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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

Nitin Bharadwaj; Kevin Widener

2

A Technique for Mapping the Distribution of Diffuse Solar Radiation over the Sky Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique to map the distribution of diffuse solar radiation over the sky hemisphere is described. The method is based on an analysis of all-sky, visible photographs and concurrent actinometric measurements of diffuse solar radiance. The ...

L. J. Bruce McArthur; John E. Hay

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Needlet detection of features in the WMAP CMB sky and the impact on anisotropies and hemispherical asymmetries  

SciTech Connect

We apply spherical needlets to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year cosmic microwave background (CMB) data set, to search for imprints of nonisotropic features in the CMB sky. We use the needlets' localization properties to resolve peculiar features in the CMB sky and to study how these features contribute to the anisotropy power spectrum of the CMB. In addition to the now well-known 'cold spot' of the CMB map in the southern hemisphere, we also find two hot spots at greater than 99% confidence level, again in the southern hemisphere and closer to the Galactic plane. While the cold spot contributes to the anisotropy power spectrum in the multipoles between l=6 to l=33, the hot spots are found to be dominating the anisotropy power in the range between l=6 and l=18. Masking both the cold and the two hot spots results in a reduction by about 15% in the amplitude of the angular power spectrum of CMB around l=10. The resulting changes to the cosmological parameters when the power spectrum is estimated masking these features (in addition to the WMAP team's KQ85 mask) are within the 1{sigma} errors published with the WMAP mask only. We also study the asymmetry between the angular power spectra evaluated on the northern and southern hemispheres. When the features detected by needlets are masked, we find that the difference in the power, measured in terms of the anisotropy variance between l=4 and l=18, is reduced by a factor 2. We make available a mask related to needlet features for more detailed studies on asymmetries in the CMB anisotropy sky.

Pietrobon, Davide [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Mercantile House, Portsmouth PO1 2EG (United Kingdom); Center for Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Amblard, Alexandre; Cooray, Asantha [Center for Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Balbi, Amedeo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Cabella, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Marinucci, Domenico [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Compensation of hemispheric albedo asymmetries by shifts of the ITCZ and tropical clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite a substantial hemispheric asymmetry in clear-sky albedo, observations of Earth’s radiation budget reveal that the two hemispheres have the same all-sky albedo. Here, aquaplanet simulations with the atmosphere general circulation model ...

Aiko Voigt; Bjorn Stevens; Jürgen Bader; Thorsten Mauritsen

5

Cloud-Base-Height Estimation from Paired Ground-Based Hemispherical Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total-sky imager (TSI) and hemispheric-sky imager (HSI) each have a hemispherical field of view, and many TSIs are now deployed. These instruments have been used routinely to provide a time series of the fractional sky cover only. In this study, ...

Evgueni Kassianov; Charles N. Long; Jason Christy

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Clear Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clear Skies A. A. lacis NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Institute for Space Studies New York, NY 10025 "convective adjustment"takes place. Energy is transported upward within the...

7

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover. C. N. Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1) Introduction In observing the cloudless sky, one can often notice that the area near the sun is whiter and brighter than the rest of the hemisphere. Additionally, even a slight haze will make a large angular area of the horizon whiter and brighter when the sun is low on the horizon. The human eye has an amazing ability to handle a range of light intensity spanning orders of magnitude. But one of the persistent problems in using sky images to infer fractional sky cover is the intensity range limitations of the camera detector. It is desirable to have bright enough images to be able to detect thin clouds, yet this often means the part of the image near the

8

A Variable Sky-View Platform for the Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the more difficult tasks confronting atmospheric researchers today is the acquisition of long-term radiometric measurements that encapsulate variability in the sky hemisphere as well as time. High quality spatial measurements would allow ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Manuel Nunez

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Big Sky [BSCSP; ,

10

Hemispherical Laue camera  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

Li, James C. M. (Pittsford, NY); Chu, Sungnee G. (Rochester, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

COBE Sky Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COBE sky map COBE sky map This map of the ancient sky shows the minute variations in the microwave background discovered by the team led by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory astrophysicist George Smoot. As seen in the map, vast regions of space have minute variations in temperature. Over billions of years, gravity magnified these small differences into the clusters of galaxies we observe today. Displayed horizontally across the middle of the map is the Milky Way galaxy. The image, a 360-degree map of the whole sky, shows the relic radiation from the Big Bang. The map was derived from one year of data taken by the Differential Microwave Radiometers onboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer satellite. Using Galactic coordinates, the map shows the plane of the Milky Way galaxy horizontally and the center of our galaxy at its

12

Sloan digital sky survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey will produce a detailed digital photometric map of half the northern sky to about 23 magnitude using a special purpose wide field 2.5 meter telescope. From this map we will select {approximately} 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars, and obtain high resolution spectra using the same telescope. The imaging catalog will contain 10{sup 8} galaxies, a similar number of stars, and 10{sup 6} quasar candidates.

Kent, S.M.; Stoughton, C.; Newberg, H.; Loveday, J.; Petravick, D.; Gurbani, V.; Berman, E.; Sergey, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sky Train Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Train Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Train Corp. Place Palm Harbor, Florida Zip 34684 Sector Services Product Sky Train Corporation is a consultant company...

14

Maximum Surface Albedo of Seasonally Snow-Covered Lands in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Areally weighted clear sky surface albedo of snow-covered land in the middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere was measured from satellite imagery in A 1×1° latitude-longitude cells. The study area included 87% of the land polewards ...

David A. Robinson; George Kukla

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sky Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Energy Place Germany Product A German company which is involved with the development of a 10MW STEG plant in the Moura region of...

16

The Infrared Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The infrared sky from space is the sum of a cosmic signal from galaxies, quasars, and perhaps more exotic sources; and foregrounds from the Milky Way and from the Solar System. At a distance of 1 AU from the Sun, the foreground from interplanetary dust is very bright between 5 and 100 microns, but ``very bright'' is still several million times fainter than the background produced by ground-based telescopes. In the near infrared 1-2.2 micron range the space infrared sky is a thousand times fainter than the OH nightglow from the Earth's atmosphere. As a result of these advantages, wide-field imaging from space in the infrared can be an incredibly sensitive method to study the Universe.

E. L. Wright

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

Free form hemispherical shaped charge  

SciTech Connect

A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

Haselman, Jr., Leonard C. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Wavelike Southern Hemisphere Extratropical Teleconnections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical basis of intraseasonal oscillations of the Southern Hemisphere summer and winter seasons is studied with a combination of observed diagnostics and simplified prognostic models. High-frequency oscillations, zonal mean variations, and ...

Ernesto H. Berbery; Julia Nogués-Paegle; John D. Horel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Free form hemispherical shaped charge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is a spherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved. It is an object of this invention to provide an improved shape charge for oil well perforation.

Haselman, L.C. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Teleconnections in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Teleconnections are calculated from monthly mean anomalies of sea level pressure and 500 mb geopotential height for the Southern Hemisphere (10–90°S) for five-month winter and summer seasons. The monthly means were calculated from Australian ...

Kingtse C. Mo; Glenn H. White

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sky Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy, Inc is a company located in Greenville, South Carolina . References "Sky Energy, Inc" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSkyEnergyInc&oldid351167...

22

Measurements of sky luminance, sky illuminance, and horizontal solar radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents initial findings of a sky measurement program currently in progress at the National Bureau of Standards. Measurements are reported on sky luminance and illuminance and how they relate to horizontal solar radiation and sun position. Correlations are presented relating horizontal illuminance to horizontal solar radiation, and zenith luminance to solar altitude. These empirical models are particularly suitable for use in daylighting energy studies since they are based on existing solar data currently available on standard weather tapes.

Treado, S.; Gillette, G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Dynamics of the Southern Hemisphere Spiral Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of the Southern Hemisphere spiral jet is investigated using observations over a 40-yr period. It is found that between late March and early April, the upper-tropospheric westerly jet in the Southern Hemisphere undergoes a transition ...

