Ilinois at Urbana-Champaign) had done and said.' All of

227

HEP education and outreach activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student's Story Student's Story At Brookhaven National Laboratory, we have many opportunities for interaction with students and the public. An unusual opportunity arose in the summer of 1995. A high school student, Erica Sanders, wrote to the Lab asking for a chance to do research. Her exceptional resume indicated that she had completed calculus as a sophomore and possessed a strong interest in science. We interviewed her and found her quite poised and interested. Her first project involved analyzing test beam data from the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeter, destined for use at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. She learned the tools of the particle physicists' trade: Unix, PAW, tex, etc. But Erica wanted to have a project of her own. We eventually selected development of Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) for medical imaging. (We used

228

COMP-1h.EPS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Did y Did y ou know most of this stuff come s from oil & na t ural gas? NAAW... Are you sure? Yes, it does...even these eyeglasses! C O M M O N P R O D U C T S M A D E F R O M O I L A N D N A T U R A L G A S * Air mattresses Ammonia Antifreeze Antihistamines Antiseptics Artificial turf Artificial limbs Aspirin Awnings Balloons Ballpoint pens Bandages Beach umbrellas Boats Cameras Candles Candies and gum Car battery cases Car enamel Cassettes Caulking CDs/computer disks Cellular phones Clothesline Coffee makers Cold cream Combs Computer keyboards Computer monitors Cortisone Crayons Credit cards Curtains Dashboards Denture adhesives Dentures Deodorant Detergent Dice Dishwashing liquid Drinking cups Dyes Electric blankets Electrical tape Enamel Epoxy paint Eyeglasses Fan belts Faucet washers Fertilizers Fishing boots Fishing lures Fishing rods

229

HEP education and outreach activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dark matter, and unified theories. While some aspects of particle physics may seem esoteric, they capture people's interest and lead them to learn much more about our scientific...

230

HEP education and outreach activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connection to Science and Technology As particle physicists develop detectors and accelerators, invariably they create new tools for science and technology. Particle physics has...

231

HEP education and outreach activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the universe and test the forces that affect them. Physicists use particle accelerators, many kilometers in length or circumference, to accelerate particles such as...

232

Amber_HEP-NERSC.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory is typically compute intensive. We recognize that computing infrastructure and facilities are essential to fulfill our research mission * Data storage and compute...

233

Medicine Bow Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Bow Wind Farm I Medicine Bow Wind Farm I Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte River Power Authority Developer Platte River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Platte River Power Authority Location Medicine Bow WY Coordinates 41.927554°, -106.371968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.927554,"lon":-106.371968,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte River Power Authority Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Platte River Power Authority Location Medicine Bow WY Coordinates 41.927554°, -106.371968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.927554,"lon":-106.371968,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Medicine Bow Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Medicine Bow Wind Farm III Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte River Power Authority Developer Platte River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Platte River Power Authority Location Medicine Bow WY Coordinates 41.927554°, -106.371968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.927554,"lon":-106.371968,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

Biocompatibility and toxicity of magnetic nanoparticles in regenerative medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regenerative medicine is a pioneering field aimed at restoring and regenerating the function of damaged cells, organs and tissues in order to establish normal function. It demands the cross communication of disciplines to develop effective therapeutic ...

H. Markides; M. Rotherham; A. J. El Haj

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1982-1983  

SciTech Connect

This annual report presents brief summaries of research activities during 1982 to 1983. Program activities have been individually entered into EDB. They include research medicine, radiosurgery, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics, and structural biophysics. (ACR)

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Medicine Bow Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Bow Wind Farm II Medicine Bow Wind Farm II Jump to: navigation, search Name Medicine Bow Wind Farm II Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte River Power Authority Developer Platte River Power Authority Energy Purchaser Platte River Power Authority Location Medicine Bow WY Coordinates 41.927554°, -106.371968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.927554,"lon":-106.371968,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Radiation Medicine Advanced Radiation Medicine Dates Scheduled Register Online March 24-28, 2014 August 18-22, 2014 Fee: $250 Maximum enrollment: 28 30 hours AMA PRA Category 1 Credits(tm) This 4½-day course includes more advanced information for medical practitioners. This program is academically more rigorous than the Radiation Emergency Medicine course and is primarily for Physicians, Clinical Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants desiring an advanced level of information on the diagnosis and management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses. Advanced topics in the diagnosis and management of radiation-induced injuries and illnesses includes the use of cytokines, stem cell transplants, antimicrobials, wound care and other advanced techniques. Group problem-solving is used to thoroughly orient attendees to the

240

Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Medicine Lake Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date 1984 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The melt zones of volcanic clusters was analyzed with recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. References Goldstein, N. E.; Flexser, S. (1 December 1984) Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

UW Medicine Harborview Medical Center UW Medical Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PT.NO NAME DOB UW Medicine Harborview Medical Center ­ UW Medical Center Northwest Hospital & Medical Center ­ University of Washington Physicians Seattle, Washington REQUEST AMENDMENT OF MED RECORD *U2078* *U2078* WHITE ­ MEDICAL RECORD UH2078 REV JUN 12 CANARY - PATIENT Request for Correction

Borenstein, Elhanan

242

the Front Line of Medicine to Prevent Needless Work Disability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preparing the Front Line of Medicine to Prevent Needless Work Disability: Private 4. Free on-line CME; "Medical Rounds" in a talk show format 3. Free live;6 Approaches 1. Sessions at exis9ng medical educa9on events 2. Offer of on-line CME training

243

Science, Technology, Medicine & Society Speaker How Geneticists Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science, Technology, Medicine & Society Speaker Series How Geneticists Learned to Stop Worrying on a history of American medical genetics, tentatively titled The Science of Human Perfection. More information: Science, Technology and Society Program 734-763-2066 umsts@umich.edu www

Rosenberg, Noah

244

Building Bayesian Network Models in Medicine: The MENTOR Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment in Bayesian model building from a large medical dataset for Mental Retardation is discussed in this paper. We give a step by step description of the practical aspects of building a Bayesian Network from a dataset. We enumerate and briefly ... Keywords: Bayesian networks, artificial intelligence in medicine, machine learning

Subramani Mani; Marco Valtorta; Suzanne McDermott

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Dictionary/handbook of nuclear medicine and clinical imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book covers the following topics: Fundamentals of English medical etymology, Abbreviations, acronyms, symbols, denotations, and signs commonly used or defined in the dictionary, Characteristics of the elements, Characteristics of practicable radioisotopes and of selected radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine, Properties and production of radionuclides, Radioactive decay, Radiopharmaceuticals, and Radiation dosimetry.

Iturralde, M.P. (Univ. of Pretoria and H.S. Verwoerd Hospital, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (ZA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A statistical relational learning approach to identifying evidence based medicine categories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence-based medicine is an approach whereby clinical decisions are supported by the best available findings gained from scientific research. This requires efficient access to such evidence. To this end, abstracts in evidence-based medicine ...

Mathias Verbeke; Vincent Van Asch; Roser Morante; Paolo Frasconi; Walter Daelemans; Luc De Raedt

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry White Paper on Globalization and Internationalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry White Paper on Globalization and Internationalization Version: 20120825 1 Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry "White Paper on Internationalization, this white paper addresses a number of key issues, including the following: Defining what it means

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

248

Replenishment prioritization of highly perishable goods : a case study on nuclear medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Serving customers in a nuclear medicine supply chain requires frequent and responsive replenishments. Nuclear medicine is a special category of perishable goods that is subject to rapid, but predictable radioactive decay. ...

Yea, Young-bai Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology NAME:________________________________ OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY UID___________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology NAME:________________________________ OLD________________________________ Entrance Writing Sample Placement Test:_________________ LOWER DIVISION GENERAL EDUCATION Credits/Grade A____________________ Students must complete the following courses (or equivalent) prior to entering the nuclear medicine

250

STS.330 History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics include histories of bodies and embodiment in medicine; institutional and social genealogies and futures ...

Helmreich, Stefan, 1966-

251

Combining relevancy and methodological quality into a single ranking for evidence-based medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence-based medicine has recently received a large amount of attention in medical research. To help clinical practices use evidence-based medicine, it should be easy to find the best current evidence that is relevant to the clinical question and has ... Keywords: Classification, Document quality, Evidence-based medicine, Ranking

Sungbin Choi; Borim Ryu; Sooyoung Yoo; Jinwook Choi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.7380445°, -95.8564864° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.7380445,"lon":-95.8564864,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

ORISE: Radiation Emergency Medicine - Continuing Medical Education Course  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Emergency Medicine Radiation Emergency Medicine Dates Scheduled Register Online February 4-7, 2014 March 18-21, 2014 April 29-May 2, 2014 June 3-6, 2014 August 12-15, 2014 Fee: $175 Maximum enrollment: 24 24.5 hours AMA PRA Category 1 Credits(tm) This 3½-day course is intended for physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners and physician assistants who may be called upon to provide emergency medical care following a radiological or nuclear incident. Priority registration will be given to these groups of professionals. This course may also be relevant for paramedic instructors but is generally not intended for pre-hospital responders. The course emphasizes the practical aspects of initial hospital management of irradiated and/or contaminated patients through lectures and hands-on practical exercises.

254

Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

255

Veblen on medicine: a sociological analysis of the cultural and organizational development of medicine as a social institution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this dissertation is to provide a cultural and organizational analysis of the development of medicine as viewed through the theoretical tenets of Thorstein Veblen, one of our most brilliant social and economic theorists. I trace the historical development, examine the current status, and project the future trends of our medical institution. I explore how our current medical system has evolved, both culturally and organizationally, along the same path that Veblen set forth in his social and economic theories of instincts, status emulation, ceremonial-technological dichotomy, and business and market capitalism. I include his thoughts on the development of institutions and the ways in which cultural lag impedes progress. To accomplish this, I rely heavily on theoretical discussion, interpretative analysis of secondary data, and qualitative analysis of current medical issues. As a result, I discover that the development of medicine as a social institution has followed a predictable course; one that reflects a cultural and organizational dilemma created by the profit motive, which restricts the implementation of technological advances and negatively impacts the health of our nation. I find that the ability to view a modern day social institution, such as medicine, through the lens of theories that were at the forefront of social and economic thought at the beginning of the twentieth century, provides us with a unique perspective; the insight to better understand exactly why that development occurred. With that understanding, we are better equipped to alter future development thereby improving structures, processes, policies, and procedures. This research focuses on exposing not only how the institution of medicine evolved but, more importantly, what we can do to improve the delivery of health care and the overall health of our nations population.

Hille, Kathy

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Radionuclides in biology and medicine-review and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactivity was discovered by Becquerel in France on March 1, 1896. It is appropriate in this centennial year to review its history, especially its applications in biology and medicine. Its future is currently {open_quotes}under a cloud{close_quotes} because of the exaggerated fear of health risks from low-level radioactivity. The author is optimistic about its future, but one will have to wait a few decades for the cloud of ignorance to pass and the sunshine of education about radiation to greatly reduce radiation phobia.

Cameron, J.R. [Cameron Consultant, Lone Rock, WI (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Geodetic Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) Geodetic Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Poland, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Michael Poland, Roland Burgmann, Daniel Dzurisin, Michael Lisowski, Timothy Masterlark, Susan Owen, Jonathan Fink (2006) Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geodetic_Survey_At_Medicine_Lake_Area_(Poland,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=386441"

258

Choosing transportation alternatives for highly perishable goods : a case study on nuclear medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport of highly perishable goods, in particular nuclear medicine, is subject to stringent regulations. Carefully designed transport selection criteria considering available alternatives, product attributes, decay ...

Yang, Xiaowen, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Sexual Assault Training in Emergency Medicine Residencies: A Survey of Program Directors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and evaluation of a training program for the management offorensic medicine training program for emergency medicinefrom approved EM residency training programs who completed a

Sande, Margaret Kramer; Broderick, Kerry B.; Moreira, MD, Maria E.; Bender, Brooke; Hopkins, Emily; Buchanan, Jennie A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assessment of a Chief ComplaintBased Curriculum for Resident Education in Geriatric Emergency Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for emergency medicine training programs. Ann Emerg Med.postgraduate medical training programs. Didactic instructionof subspecialty training programs, Accreditation Council for

Wadman, Michael C; Lyons, William L; Hoffman, Lance H; Muelleman, Robert L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Assessment of a Chief ComplaintBased Curriculum for Resident Education in Geriatric Emergency Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L, et al. A geriatrics curriculum for emergency medicineA geriatric chief complaintbased curriculum derived froma practice-based curriculum analysis improved EM resident

Wadman, Michael C; Lyons, William L; Hoffman, Lance H; Muelleman, Robert L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Are Simulation Stethoscopes a Useful Adjunct for Emergency Medicine Residents Training on High-fidelity Mannequins?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a simulator in training anesthesiology residents. Acadal. Simulation-based training of internal medicine residentsEmergency Residents Training on High-fidelity Mannequins?

Warrington, Steven Jay; Beeson, Michael S; Fire, Frank L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Procedural Skills Training During Emergency Medicine Residency: Are We Teaching the Right Things?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES Procedural Skills Training Kilian BJ, Binder LS,perceptions of their residency training needs: results of aesearch Procedural Skills Training During Emergency Medicine

Druck, Jeffrey; Valley, Morgan A; Lowenstein, Steven R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Role of WestJEM in Promoting International Emergency Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 Western Journal of Emergency Medicine Countriespolicies and practices that benefit emergency patients. 2.global equity in emergency care systems, particularly those

Langdorf, Mark I.; Della Corte, Francesco; Petrino, Roberta

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Occupational Medicine in Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs Departmental requirements provide for support of both Federal and contractor employees with respect to crisis intervention, assessment, short-term counseling, case management, management consultation, education, and training (and the promotion thereof), and prevention. These include services for all behavioral problems, ensuring that medical evaluations are obtained before or as part of psychiatric evaluations to determine whether behavioral problems are caused by medical conditions. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. 1. Employee Assistance Programs 2. Substance Abuse Programs 1. Employee Assistance Programs Federal Employees Federal Employee Health Services: Occupational Medicine, Employee Assistance, and Workers' Compensation Programs (DOE O 341.1A, 2007)

266

Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1981-1982. [Lead abstract  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 61 research reports in the 1981-1982 annual report for the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Programs reviewed include research medicine, Donner Pavilion, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics and structural biophysics. (KRM)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Glass Mountain region of northern California, which is considered to be one of the sites of the greatest untapped geothermal potential in the lower 48 states, is the focus of an exploration project to identify the characteristics of the resource at the Fourmile Hill location (northwest of Medicine Lake in T44N R3E). The objective of Phase I work was to deepen a temperature gradient well to finalize the assessment of the site. The

268

A method for identification and classification of medicinal plant images based on level set segmentation and SVM classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for identification and classification of images of the medicinal plants based on level set segmentation. The medicinal plants are identified using structural features, namely, height, shape, size of leafy part, flowers, ...