Lindsey N. Williams; Sukyoung Lee; Seok-Woo Son

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Sky Volt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volt Volt Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Volt Facility Sky Volt Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sky Volt LLC (community owned) Energy Purchaser City of Greenfield - excess to Central Iowa Power Cooperative Location Greenfield IA Coordinates 41.29038343°, -94.48851585° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.29038343,"lon":-94.48851585,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

RECIPIENT:SkyFuel, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SkyFuel, Inc. SkyFuel, Inc. u.s. DEPARTl.\IIEN T OF ENER qY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlvIINATION Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITL E: SkyFuel 8aseload Parabolic Trough Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement I.nstrument N mber NEPA Control Number CID Number Baseload DE-EEOO03584 GFO-OOO3584-002 G03584 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed achon, as NEP] Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4Sl.tA), I have made the followmg determmatlOn: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Descnptlon : 83.6 Small-scale Sltmg, construction, modification, operation, and de mmlSSlonlng of faCilities for smaliscale research research and and development projects; conventionallaboralory 0 rations (such as preparation of chemical

26

Hemispherical spondylosclerosis - a polyetiologic syndrome  

SciTech Connect

Radiologic examination of 43 patients revealed 47 lesions of a type which we have termed hemispherical spondylosclerosis (HSS). This term describes and includes the following essential and possible radiologic findings of the disease: 1) Hemispherical (or dome - or helmet-shaped ) sclerosis of the vertebra above the intervertebral disk. Thus it is a supradiscal HSS. 2) One or more small erosions of the inferior end plate of the vertebra involved. 3) Periosteal apposition on the anterior border of the vertebra along the length of the sclerosis. 4) New bone formation on the inferior end plate. 5) Anterior vertebral osteophytes. 6) Narrowing of the disk space below the affected vertebra. HSS occurs not only as a sequel of degenerative disk disease, but also in bacterial (tuberculous and non-tuberculous) spondylitis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoid osteoma, and metastases of neoplasms. The differential diagnosis between inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathogenesis and etiology of HSS is described. The characteristic shape of HSS, its sites of predilection (L4 >> L5 > L3), and the preponderance of female sufferers from this painful condition are due to factors which, as yet, remain unknown.

Dihlmann, W.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Science satellites scour skies for Santa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

satellites scour skies for Santa Science satellites scour skies for Santa Beginning at 6 a.m. Monday, Dec. 24, scientists will use two advanced science satellites to mark the...

28

`blue-sky' science Spending review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Cooling Towers Fiddlers Ferry #12;What are the benefits of `blue-sky' science? At a time where every penny

29

NIST Complete hemispherical infrared laser-based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A custom instrument, the Complete Hemispherical infrared Laser-based Reflectometer ... using light input from a selection of lasers covering the ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Unusual Midwinter Warming in the Southern Hemisphere Stratosphere 2002: A Comparison to Northern Hemisphere Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong midwinter warming occurred in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) stratosphere in September 2002. Based on experiences from the Northern Hemisphere (NH), this event can be defined as a major warming with a breakdown of the polar vortex in ...

Kirstin Krüger; Barbara Naujokat; Karin Labitzke

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Observed Hemispheric Symmetry in Reflected Shortwave Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the concentration of landmasses and atmospheric aerosols on the Northern Hemisphere suggests that the Northern Hemisphere is brighter than the Southern Hemisphere, satellite measurements of top-of-atmosphere irradiances found that both ...

Aiko Voigt; Bjorn Stevens; Jürgen Bader; Thorsten Mauritsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The influence of context on hemispheric recruitment during metaphor processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the left hemisphere's prominence in language is well established, less emphasis has been placed on possible roles for the right hemisphere. Behavioral, patient, and neuroimaging research suggests that the right hemisphere may be involved in ...

Michele T. Diaz; Larson J. Hogstrom

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Time Series Graphs of Global and Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Series Graphs of Global and Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies graphics Graph - Global and Hemispheric Annual Temperature Anomalies, 1850-2012 graphics Graph - Northern...

34

SkyBuilt Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name SkyBuilt Power Place Arlington, Virginia Zip 22207 Sector Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product US-based renewable energy system...

35

Eastern Hemisphere Tropical Cyclones of 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an annual summary of the Eastern Hemisphere tropical cyclones of 1996. The tropical cyclone statistics presented derive from records at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Guam. Although the text focuses on the tropical cyclones that ...

Mark A. Lander; Eric J. Trehubenko; Charles P. Guard

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Vorticity Budget of the Hemispheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cyclonic vorticity budget of the hemispheres is investigated using the output of the CCC GCM and objective analyses for the FGGE period. Analysis of GCM output gives direct estimates of the “topographic” and “frictional” vorticity sources and ...

G. J. Boer

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Eastern Hemisphere Tropical Cyclones of 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is designed to be an annual summary of the Eastern Hemisphere tropical cyclones of 1995. The tropical cyclone statistics presented are those of the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Guam. The text focuses primarily upon the tropical ...

Mark A. Lander; Michael D. Angove

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Climatic Trends in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of monthly mean sea level pressure, surface air temperature, and 500 mb and 300 mb geopotential heights and temperatures are used to study trends in the Southern Hemisphere from 1951–81.

Kingtse C. Mo; Harry Van Loon

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

TRENDS: Global and Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global and Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies - Land and Marine Instrumental Records graphics Graphics data Data Investigators P. D. Jones1, D. E. Parker2, T. J. Osborn1, and K. R....

40

Potential Vorticity Inversion on a Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different kinds of accurate potential vorticity (PV) inversion operators, and the associated balanced models, are tested for the shallow water equations on a hemisphere in an attempt to approach the ultimate limitations of the balance, ...

Michael E. McIntyre; Warwick A. Norton

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Future Changes in Northern Hemisphere Snowfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using simulations performed with 18 coupled atmosphere–ocean global climate models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), projections of the Northern Hemisphere snowfall under the representative concentration pathway (...

John P. Krasting; Anthony J. Broccoli; Keith W. Dixon; John R. Lanzante

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Interannual Variations in the Southern Hemisphere Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis has been made of variations in the atmospheric circulation with periods of more than 50 days occurring in the Southern Hemisphere between 1980 and 1986, using analyses produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts ...

John W. Kidson

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetables Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Vegetables Address 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place Needham, MA Zip 02494 Sector Solar Website http://www.skyvegetables.com/i Coordinates 42.2882945°, -71.2335259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2882945,"lon":-71.2335259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

A physically-based night sky model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a physically-based model of the night sky for realistic image synthesis. We model both the direct appearance of the night sky and the illumination coming from the Moon, the stars, the zodiacal light, and the atmosphere. To accurately ...

Henrik Wann Jensen; Frédo Durand; Julie Dorsey; Michael M. Stark; Peter Shirley; Simon Premože

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. Fun with polarizers D. Fun with polarizers In one respect, Einstein's mathematical analysis (like Rayleigh's earlier one) proves quite accurate, in a way that's easy to demonstrate. This has to do with how the sky's scattered light is polarized. Try looking at a patch of clear sky through one lens of a pair of polarizing sunglasses while you rotate the lens. You'll notice that the sky looks brighter as you look through the lens in some positions, and darker when the lens is in other positions. If the sun is not far from the patch of sky you're looking at, you'll find that the sky looks brightest when the sun is to the left or right of the lens, and darkest when the sun is "above the top" or "below the bottom" of the lens. Why is this? Any kind of wave-whether sound wave, water wave, light wave-is associated

46

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP ATLAS THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration...

47

SkyPower Pekon Electronics JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name SkyPower-Pekon Electronics JV Place India Sector Wind energy Product Joint venture for development of Indian wind farms. References SkyPower-Pekon Electronics...

48

Beijing Sky Solar Investment Management Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Solar Investment Management Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Sky Solar Investment & Management Co. Place Beijing, China Sector Solar Product Beijing based company...

49

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

50

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Big Sky Wind Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Wind Facility Sky Wind Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Sky Wind Facility Facility Big Sky Wind Facility Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Energy Developer Edison Mission Energy Energy Purchaser PJM Market Location Bureau County IL Coordinates 41.579967°, -89.46177° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.579967,"lon":-89.46177,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

SkyFuel Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyFuel Inc SkyFuel Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SkyFuel Inc Name SkyFuel Inc Address 18300 W Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Solar Product Solar thermal power Website http://www.skyfuel.com/ Coordinates 39.862942°, -105.206509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.862942,"lon":-105.206509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

North Sky River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Sky River Jump to: navigation, search Name North Sky River Facility North Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.335578°, -118.186347° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.335578,"lon":-118.186347,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - C  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Einstein "Einstein and the Daytime Sky" (continued) A B C D C. Imitation of opal Since Einstein was addressing a more general question than the color of the atmosphere, his results...

56

Sky Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power LLC Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97204 Sector Wind energy Product Developer of a high-altitude wind turbine technology. References Sky Power LLC1 LinkedIn Connections...

57

Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Wind Farm Sky River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Future Changes in Northern Hemisphere Snowfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using simulations performed with 18 coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate models from the CMIP5 project, projections of Northern Hemisphere snowfall under the RCP4.5 scenario are analyzed for the period 2006-2100. These models perform well in ...

John P. Krasting; Anthony J. Broccoli; Keith Dixon; John Lanzante

59

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Google Sky, WorldWide Telescope & Celestia in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Sky, WorldWide Telescope & Celestia in the Undergraduate Non-Science Major Classroom & Lab of Public Outreach Dept.Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Chicago Sky #12;Google Sky, World interactive labs and self-directed modules that utilize new, emerging, software tools, specifically Google Sky

Collar, Juan I.

62

Explosive Cyclone Development in the Southern Hemisphere and a Comparison with Northern Hemisphere Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compilation of Southern Hemisphere (SH) explosively developing cyclones (or “bombs”) has been assembled based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–Department of Energy reanalysis-2 data over the 21-yr period from 1979 to 1999. ...

Eun-Pa Lim; Ian Simmonds

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cloudy Sky Version of Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on Bird's Broadband Hourly Clear Sky Model given by NREL's Daryl Myers at SOLAR 2006. The objective of this report is to produce ''all sky'' modeled hourly solar radiation. This is based on observed cloud cover data using a SIMPLE model.

Myers, D.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SolarSkies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarSkies SolarSkies Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarSkies Address 106 Donovan Drive Place Alexandria, Minnesota Zip 56308 Country United States Sector Solar Coordinates 45.88897°, -95.3536576° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.88897,"lon":-95.3536576,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Sky Wind Farm Desert Sky Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Sky Wind Farm Facility Desert Sky Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner American Electric Power Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser City of San Antonio Texas (Utility Company) Location Pecos County TX Coordinates 30.926626°, -102.100067° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.926626,"lon":-102.100067,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

66

SkyFuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyFuel SkyFuel Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SkyFuel Name SkyFuel Address 18300 West Highway 72 Place Arvada, Colorado Zip 80007 Sector Solar Product Parabolic Trough Solar Collector Year founded 2007 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 303.330.0276 Website http://www.skyfuel.com Coordinates 39.8630176°, -105.2064482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8630176,"lon":-105.2064482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

67

American Clean Skies Foundation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Skies Foundation Skies Foundation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: American Clean Skies Foundation Name American Clean Skies Foundation Address 750 1st Street NE, Suite 1100 Place Washington, DC Zip 20002 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 2007 Phone number (202) 682-6294 Website http://www.cleanskies.org/ Coordinates 38.899704°, -77.007068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.899704,"lon":-77.007068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

Hemispheric Helicity Trend for Solar Cycle 24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using vector magnetograms obtained with the Spectro-polarimeter (SP) on aboard Hinode satellite, we studied two helicity parameters (local twist and current helicity) of 64 active regions occurred in the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. Our analysis gives the following results. (1) The 34 active regions of the solar cycle 24 follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule, whereas the 30 active regions of the solar cycle 23 do not. (2) When combining all 64 active regions as one sample, they follow the hemispheric helicity sign rule as in most other observations. (3) Despite with the so-far most accurate measurement of vector magnetic field given by SP/Hinode, the rule is still weak with large scatters. (4) The data show evidence of different helicity signs between strong and weak fields, confirming previous result from a large sample of ground-based observations. (5) With two example sunspots we show that the helicity parameters change sign from the inner umbra to ...

Hao, Juan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

HEMISPHERIC HELICITY TREND FOR SOLAR CYCLE 24  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using vector magnetograms obtained with the Spectro-polarimeter (SP) on board Hinode satellite, we studied two helicity parameters (local twist and current helicity) of 64 active regions that occurred in the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. Our analysis gives the following results. (1) The 34 active regions of the solar cycle 24 follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule, whereas the 30 active regions of the solar cycle 23 do not. (2) When combining all 64 active regions as one sample, they follow the hemispheric helicity sign rule as in most other observations. (3) Despite the so-far most accurate measurement of vector magnetic field given by SP/Hinode, the rule is still weak with large scatters. (4) The data show evidence of different helicity signs between strong and weak fields, confirming previous result from a large sample of ground-based observations. (5) With two example sunspots we show that the helicity parameters change sign from the inner umbra to the outer penumbra, where the sign of penumbra agrees with the sign of the active region as a whole. From these results, we speculate that both the {Sigma}-effect (turbulent convection) and the dynamo have contributed in the generation of helicity, whereas in both cases turbulence in the convection zone has played a significant role.

Hao Juan; Zhang Mei, E-mail: haojuan@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Blue Sky Bio Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio Fuels Bio Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Bio-Fuels Place Oakland, California Zip 94602 Product Blue Sky owns and operates a biodiesel plant in Idaho with a capacity of 37.9mLpa (10m gallons annually). Coordinates 37.805065°, -122.273024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.805065,"lon":-122.273024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

NETL: News Release - Eyes in the Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 28, 2003 August 28, 2003 Eyes in the Sky... Remote Sensing Technology Maps Flow of Groundwater from the Air Photo: Remote Sensor Suspended Beneath a Helicopter Detects Groundwater Beneath the Surface DOE is using remote sensors suspended from helicopters to map the flow of groundwater that may be affected by energy projects. In four states this past spring and summer, eyes have turned skyward as helicopters zig-zagged over hills and valleys, towing torpedo- or spiderweb-like contraptions that conjured up thoughts of Superman - "Look! Up in the sky!" But the "x-ray vision" in this case isn't comic-book fantasy. Instead, using aerial remote sensing techniques, researchers working with the U.S. Department of Energy are "seeing" through solid ground to create

72

New Sky Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Sky Energy New Sky Energy Place Boulder, Colorado Sector Carbon Product Colorado-based startup that focuses on using chemical technology to convert carbon dioxide to usable outputs. Coordinates 42.74962°, -109.714163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.74962,"lon":-109.714163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

Einstein and the Daytime Sky - A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The distinction between a fluid's liquid and gaseous phases breaks down at a certain temperature and pressure; when illuminated under these conditions, the fluid looks milky white, like a common opal. Einstein found how this relates to the reason the sky is blue. A B C D A. A path with a detour If you look at many artists' renderings of Albert Einstein, you are likely to find some that depict Einstein with some representation of the universe as a whole, or black holes, or other objects in deep space. Because many such pictures exist, we may, somewhat unconsciously, associate Einstein with the dark nighttime sky. This is a quite reasonable association, since Einstein's theories of space and time deal with the universe as a whole and with certain astrophysical

74

Blue Sky Optimum Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimum Energy Optimum Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Optimum Energy Place Buffalo, New York Product Blue Sky offers a processing system to produce biodiesel at a cheaper price. Coordinates 42.88544°, -78.878464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.88544,"lon":-78.878464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

Infrared Sky Brightness Monitors for Antarctica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Two sky brightness monitorsone for the near-infrared and one for the mid-infraredhave been developed for site survey work in Antarctica. The instruments, which we refer to as the NISM (Near-Infrared Sky Monitor) and the MISM (Mid-Infrared Sky Monitor), are part of a suite of instruments being deployed in the Automated Astrophysical Site-Testing Observatory (AASTO). The chief design constraints include reliable, autonomous operation, low power consumption, and of course the ability to operate under conditions of extreme cold. The instruments are currently operational at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, prior to deployment at remote, unattended sites on the high antarctic plateau. 1. INTRODUCTION The antarctic plateau is recognized as having the potential to provide some of the best astronomical observing conditions on earth (see, e.g., Burton et al. 1994). Almost all the site testing to date has been carried out at the South Pole, where it has already been demonstrated t...