Suvarna S. Nandyal; Basavaraj S. Anami; A. Govardhan; P. S. Hiremath

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The A-bomb, 50 years later: The evolution of nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, the U.S. government began to invest heavily in its nuclear program. Nuclear medicine stood to gain from these postwar policies, but it also suffered some setbacks. Fifty years ago this month, two atomic bombs were dropped on Japan, killing thousands of civilians and ushering in a quick and final end to World War II. The beginning of the post-war era signaled the birth of nuclear medicine as it is widely applied today. In fact, the same nuclear reactor that produced elements for the A-bomb project was turned over for the mass production of radionuclides for medicine and industry. The link between the A-bomb and nuclear medicine, however, has always been a sensitive subject among nuclear physicians whose patients may associate radionuclide injections with mushroom clouds. Although this link is not justified, the government`s interest in developing nuclear technology following World War II did have a significant impact on nuclear medicine: on the upside, millions of federal dollars were funneled into the production of radionuclides for research and medicine. On the downside, Congress established the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)-which later became the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-to oversee safety issues, making nuclear medicine the only medical field regulated by a federal agency.

Kotz, D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Microsoft Word - HEP2017_FINAL.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017 2 Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of a program review sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

271

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glossary . 59 Acknowledgements . 61 1 Executive Summary The EnergyGlossary Booster (at Fermilab): The Booster is used to accelerate protons from the Linac to an energy

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advancedthe Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedHigh Energy Physics, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NERSC/DOE HEP Requirements Workshop Participants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12-13, 2009 Richard Gerber, John Bell, Julian Borrill, John Shalf, Peter Nugent, Craig Tull, Cameron Geddes, Amber Boehnlein, Michael Norman, David Bruhwiler, Stan Woosley,...

274

nersc-for-hep-theory.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ph.D. NERSC User Services High Performance Computing and Big Data at NERSC --- 1 --- April 3 , 2 013 Outline * What i s N ERSC? * Who r uns a t N ERSC? * Can y ou u sedo y ou n...

275

HEP-NUG-WS-forcray.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supernovae Astrophysical Data Analysis Palomar Transient Factory & La Silla Supernova Search Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis for the Planck Satellite Lattice QCD MIMD...

276

Combining Triggers in HEP Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern high-energy physics experiments collect data using dedicated complex multi-level trigger systems which perform an online selection of potentially interesting events. In general, this selection suffers from inefficiencies. A further loss of statistics occurs when the rate of accepted events is artificially scaled down in order to meet bandwidth constraints. An offline analysis of the recorded data must correct for the resulting losses in order to determine the original statistics of the analysed data sample. This is particularly challenging when data samples recorded by several triggers are combined. In this paper we present methods for the calculation of the offline corrections and study their statistical performance. Implications on building and operating trigger systems are discussed.

Victor Lendermann; Johannes Haller; Michael Herbst; Katja Krueger; Hans-Christian Schultz-Coulon; Rainer Stamen

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

Combining Triggers in HEP Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern high-energy physics experiments collect data using dedicated complex multi-level trigger systems which perform an online selection of potentially interesting events. In general, this selection suffers from inefficiencies. A further loss of statistics occurs when the rate of accepted events is artificially scaled down in order to meet bandwidth constraints. An offline analysis of the recorded data must correct for the resulting losses in order to determine the original statistics of the analysed data sample. This is particularly challenging when data samples recorded by several triggers are combined. In this paper we present methods for the calculation of the offline corrections and study their statistical performance. Implications on building and operating trigger systems are discussed.

Lendermann, Victor; Herbst, Michael; Krueger, Katja; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Stamen, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and attended the workshop. ESnet would also like to thankstaff was very helpful. ESnet is funded by the US DepartmentASCR). Vince Dattoria is the ESnet Program Manager. ESnet is

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

HEP/ Particle Astrophysics Special Seminar | Princeton Plasma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

280

New Optical Link Technologies for HEP Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a concern with the reliability and mass of current optical links in LHC experiments, we are investigating CW lasers and light modulators as an alternative to VCSELs. In addition we are developing data links in air, utilizing steering by MEMS mirrors and optical feedback paths for the control loop. Laser, modulator, and lens systems used are described, as well as two different electronic systems for a free space steering feedback loop. Our prototype system currently operates at 1.25 Gb/s, but could be upgraded. This link works over distances of order meters. Such links might enable one to move communication lasers (e.g. VCSELs) and optical fibers out of tracking detectors, for reasons such as reliability and power consumption. Some applications for free space data links, such as local triggering and data readout and trigger-clock distribution and links for much longer distances are also discussed.

P. Delurgio; W. Fernando; B. Salvachua; D. Lopez; R. Stanek; D. Underwood

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yukiko Sekine, DOE/SC/ASCR (NERSC Program Manager) AlanDrivers The PDSF Cluster at NERSC is the US Tier 1 centermass storage system at NERSC is our main US data archive for

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

NERSC/DOE HEP Requirements Review Participants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Accelerator Laboratory CMS Center Director Kenneth Bloom University of Nebraska-Lincoln US CMS Tier-2 program leader Jean Cottam NSF Computational and Data-Enabled...

283

HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR).

Dart Ed, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Photo of the Week: Acoustic Levitation for Medicine | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acoustic Levitation for Medicine Acoustic Levitation for Medicine Photo of the Week: Acoustic Levitation for Medicine October 19, 2012 - 2:08pm Addthis This acoustic levitator was originally developed to help NASA simulate microgravity conditions, but now, scientists are using this piece of equipment to study pharmaceutical solutions at the molecular level. At Argonne National Laboratory, droplets are suspended in air between two sets of speakers, which generate sound waves at frequencies slightly above the audible range -- about 22 kilohertz. Learn more about how acoustic levitation is performed and how it helps scientists study pharmaceuticals here. | Photo by Dan Harris, Argonne National Laboratory.

285

Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Medicine_Lake_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=511156" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

286

Genomic medicine in primary care: Texas physicians' adoption of an innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New applications of genomic medicine stemming from the Human Genome Project are predicted to become routine components of primary care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) will increasingly become responsible for screening patients for inherited diseases, recommending genetic testing, and making referrals to genetic services. Clinical applications of genomic medicine will occur at a variable pace. Characteristics of an innovation such as genomic medicine are strong indicators of its potential for adoption. The purpose of this study is to assess whether (and to what extent) physicians' perceptions of genomic medicine as an innovation influence their likelihood of adopting this innovation into primary care. The study's sample consists of 400 primary care physicians in Texas and employs a survey design. Based on Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations Theory, the perceived characteristics of genomic medicine - Relative Advantage, Compatibility, Complexity, Trialability, and Observability - are the study's independent/predictor variables. Likelihood of PCPs Adopting Genomic Medicine is the dependent variable. The nature of the social system (private or group practice) is examined as a possible moderator variable. The study suggests that Texas PCPs who are likely to adopt genomic medicine strongly perceive its clinical uses (such as genetic testing for carrier status or susceptibility to common diseases, testing an embryo for genetic disorders before it is implanted, and supplementing a family history) to be highly advantageous. For half of the PCPs, genetic services such as genetic counseling and genetic testing are not compatible with current practice. Perceived complexity of the innovation is the strongest predictor of likelihood of PCPs adopting genomic medicine. Many PCPs find it difficult to stay updated on genomic medicine and locate genetic services. Although Texas PCPs feel genomic medicine can be gradually incorporated into primary care practice, most are not presently observing their colleagues adopting genomic medicine or assisting their patients to make decisions regarding genetic services. Future efforts to advance the use of genomic medicine in primary care will require more emphasis on genetics in medical school curriculum and continuing education programs. Links with specialists trained in genetic counseling and health education will be essential to translate relevant information to patients and families.

Suther, Sandra Gayle

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background: To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD) in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods: We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching), comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results: There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78 % covered once in 3 years). Only 42 hours (15%) involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (1819 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year). Most AHD hours (78%) focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90 % response) was high throughout (range 3.64 0.21, 3.84 0.14 out of 4),

Roger Y Wong; J Mark Roberts; Roger Y Wong; J Mark Roberts

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

High resolution seismic attenuation tomography at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. In a joint project sponsored by the Geothermal Research Program of the USGS and the Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Division of the US-DOE, the USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. The experiment of eight explosions detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano recorded on a 11 x 15 km grid of 140 seismographs. The travel time data from the experiment have been inverted for structure and are presented elsewhere in this volume. In this paper we present the results of an inversion for 1/Q structure using t* data in a modified Aki inversion scheme. Although the data are noisy, we find that in general attenuative zones correlate with low velocity zones. In particular, we observe a high 1/Q zone roughly in the center of the caldera at 4 km depth in between two large recent dacite flows. This zone could represent the still molten or partially molten source of the flows.

Zucca, J.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nuclear and solar energy implications for homeland security .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the eyes of many experts, the world is moving away from oil as a cheap energy source. As this future unfolds, the United States (more)

Thibeaux, Allen L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

HSO Spotlight No 02 2012 Homeland Security Presidential Directive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and those badges will need to be renewed. Appointment of HSPD-12 Renewal Officials: Each HQ element needs to assign Federal personnel within their organization as USAccess...

291

Preliminary Benchmarking Efforts and MCNP Simulation Results for Homeland Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MC Calculations / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (PART 3) / Radiation Measurements and Instrumentation

Robert B. Hayes

292

Policies: Homeland Security Presidential Directive/Hspd-7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Routine database systems. ... 208, OMB will rely on the CIO Council to ... of the privacy impact assessment by the Chief Information Officer, or equivalent ...

293

Prepared for the Department of Homeland Security Science and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIDSTM ANP Technologies/Sm iths Detection http://www.smithsdetection.com/NIDS.php Immunoassay and reader ....................................................................................4.15 Smiths Detection: NIDSTM (Developed by ANP Technologies

294

Historical Memory and Ethnographic Perspectives on the Southern Paiute Homeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were fed with "wheat & seed flour porridge & berries" andwheat from the husks and thus prepare it for grinding into flour

Stoffle, Richard W; Zedeno, Maria Nieves

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Sustainable Federal Government Executive Order More Documents & Publications Data Center Optimization Plan Before the House Subcommittees on Oversight and Energy -...

296

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12 - DOE HSPD-12 Implementati...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

297

Department of Homeland Security Urban Search and Rescue ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Response Robot Evaluation Exercise (#7) Disaster City, Texas A&M University College Station, TX November 14 - 18, 2011 November 18, 2011 ...

2013-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

Directionally Sensitive Neutron Detector For Homeland Security Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With an increase in the capabilities and sophistication of terrorist networks worldwide comes a corresponding increase in the probability of a radiological or nuclear device being detonated within the borders of the United States. One method to decrease the risk associated with this threat is to interdict the material during transport into the US. Current RPMS have limitations in their ability to detect shielded nuclear materials. It was proposed that directionally sensitive neutron detectors might be able to overcome many of these limitations. This thesis presents a method to create a directionally sensitive neutron detector using a unique characteristic of 10B. This characteristic is the Doppler broadening of the de-excitation gamma-ray from the 10B(n, alpha) reaction. Using conservation principles and the method of cone superposition, the mathematics for determining the incoming neutron direction vector from counts in a boron loaded cloud chamber and boron loaded semiconductor were derived. An external routine for MCNPX was developed to calculate the Doppler broaden de-excitation gamma-rays. The calculated spectrum of Doppler broadened de-excitation gamma-rays was then compared to measured and analytical spectrums and matched with a high degree of accuracy. MCNPX simulations were performed for both a prototype 10B loaded cloud chamber and prototype 10B loaded semiconductor detector. These simulations assessed the detectors' abilities to determine incoming neutron direction vectors using simulated particle reactant data. A sensitivity analysis was also performed by modifying the energy and direction vector of the simulated output data for 7Li* particles. Deviation coefficients showed a respective angular uncertainty of 1.86 degrees and 6.07 degrees for the boron loaded cloud chamber and a boron loaded semiconductor detectors. These capabilities were used to propose a possible RPM design that could be implemented.

Spence, Grant

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 (December 17, 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This directive establishes a national policy for Federal departments and agencies to identify and prioritize United States critical infrastructure and key resources and to protect them from...

300

FOIA Post from CSRC -- Guidance on Homeland Security Info. ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of our nation or threaten public safety. ... the protection of sensitive critical infrastructure information. ... if the information concerns nuclear or radiological ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Analytical Chemistry for Homeland Defense and National Security  

SciTech Connect

The budget was requested to support speaker expenses to attend and speak in the day long symposium at the ACS meeting. The purpose of the symposium was to encourage analytical chemists to contribute to national security.