Storey Ashley Boccas; J. W. V. Storey; M. C. B. Ashley; M. Boccas; M. A. Phillips; A. E. T. Schinckel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Conergy SkyPower JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SkyPower JV SkyPower JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Conergy & SkyPower JV Place Canada Sector Solar Product Canada-based solar project developer. References Conergy & SkyPower JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Conergy & SkyPower JV is a company located in Canada . References ↑ "Conergy & SkyPower JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Conergy_SkyPower_JV&oldid=343842" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

77

Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy Cogenra Solar formerly SkyWatch Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy) Place Mountain View, California Zip 94043 Sector Solar Product California-based and founded by a former Applied Materials executive, Cogenra Solar is a stealth mode solar company. References Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy) is a company located in Mountain View, California . References ↑ "Cogenra Solar (formerly SkyWatch Energy)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cogenra_Solar_formerly_SkyWatch_Energy&oldid=343766"

78

Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

Marriner, John; /Fermilab

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SkyVision SkyVision SkyVision logo. Calculates the overall optical characteristics (transmittance, absorptance, reflectance and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient) of conventional and tubular skylights, performance indicators of skylight/room interfaces (well efficiency and coefficient of utilization), indoor daylight availability (daylight factor and illuminance) and daily/annual lighting energy savings. SkyVision accounts for the skylight shape and glazing, geometry of the indoor space (curb, well, room), skylight layouts, lighting and shading controls, site location and sky/ground conditions. SkyVision is unique--it uses the state-of-art glazing models and ray-tracing-based methods to compute the optical characteristics of skylights and indoor daylight availability. Screen Shots

80

EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. I. PHOTOMETRIC RECALIBRATION WITH THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We describe photometric recalibration of data obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR. Although LINEAR was designed for astrometric discovery of moving objects, the data set described here contains over 5 billion photometric measurements for about 25 million objects, mostly stars. We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data from the overlapping {approx}10,000 deg{sup 2} of sky to recalibrate LINEAR photometry and achieve errors of 0.03 mag for sources not limited by photon statistics with errors of 0.2 mag at r {approx} 18. With its 200 observations per object on average, LINEAR data provide time domain information for the brightest four magnitudes of the SDSS survey. At the same time, LINEAR extends the deepest similar wide-area variability survey, the Northern Sky Variability Survey, by 3 mag. We briefly discuss the properties of about 7000 visually confirmed periodic variables, dominated by roughly equal fractions of RR Lyrae stars and eclipsing binary stars, and analyze their distribution in optical and infrared color-color diagrams. The LINEAR data set is publicly available from the SkyDOT Web site.

Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stuart, J. Scott [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States); Ivezic, Zeljko; Morgan, Dylan P.; Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Wozniak, Przemyslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates for use in science. The SkyWalker "technique" can be applied to other data sets. This requires some customization, notably the slicing up of a data set into small (e.g., 256^2 pixel) subimages. An advantage of the SkyWalker is the use of standard Web browser components; thus, it requires no installation of any software and can therefore be viewed by anyone across many operating systems.

K. Jahnke; S. F. Sanchez; A. Koekemoer

2006-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

Meridional and Downward Propagation of Atmospheric Circulation Anomalies. Part II: Southern Hemisphere Cold Season Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As in the Northern Hemisphere, there exists a simultaneous poleward propagation of temperature anomalies in the stratosphere and equatorward propagation in the troposphere in the Southern Hemisphere’s cold season. It takes about 110 days for ...

R-C. Ren; Ming Cai

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Kevin Dome...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Services Vecta Oil & Gas, Ltd. Washington State University Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Kevin Dome Development Phase Project Background The U.S....

84

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SkyVision  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dailyannual lighting energy savings. SkyVision accounts for the skylight shape and glazing, geometry of the indoor space (curb, well, room), skylight layouts,...

85

NETL: Carbon Storage - Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BSCSP BSCSP Carbon Storage Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing BSCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is led by Montana State University-Bozeman and represents a coalition of more than 60 organizations including universities, national laboratories, private companies, state agencies, Native American tribes, and international collaborators. The partners are engaged in several aspects of BSCSP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects in the BSCSP region. The BSCSP region encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, South Dakota, and eastern Washington and Oregon. BSCSP Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region

86

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA,...

87

Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Solar Product Designs and installs photovoltaic, solar thermal and co-generation power generation systems for domestic use. References Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings...

88

SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

A Climatology of Cyclogenesis for the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study surveys life cycle characteristics of cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). An objective technique for locating instances of cyclone formation, intensification, maturation, and decay is applied to a 7-year dataset of SH cyclone ...

Mark R. Sinclair

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Recent Observed Interdecadal Climate Changes in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The largest increases in surface temperatures over the Northern Hemisphere in the decade prior to 1988 were in Alaska, while substantial decreases occurred in the North Pacific Ocean. This illustrates the considerable geographic spatial structure ...

Kevin E. Trenberth

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Heat Balance of the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic development of the Western Hemisphere warm pool and its four geographic subregions are analyzed. The subregional warm pools of the eastern North Pacific and equatorial Atlantic are best developed in the boreal spring, while in ...

David B. Enfield; Sang-ki Lee

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Differences in El Niño Response over the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Hemisphere (SH) circulation conditions during austral springs of ENSO events are examined. Based on previous knowledge that SST variations over the subtropical south-central Pacific (SSCP) region are linked to differences among El Niño (...

Carolina Vera; Gabriel Silvestri; Vicente Barros; Andrea Carril

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Effects of Orography on Midlatitude Northern Hemisphere Dry Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of mountains in maintaining extensive midlatitude arid regions in the Northern Hemisphere was investigated using simulations from the GFDL Global Climate Model with and without orography. In the integration with mountains, dry climates ...

A. J. Broccoli; S. Manabe

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Isentropic Cross-Tropopause Ozone Transport in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates isentropic ozone exchange between the extratropical lower stratosphere and the subtropical upper troposphere in the Northern Hemisphere. The quantification method is based on the potential vorticity (PV) mapping of ...

P. Jing; D. M. Cunnold; H. J. Wang; E-S. Yang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Zonal Asymmetry of the Southern Hemisphere Winter Storm Track  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric general circulation model experiments have been performed to investigate how the significant zonal asymmetry in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) winter storm track is forced by sea surface temperature (SST) and orography. An experiment ...

Masaru Inatsu; Brian J. Hoskins

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Thermally-Forced Mean Mass Circulations in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic approach to infer three-dimensional distribution of the thermally-forced, time-averaged horizontal mass and energy transport (Johnson and Townsend, 1981), which was previously applied in the Southern Hemisphere (Zillman, 1972), is ...

Bette L. Otto-Bliesner; Donald R. Johnson

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Continuum and Dynamics of Northern Hemisphere Teleconnection Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents an alternative interpretation for Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns. Rather than comprising several different recurrent regimes, this study suggests that there is a continuum of teleconnection patterns. This ...

Christian Franzke; Steven B. Feldstein

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Seasonality in Southern Hemisphere Eddy Statistics at 500 mb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis has been made of the spatial and frequency dependence of transient eddy statistics in the Southern Hemisphere at 500 mb. This study emphasizes summer versus winter differences in order to complement previous results of Trenberth (1981)...

Kevin E. Trenberth

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Life Cycle of the Northern Hemisphere Sudden Stratospheric Warmings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by recent evidence of strong stratospheric–tropospheric coupling during the Northern Hemisphere winter, this study examines the evolution of the atmospheric flow and wave fluxes at levels throughout the stratosphere and troposphere ...

Varavut Limpasuvan; David W. J. Thompson; Dennis L. Hartmann

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Skewness, Kurtosis and Extreme Values of Northern Hemisphere Geopotential Heights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twelve summers and 11 winters of Northern Hemisphere 500 and 1000 mb geopotential height are used to calculate the third and fourth moments of height in the nondimensional form of skewness and kurtosis. Geopotential height exhibits small but ...

Glenn H. White

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Dynamics of Northern Hemisphere Stratospheric Final Warming Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lag composite analysis is performed of the zonal-mean structure and dynamics of Northern Hemisphere stratospheric final warming (SFW) events. SFW events are linked to distinct zonal wind deceleration signatures in the stratosphere and ...

Robert X. Black; Brent A. McDaniel

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A search for chaotic behavior in Northern Hemisphere stratospheric variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern Hemisphere stratospheric variability is investigated with respect to chaotic behavior using time series from three different variables extracted from four different re-analysis products and two numerical model runs with different forcing. ...

Gualtiero Badin; Daniela I.V. Domeisen

103

Tropospheric Precursors of Anomalous Northern Hemisphere Stratospheric Polar Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional extratropical tropospheric variability in the North Pacific and eastern Europe is well correlated with variability in the Northern Hemisphere wintertime stratospheric polar vortex in both the ECMWF reanalysis record and in the Whole ...

Chaim I. Garfinkel; Dennis L. Hartmann; Fabrizio Sassi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Some Considerations Relevant to Computing Average Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three data bases of gridded surface temperature anomalies were used to assess the sensitivity of the average estimated Northern Hemisphere (NH) temperature anomaly to: 1) extreme gridpoint values and 2) zonal band contributions. Over the last 100 ...

S. L. Grotch

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Real-time rendering of daylight sky scene for virtual environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Realistic rendering of sky scene is important in virtual environment. Traditional methods are mostly based on skybox, thus failing to realistically simulate the change of sky scene under different weathers and conditions. In this paper, a new sky light ...

Changbo Wang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

An optimum approach for fabrication of tapered hemispherical-end fiber for laser module packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: coupling efficientcy, laser module packaging, semiempirical model, tapered hemispherical-end fiber

H. M. Yang; D. C. Jou; M. H. Chen; S. H. Wu; W. H. Cheng

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Pink Skies coming to Northern New Mexico October 15-16  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pink Skies Coming To Northern New Mexico Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues submit Pink Skies coming to...

108

Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info Start Date 2005 State Montana Program Type Grant Program Provider Montana Department of Commerce The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal government on behalf of any business may apply. The funding limit of the program is $5,000 per new qualifying job created or $7,500 per qualifying job created in a high poverty county. A dollar for dollar match (or 50% match in a high poverty

110

Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Sky Astronomical Image Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Key Challenges: Develop, store, analyze, and make available an astronomical image database of unprecedented depth, temporal breadth, and sky coverage, consisting of images from the seven-year span of the Palomar-Quest and Near-Earth Astroid Tracking (NEAT) transient surveys and the current Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The database currently has over 13 million images stored on the NERSC Global Filesystem but data from the PTF are accumulating at the rate of about 105TB per year. The challenge is not only archiving the data but processing it in near-real time to observe rare and fleeting cosmic events as they happen so that experimental astronomers can be alerted. Why it Matters: The PTF will probe gaps in the transient phase space and

111

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

112

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

113

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

114

Real-Time Sky-View Factor Calculation and Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously, the acquisition of sky-view factor data for climate studies has been time consuming and dependent on postprocessing. However, advances in technology now mean that techniques using fish-eye imagery can be algorithmically processed in ...

L. Chapman; J. E. Thornes

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Clear-Sky Nocturnal Temperatures Forecast and the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nocturnal evolution of air and soil temperatures are computed for clear-sky situations. The model takes into account the soil heat conduction and the atmospheric radiative transfers by using radiosonde data for temperature, water vapor, and ...

A. Quinft; J. Vanderborght

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Empirical Estimation of Daily Clear Sky Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suitability of two simple empirical equations for the estimation of clear sky radiation was investigated. Results indicated that latitude and altitude were sufficient to estimate the empirical equation coefficients and that the estimates of ...

D. F. Heermann; G. J. Harrington; K. M. Stahl

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

American Clean Skies Foundation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Clean Skies Foundation Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 2 October, 2012 - 14:01 Nominations open for 250,000 Multimedia Clean...

118

SkySails GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kite, with which it supplements the momentum of commercial vessels on long journeys, saving fuel costs. References SkySails GmbH1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

119

Factors Controlling ERBE Longwave Clear Sky and Cloud Forcing Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors controlling the Earth Radiation Budget satellite (ERBS) longwave clear sky and cloud-forcing fluxes are investigated using statistical analyses of the ERBS fluxes with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud ...

Bryan C. Weare

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Feasibility of night-sky radiation with heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the procedure involved in the determination of the feasibility of high-sky radiation as the means of rejecting heat through solar collectors for a sample residential house in the Evansville area. It presents conclusions on different types of coatings that are used on solar collectors. It also designs the system, and its backup, in schematic form. For the purpose of cost analysis it discusses the difference of a cooling tower and night-sky radiation.

McKinney, T.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

122

Column Water Vapor Content in Clear and Cloudy Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With radiosonde data from 15 Northern Hemisphere stations, surface-to-400-mb column water vapor is computed from daytime soundings for 1988–1990. On the basis of simultaneous surface visual cloud observations, the data are categorized according ...

Dian J. Gaffen; William P. Elliott

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates f...

Jahnke, K; Koekemoer, A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Display of clouds taking into account multiple anisotropic scattering and sky light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: clouds, multiple scattering, optical length, participating media, photo-realism, radiative transfer, sky light

Tomoyuki Nishita; Yoshinori Dobashi; Eihachiro Nakamae

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Climatology of Anticyclones and Blocking for the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated procedure for locating and tracking high pressure centers is applied to 10 years of twice-daily ECMWF analyses during 1980–89 to survey the behavior of anticyclones in the Southern Hemisphere. Anticyclones are concentrated in the 25°–...

Mark R. Sinclair

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

An Objective Cyclone Climatology for the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective method is developed and used to derive a climatology of centers of cyclonic vorticity for the Southern Hemisphere, based on twice-daily European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 1000-hPa analyses during 1980–86. ...

Mark R. Sinclair

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Northern Hemisphere Surface Air Temperature Variations: 1851–1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new compilation of monthly mean surface air temperature for the Northern Hemisphere for 1851–1984 is presented based on land-based meteorological station data and fixed-position weather ship data. This compilation differs from others in two ...

P. D. Jones; S. C. B. Raper; R. S. Bradley; H. F. Diaz; P. M. Kellyo; T. M. L. Wigley

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Southern Hemisphere Surface Air Temperature Variations: 1851–1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new compilation of monthly mean surface air temperature data for the Southern Hemisphere for 1851–1984 is presented based on land-based meteorological station data. Where possible, the station data used in the analysis have been assessed for ...

P. D. Jones; S. C. B. Raper; T. M. L. Wigley

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Decadal-Scale Temperature Trends in the Southern Hemisphere Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term trends in the heat content of the Southern Hemisphere ocean are evaluated by comparing temperature profiles collected during the 1990s with profiles collected starting in the 1930s. Data are drawn both from ship-based hydrographic ...

Sarah T. Gille

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Comparison of Northern Hemisphere Snow Cover Data Sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four Northern Hemisphere snow cover data sets are compared on a weekly basis for the 25-month period, July 1981 through July 1983. The data sets are the NOAA/NESDIS Weekly Snow and Ice Chart, the Composite Minimum Brightness (CMB) Chart, the U.S. ...

John Scialdone; Alan Robock

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

New Perspectives on the Northern Hemisphere Winter Storm Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to explore the use of both an Eulerian and system-centered method of storm track diagnosis applied to a wide range of meteorological fields at multiple levels to provide a range of perspectives on the Northern Hemisphere ...

Brian J. Hoskins; Kevin I. Hodges

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Intraseasonal Oscillations in the Global Atmosphere. Part II: Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of this two-part article, we complete the systematic examination of oscillatory modes in the global atmosphere by studying 12 years of 500 mb geopotential heights in the Southern Hemisphere. As in Part I, for the tropics and Northern ...

Michael Ghil; Kingtse Mo

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Climatological Features of Cutoff Low Systems in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the first multidecadal climatology of cutoff low systems in the Northern Hemisphere. The climatology was constructed by using 41 yr (1958–98) of NCEP–NCAR reanalysis data and identifying cutoff lows by means of an objective ...

Raquel Nieto; Luis Gimeno; Laura de la Torre; Pedro Ribera; David Gallego; Ricardo García-Herrera; José Agustín García; Marcelino Nuñez; Angel Redaño; Jerónimo Lorente

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Opposite Annular Responses of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres to Indian Ocean Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric circulation changes during boreal winter of the second half of the twentieth century exhibit a trend toward the positive polarity of both the Northern Hemisphere annular mode (NAM) and the Southern Hemisphere annular mode (SAM). This ...

Shuanglin Li; Judith Perlwitz; Martin P. Hoerling; Xiaoting Chen

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Changes of Snow Cover, Temperature, and Radiative Heat Balance over the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contemporary large-scale changes in satellite-derived snow cover were examined over the Northern Hemisphere extratropical land (NEL) areas. These areas encompass 55% of the land in the Northern Hemisphere. Snow cover (S) transient regions, the “...

Pavel Ya Groisman; Thomas R. Karl; Richard W. Knight; Georgiy L. Stenchikov

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

see also the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Page: http://from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA A.Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA The IceCube

Achterberg, A.; IceCube Collaboration

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Southern Hemisphere Wave Response to ENSO with Implications for Southern Africa Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble GCM simulations with an imposed, idealized warming of the eastern Pacific Ocean reveal two wave anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere, one in the eastern and one in the western hemisphere. Both are statistically significant at the 99% ...