S.Randolph Long; Dan rock; Gary Eiceman; Chris Rowe Taitt; Robert J.Cotter; Dean D.Fetterolf; David R.Walt; Basil I. Swanson; Scott A McLuckey; Robin L.Garrell; Scott D. Cunningham

2002-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Passive Neutron Detection in Ports for Homeland Security Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The smuggling of special nuclear material (SNM) has long been a concern. In April 2009, President Obama declared that a terrorist acquiring a nuclear weapon was the most immediate threat to global security. The Second Line of Defense (SLD) initiative was stood up by the National Nuclear Security Administration to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials across international borders and maritime shipping. The SLD initiative does not provide for the detection of SNM being carried on small, personal watercraft. Previous work examined the possibility of using active neutron detectors to induce fission in SNM and detect the response. This thesis examines the possibility of detecting SNM using passive 3He neutron detectors. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulations were run to determine the best detector configuration. Detecting sources at increasing depths, detecting moving sources and the effects of waves were also simulated in MCNP. Comparisons with experimental measurements showed that detectors parallel to the surface of water were best at detecting neutron sources below the surface. Additionally, stacking detectors and placing a cadmium sheet between the polyethylene blocks resulted in a greater ability to determine the height of a source by taking the ratio of count rates in the lower and upper detectors. Using this configuration, a source of strength 3.39 x 10^5 n/s could be detected to a depth of 12.00 in below the water surface. Count rates in the presence of waves did not average out to count rates taken above a flat plane of water. Detectors closer to the water performed worse than above a flat plane while detectors placed higher recorded more counts than above a flat plane. Moving sources were also simulated; sources under water, 3.00 ft from the detectors, and moving at 5.8 kts could be detected above background.

Pedicini, Eowyn E

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

New NIST Trace Explosives Standard Slated for Homeland ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... explosives. According to MacCrehan, efforts also are underway to develop reference materials to help train bomb-sniffing dogs.

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

kWh kilowatt-hour kWm 2 kilowatts per square meter LCC life cycle cost LED light-emitting diode Li lithium Li-air lithium-air LiFePO4 lithium iron phosphate Li-ion lithium-ion...

305

Monte Carlo Simulations for Homeland Security Using Anthropomorphic Phantoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiological dispersion device (RDD) is a device which deliberately releases radioactive material for the purpose of causing terror or harm. In the event that a dirty bomb is detonated, there may be airborne radioactive material that can be inhaled as well as settle on an individuals leading to external contamination.

Burns, Kimberly A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Homeland Security/Forensics/Human Identity Programs and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Digital PCR Last Updated Date: 04/26/2013 Digital PCR (dPCR) is a method used to quantify nucleic acids (DNA, RNA, cDNA). ...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

2002 TMS Fall Meeting: Opportunities and Issues in Homeland ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories (Sandia, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories) were scientific and...

308

Department of Homeland Security Urban Search and Rescue ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Technology (NIST) to develop comprehensive standards related to the development, testing, and certification of effective technologies for ...

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

JOM-e: Issues and Opportunities in Homeland Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A grand challenge for such an effort would be to develop technologies to allow people to live independently ten years longer. The application of technology to...

310

Symes Hotel and Medicinal Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Symes Hotel and Medicinal Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Symes Hotel and Medicinal Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Symes Hotel and Medicinal Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Symes Hotel and Medicinal Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Hot Springs, Montana Coordinates 47.6091041°, -114.6687414° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

311

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Long Island College of Medicine - NY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Long Island College of Medicine - Long Island College of Medicine - NY 0-14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Long Island College of Medicine (NY.0-14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.0-14-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-14-1 Site Operations: Performed research utilizing small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment. NY.0-14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.0-14-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Not Specified NY.0-14-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated NY.0-14-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Long Island College of Medicine

312

Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Leveling surveys across Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) have documented subsidence that is centered on the summit caldera and decays symmetrically on the flanks of the edifice. Possible mechanisms for this deformation include fluid withdrawal from a subsurface reservoir, cooling/crystallization of subsurface magma, loading by the volcano and dense intrusions, and crustal thinning due to tectonic extension (Dzurisin

313

EIS-0432: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Medicine Bow Gasification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Medicine Bow 2: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Medicine Bow Gasification and Liquefaction Coal-to-Liquids, Carbon County, Wyoming EIS-0432: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Medicine Bow Gasification and Liquefaction Coal-to-Liquids, Carbon County, Wyoming Summary DOE is assessing the potential environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Medicine Bow Fuel & Power LLC (MBFP), a wholly-owned subsidiary of DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC. MBFP submitted an application to DOE under the Federal loan guarantee program pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to support the construction and startup of the MBFP coal-to-liquids facility, a coal mine and associated coal handling facilities. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

314

Evidence-based medicine, heterogeneity of treatment effects, and the trouble with averages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annals of Internal Medicine Volk, R.J. , S.B. Cantor, A.R.can range from 0.1 to 1.0 (Volk et al. 2004). (A utility of

Kravitz, Richard L; Duan, N H; Braslow, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Basic Biomedical Sciences and the Future of Medical Education: Implications for Internal Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corresponding Author: Eric P. Brass, MD, PhD; Department ofprimary care in siblings of Brass: Basic Biomedical Sciencesfor Internal Medicine Eric P. Brass, MD, PhD Department of

Brass, Eric P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Rise of radiation protection: science, medicine and technology in society, 1896--1935  

SciTech Connect

The history of radiation protection before World War II is treated as a case study of interactions between science, medicine, and technology. The fundamental concerns include the following: are how medical and technical decisions with social impacts are made under conditions of uncertainty; how social pressures are brought to bear on the development of science, medicine, and technology; what it means for medicine or technology to be scientific; why professional groups seek international cooperation; and the roles various professionals and organizations play in controlling the harmful side effects of science, medicine, and technology. These questions are addressed in the specific context of protection from the biological effects of x-rays and radium in medical use.

Serwer, D.P.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Personalized medicine, population genetics and privacy : an empirical study of international gene banks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The promise of personalized medicine lies in its potential to fundamentally change healthcare. In the past, pharmaceuticals were prescribed on a "one size fits all" basis-patients with certain disease phenotypes were given ...

Holland, Chad D. (Chad Darrel)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Sexual Assault Training in Emergency Medicine Residencies: A Survey of Program Directors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continue to coexist at residency training sites. In order toof SANE programs on resident training, future work should beSande et al Sexual Assault Training in Emergency Medicine

Sande, Margaret Kramer; Broderick, Kerry B.; Moreira, MD, Maria E.; Bender, Brooke; Hopkins, Emily; Buchanan, Jennie A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Circulating endothelial progenitor cells: a new approach to anti-aging medicine?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

findings from the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study.a new approach to anti-aging medicine? Nina A Mikirova 1 ,of the most fearful aspects of aging such as loss of mental,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Health Impacts of Traditional Medicines and Bio-prospecting: A World Scenario Accentuating Bhutan's Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medicinal plants as indispensable cures for many ailments. Although some cultures used individual natural products as medicines, many traditions propounded powerful combinations with different ingredients known as poultices, tinctures and mixtures... health care, the natural products also play significant role in the discovery of the natural product-based drugs. The natural products like plants, animals, microorganisms, marine organisms and the extremophiles have been an important sources...

Wangchuk, Phurpa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Patient Perceptions of Resident Interpersonal and Communication Skills in the Emergency Department; An Analysis by Post-Graduate Year of Emergency Medicine Residents and Off-Service Residents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interns, regardless of training program, to have better ICSdiffer between training programs [emergency medicine (EM) v.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Generic medicines and regulatory policies : The effects of differentiated price caps and co-payments on drug prices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When entering the market, pharmaceutical firms face various regulatory factors that will influence the producer prices for their products. Price competition occurs when generic medicines (more)

Hofmann, Karen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Role of Forecasting, Price Negotiation and Procurement Management in Determining Availability of Antiretroviral Medicines (ARVs) in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

antiretroviral drug prices: the experience of the Andeanstrategies to reduce the price of antiretroviral medicines:Summary Report from the Global Price Reporting Mechanism on

Adesina, Adebiyi Ola-Oluwa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

NETL's High-Speed Imaging System Successfully Applied in Medicine, Broad  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NETL's High-Speed Imaging System Successfully Applied in Medicine, NETL's High-Speed Imaging System Successfully Applied in Medicine, Broad Spectrum of Industry NETL's High-Speed Imaging System Successfully Applied in Medicine, Broad Spectrum of Industry November 15, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A groundbreaking Department of Energy-developed imaging system originally designed to help create cleaner fossil energy processes is finding successful applications in a wide range of medical, chemical processing, energy, and other industries. Developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the high-speed imaging technology known as "particle imaging velocimetry" (PIV) is being put to use by a research consortium of more than 25 major chemical and energy companies and may soon have other

325

Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clausen Et Al, 2006) Clausen Et Al, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A major challenge to energy production in the region has been locating high-permeability fracture zones in the largely impermeable volcanic host rock. An understanding of the fracture networks will be a key to harnessing geothermal resources in the Cascades. Medicine Lake site was selected for this study because of the extensive collection of core samples, lithologic, structural, geophysical and temperature data that are available. The sample collection totals about 15.8 km of core from 18 wells. Core samples are

326

Stepout-Deepening Wells At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Deepening At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Well Deepening Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Glass Mountain region of northern California, which is considered to be one of the sites of the greatest untapped geothermal potential in the lower 48 states, is the focus of an exploration project to identify the characteristics of the resource at the Fourmile Hill location (northwest of Medicine Lake in T44N R3E). The objective of Phase I work was to deepen a temperature gradient well to finalize the assessment of the site. The temperature gradient well - TGH88-28 - was completed in October 2001 and

327

Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equal Access Initiative: Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine Instructors: Nicole Dancy, National Library of Medicine Wilma Templin-Branner, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education For Grantees of National Minority AIDS Council 2010 Equal Access Initiative Computer Grants Program United States Conference on AIDS September 11, 2010 2 Purpose  To familiarize participants with reliable online health information from the National Library of Medicine and other reputable HIV/AIDS-related resources  To empower participants with the skills and knowledge to better serve their clients, colleagues, and communities through the use of online HIV/AIDS-related resources 3 Objectives After completing this class, participants will be able to

328

HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine-STOP  

SciTech Connect

The HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine training is designed specifically for the UNCFSP HBCU Screening, Testing, Outreach, and Prevention (STOP) HIV/AIDS Program project members to provide valuable health information resources from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources to increase awareness of the wealth of treatment information and educational materials that are available on the Internet and to improve prevention and treatment education for their clients. These resources will also meet the needs of community-based organizations

Templin-Branner, W. and N. Dancy

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Radiation risk and nuclear medicine: An interview with a Nobel Prize winner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a speech given years ago at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosalyn S. Yalow, 1977 Nobel Prize recipient for her invention of radioimmunoassay, made several salient points on the perception of fear or hazards from exposure to low-level radiation and low-level radioactive wastes. For the past three years, Yalow has been concerned with the general fear of radiation. In this interview, Newsline solicited Yalow`s views on public perceptions on radiation risk and what the nuclear medicine community can do to emphasize the fact that, if properly managed, the use of isotopes in medicine and other cases is not dangerous.

Yalow, R.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE (GMEC) The Graduate Medical Education Committee is a standing committee of the School of Medicine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 25 GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE (GMEC) The Graduate Medical Education Committee is a standing committee of the School of Medicine. The Graduate Medical Education Committee reports in Graduate Medical Education sponsored by the University of Connecticut School of Medicine. The Graduate

Oliver, Douglas L.

331

A semi-supervised approach to extract pharmacogenomics-specific drug-gene pairs from biomedical literature for personalized medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Personalized medicine is to deliver the right drug to the right patient in the right dose. Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is to identify genetic variants that may affect drug efficacy and toxicity. The availability of a comprehensive and accurate PGx-specific ... Keywords: Information extraction, Personalized medicine, Pharmacogenomics, Text mining

Rong Xu, Quanqiu Wang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Proceedings of seventh symposium on sharing of computer programs and technology in nuclear medicine, computer assisted data processing  

SciTech Connect

The Council on Computers (CC) of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) annually publishes the Proceedings of its Symposium on the Sharing of Computer Programs and Technology in Nuclear Medicine. This is the seventh such volume and has been organized by topic, with the exception of the invited papers and the discussion following them. An index arranged by author and by subject is included.

Howard, B.Y.; McClain, W.J.; Landay, M. (comps.)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Honors Medical Scholars Program Application The Florida State University College of Medicine Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Honors Medical Scholars Program Application The Florida State University College of Medicine Page 1 To: FSU Honors Medical Scholars Program Applicants To qualify for consideration, you must have received an invitation to The Florida State University Honors Program. Your Honors Medical Scholars Program

Weston, Ken

334

Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine - An International Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference abstract book contains seven sections: Plenary-4 abstracts; Chemical-9 abstracts; Radiation-7 abstracts; Ultra Low Doses and Medicine-6 abstracts; Biomedical-11 abstracts; Risk Assessment-5 abstracts and Poster Sessions-25 abstracts. Each abstract was provided by the author/presenter participating in the conference.

Calabrese, Edward J.; Kostecki, Paul T.

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Mobile Medicine: semantic computing management for health care applications on desktop and mobile devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many health care situations, powerful mobile tools may help to make decisions and provide support for continuous education and training. They can be useful in emergency conditions and for the supervised application of protocols and procedures. To ... Keywords: Automated production, Content distribution, Cross media content, DRM, Mobile Medicine, Semantic computing, iphone, mpeg-21, pda

Pierfrancesco Bellini; Ivan Bruno; Daniele Cenni; Alice Fuzier; Paolo Nesi; Michela Paolucci

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nuclear medicine and imaging research (instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation)  

SciTech Connect

This document is the annual progress report for project entitled 'Instrumentation and Quantitative Methods of Evaluation.' Progress is reported in separate sections individually abstracted and indexed for the database. Subject areas reported include theoretical studies of imaging systems and methods, hardware developments, quantitative methods of evaluation, and knowledge transfer: education in quantitative nuclear medicine imaging.

Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Comparison of Brazilian researchers in clinical medicine: are criteria for ranking well-adjusted?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantifying the relative performance of individual scholars has become an integral part of decision-making in research policy. The objective of the present study was to evaluate if the scholarship rank of Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological ... Keywords: Clinical medicine, H index, Health postgraduate programs, Health sciences, I23, Scientific publication indicators, Scopus

Eduardo A. Oliveira; Enrico A. Colosimo; Daniella R. Martelli; Isabel G. Quirino; Maria Christina Oliveira; Leonardo S. Lima; Ana Cristina Simes E Silva; Herclio Martelli-Jnior

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Spectral Factor Analysis for Multi-isotope Imaging in Nuclear Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear medicine, simultaneous dual-isotope imaging is used to determine the distribution of two radiotracers from a single acquisition and for emission/transmission (E/T) imaging in SPECT. However, no general solution to the cross-talk problem caused ...

Irne Buvat; S. Hapdey; Habib Benali; Andrew Todd-Pokropek; R. Di Paola

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Chemogenomics approaches to rationalising compound action of traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Chemogenomics approaches to rationalising compound action of traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicines Fazlin Mohd Fauzi1,2, Alexios Koutsoukas1, Rob Lowe3, Kalpana Joshi4, Tai-Ping Fan5, Andreas Bender1* From 8th...

Fauzi, Fazlin M; Koutsoukas, Alexios; Lowe, Rob; Joshi, Kalpana; Fan, Tai-Ping; Bender, Andreas

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Wake Characteristics of the MOD-2 Wind Turbine at Medicine Bow, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The present paper summarizes results obtained from profile measurements of the MOD-2 wind turbine wake at Medicine Bow, Wyoming. Vertical profiles of wind speed, potential temperature, and turbulence at 3 and 7 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine, taken under near neutral or slightly stable atmospheric conditions, are presented.

Jacobs, E. W.; Kelley, N. D.; McKenna, H. E.; Birkenheuer, N. B.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hard to believe, but our first class of Shelter Medicine Interns complete their year of spe-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard to believe, but our first class of Shelter Medicine Interns complete their year of spe- specific legislation, and how they can part- ner with their dogs to educate the public about pit but are doing so now, contin- gent upon adopters taking part in the pro- gram. For more information, visit:: www

Keinan, Alon

342

ResEval: a web-based evaluation system for internal medicine house staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation and assessment of physicians-in-training (house staff) is a complex task. Residency training programs are under increasing pressure [1] to provide accurate and comprehensive evaluations of performance of resident physicians [2,3]. For ... Keywords: HTML, assessment, education, evaluations, house staff, medicine, oracle, python, web

H. J. Feldman; M. M. Triola

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1981 Moody, J.B. (comp.) (1982) 306 Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) 99 SURVEY OF NOISE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS FOR ENGINE GENERATOR SETS. KRISHNA,C.R. (1999) 95 Defining the Effectiveness of UV Lamps Installed in Circulating Air Ductwork Douglas VanOsdell; Karin Foarde (2002) 84 Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis, Sensing, Drug Delivery and Gene Transfection Daniela Rodica Radu (2005) 84 Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report NONE (1995) 72 Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy

344

Medicine Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Medicine Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Medicine Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Conner, Montana Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

345

September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) 29 Oleoresin Capsicum toxicology evaluation and hazard review Archuleta, M.M. (1995) 27 SURVEY OF NOISE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS FOR ENGINE GENERATOR SETS. KRISHNA,C.R. (1999) 27 Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report , (2013) 27 Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Donner Lab Administrator Baird G. Whaley, August 15, 1994 NONE (1995) 26 Degradation of high concentrations of glycols, antifreeze, and deicing fluids Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Wheelis, S.; Carroll, S.L.; Waltz, M.D.; Palumbo, A.V. (1995) 24 Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. George Voelz, M.D., November 29, 1994

346

Caribbean Equal Access Program: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine  

SciTech Connect

As the treatment and management of HIV/AIDS continues to evolve with new scientific breakthroughs, treatment discoveries, and management challenges, it is difficult for people living with HIV/AIDS and those who care for them to keep up with the latest information on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and research. The National Library of Medicine, of the National Institutes of Health, has a wealth of health information resources freely available on the Internet to address these needs.

Nancy Dancy, NLM, and Wilma Templin-Branner, ORISE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine -- recent advances and future perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80% of all diagnostic clinical studies and there is increasing interest and use of therapeutic radioisotopes obtained from generator systems. This paper focuses on a discussion of the major current areas of radionuclide generator research, and the expected areas of future research and applications.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

TOXNET and Beyond: Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal  

SciTech Connect

The National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal provides access to numerous databases that can help you explore environmental chemicals and risks. TOXNET and Beyond: Using NLM's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal conveys the fundamentals of searching the NLM's TOXNET system of databases in chemistry, toxicology, environmental health, and related fields. In addition to TOXNET, the course will highlight various resources available through the Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal.

Templin-Branner, W.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

International Perspectives on Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine: Outcomes of an IAEA Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, 'Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine' (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?.

Shortt, Ken [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: dosimetry@iaea.org; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

SciTech Connect

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Travel Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCOPE OF PROBLEM SCOPE OF PROBLEM * 21% of U.S. Adult Population Travel for Business * 1.4 million International Travelers Daily * Numbers will Increase * Include Workers in Planning TRAVEL AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE * Endemic Exotic Diseases * Antimicrobial Resistance *Non-Specific Presentation of Disease * Emergence/ Re-emergence of Infectious Agents * Importation/ Exportation of Infection Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 17,2002 INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL * Economic Expansion * Globalization of Companies * Extended * Extended & Short-tenn Assignments * Multi-National Travel * Circle Globe in Three Days * Incubation Period for Infectious Diseases * Employee Needs Advice from OHN HEALTH ASSESSMENT * Potential Travel Illnesses * Employee Health Risks

353

Internal Medicine,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing evidence supports a crucial role for glial metabolism in maintaining proper synaptic function and in the etiology of neurological disease. However, the study of glial metabolism in humans has been hampered by the lack of noninvasive methods. To specifically measure the contribution of astroglia to brain energy metabolism in humans, we used a novel noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic approach. We measured carbon 13 incorporation into brain glutamate and glutamine in eight volunteers during an intravenous infusion of [2- 13 C] acetate, which has been shown in animal models to be metabolized specifically in astroglia. Mathematical modeling of the three established pathways for neurotransmitter glutamate repletion indicates that the glutamate/glutamine neurotransmitter cycle between astroglia and neurons (0.32 ? 0.07 ?mol ? gm ?1 ? min ?1) is the major pathway for neuronal glutamate

Vincent Lebon; Kitt F. Petersen; Gary W. Cline; Jun Shen; Graeme F. Mason; Sylvie Dufour; Kevin L. Behar; Gerald I. Shulman; Douglas L. Rothman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Published by American Association of Physicists in Medicine One Physics Ellipse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISCLAIMER: This publication is based on sources and information believed to be reliable, but the AAPM, the authors, and the editors disclaim any warranty or liability based on or relating to the contents of this publication. The AAPM does not endorse any products, manufacturers, or suppliers. Nothing in this publication should be interpreted as implying such endorsement. 2012 by American Association of Physicists in MedicineDISCLAIMER: This publication is based on sources and information believed to be reliable, but the AAPM, the authors, and the publisher disclaim any warranty or liability based on or relating to the contents of this publication. The AAPM does not endorse any products, manufacturers, or suppliers. Nothing in this publication should be interpreted as implying such endorsement.

Of Radionuclide Calibrators; James E. Carey; Patrick Byrne Ms; Larry Dewerd Phd; Ralph Lieto Ms

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

1 EXERCISE III.2 A LABORATORY COURSE IN MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY INTRODUCING MOLECULAR MODELING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: A laboratory course in medicinal chemistry introducing molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is an important and useful tool in drug design and for predicting biological activity in library compounds. A wide variety of computer programs and methods have been developed to visualize the 3D geometry and to calculate the physicochemical properties of drugs. In this paper, we describe a practical approach to molecular modeling as a powerful tool to study structureactivity relationship in drugs such as antibacterials, hormones, and cholinergic and adrenergic agents. Early in the course, the students learn how to draw 3D structures and to use them to perform conformational and molecular analyses. Thus, they may compare drugs with similar pharmacological activities by superimposing their structures and evaluating geometry and physical properties.

Ivone Carvalho; Mnica T. Pupo; urea D. L. Borges; Lilian S. C. Bernardes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine ACLAM Medical Records Committee: Karl Field (Chair), Michele. Suckow Abstract Medical records are considered to be a key element of a program of adequate veterinary

Oliver, Douglas L.

357

CenterLineBowles Center for Alcohol Studies School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism--is designed for middle-school and high-school scienceCenterLineBowles Center for Alcohol Studies School of Medicine, University of North Carolina grant to develop a second science-based curriculum. Designed for high-school students,Fetal Alcohol

Crews, Stephen

358

BROWN-HET-1169 hep-th/9902119 Comments on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider four dimensional supersymmetric gauge field theories from brane configurations with the matter content given by semi-infinite D4 branes ending on both sides of NS branes. In M theory configuration, we discuss the splitting of the M5 brane into infinite cylindrical M5 branes (which decouple) and transversal M5 brane. The splitting condition appears naturally from the consistency of the different projections of One of the main developments in the recent years is clarification of the idea that gauge theory and gravity are complementary descriptions of a single theory. Configurations in string/M theory have been very useful tools to study supersymmetric gauge field theories in different dimensions and with different amounts of unbroken supersymmetry. (see [1

Brane Configurations; Semi-infinite D Branes

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

LHCNet: Wide Area Networking and Collaborative Systems for HEP  

SciTech Connect

This proposal presents the status and progress in 2006-7, and the technical and financial plans for 2008-2010 for the US LHCNet transatlantic network supporting U.S. participation in the LHC physics program. US LHCNet provides transatlantic connections of the Tier1 computing facilities at Fermilab and Brookhaven with the Tier0 and Tier1 facilities at CERN as well as Tier1s elsewhere in Europe and Asia. Together with ESnet, Internet2, the GEANT pan-European network, and NSFs UltraLight project, US LHCNet also supports connections between the Tier2 centers (where most of the analysis of the data will take place, starting this year) and the Tier1s as needed.See report

Newman, H.B,

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modulator-Based, High Bandwidth Optical Links for HEP Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a concern with the reliability, bandwidth and mass of future optical links in LHC experiments, we are investigating CW lasers and light modulators as an alternative to VCSELs. These links will be particularly useful if they utilize light modulators which are very small, low power, high bandwidth, and are very radiation hard. We have constructed a test system with 3 such links, each operating at 10 Gb/s. We present the quality of these links (jitter, rise and fall time, BER) and eye mask margins (10GbE) for 3 different types of modulators: LiNbO3-based, InP-based, and Si-based. We present the results of radiation hardness measurements with up to ~1012 protons/cm2 and ~65 krad total ionizing dose (TID), confirming no single event effects (SEE) at 10 Gb/s with either of the 3 types of modulators. These optical links will be an integral part of intelligent tracking systems at various scales from coupled sensors through intra-module and off detector communication. We have used a Si-based photonic transceiver to build a complete 40 Gb/s bi-directional link (10 Gb/s in each of four fibers) for a 100m run and have characterized it to compare with standard VCSEL-based optical links. Some future developments of optical modulator-based high bandwidth optical readout systems, and applications based on both fiber and free space data links, such as local triggering and data readout and trigger-clock distribution, are also discussed.

D. G. Underwood; G. Drake; W. S. Fernando; R. W. Stanek

2012-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The ``IQNP`` agent is an antagonist for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor. Since the IQNP molecule has two asymmetric centers and either cis or trans isomerism of the vinyl iodide, there are eight possible isomeric combinations. In this report, the systematic synthesis, purification and animal testing of several isomers of radioiodinated ``IQNP`` are reported. A dramatic and unexpected relation between the absolute configuration at the two asymmetric centers and the stereochemistry of the vinyl iodide on receptor specificity was observed. The E-(R)(R) isomer shows specific and significant localization (per cent dose/gram at 6 hours) in receptor-rich cerebral structures (i.e. Cortex = 1.38 + 0.31; Striatum = 1.22 + 0.20) and low uptake in tissues rich in the M{sub 2} subtype (Heart = 0.10; Cerebellum = 0.04). In contrast, the E-(R)(S) isomer shows very low receptor-specific uptake (Cortex = 0.04; Striatum = 0.02), demonstrating the importance of absolute configuration at the acetate center. An unexpected and important observation is that the stereochemistry of the vinyl iodine appears to affect receptor subtype specificity, since the Z-(R,S)(R) isomer shows much higher uptake in the heart (0.56 + 0.12) and cerebellum (0.17 + 0.04). Studies are now in progress to confirm these exciting results in vitro. Progress has also continued during this period with several collaborative programs. The first large-scale clinical tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator prototype (500 mCi) was fabricated and supplied to the Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology (CMMI), in Newark, New Jersey, for Phase I clinical trials of rhenium-188-labeled anti CEA antibodies for patient treatment. Collaborative studies are also continuing in conjunction with the Nuclear Medicine Department at the University of Massachusetts where a generator is in use to compare the biological properties of {open_quotes}direct{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}indirect{close_quotes} labeled antibodies.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Beets, A.L.; Callahan, A.P.; Hsieh, B.T.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Lambert, C.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

TOXNET and Beyond-Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this training is to familiarize participants with reliable online environmental health and toxicology information, from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources. Skills and knowledge acquired in this training class will enable participants to access, utilize, and refer others to environmental health and toxicology information. After completing this course, participants will be able to: (1) Identify quality, accurate, and authoritative online resources pertaining to environmental health, toxicology, and related medical information; (2) Demonstrate the ability to perform strategic search techniques to find relevant online information; and (3) Apply the skills and knowledge obtained in this class to their organization's health information needs. NLMs TOXNET (Toxicology Data Network) is a free, Web-based system of databases on toxicology, environmental health, hazardous chemicals, toxic releases, chemical nomenclatures, and specialty areas such as occupational health and consumer products. Types of information in the TOXNET databases include: (1) Specific chemicals, mixtures, and products; (2) Unknown chemicals; and (3) Special toxic effects of chemicals in humans and/or animals.