Kerry H. Cook

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Persistence of the 500 mb Height Field during Northern Hemisphere Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The persistence of the planetary-scale circulation during the Northern Hemisphere winters from 1965/66 to 1981/82 is documented. National Meteorological Center analyses of 500 mb geopotential height for the Northern Hemisphere poleward of 20°N ...

John D. Horel

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Interannual Variability and Trends of Extratropical Ozone. Part II: Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to the Southern Hemisphere (SH) total column ozone following the method established for analyzing the data in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) in a companion paper. The interannual variability (IAV) of ...

Xun Jiang; Steven Pawson; Charles D. Camp; J. Eric Nielsen; Run-Lie Shia; Ting Liao; Varavut Limpasuvan; Yuk L. Yung

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd Zhenjiang Sky Solar Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Zhenjiang Sky-Solar Co Ltd Place Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 212009 Sector Solar Product A high-tech enterprise specialized in developing and manufacturing solar series lights and solar panels. Coordinates 31.966261°, 119.472687° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.966261,"lon":119.472687,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A blue sky catastrophe in double-diffusive convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global bifurcation of the blue sky catastrophe type has been found in a small Prandtl number binary mixture contained in a laterally heated cavity. The system has been studied numerically applying the tools of bifurcation theory. The catastrophe corresponds to the destruction of an orbit which, for a large range of Rayleigh numbers, is the only stable solution. This orbit is born in a global saddle-loop bifurcation and becomes chaotic in a period doubling cascade just before its disappearance at the blue sky catastrophe.

Esteban Meca; Isabel Mercader; Oriol Batiste; Laureano Ramirez-Piscina

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

Microsoft Word - NEPA Big Sky Final EA .doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

886 886 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For The Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY April 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment i April 2013 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project (DOE/EA-1886) Contact: For additional copies or more information about this Environmental Assessment, please contact: Mr. Bill Gwilliam U.S. Department of Energy

143

Extraction of cloud statistics from whole sky imaging cameras  

SciTech Connect

Computer codes have been developed to extract basic cloud statistics from whole sky imaging (WSI) cameras. This report documents, on an algorithmic level, the steps and processes underlying these codes. Appendices comment on code details and on how to adapt to future changes in either the source camera or the host computer.

Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Name Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Address 2327 University Way, 3rd Floor Place Bozeman, Montana Zip 59715 Region Pacific Northwest Area Phone number 406-994-3755 Notes One of the US DOE's seven regional carbon sequestration partnerships. Coordinates 45.6565752°, -111.041813° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6565752,"lon":-111.041813,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

The Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Sensitivity to a Sea Surface Temperature Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Considering geographical distributions ...

J. Ph Duvel; F. M. Bréon

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Feasibility of GRB with TeV gamma ray all sky monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss feasibility of Gamma ray burst (GRB) with TeV gamma ray all sky monitor and discuss necessity of TeV gamma ray cherenkov all sky monitor.

S. Osone

2003-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Study of the Incoming Longwave Atmospheric Radiation from a Clear Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A band model for atmospheric absorption is used to calculate the incoming longwave atmospheric radiative flux for some typical clear sky conditions. The sky radiation is also measured using a specially-designed calorimetric apparatus over a wide ...

J. W. Ramsey; H. D. Chiang; R. J. Goldstein

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Equilibrium magnetic states in individual hemispherical permalloy caps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetization distributions in individual soft magnetic permalloy caps on non-magnetic spherical particles with sizes ranging from 50 to 800 nm are investigated. We experimentally visualize the magnetic structures at the resolution limit of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoelectron emission microscopy (XMCD-PEEM). By analyzing the so-called tail contrast in XMCD-PEEM, the spatial resolution is significantly enhanced, which allowed us to explore magnetic vortices and their displacement on curved surfaces. Furthermore, cap nanostructures are modeled as extruded hemispheres to determine theoretically the phase diagram of equilibrium magnetic states. The calculated phase diagram agrees well with the experimental observations.

Streubel, Robert; Schmidt, Oliver G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine); Sheka, Denis D. [Radiophysics Faculty, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Makarov, Denys [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Kronast, Florian [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Retrieving Cloud Characteristics from Ground-Based Daytime Color All-Sky Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discussion is presented of daytime sky imaging and techniques that may be applied to the analysis of full-color sky images to infer cloud macrophysical properties. Descriptions of two different types of sky-imaging systems developed by the ...

C. N. Long; J. M. Sabburg; J. Calbó; D. Pagès

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Determination of Sky View-Factors in Urban Environments Using Video Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is described whereby sky view-factors may be determined using a video camera equipped with a fish-eye lens. The video image is digitized and then analyzed to distinguish between “sky” and “non-sky” pixels. View-factors are calculated ...

D. G. Steyn; J. E. Hay; Ian D. Watson; Glenn T. Johnson

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

152

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

153

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

SciTech Connect

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

SciTech Connect

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

155

Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Hemispheres Reflected by Steel and Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period from June 1967 through September 1969 a series of critical experiments was performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory with spherical and hemispherical plutonium assemblies as nested hemishells as part of a Nuclear Safety Facility Experimental Program to evaluate operational safety margins for the Rocky Flats Plant. These assemblies were both bare and fully or partially oil-reflected. Many of these experiments were subcritical with an extrapolation to critical configurations or critical at a particular oil height. Existing records reveal that 167 experiments were performed over the course of 28 months. Unfortunately, much of the data was not recorded. A reevaluation of the experiments had been summarized in a report for future experimental and computational analyses. This report examines only fifteen partially oil-reflected hemispherical assemblies. Fourteen of these assemblies also had close-fitting stainless-steel hemishell reflectors, used to determine the effective critical reflector height of oil with varying steel-reflector thickness. The experiments and their uncertainty in keff values were evaluated to determine their potential as valid criticality benchmark experiments of plutonium.

John Darrell Bess

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Big Sky, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky, Montana: Energy Resources Sky, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.2846507°, -111.368292° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.2846507,"lon":-111.368292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

157

The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

Abazajian, Kevork N; Agüeros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

D. Pourbaix; G. R. Knapp; P. Szkody; Z. Ivezic; S. J. Kleinman; D. Long; S. A. Snedden; A. Nitta; M. Harvanek; J. Krzesinski; H. J. Brewington; J. C. Barentine; E. H. Neilsen; J. Brinkman

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

Pourbaix, D; Szkody, P; Ivezic, Z; Kleinman, S J; Long, D; Snedden, S A; Nitta, A; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Brewington, H J; Barentine, J C; Neilsen, E H; Brinkmann, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International OZZ Solar Inc Sky Ozz International Jump to: navigation, search Name OZZ Solar Inc. (Sky Ozz International) Place Concord, Ontario, Canada Zip L4K 4R1 Sector Solar Product Ontario-based OZZ Solar was formed to build commercial and residential rooftop solar projects under the province's feed-in tariff programme. Coordinates 37.344704°, -78.975299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.344704,"lon":-78.975299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa March 1, 2013 - 7:19pm Addthis In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes. Moapa Band of Paiutes Chairman William Anderson. In addition to the planned 250-MW solar farm set to begin construction in June 2013, the Moapa Band of Paiutes is working on a second 150-MW project that would use both PV and concentrated solar technologies to generate power for the Tribe. Photo from Moapa Band of Paiutes.

162

Sloan Digital Sky Survey III: Data Release Eight  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are:

  • Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)
  • SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)
  • The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)
  • The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

[Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

SDSS Collaboration

163

Correlated Errors in the COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The {\\it COBE} DMR sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions, and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of $60 \\deg$ due to the $60 \\deg$ separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at $60 \\deg$ is $0.45\\% ^{+0.18}_{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is $0.7\\%$ greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Auto-correlation functions suffer from a $\\sim 1.5\\; \\sigma$ positive bias at $60 \\deg$ while cross-correlations have no bias. Published {\\it COBE} DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise. COBE pre-print 94-

C. H. Lineweaver; G. F. Smoot; C. L. Bennett; E. L. Wright; L. Tenorio; A. Kogut; P. B. Keegstra; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

Index Cycles in the Northern Hemisphere during the Global Weather Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An index cycle occurring in the Northern Hemisphere during the late winter and spring of 1979 has been examined in detail using the ECMWF Level IIIb data set.