Templin-Branner, Wilma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Independent Oversight Review of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Medicine Programs from June 1998 to December 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summary Executive Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Oversight performed a two-phased review of eight Departmental contractor occupational medicine programs. The first phase of the review was completed in September 1998 and the second phase in December 1999. To conduct the review, Oversight teamed with the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), a non-profit accreditation organization for health-care facilities. The Office of Oversight's interim report on the three sites covered in the initial phase revealed that some contractor occupational medicine programs were not implementing several important DOE policies and requirements. The most significant issue concerned the comprehensiveness of medical surveillance programs. Other issues included poorly defined and marginally implemented quality management and

364

Independent Oversight Review of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Medicine Programs from June 1998 to December 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Oversight performed a two-phased review of eight Departmental contractor occupational medicine programs. The first phase of the review was completed in September 1998 and the second phase in December 1999. To conduct the review, Oversight teamed with the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), a non-profit accreditation organization for health-care facilities. The Office of Oversight's interim report on the three sites covered in the initial phase revealed that some contractor occupational medicine programs were not implementing several important DOE policies and requirements. The most significant issue concerned the comprehensiveness of medical surveillance programs. Other issues included poorly defined and marginally implemented quality management and

365

EIS-0432: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Medicine Bow Gasification and Liquefaction Coal-to-Liquids, Carbon County, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is assessing the potential environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Medicine Bow Fuel & Power LLC (MBFP), a wholly-owned subsidiary of DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC. MBFP submitted an application to DOE under the Federal loan guarantee program pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to support the construction and startup of the MBFP coal-to-liquids facility, a coal mine and associated coal handling facilities.

366

The Relationship Between Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use, Psychological Well-Being, Locus Of Control, Spiritual Well-Being, and Social Support Among Persons with Fibromyalgia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The present studied explored the relationship between Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use, psychological well-being, multidimensional health locus of control, spiritual well-being, and social (more)

Fava, Brianna L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

Ge Jin [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fishman, Jessica [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xie, Sharon X. [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mao, Jun J., E-mail: maoj@uphs.upenn.edu [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department  

SciTech Connect

Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia' (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In and {sup 11}C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of 'Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares' (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the {sup R}eglamento General de Seguridad Radiologica{sup ,} Mexico (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the 'International Commission on Radiation Protection' (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

Avila, O.; Sanchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico) and Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico) and Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando No.22 C.P. 4080 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Beyond Two Homelands: Migration and Transnationalism of Japanese Americans in the Pacific, 1930-1955  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic bomb? Amo drove to a church outside Manila, knelt before the altar, and wondered whether his report

Jin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Beyond Two Homelands: Migration and Transnationalism of Japanese Americans in the Pacific, 1930-1955  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that an atomic bomb had been dropped on Hiroshima. The newstrapped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the atomic bombs were

Jin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

How to prepare the National Guard's leadership for successful venture in homeland security .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The National Guard (NG) will be the first military force on disaster scenes in the United States. If the NG is to respond as efficiently (more)

Amundson, Randy J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Northwest Regional Technology Center, October 2011 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management system to be piloted in a Los Angeles exercise New guidance on nuclear and chemical response then be vetted in other interested cities and states in the Northwest Region. The final concept and procedure will help transition this technology for use nationwide. DHHS Issues Guidance on Nuclear and Chemical

373

Northwest Regional Technology Center, May 2011 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national standards for disaster prepared- ness, response, and recovery systems. The county then documented by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response Program, allows emergency response agencies to engage with each other and leverage their collective

374

Before the Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight- Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Overview of DOE Office of Environmental Management acquisitions and contract project management reforms By: J.E. "Jack" Surash, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management

375

Current State of Commercial Radiation Detection Equipment for Homeland Security Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detectors / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 1) / Radiation Measurements and Instrumentation

Raymond T. Klann; Jason Shergur; Gary Mattesich

376

Northwest Regional Technology Center, November 2012 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency Responders to effectively counter a potential threat to our Nation. PNNL, in collaboration with DHS S. To better determine the requirements and needs of First Responders in a daily operational context, PNNL held

377

Northwest Regional Technology Center, May 2013 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to support regional preparedness, resiliency, response Events Next-Generation Communications Inoperability Virtual Workshop PNNL hosted a Next including Lync, LiveWall and Twitter. The purpose of the workshop, organized by PNNL's Jon Barr, Jessica

378

DOE O 484.1 Admin Chg 1, Reimbursable Work for the Department of Homeland Security  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes DOE policies and procedures for the acceptance, performance, and administration of reimbursable work directly funded by the Department of ...

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

379

Building a Home-Land: Zionism as a Regime of Housing 1860-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weiss, D. 2009. This Was My Home: Daniela Weiss Remembersfor the symposium Communal Home: Reflections on the Pastand Future of the National Home, Shalom Hartman Institute,

Allweil, Yael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Economics definitions, methods, models, and analysis procedures for Homeland Security applications.  

SciTech Connect

This report gives an overview of the types of economic methodologies and models used by Sandia economists in their consequence analysis work for the National Infrastructure Simulation&Analysis Center and other DHS programs. It describes the three primary resolutions at which analysis is conducted (microeconomic, mesoeconomic, and macroeconomic), the tools used at these three levels (from data analysis to internally developed and publicly available tools), and how they are used individually and in concert with each other and other infrastructure tools.

Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne William; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Smith, Braeton J.; Warren, Drake E.; Downes, Paula Sue; Eidson, Eric D.; Mackey, Greg Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Agency interoperation for effective data mining in border control and homeland security applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Customs embarked on a major modernization initiative of its Information Technology systems. Drawing in data from Customs trade systems, targeting inspectors review manifest information as well as strategic and tactical intelligence to determine which ...

Nabil R. Adam; Vijayalakshmi Atluri; Rey Koslowski; Vandana P. Janeja; Janice Warner; Aabhas Paliwal

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Building a Home-Land: Zionism as a Regime of Housing 1860-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

house demonstrates his owners awareness of the home- block qualities and marks them as active rather than passive

Allweil, Yael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Integration of sensing and computing in an intelligent decision support system for homeland security defense  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an intelligent decision support system based on sensor and computer networks that incorporates various component techniques for sensor deployment, data routing, distributed computing, and information fusion. The integrated system is deployed ... Keywords: Data routing, Distributed computing, Dynamic programming, Intelligent decision support system, Sensor deployment, Sensor fusion

Qishi Wu; Mengxia Zhu; Nageswara S. V. Rao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Improving National and Homeland Security through a proposed Laboratory for Information Globalization and Harmonization Technologies (LIGHT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent National Research Council study found that: "Although there are many private and public databases that contain information potentially relevant to counter terrorism programs, they lack the ...

Choucri, Nazli

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Improving National and Homeland Security through a proposed Laboratory for nformation Globalization and Harmonization Technologies (LIGHT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent National Research Council study found that: "Although there are many private and public databases that contain information potentially relevant to counter terrorism programs, they lack the ...

Choucri, Nazli

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Implementation of test for quality assurance in nuclear medicine gamma camera  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear medicine (NM) over 90% of procedures are performed for diagnostic purposes. To ensure adequate diagnostic quality of images and the optimization of the doses received by patients originated from the radioactive material is essential for regular monitoring and equipment performance through a quality assurance program (QAP). The QAP consists of 15 proposed performance tomographic and not tomographic gamma camera (GC) tests, and is based on recommendations of international organizations. We describe some results of the performance parameters of QAP applied to a GC model e.cam Siemens, of the Department of NM of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan). The results were: (1) The average intrinsic spatial resolution (R{sub in}) was 4.67 {+-} 0.25 mm at the limit of acceptance criterion of 4.4 mm. (2) The sensitivity extrinsic (S{sub ext}), with maximum variations of 1.8% (less than 2% which is the criterion of acceptance). (3) Rotational Uniformity (U{sub rot}), with values of integral uniformity (IU) in the useful field of view detector (UFOV), with maximum percentage change of 0.97% and monthly variations equal angles, ranging from 0.13 to 0.99% less than 1%. (4) The displacement of the center of rotation (DCOR), indicated a maximum deviation of 0.155 {+-} 0.039 mm less than 4.795 mm, an absolute deviation of less than 0.5 where pixel 0.085 pixel is suggested, the criteria are assigned to low-energy collimator high resolution. (5) In tomographic uniformity (U{sub tomo}), UI values (%) and percentage noise level (rms%) were 7.54 {+-} 1.53 and 4.18 {+-} 1.69 which are consistent with the limits of acceptance of 7.0-12.0% and 3.0-6.0% respectively. The smallest cold sphere has a diameter of 11.4 mm. The implementation of a QAP allows for high quality diagnostic images, optimization of the doses given to patients, a reduction of exposure to occupationally exposed workers (POE, by its Spanish acronym), and generally improves the productivity of the service. This proposal can be used to develop a similar QAP in other facilities and may serve as a precedent for the proposed regulations for quality assurance (QA) teams in MN.

Montoya Moreno, A.; Rodriguez Laguna, A.; Trujillo Zamudio, Flavio E [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute San Fernando Avenue No.22, Col. Section XVI (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

New Technology Paves Way for Highly Sensitive Photodetectors with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Technology Paves Way for Highly Sensitive Photodetectors with New Technology Paves Way for Highly Sensitive Photodetectors with Applications in High Energy Physics, Medicine, and National Security High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F: (301) 903-2597 E: sc.hep@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 New Technology Paves Way for Highly Sensitive Photodetectors with Applications in High Energy Physics, Medicine, and National Security Argonne National Lab wins prestigious 2012 R&D 100 award for development of Large Area Microchannel Plate Detectors

388

Occupational Medicine - Occupational Medicine Guiding Principles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the President's Fiscal Year 2011 Budget and Performance Plans" (June 11, 2009) DOE Human Capital Strategic Plan For additional information regarding the Occupational...

389

Usefulness of specific calibration coefficients for gamma-emitting sources measured by radionuclide calibrators in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: In nuclear medicine, the activity of a radionuclide is measured with a radionuclide calibrator that often has a calibration coefficient independent of the container type and filling. Methods: To determine the effect of the container on the accuracy of measuring the activity injected into a patient, The authors simulated a commercial radionuclide calibrator and 18 container types most typically used in clinical practice. The instrument sensitivity was computed for various container thicknesses and filling levels. Monoenergetic photons and electrons as well as seven common radionuclides were considered. Results: The quality of the simulation with gamma-emitting sources was validated by an agreement with measurements better than 4% in five selected radionuclides. The results show that the measured activity can vary by more than a factor of 2 depending on the type of container. The filling level and the thickness of the container wall only have a marginal effect for radionuclides of high energy but could induce differences up to 4%. Conclusions: The authors conclude that radionuclide calibrators should be tailored to the uncertainty required by clinical applications. For most clinical cases, and at least for the low-energy gamma and x-ray emitters, measurements should be performed with calibration coefficients specific to the container type.

Bochud, Francois O.; Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Baechler, Sebastien; Kosinski, Marek; Bailat, Claude J. [Institute of Radiation Physics, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Rue du Grand-Pre 1, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radiation Safety and Education in the Applicants of the Final Test for the Expert of Pain Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The C-arm fluoroscope is known as the most important equipment in pain interventions. This study was conducted to investigate the completion rate of education on radiation safety, the knowledge of radiation exposure, the use of radiation protection, and so on. Methods: Unsigned questionnaires were collected from the 27 pain physicians who applied for the final test to become an expert in pain medicine in 2011. The survey was composed of 12 questions about the position of the hospital, the kind of hospital, the use of C-arm fluoroscopy, radiation safety education, knowledge of annual permissible radiation dose, use of radiation protection, and efforts to reduce radiation exposure. Results: In this study, although most respondents (93%) had used C-arm fluoroscopy, only 33 % of the physicians completed radiation safety education. Even though nine (33%) had received education on radiation safety, none of the physicians knew the annual permissible radiation dose. In comparing the radiation safety education group and the no-education group, the rate of wearing radiation-protective glasses or goggles and the use of radiation badges or dosimeters were significantly higher in the education group. However, in the use of other protective equipment, knowledge of radiation safety, and efforts to reduce radiation exposure, there were no statistical differences between the two groups. Conclusions: The respondents knew very little about radiation safety and had low interest in their radiation exposure. To make the use of fluoroscopy safer, additional education, as well as attention to and knowledge of practices of radiation safety are required for pain physicians. (Korean J Pain 2012; 25: 16-21)

Department Of Anesthesiology; Pain Medicine; Yong Chul Kim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast cancer.

Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Ma Shuangge [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Higgins, Susan A. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut (United States); Weidhaas, Joanne B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Lloyd, Shane [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Peschel, Richard [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States) [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Gaudreau, Bryant [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Rockwell, Sara [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Materials in Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solidification Advances The Solidification of Methane Hydrate **Synthesis and Processing of Abrasives as Industrial Ceramics: Prof. M. C. Flemings' Role in...

393

Occupational Medicine Variance Request  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it may not add value for a subcontractor medical provider to "review medical emergency response procedures included in site emergency and disaster preparedness plans." (Appendix...

394

Space clinical medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

consciousness' following rapid decompression of resting humans who were .... such as errors in and loss of interpretation and judgment, overconfidence,...

395

Problems in medicine: hypercalcemia  

SciTech Connect

The pathophysiologic mechanisms for hypercalcemia are reviewed and a diagnostic approach to determining the cause of hypercalcemia in clinical cases in dogs and cats is recommended. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab. (ACR)

Weller, R.E.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper it is shortly presented PubMed as one of the most important on-line databases of the scientific biomedical literature. Also, the author has analyzed the most cited authors, professors of the medical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, from the published papers in the biomedical journals abstracted and indexed in PubMed. Key words: PubMed, medical scientists

Izet Masic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Forschungsverbund community medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Verbrau- cherschutz Mecklenburg-Vorpommerns · Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft · Kompetenznetz-Gemeinschaft · Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector (Erlangen, Deutsch- land) · Pfizer Pharma GmbH (Berlin, Deutschland ) · Novo. M. Nauck Klinische Chemie und Metabolomics in SHIP 15:15 Uhr Diskussion 15:30 Uhr Kaffeepause 15

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

398

The Materials of Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 1, 2008 ... The natural human desire to reduce the limitations caused by disability ... pushing this skyrocketing demand for biomedical materials and devices. ... real- time monitoring of hormone concentrations, gas concentrations, and...

399

Medicine, Seoul, Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes clinical and parasitological findings of an 82-yr-old female patient who lived in a local rural village and suffered from severe chronic anemia for several years. She was transferred to the National Police Hospital in Seoul for management of severe dyspnea and dizziness. At admission, she showed symptoms or signs of severe anemia. Gastroduodenoscopy observed hyperemic mucosa of the duodenum and discovered numerous moving roundworms on the mucosa. Endoscopy isolated seven of them, which were identified as Necator americanus by characteristic morphology of cutting plates in the buccal cavity. The patient was treated with albendazole and supportive measures for anemia, and her physical condition much improved. This case suggests the possibility that hookworm N. americanus is still transmitted in a remote local mountainous area in Korea.

Hee Jae Hyun; Eun-min Kim; So Yeon Park; Jun-oh Jung; Jong-yil Chai; Sung-tae Hong; Hee Jae Hyun; Eun-min Kim Contributed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Health & Medicine Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in archives: 83,709 Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily's archives for related news topics. 1000+ Degrees! www.EarnMyDegree.com Search ScienceDaily Find with keyword(s): Search Number of stories security measures Arizona murder prompts calls to tighten security Obama previews rhetoric for mid-term

Rogers, John A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Welcome - Nuclear Medicine Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combined resources of the stable isotope inventory, a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), hot cell processing capabilities, and a wide range of support functions required for such...

402

Site Visits by US Dept of Homeland Security regarding H-1B employees at Stanford University If your Department has sponsored H-1B employees, it is possible that the U.S. Department of Homeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;OFFICe OF InSpeCtOr GenerAl I SemIAnnuAl repOrt #12; I AprIl 1­September 30, 2007 Robert W. Cobb Inspector General from The InspeCTor General #12;OFFICe OF InSpeCtOr GenerAl I SemIAnnuAl repOrt #12; I Apr executIve offIcer Renee N. Juhans counsel to the Inspector General Francis P. LaRocca offIce of au

Ford, James

403

European Society of Intensive Care Medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35degreesC) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/8 (12 January 2011) S T U D Y P R O T O C O L Open Acces s European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial) Peter JD... which is completed at hospital discharge. Paper copies of all CRFs are available to centres with lit- tle or no access to the internet. All CRFs must be com- pleted in English and is managed by Lincoln, Paris. Blinded and patient identifiable data...

Andrews, Peter J D; Sinclair, Helen Louise K; Battison, Claire G; Polderman, Kees K; Citerio, Giuseppe K; Mascia, Luciana K; Harris, Bridget A; Murray, Gordon D; Stocchetti, Nino K; Menon, David K; Shakur, Haleema K; De Backer, Daniel K; Eurotherm3235Trial Collaborators

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

404

University of Central Florida CREOL The College of Optics and Photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://mqw.creol.ucf.edu/patrick/likamwa.html Research · Fiber-optic transmission systems · All-optical signal processing · Free-space optical spectrum of programs covering materials, devices, and systems for applications including photonic, communication and information technology, biology and medicine, energy and lighting, aerospace, and homeland

Glebov, Leon

405

Proposal for Reviews | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

For Reviewers: Find your Proposal High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About HEP Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Award Search Early...

406

Northwest Regional Technology Center, April 2011 Page 1 of 2 Around The R egion In Homeland S ecurity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are being used to monitor radiation from Japan How Google supports disaster response An upcoming Google. Google's Crisis Response website offers an aggregation of information on unfolding disasters. When a disaster strikes, the Google Crisis Response team assesses the severity and impact

407

6 Homeland Defense Journal -December 18, 2002 | Vol 1. Issue 23 Gilmore Commission Calls for Independent Center to Coordinate Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington DC. · How much will new security initiatives cost and who will end up paying for them? · Which allowed. The building walls are a metal composite, and standard glass windows are used. The receiver- cant levels are transmitted through the walls and windows. No inter- ception would be possible

Jenn, David C.

408

Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services and International Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Cutting the Federal Government's Energy Bill: An Examination of the Sustainable Federal Government Executive Order 13524 By: Richard Kidd, Program Manager Federal Energy Management Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

409

Peoples, Homelands, and Wars? Ethnicity, the Military, and Battle among British Imperial Forces in the War against Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tarak barkawi 26 Peter Gadsdon, An Amateur at War, unpublished ms., p. 29. 27 Bruce Lincoln, Discourse and the Construction of Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989), p. 88. 28 Rosen, Societies and Military Power. See also Alon Peled, A Question... of the class organization of the army was the reinforcement of ethnic difference. Peter Gadsdon, a wartime officer in 4/14th Punjab, new to the Indian Army, learned about the foibles of each class while his battalion trained for service in Burma: A Company...

Barkawi, Tarak

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

Technology Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security & Defense Homeland Security & Defense Information Technology & Communications Information Technology & Communications Sensors, Electronics &...

411

Microsoft Word - OE HEPS cybersecurity hearing May 31 2011_2.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMERCE COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES May 31, 2011 2 Chairman Whitfield, Ranking Member Rush and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for this opportunity to discuss the cyber security issues facing the electric industry, as well as potential legislation intended to strengthen protection of the bulk power system and electric infrastructure from cyber security threats. Title XIII of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) states, "It is the policy of the United States to support the modernization of the Nation's electricity transmission and distribution system to maintain a reliable and secure electricity infrastructure." The protection and resilience of critical national infrastructures is a shared responsibility of the private sector,

412

hep-ph/0106116 Distinguishing a MSSM Higgs Boson from the SM Higgs Boson at a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decoupling properties of the Higgs sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) imply that a light CP-even Higgs boson discovered at the Tevatron or LHC may closely resemble the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. In this paper, we investigate how precision measurements of Higgs properties at a Linear Collider (LC) can distinguish between a CP-even Higgs boson of the MSSM and the SM Higgs boson. We review the expected theoretical behavior of the partial widths and branching ratios for decays of the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons with significant couplings to the W and Z bosons, including the leading radiative corrections to the mixing angle ? and tan ?-enhanced vertex corrections. The general expectation is that the Higgs couplings to W + W ? , ZZ, cc and tt should quickly approach their SM values for increasing CP-odd Higgs mass mA, while the couplings to b b and ? + ? ? do so more slowly. Using the expected experimental accuracy in determining SM branching ratios and partial widths, we demonstrate the sensitivity of measurements at the LC to variations in the MSSM parameters, with particular attention to the decoupling limit. For a wide range of MSSM parameters, the LC is sensitive to mA ? 600 GeV almost independently of tan ?. For large values of tan ? and some specific choices of MSSM parameters [e.g., At < 0 and |At | ? | | ? O(1 TeV)], one of the CP-even Higgs bosons can be SM-like independent of the value of mA. In the case of large deviations from the SM, we present a procedure using branching ratio measurements to extract the supersymmetric correction to the b quark mass.

Linear Collider; Marcela Carenaa; Howard E. Haberb; Heather E. Logana C; Stephen Mrenna

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

arXiv:hep-ex/0406012v12Jun2004 EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2003 Search for fermiophobic Higgs bosons in final states with photons at LEP 2 DELPHI Collaboration Abstract Higgs boson production with subsequent decay to photons was searched for in the data), the decay of the Higgs boson to photons is mediated by heavy charged particles (namely W± bosons and top

414

US LHCNet: Transatlantic Networking for the LHC and the U.S. HEP Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US LHCNet provides the transatlantic connectivity between the Tier1 computing facilities at the Fermilab and Brookhaven National Labs and the Tier0 and Tier1 facilities at CERN, as well as Tier1s elsewhere in Europe and Asia. Together with ESnet, Internet2, and other R&E Networks participating in the LHCONE initiative, US LHCNet also supports transatlantic connections between the Tier2 centers (where most of the data analysis is taking place) and the Tier1s as needed. Given the key roles of the US and European Tier1 centers as well as Tier2 centers on both continents, the largest data flows are across the Atlantic, where US LHCNet has the major role. US LHCNet manages and operates the transatlantic network infrastructure including four Points of Presence (PoPs) and currently six transatlantic OC-192 (10Gbps) leased links. Operating at the optical layer, the network provides a highly resilient fabric for data movement, with a target service availability level in excess of 99.95%. This level of resilience and seamless operation is achieved through careful design including path diversity on both submarine and terrestrial segments, use of carrier-grade equipment with built-in high-availability and redundancy features, deployment of robust failover mechanisms based on SONET protection schemes, as well as the design of facility-diverse paths between the LHC computing sites. The US LHCNet network provides services at Layer 1(optical), Layer 2 (Ethernet) and Layer 3 (IPv4 and IPv6). The flexible design of the network, including modular equipment, a talented and agile team, and flexible circuit lease management, allows US LHCNet to react quickly to changing requirements form the LHC community. Network capacity is provisioned just-in-time to meet the needs, as demonstrated in the past years during the changing LHC start-up plans.

Newman, Harvey B; Barczyk, Artur J

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

415

PoS(EPS-HEP2011)390 Testing fundamental principles with high-energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in models incorporating a privileged local reference frame (the "vacuum rest frame", VRF [4, 5 for nucleons, quarks, leptons and the photon [6, 7]. If a VRF exists, LSV can modify the internal structure. A crucial question is that of the existence of a VRF. Contrary to the old ether, the vacuum of quantum field

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

416

TLEP, first step in a long-term vision for HEP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of H(126) has renewed interest in circular e+e- colliders that can operate as Higgs factories, which benefit from three unique characteristics: i) high luminosity and reliability, ii) the availability of several interaction points, iii) superior beam energy accuracy. TLEP is an e+e- storage ring of 80-km circumference that can operate with very high luminosity from the Z peak (90 GeV) to the top quark pair threshold (350 GeV). It can achieve transverse beam polarization at the Z peak and WW threshold, giving it unparalleled accuracy on the beam energy. A preliminary study indicates that an 80 km tunnel could be constructed around CERN. Such a tunnel would allow a 100 TeV proton-proton collider to be established in the same ring (VHE-LHC), offering a long term vision.

Koratzinos, M; Aleksan, R; Janot, P; Zimmermann, F; Ellis, J R; Zanetti, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Benefits of HEP | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

magnets existed before Fermilab's Tevatron but the scale of the accelerator made the production of such magnets an industrial process, which led to the economical MRI machine. The...

418

arXiv:hep-ph/9910333v3 14 Jul 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at RHIC R.L. Jaffe a , W. Busza a , J. Sandweiss b , and F. Wilczek c a) Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge,...

419

HEP Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

News In the News In Focus Presentations & Testimony Recovery Act About Organization Budget Field Offices Federal Advisory Committees History Scientific and Technical...

420

HEP/123-qed Fine structure of alpha decay in odd nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an ? decay level scheme, the fine structure in odd nuclei is explained by taking into account the radial and rotational couplings between the unpaired valence nucleon and the core of the decaying system. It is shown that the experimental behavior of the ? decay fine structure phenomenon is governed by the dynamical characteristics of the system.

M. Mirea

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

arXiv:hep-ex/0607071v126Jul2006 BABAR-PUB-06/037  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. G. Fulsom,10 C. Hearty,10 N. S. Knecht,10 T. S. Mattison,10 J. A. McKenna,10 A. Khan,11 P. Kyberd. Toki,22 R. J. Wilson,22 F. Winklmeier,22 Q. Zeng,22 D. D. Altenburg,23 E. Feltresi,23 A. Hauke,23 H,1 F. Couderc,1 Y. Karyotakis,1 J. P. Lees,1 V. Poireau,1 V. Tisserand,1 A. Zghiche,1 E. Grauges,2 A

Jessop, Colin

422

HEP Early Career Research Opportunities | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Essig, Rouven Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY Particle Physics at the Cosmic Intensity, and Energy Frontiers Hartnoll, Sean Stanford University Palo Alto, CA...

423

SciDAC HEP FAQ | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

for Teachers and Scientists Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Project Assessment Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National...

424

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

SciTech Connect

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Directions to HEP | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

for non U.S. citizens requires at least one month advanced notice. The Office of High Energy Physics is located on the fourth floor of G-wing and H-wing in the DOE complex. a...

426

arXiv:0902.0355v1[hep-ex]2Feb2009 UASLPIF09001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, U.S.A. nUniversity of Michigan-Flint, Flint, MI 48502, U.S.A. o

Akgun, Ugur

427

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Sandy River Delta, Technical Report 2000-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Land managers are often challenged with the mandate to control exotic and invasive plant species. Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) and Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor) are 2 such species that are currently threatening natural areas in western United States. Reed canarygrass may be native to the inland northwest (Antieau 2000), but it has invaded many wetland areas as dense, monoculture stands. Spread of this plant species is largely attributed to human disturbances, e.g., draining, farming (Antieau 2000). Reed canarygrass often dominates other emergent vegetation such as cattail (Typha spp.) and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) (Whitson et al. 1996, Apfelbaum and Sams 1987), and the resulting habitat is largely unsuitable for wetland birds. Himalayan blackberry was introduced to the United States as a garden shrub and was planted at wildlife-management areas for food and cover. It easily colonizes disturbed places, such as roadsides, ditches, and flood plains (Hoshovsky 2000). Once established, it forms a thick, impenetrable stand, which excludes native shrub species. Although Himalayan blackberry does provide food and cover for wildlife, particularly during fall and winter, it decreases habitat diversity, and therefore, may decrease wildlife diversity. Furthermore, patterns of avian nest predation may be altered in some exotic-shrub communities (Schmidt and Whelan 1999). For land managers to make sound decisions regarding invasive-plant control, it is useful to obtain information on current plant distributions in relation to targeted wildlife species, and then use models to predict how those species may respond to changes in vegetation. The Habitat Evaluations Program was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate current and future habitat conditions for fish and wildlife (Stiehl 1994). The program is based on Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for specific wildlife species. Each model contains several variables that represent life requisites (e.g., food and nesting cover) for that species. These variables are evaluated with vegetation sampling, and/or through the interpretation of aerial photographs and the like. Variable values are assigned a numerical score. The score may be based on a categorical rating (e.g . , different vegetation types receive different scores based on their importance for that species) or may be the result of a linear relationship (e.g., the score increases with the variable value; Figure 1). Variable scores are then input into a mathematical formula, which results in an HSI score. The HSI score ranges from 0-1, with 0 representing poor-quality habitat and 1 optimal habitat. HSI models assume a positive, linear relationship between wildlife-species density and the HSI score. For example, with an HSI score of 1, we assume that a species will be present at its highest density. Models can be projected into the future by changing variable values and observing the corresponding changes in HSI scores. Most models are relatively simple, but some are complex. These models have come under considerable scrutiny in the last several years, particularly concerning the validity of model assumptions (Van Horne 1983, Laymon and Barrett 1986, Hobbs and Hanley 1990, Kellner et al. 1992). Regardless of criticisms, these models may be used with success when there is an understanding and acceptance of model limitations. Each model should be evaluated as to its applicability in a given situation. Model validation, where results have on-the-ground verification, is highly recommended. Specific objectives of this project were to (1) conduct avian surveys and measure the present vegetation at the Sandy River Delta, (2) input the vegetation data into HSI models for 5 avian species, (3) evaluate the current habitat suitability for these species, and (4) predict species responses to potential changes in vegetation, resulting from the removal of reed canarygrass and/or Himalayan blackberry.

Rocklage, Ann; Ratti, John

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

arXiv:hep-ph/0207010v529Jan2003 UCD-2002-10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Peter Vanderveer--Biotron (BIOTRON) Tina Yao--Aquatic Sciences Center (ASC) #12;3 4 10 11 22 26 Cont Institute; ASC--Aquatic Sciences Center; BIOTECH--BioTechnology Center; BIOTRON--Biotron; GRAD Research Institute; ASC--Aquatic Sciences Center; BIOTECH--BioTechnology Center; BIOTRON--Biotron; GRAD

California at Santa Cruz, University of

430

Energy-Scale Dependence of the Lepton-Flavor-Mixing Matrix hep-ph/9904292  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study an energy-scale dependence of the lepton-flavor-mixing matrix in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with the effective dimension-five operators which give the masses of neutrinos. We analyze the renormalization group equations of ?ijs which are coefficients of these effective operators under the approximation to neglect the corrections of O(?2). As a consequence, we find that all phases in ? do not depend on the energy-scale, and that only ng ? 1 (ng: generation number) real independent parameters in the lepton-flavor-mixing matrix depend on the energyscale.

N. Haba; Y. Matsui; N. Okamura; M. Sugiura

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

HEP Conference Funding Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search Peer Merit Review Policies Early Career Research Opportunities in High Energy...

432

sured in microsomes extracted from hep-atic and adipose tissues of the pig. The activ-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, containing 4 % maize oil) with a high saturated fatty acid diet (diet T, containing 4 % beef tallow) for A9

Recanati, Catherine

433

hep-th/0407046 Local Commutativity and Causality in Interacting PP-wave String Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this paper, we extend our previous study of causality and local commutativity of string fields in the pp-wave lightcone string field theory to include interaction. Contrary to the flat space case result of Lowe, Polchinski, Susskind, Thorlacius and Uglum, we found that the pp-wave interaction does not affect the local commutativity condition. Our results show that the pp-wave lightcone string field theory is not continuously connected with the flat space one. We also discuss the relation between the condition of local commutativity and causality. While the two notions are closely related in a point particle theory, their relation is less clear in string theory. We suggest that string local commutativity may be relevant for an operational defintion of causality using strings as

Chong-sun Chu; Konstantinos Kyritsis

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

hep-lat/0105004 Are Topological Charge Fluctuations in QCD Instanton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a recent proposal by Horvth et al. to address the question whether topological charge fluctuations in QCD are instanton dominated via the response of fermions using lattice fermions with exact chiral symmetry, the overlap fermions. Considering several volumes and lattice spacings we find strong evidence for chirality of a finite density of low-lying eigenvectors of the overlap-Dirac operator in the regions where these modes are peaked. This result suggests instanton dominance of topological charge fluctuations in quenched QCD. Typeset using REVTEX 1 I.

Robert G. Edwards; Urs M. Heller

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

CERN-TH/97-371 hep-ph/9712442 QCD AT HIGH ENERGIES ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following topics in perturbative QCD are reviewed: recent theoretical progress in higher-order calculations; soft-gluon resummation for hard-scattering processes at large ET and high x; low-x behaviour of structure functions and recent theoretical results on BFKL dynamics; infrared renormalons and power corrections to perturbative predictions; updated summary of ?S measurements.

Stefano Catani; Stefano Catani

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microsoft Word - OE HEPS cybersecurity hearing May 31 2011_2...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

includes smart grid use cases, a high-level smart grid risk assessment process, smart grid-specific security requirements, development of a security architecture, assessment of...

437

International Conference on Fully 3D Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Linau, Germany, July 9-13, 2007 Abstract--Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a breathing cycle. Thus the radiation exposure during the data acquisition is at least 10 times higher than. This will result in unacceptable radiation to the patient. Lower the radiation exposure will sacrifice the imageInternational Conference on Fully 3D Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Linau

438

Engineering Foundation Conference: Advances in optics for biotechnology, medicine, and surgery, Kona Surf Resort and Conference Center, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, August 1-6, 1999. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of the conference was to gather a group of cross-disciplinary investigators from universities, medical schools, national laboratories, industry, and government in order to highlight future applications and technology of the optical sciences in biotechnology, medicine, and surgery. The session chairs brought new participants and speakers to the conference who were not regular attendees of the OSA and SPIE conferences. Attendees included a good number of graduate and post-doctoral students who tended to join the more senior members in organized and spontaneous afternoon activities. A critique of the conference is given which discusses things that worked well and things that could have been better, focusing on costs, funding, and speaker cancellations. Sessions were held on the following topics: Photodynamic therapy: fundamental and clinical studies; Frontiers in spectroscopy; Photon migration; Advances in tissue microscopy, dyes and reporters; Advances in cell microscopy: spectroscopy and micromanipulation; Laser-tissue interactions: therapeutic interventions; and Optics for biotechnology. Along with the program and participant lists, nearly 50 poster presentations are included.

Yodh, Arjun; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Benaron, David

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Drill-hole data, drill-site geology, and geochemical data from the study of Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of southeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume is presented as a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential of Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 3: Uranium Assessment for Precambrian Pebble Conglomerates in Southeastern Wyoming. Volume 1 summarized the geologic setting and geologic and geochemical characteristics of uranium-bearing conglomerates in Precambrian metasedimentary rocks of southeastern Wyoming. Volume 3 is a geostatistical resource estimate of U and Th in quartz-pebble conglomerates. This volume contains supporting geochemical data, lithologic logs from 48 drill holes in Precambrian rocks of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre, and drill site geologic maps and cross-sections from most of the holes.

Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.; Schmidt, T.G.; Inlow, D.; Flurkey, A.J.; Kratochvil, A.L.; Coolidge, C.M.; Sever, C.K.; Quimby, W.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Tibetan Medicine Compared with Ancient and Mediaeval Western Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Archives, 1976. The Ambrosia heart tantra, trI. Jhampa Kel sang, Dharmsala, Library of Tibetan Works and Archives, 1977 ( rGyud. bzhi, rTsa. rgyud, ch. 1-6. bShad. rgyud, chs. 115. ...

Winder, Marianne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

442

Pulse - Accelerator Science in Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

molecules. At the heart of MRI technology are powerful magnets made of superconducting wire and cable first developed in the 1970s to build Fermilab's Tevatron. To build the...

443

PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi:10.1088/0031-9155/55/1/014 Complexity and accuracy of image registration methods in SPECT-guided radiation therapy

L Tang; G Hamarneh; B Gill; A Celler; S Shcherbinin; A Thompson; C Duzenli; F Sheehan; V Moiseenko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Pulse - Accelerator Science in Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California. Lawrence often operated the Berkeley cyclotrons all night to produce medical isotopes for research and treatment. In 1938, Lawrences mother Gunda became the...

445

American College of Internal Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, gravity, and surface tension.16,17 First, a metal wire, such as tungsten or platinum/iridium had resistor in order to reduce the damage to the tip. Unfortunately, most metal tips take dam- age during

Taylor, Jerry

446

Personalized medicine: selected Web resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US National Cancer Institute have created useful glossaries:Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms, US National Human GenomeThere is an excellent glossary in the new, comprehensive,

Stimson, Nancy F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Pulse - Accelerator Science in Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t the forefront of biomedical research, medical scientists use particle accelerators to explore the structure of biological molecules. They use the energy that charged particles emit when accelerated to nearly the speed of light to create one of the brightest lights on earth, 30 times more powerful than the sun and focused on a pinpoint. t the forefront of biomedical research, medical scientists use particle accelerators to explore the structure of biological molecules. They use the energy that charged particles emit when accelerated to nearly the speed of light to create one of the brightest lights on earth, 30 times more powerful than the sun and focused on a pinpoint. Deciphering the structure of proteins is key to understanding biological processes and healing disease. To determine a protein’s structure, researchers direct the beam from an accelerator called a synchrotron through a protein crystal. The crystal scatters the beam onto a detector. From the pattern of scattering, computers calculate the position of every atom in the protein molecule and create a 3-D image of the molecule.

448

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Global Security Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Links Department of Homeland Security DHS Centers of Excellence Home Centers & Programs Department of Homeland Security Programs The Homeland Security Programs Office...

449

A dose point kernel database using GATE Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for nuclear medicine applications: Comparison with other Monte Carlo codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: GATE is a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit based on the Geant4 package, widely used for many medical physics applications, including SPECT and PET image simulation and more recently CT image simulation and patient dosimetry. The purpose of the current study was to calculate dose point kernels (DPKs) using GATE, compare them against reference data, and finally produce a complete dataset of the total DPKs for the most commonly used radionuclides in nuclear medicine. Methods: Patient-specific absorbed dose calculations can be carried out using Monte Carlo simulations. The latest version of GATE extends its applications to Radiotherapy and Dosimetry. Comparison of the proposed method for the generation of DPKs was performed for (a) monoenergetic electron sources, with energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV, (b) beta emitting isotopes, e.g., {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y, and {sup 32}P, and (c) gamma emitting isotopes, e.g., {sup 111}In, {sup 131}I, {sup 125}I, and {sup 99m}Tc. Point isotropic sources were simulated at the center of a sphere phantom, and the absorbed dose was stored in concentric spherical shells around the source. Evaluation was performed with already published studies for different Monte Carlo codes namely MCNP, EGS, FLUKA, ETRAN, GEPTS, and PENELOPE. A complete dataset of total DPKs was generated for water (equivalent to soft tissue), bone, and lung. This dataset takes into account all the major components of radiation interactions for the selected isotopes, including the absorbed dose from emitted electrons, photons, and all secondary particles generated from the electromagnetic interactions. Results: GATE comparison provided reliable results in all cases (monoenergetic electrons, beta emitting isotopes, and photon emitting isotopes). The observed differences between GATE and other codes are less than 10% and comparable to the discrepancies observed among other packages. The produced DPKs are in very good agreement with the already published data, which allowed us to produce a unique DPKs dataset using GATE. The dataset contains the total DPKs for {sup 67}Ga, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 90}Y, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I, {sup 124}I, {sup 125}I, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 177}Lu {sup 186}Re, and {sup 188}Re generated in water, bone, and lung. Conclusions: In this study, the authors have checked GATE's reliability for absorbed dose calculation when transporting different kind of particles, which indicates its robustness for dosimetry applications. A novel dataset of DPKs is provided, which can be applied in patient-specific dosimetry using analytical point kernel convolution algorithms.

Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Loudos, George; Nikiforidis, George C.; Kagadis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 265 04 (Greece) and Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational institute of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos Street, Egaleo GR 122 10, Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational institute of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos Street, Egaleo GR 122 10, Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 265 04 (Greece)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

DAVENPORT,J.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untitled Document Argonne Logo DOE Logo High Energy Physics Division Home Division ES&H Personnel Publications HEP Awards HEP Computing HEP Committees Administration...

452

Quick Links | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Quick Links High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees News & Resources SC Graduate...

453

Use of a virtual environment to solve real world problems The research involves a project for homeland security within the Modeling and Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Simulation Group has worked diligently to duplicate virtual nuclear facilities and power plants across certain components are attacked by terrorists. Certain components of a nuclear facility or power plant at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Using the Unreal Engine, nuclear facilities and other real-world plants

455

Before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Workforce, and the District of Columbia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Strengthening the Federal Acquisition Workforce: Government-wide Leadership and Initiatives By: John Bashista, Deputy Director, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management, Office of Management

456

Deputy Assistant Secretary Jack Surash's Written Statement before the Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs (June 27, 2013)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Written Statement of Jack Surash, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management of Office of Environmental Management, United States Department of Energy, before the...

457

Hearing on Online Privacy, Social Networking, and Crime Victimization Before the Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security U.S. House of Representatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DCMr. Chairman and Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to testify today. My name is Marc Rotenberg, and I am the President of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. EPIC was established to focus public attention on emerging privacy and civil liberties issue. I also teach Information Privacy Law at Georgetown University Law Center. I want to thank you for holding this hearing today and also thank Chairman Conyers for his May letter to Facebook. EPIC has a particular interest in privacy and social networking services. We filed two complaints at the Federal Trade Commission in the last year following decisions by Facebook to change its privacy policies and the privacy settings of its users. We also filed a complaint when Google introduced Buzz, its social network service, because the company essentially opted in all of its Gmail users. We believe it is vitally important to protect the privacy of users of these services, and many users agree. To be clear, we do not object to social network servicesthey are enormously valuablebut we do believe that there are serious privacy risks to

Marc Rotenberg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ULB-TH/06-10 hep-th/0605049 Twisted K-Theory as a BRST Cohomology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the BRST formalism to classify the gauge orbits of type II string theorys Ramond-Ramond (RR) field strengths under large RR gauge transformations of the RR gauge potentials. We find that this construction is identical to the Atiyah-Hirzebruch spectral sequence construction of twisted K-theory, where the Atiyah-Hirzebruch differentials are the BRST operators. The actions of the large gauge transformations on the field strengths that lie in an integral lattice of de Rham cohomology are found using supergravity, while the action on Z2 torsion classes is found using the Freed-Witten anomaly. We speculate that an S-duality covariant classification may be obtained by including NSNS gauge transformations and using the BV formalism. An example of a Z3 torsion generalization of the Freed-Witten anomaly is provided.

Jarah Evslin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

arXiv:hep-ph/0103095v19Mar2001 Low-Energy Supersymmetry and its Phenomenology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage, the word "minimal" in MSSM refers to the minimal particle spectrum and the associated R- tions to the MSSM Higgs sector is the modifi- cation of the upper bound of the light CP-even Higgs mass precise result. First, the increase of the light CP-even Higgs mass bound beyond mZ can be significant

California at Santa Cruz, University of

460

Effect of Size, shape, and surface modification on cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles to human HEp-2 and canine MDCK cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been increasing interests in applying gold nanoparticles in biological research, drug delivery, and therapy. As the interaction of gold nanoparticles with cells relies on properties of nanoparticles, the cytotoxicity is complex and still under ...

Yinan Zhang; Dan Xu; Wenqin Li; Jun Yu; Yu Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hep medicine homeland" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

arXiv:hep-ph/0010338v26Dec2000 FERMILAB-Conf-00/279-T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Lorenzo D´iaz-Cruz (Puebla) Duane Dicus (Texas, Austin) Bogdan Dobrescu (Yale) Tommaso Dorigo (INFN Padova (Stony Brook) Tao Han (Wisconsin) Brian W. Harris (Argonne) Hong-Jian He (Texas, Austin) David Hedin. Its elucidation remains one of the primary goals of future high energy physics experimentation

California at Santa Cruz, University of

462

Preprint typeset in JHEP style. -PAPER VERSION hep-th0606260 SCIPP-06-05/RU-06-05  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piscataway, NJ 08540 W. Fischler Department of Physics University of Texas, Austin, TX E-mail: fischler metric. Define the center of mass energy, s, of these two mass points by the norm of the sum of the first. The Schwarzschild radius corresponding to this energy always exceeds the impact parameter 1 #12

California at Santa Cruz, University of

463

arXiv:hep-ex/0406035v31Nov2004 Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation with KamLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with solar neutrino [10] and SN1987A data [11]. The allowed region contours in m2 -tan2 parameter space.9+0.6 -0.5?10-5 eV2 . A global analysis of data from KamLAND and solar neutrino experiments yields m2 = 7] suggested that solar neutrino flavor transformation through the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) [2

Learned, John

464

arXiv:1206.2443v1[hep-ex]12Jun2012 EUROPEAN ORGANISATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (CERN)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 12.8 7.4 10.1 4.8 5.3 Uzbekistan 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 Azerbaijan 7.9 2.6 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.0 Georgia 10.3 0.5 0

465

arXiv:hep-ex/0310030v212Jan2004 Constraints on Nucleon Decay via "Invisible" Modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water,7 C.J. Virtue,5 B.L. Wall,14 D. Waller,3 C.E. Waltham,1 H. Wan Chan Tseung,8 D.L. Wark,11 N. West,8 J.B. Wilhelmy,7 J.F. Wilkerson,14 J.R. Wilson,8 P. Wittich,9 J.M. Wouters,7 M. Yeh,2 and K. Zuber8

466

arXiv:0712.3549v1[hep-th]20Dec2007 Boundary spectra in superspace -models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is included in a very interesting upcoming paper by Candu and Saleur [41]. The plan of this work is as follows

467

SISSA 47/2004/EP hep-ph/0406328 Update of the Solar Neutrino Oscillation Analysis with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the impact of the 766.3 Ty KamLAND spectrum data on the determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters. We show that the observed spectrum distortion in the KamLAND experiment firmly establishes ?m2 21 to lie in the low-LMA solution region. The high-LMA solution is excluded at more than 4? by the global solar neutrino and KamLAND spectrum data. The maximal solar neutrino mixing is ruled out at 6? level. The 3? allowed region in the ?m2 21 ? sin2 ?12 plane is found to be remarkably stable with respect to leaving out the data from one of the solar neutrino experiments from the global analysis. We perform a three flavor neutrino oscillation analysis of the global solar neutrino and KamLAND spectrum data as well. The 3? upper limit on sin2 ?13 is found to be sin2 ?13 solar neutrino oscillation parameters are also discussed. 1 1

The Ty Kamland Spectrum; Abhijit B; Hya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov; D. P. Roy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

hep-ph/0511023 MSSM Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron and the LHC: Impact of Different Benchmark Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Higgs boson search has shifted from LEP2 to the Tevatron and will subsequently move to the LHC. The current limits from the Tevatron and the prospective sensitivities at the LHC are often interpreted in specific MSSM scenarios. For heavy Higgs boson production and subsequent decay into b b or ? + ? ? , the present Tevatron data allow to set limits in the MAtan ? plane for small MA and large tan ? values. Similar channels have been explored for the LHC, where the discovery reach extends to higher values of MA and smaller tan ?. Searches for MSSM charged Higgs bosons, produced in top decays or in association with top quarks, have also been investigated at the Tevatron and the LHC. We analyze the current Tevatron limits and prospective LHC sensitivities. We discuss how robust they are with respect to variations of the other MSSM parameters and possible improvements of the theoretical predictions for Higgs boson production and decay. It is shown that the inclusion of supersymmetric radiative corrections to the production cross sections and decay widths leads to important modifications of the present limits on the MSSM parameter space. The impact on the region where only the lightest MSSM Higgs boson can be detected at the LHC is also analyzed. We propose to extend the existing benchmark scenarios by including additional values of the higgsino mass parameter . This affects only slightly the search channels for a SM-like Higgs boson, while having a major impact on the searches for non-standard MSSM Higgs bosons.

M. Carena; S. Heinemeyer; C. E. M. Wagner; G. Weiglein

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

hep-th/0411025 Cosmology with Interaction between Phantom Dark Energy and Dark Matter and the Coincidence Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a cosmological model in which phantom dark energy has an interaction with dark matter by introducing a term in the equations of motion of dark energy and dark matter. Such a term is parameterized by a product of a dimensionless coupling function ?, Hubble parameter and the energy density of dark matter, and it manifests an energy flow between the dark energy and dark matter. We discuss two cases, one is that the state parameter ?e of the dark energy keeps as a constant; the other is that the dimensionless coupling function ? remains as a constant. We investigate the effect of the interaction on the evolution of the universe, the total lifetime of the universe, and the ratio of the period when the universe is in the coincidence state to its total lifetime. It turns out the interaction will produce significant deviation from the case without the interaction.

Rong-gen Cai; Anzhong Wang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

arXiv:1206.2651v1[hep-ex]12Jun2012 Future Programme of COMPASS at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources

471

EA-0896; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center For Nuclear Medicine Research In Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West 6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 1.1. Description 1.2 Alternatives 1.3 Affected Environment 1.4 Construction Impacts 1.5 Operating Impacts 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operation Activities 3.3 The No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources

472

PLUS: CentrifUgaL forCeS n the wormS' tUrn n traCking rabbit fever MAGA ZINE of thE cuMMINGs school of vE tErINAry MEdIcINE SPring 2010 voL . 11 no. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thE cuMMINGs school of vE tErINAry MEdIcINE SPring 2010 voL . 11 no. 2 PLUS: fat CatS n man'S beSt o and littermates who each weigh about 180 pounds. anesthesiologist Lois wetmore used a tranquilizing dart to render

Tufts University

473

Chief Medical Officer: Occupational Medicine in Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Security Security requirements provide for the medical assessment of employees to identify potential threats against the nuclear information, materials, and weapons over which DOE holds jurisdiction. When effectively integrated with the services of personnel security, counterintelligence, and other allied security professionals, medical services contribute directly to national security. In addition, workplace violence has increasingly been recognized as safety and security concern which warrants organizational planning and response. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. 1. Access Authorization Programs 2. Human Reliability Programs 3. Physical Protection Programs 4. Workplace Violence Programs 5. Counterintelligence Programs

474

JOM Examines the Materials of Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 3, 2009 ... To provide a comprehensive overview of the pivotal role that ... of health care for patients in the United States and in other countries. ... and Bio-materials symposium at the TMS 2010 Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington.

475

College of Medicine Department of Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical IRB review of graduate student activities that involve Human Subjects Research. Thesis Activities that involve Human Subjects Research in the Department of Environmental Health. a. The UC IRB of a graduate degree" that involve human subjects research. b. The UC IRB may accept CCHMC as the IRB

Papautsky, Ian

476

Open Bibliography for Science, Technology, and Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Access articles from the IUCr. These already contain bibliographic information in PRISM and Dublin Core, together with some submitted by authors (e.g. email and addresses). The Open Access subset of PubMed Central (PMC). There are about 250,000 fulltext...

Jones, Richard; MacGillivray, Mark; Murray-Rust, Peter; Pitman, Jim; Sefton, Peter; O'Steen, Ben; Waites, William

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

Open Bibliography for Science, Technology, and Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and addresses). The Open Access subset of PubMed Central (PMC). There are about 250,000 fulltext papers which contain bibliographic data but which vary due to the publishers syntax and semantics. These have been normalised so that the information is in a...

Jones, Richard; MacGillivray, Mark; Murray-Rust, Peter; Pitman, Jim; Sefton, Peter; O'Steen, Ben; Waites, William

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

478

Occupational Medicine - Collaborations and Library Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

479

Project Brief: Mayo Clinic College of Medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... PSA test results are directly linked to clinical decisions for biopsy of the prostate gland to diagnose prostate cancer, and accurate measurements of ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

480

Society of General Internal Medicine - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

serve as a red flag of weaker student performance. Table. Subgroup. All yes. No ...... Willing to authorize a feeding tube. 19. Surrogates' assessment of the...

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481

Tibetan Medicine, Its Humors and Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of which contained atoms of one kind only. They were divided according to how many atoms a molecule of each contained. Then when the scientists suc ceeded in splitting the atom, many more elements were discovered. In the Buddhist philosophical system... , aggression and delusion. The elements What I want to say about the elements is that each humour is symbolically connected with an element: bile with fire, phlegm with water, and wind with air. The traditional number of elements in the West is four: fire...

Winder, Marianne

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Evaluation of Emergency Medicine Community Educational Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart Association. Training Programs. Available at www.and community-based training programs have been shown tothe impact of the training program. METHODS This study was

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Salaries & Awards, Human Resources and Occupational Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salaries & Awards Compensation Group's Mission The Compensation Group provides services and advice on employee salaries and other forms of cash compensation to assist Laboratory...

484

(New imaging systems in nuclear medicine)  

SciTech Connect

Further progress has been made on improving the uniformity and stability of PCR-I, the single ring analog coded tomograph. This camera has been employed in a wide range of animal studies described below. Data from PCR-I have been used in various image processing procedures. These include motion pictures of dog heart, comparison of PET and MRI image in dog heart and rat brain and quantitation of tumor metabolism in the nude mouse using blood data from heart images. A SUN workstation with TAAC board has been used to produce gated three-dimensional images of the dog heart. The ANALYZE program from the Mayo Clinic has also been mounted on a SUN workstation for comparison of images and image processing. 15 refs., 6 figs.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Imperial College OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND MEDICINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten Carbonate Solid Oxide Acronym AFC SPFC PAFC MCFC SOFC Operating temp. 60-90°C 80-100°C 200°C 650°C temperature fuel cells (MCFC, SOFC). The low temperature fuel cells can be distinguished by the following is of course a simplification. There is work on-going to develop `intermediate' temperature SOFCs for example

486

Companion Diagnostics for Personalized Medicine A Critical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in diagnostics began to increase slightly in 2007 6 Bloomberg News, Nov. 14, 2008 7 Kurtzman, A Business Model for ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

487

BMC Pulmonary Medicine BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Hospital acquired pneumonia with high-risk bacteria is associated with increased pulmonary matrix metalloproteinase activity

Bernhard Schaaf; Cornelia Liebau; Volkhard Kurowski; Daniel Droemann; Klaus Dalhoff; Open Access; Daniel Droemann; Klaus Dalhoff

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

From Genomics to Personalized Medicine with  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... techniques is urgently needed to improve predictability and efficiency along the ... Benefit/harm is a unitary dimension that can be used to evaluate ...

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

BMC Medicine BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article The effect of acetaminophen (four grams a day for three consecutive days) on hepatic tests in alcoholic patients a multicenter randomized study

Jt Slattery; Rc Dart

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1987  

SciTech Connect

Modern biology is characterized by rapid change. The development of new tools and the results derived from their application to various biological systems require significant shifts in our concepts and the strategies that are adopted to analyze and elucidate mechanisms. In parallel with exciting new scientific developments our organizational structure and programmatic emphases have altered. These changes and developments have enabled the life sciences at LBL to be better positioned to create and respond to new opportunities. The work summarized in this annual report reflects a vital multifaceted research program that is in the vanguard of the areas represented. We are committed to justifying the confidence expressed by LBL through the new mission statement and reorganizational changes designed to give greater prominence to the life sciences.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE: MATERIALS IN MEDICINE ...  

... using glasses in the system SiO2- ... In order to design and control the interface ... grinder (Gatan, Model 656) to less than 20mmin

492

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine Division and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The materials do not repre- sent the policy position of the Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive Counterintelligence Executive National Strategy Forum #12;No More Secrets: National Security Strategies Counterintelligence Executive The Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive (ONCIX) is part of the Office

Ohta, Shigemi

493