John W. Kidson

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Global, Hemispheric, and Zonal Temperature Deviations (CDIAC) - Angell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global, Hemispheric, and Zonal Temperature Deviations Derived From a 63-Station Radiosonde Network Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Investigator J. K. Angell National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory (R/E/AR), SSMC3, Station 3459, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910, U.S.A. About Jim Angell: From the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (2005) - Jim Angell's Contributions to Meteorology DOI 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.005 Period of Record 1958-2010 (relative to a 1958-1977 average) Special Note Nine tropical radiosonde stations in this 63-station network were identified as anomalous in Angell (2003). Upon removal of these nine stations, the resulting 54-station network, also presented on the CDIAC website, results in significant differences in many of the times series and

166

Tropical-Extratropical Teleconnections during the Northern Hemisphere Winter. Part II: Relationships between Monthly Mean Northern Hemisphere Circulation Patterns and Proxies for Tropical Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean teleconnections during the northern winter between proxies for tropical heating (OLR and SST data) and Northern Hemisphere 700 mb circulation patterns (PNA, TNH, and WPO) are examined, principally with correlation analysis. In ...

Robert E. Livezey; Kingtse C. Mo

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Satellite-Derived Maps of Snow Cover Frequency for the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite imagery-based Northern Hemisphere snow cover data archive was mapped for the period 1966–84: The maps were digitized in order to create the first hemispheric, spatially data-continuous climatologies of snow cover. Annual and monthly ...

Kenneth F. Dewey

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A capsule is described containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

Gross, Kenny; Lambert, John

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon intensified by mega-El Nio/southern oscillation and Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon intensified by mega-El Niño/southern oscillation and Atlantic, and approved February 26, 2013 (received for review November 7, 2012) Prediction of monsoon changes, the causes of the decadal variability of Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon (NHSM) are largely unknown

Webster, Peter J.

170

Solar-Cycle Characteristics Examined in Separate Hemispheres: Phase, Gnevyshev Gap, and Length of Minimum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research results from solar-dynamo models show the northern and southern hemispheres may evolve separately throughout the solar cycle. The observed phase lag between the hemispheres provides information regarding the strength of hemispheric coupling. Using hemispheric sunspot-area and sunspot-number data from Cycles 12 - 23, we determine how out of phase the separate hemispheres are during the rising, maximum, and declining period of each solar cycle. Hemispheric phase differences range from 0 - 11, 0 - 14, and 2 - 19 months for the rising, maximum, and declining periods, respectively. The phases appear randomly distributed between zero months (in phase) and half of the rise (or decline) time of the solar cycle. An analysis of the Gnevyshev gap is conducted to determine if the double-peak is caused by the averaging of two hemispheres that are out of phase. We confirm previous findings that the Gnevyshev gap is a phenomenon that occurs in the separate hemispheres and is not due to a superposition of sunspot in...

Norton, A A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) Contact Information Bill Eaker 828-251-6622 x142 bill@landofsky.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Bill Eaker Photo of Bill Eaker Bill Eaker established the Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition, serving the Western North Carolina region, in 2004 and has served as the coalition's coordinator since then. Eaker has over 31 years of experience in environmental, land use, and growth management planning at the local, regional, and state scales. He has worked at Land of Sky Regional Council

172

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban, and desert dust aerosols ." JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICALand K. V. S. Badarinath. "Aerosol climatology: dependence ofUsing a Sky Imager for aerosol characterization."

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Field Wind Farm Green Field Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm Facility Blue Sky Green Field Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner We Energies Developer We Energies Energy Purchaser We Energies Location Fond du Lac County WI Coordinates 43.908549°, -88.305384° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.908549,"lon":-88.305384,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

174

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has surveyed the distribution and kinematics of ionized gas in the Galaxy above declination -30 degrees. The WHAM Northern Sky Survey (WHAM-NSS) has an angular resolution of one degree and provides the first absolutely-calibrated, kinematically-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) within ~ +/-100 km/s of the Local Standard of Rest. Leveraging WHAM's 12 km/s spectral resolution, we have modeled and removed atmospheric emission and zodiacal absorption features from each of the 37,565 spectra. The resulting H-Alpha profiles reveal ionized gas detected in nearly every direction on the sky with a sensitivity of 0.15 R (3 sigma). Complex distributions of ionized gas are revealed in the nearby spiral arms up to 1-2 kpc away from the Galactic plane. Toward the inner Galaxy, the WHAM-NSS provides information about the WIM out to the tangent point down to a few degrees from the plane. Ionized gas is also detected toward many intermediate velocity clouds at high latitudes. Several new H II regions are revealed around early B-stars and evolved stellar cores (sdB/O). This work presents the details of the instrument, the survey, and the data reduction techniques. The WHAM-NSS is also presented and analyzed for its gross properties. Finally, some general conclusions are presented about the nature of the WIM as revealed by the WHAM-NSS.

L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds; S. L. Tufte; G. J. Madsen; K. P. Jaehnig; J. W. Percival

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

175

On the Origin of the Surface Air Temperature Difference between the Hemispheres in Earth's Present-Day Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's climate, the annually averaged surface air temperature in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is 1°–2°C higher than in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). Historically, this interhemispheric temperature difference has been attributed to a number of ...

Georg Feulner; Stefan Rahmstorf; Anders Levermann; Silvia Volkwardt

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hemispherical Asymmetry of Tropical Precipitation in ECHAM5/MPI-OM during El Niño and under Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Similarities and differences between El Niño and global warming are examined in hemispherical and zonal tropical precipitation changes of the ECHAM5/Max Planck Institute Ocean Model (MPI-OM) simulations. Similarities include hemispherical ...

Chia Chou; Jien-Yi Tu

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

178

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

179

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

SciTech Connect

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

180

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

SciTech Connect

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Imprint of Intergalactic Shocks on the Radio Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong intergalactic shocks are a natural consequence of structure formation in the universe. They are expected to deposit large fractions of their energy in relativistic electrons (xi_e~0.05 according to SNR observations) and magnetic fields (xi_B~0.01 according to cluster halo observations). We calculate the synchrotron emission from such shocks using an analytical model, calibrated with a hydrodynamical LCDM simulation. The resulting signal composes a large fraction of the extragalactic radio background (ERB) below 500 MHz. The associated angular fluctuations dominate the sky for frequencies nu3*10^-4. The fluctuating signal is most pronounced for nugas and magnetic fields. Space missions such as ALFA will thus provide important insight into the structure and composition of our Galaxy (abridged).

Uri Keshet; Eli Waxman; Abraham Loeb

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Blue Sky Energy Inc BSE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Inc BSE Energy Inc BSE Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Sky Energy Inc (BSE) Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking) technology. Own a patented technology allowing an increase of power from a PV array of up to 30% more than conventional controllers. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Instantaneous velocity magnitude in a flow through an open valve in a valve/piston assembly. Christos Altantzis, MIT, and Martin Schmitt, LAV. All the images were generated from their work at LAV. Cosmological Simulations for Large-Scale Sky Surveys PI Name: Christos Frouzakis PI Email: frouzakis@lav.mavt.ethz.ch Institution: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 100 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Chemistry The combustion of coal and petroleum-based fuels supply most of the energy needed to meet the world's transportation and power generation demands. To address the anticipated petroleum shortage, along with increasing energy

184

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Technology Program Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov William Aljoe Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6569 william.aljoe@netl.doe.gov Leslie L. Schmidt Business Contact Montana State University-Bozeman 309 Montana Hall Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-2381 lschmidt@montana.edu Lee Spangler Technical Contact Montana State University-Bozeman P.O. Box 172460 Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-4399 spangler@montana.edu PARTNERS Battelle Pacific Northwest Division Center for Advanced Energy Studies Cimarex Energy Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Crow Tribe Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration

185

Running the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data archive server  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Archive Server (DAS) provides public access to over 12Tb of data in 17 million files produced by the SDSS data reduction pipeline. Many tasks which seem trivial when serving smaller, less complex data sets present challenges when serving data of this volume and technical complexity. The included output files should be chosen to support as much science as possible from publicly released data, and only publicly released data. Users must have the resources needed to read and interpret the data correctly. Server administrators must generate new data releases at regular intervals, monitor usage, quickly recover from hardware failures, and monitor the data served by the DAS both for contents and corruption. We discuss these challenges, describe tools we use to administer and support the DAS, and discuss future development plans.

Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Stoughton, Chris; /Fermilab

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Data acquisition systems for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will image {Pi} steradians about the north galactic cap in five filters, and acquire one million spectra using a dedicated 2.5 meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. The authors describe the data acquisition system for the survey`s three main detectors: an imaging camera, mounting 54 Tektronix charge-coupled devices (CCD); a pair of spectrographs, each mounting a pair of CCDs; and a smaller monitor telescope camera. The authors describe the system`s hardware and software architecture, and relate it to the survey`s special requirements for high reliability and need to understand its instrumentation in order to produce a consistent survey over a five year period.

Petravick, D.; Berman, E.; MacKinnon, B.; Nicinski, T.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Rechenmacher, R.; Annis, J.; Kent, S.; McKay, T.; Stoughton, C.; Husby, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a survey in Balmer Alpha of the entire Northern sky above declination -30 deg. This survey provides the first calibrated, velocity-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Galaxy. With one-degree spatial resolution, 12 km s^{-1} velocity resolution, and sensitivity to features as faint as 0.1 R (EM ~ 0.2 cm^{-6} pc), this survey provides the deepest maps of the ionized content of the Galaxy to date. In addition to probing the detailed kinematic structure of the Warm Ionized Medium and the vertical structure of the ionized content in spiral arms, initial results include the discovery of several faint, extended (d > 1\\deg) H II regions and the first map of the ionized component of an intermediate velocity cloud.

L. M. Haffner

2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring of IR Clear-Sky Radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS) is a Web-based tool to monitor “model minus observation” (M ? O) biases in clear-sky brightness temperatures (BTs) and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) produced by the Advanced Clear-...

Xingming Liang; Alexander Ignatov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Almost a Century of “Imaging” Clouds Over the Whole-Sky Dome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological whole-sky photography can be traced back to just after the turn of the century. Capturing an objective and well-determined view of the cloud cover over the whole-sky dome has been one of the principal goals of subsequent ...

K. McGuffe; A. Henderson-Sellers

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Computation of Cloud-Base Height from Paired Whole-Sky Imaging Cameras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a novel approach to the extraction of cloud-base height (CBH) from pairs of whole-sky images. The core problem is to spatially register cloud fields from widely separated whole-sky imaging (WSI) cameras; this complete ...

Mark C. Allmen; W. Philip Kegelmeyer Jr.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

THE SEVENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), marking the completion of the original goals of the SDSS and the end of the phase known as SDSS-II. It includes 11,663 deg{sup 2} of imaging data, with most of the {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} increment over the previous data release lying in regions of low Galactic latitude. The catalog contains five-band photometry for 357 million distinct objects. The survey also includes repeat photometry on a 120 deg. long, 2.{sup 0}5 wide stripe along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap, with some regions covered by as many as 90 individual imaging runs. We include a co-addition of the best of these data, going roughly 2 mag fainter than the main survey over 250 deg{sup 2}. The survey has completed spectroscopy over 9380 deg{sup 2}; the spectroscopy is now complete over a large contiguous area of the Northern Galactic Cap, closing the gap that was present in previous data releases. There are over 1.6 million spectra in total, including 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data release includes improved stellar photometry at low Galactic latitude. The astrometry has all been recalibrated with the second version of the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog, reducing the rms statistical errors at the bright end to 45 milliarcseconds per coordinate. We further quantify a systematic error in bright galaxy photometry due to poor sky determination; this problem is less severe than previously reported for the majority of galaxies. Finally, we describe a series of improvements to the spectroscopic reductions, including better flat fielding and improved wavelength calibration at the blue end, better processing of objects with extremely strong narrow emission lines, and an improved determination of stellar metallicities.

Abazajian, Kevork N. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Adelman-McCarthy, Jennifer K.; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Berman, Eileen F. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Agueeros, Marcel A. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury SL Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); An, Deokkeun [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Anderson, Kurt S. J. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Becker, Andrew C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bahcall, Neta A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Bell, Eric F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Barentine, J. C. [McDonald Observatory and Dept. of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Bassett, Bruce A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Beers, Timothy C. [Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics, CSCE: Center for the Study of Cosmic Evolution, and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Belokurov, Vasily [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Berlind, Andreas A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bernardi, Mariangela [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] (and others)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Breaks in the Asian Monsoon: The Influence of Southern Hemisphere Weather Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric model results suggest that chaotic weather systems in the Southern Hemisphere midlatitudes can trigger “breaks” in the Indian monsoon rainfall. Indeed, the mechanism may be able to trigger a more general break of the entire Asian ...

Mark J. Rodwell

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hemispherical Reflectance Variations of Vegetation Canopies and Implications for Global and Regional Energy Budget Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variations of spectral hemispherical reflectance (albedo) in vegetation canopies were studied as a function of solar zenith angle, leaf area index, led orientation distribution, and leaf and soil optical, properties. A three dimensional ...

D. S. Kimes; P. J. Sellers; W. W. Newcomb

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Trend in Northern Hemisphere Winter Atmospheric Circulation during the Last Half of the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last half century, the trend in the Northern Hemisphere tropospheric circulation has been associated with a deepening of both the Aleutian and Icelandic lows, a pattern akin to the “Cold Ocean Warm Land” (COWL) pattern. A simplified ...

Jian Lu; Richard J. Greatbatch; K. Andrew Peterson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

An Examination of Observed Southern Oscillation Effects in the Northern Hemisphere Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of the Southern Oscillation on the December-February mean circulation in the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere were investigated using 34 years of data. No evidence for a significant relation between the Southern Oscillation (SO) and ...

Kevin Hamilton

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Persistent Anomalies of the Extratropical Northern Hemisphere Wintertime Circulation: Geographical Distribution and Regional Persistence Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the geographical and regional persistence characteristics of wintertime Northern Hemisphere 500 mb height anomalies, focusing particular attention on the behavior of strong anomalies that persist beyond the durations associated ...

Randall M. Dole; Neil D. Gordon

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Statistical Connection between Tropospheric and Stratospheric Circulation of the Northern Hemisphere in Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The associated anomaly patterns of the stratospheric geopotential height field and the tropospheric geopetential and temperature height fields of the Northern Hemisphere are determined applying the canonical correlation analysis. With this linear ...

Judith Perlwitz; Hans-F. Graf

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Linear Statistical Short-Term Climate Predictive Skill in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the sources and strengths of statistical short-term climate predictability for local surface climate (temperature and precipitation) and 700-mb geopotential height in the Northern Hemisphere are explored at all times of the year at ...

Anthony G. Barnston

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Remarks on Northern Hemisphere Forecast Error Sensitivity from 1996 to 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of 2-day Northern Hemisphere extratropical forecast errors to changes in initial conditions, computed daily over a 4-yr period, is documented. The sensitivity is computed using the (dry) adjoint of the Navy Operational Global ...

C. A. Reynolds; R. Gelaro

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

NOGAPS-ALPHA Simulations of the 2002 Southern Hemisphere Stratospheric Major Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-altitude version of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) spectral forecast model is used to simulate the unusual September 2002 Southern Hemisphere stratospheric major warming. Designated as NOGAPS-Advanced ...

Douglas R. Allen; Lawrence Coy; Stephen D. Eckermann; John P. McCormack; Gloria L. Manney; Timothy F. Hogan; Young-Joon Kim

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569 TWINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569) and 112 adolescents (age 12-16) with 4-Tesla 105-gradient high- angular resolution diffusion imaging. We

Thompson, Paul

202

Separating the Dynamical Effects of Climate Change and Ozone Depletion. Part II: Southern Hemisphere Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separate effects of ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) on forcing circulation changes in the Southern Hemisphere extratropical troposphere are investigated using a version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (...

Charles McLandress; Theodore G. Shepherd; John F. Scinocca; David A. Plummer; Michael Sigmond; Andreas I. Jonsson; M. Catherine Reader

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Northern Hemispheric Interannual Teleconnection Patterns and Their Changes Due to the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed and general circulation climate model (GCM) simulated interannual teleconnection patterns in the Northern Hemisphere are compared on a monthly basis. The study was based on 1946–1991 observations and two separate 100-year simulations ...

Xin-Zhong Liang; Wei-Chyung Wang; Michael P. Dudek

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Some Synoptic Indices of the Southern Hemisphere Mean Sea Level Circulation 1972–77  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of 10 synoptic indices for the Southern Hemisphere is presented based on the first five years of numerical analysis by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. The indices describe the characteristics and variability of the monthly and ...

N. A. Streten

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluation of Northern Hemisphere Blocking Climatology in the Global Environment Multiscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) model, the Canadian operational numerical model, in reproducing atmospheric low-frequency variability is evaluated in the context of Northern Hemisphere blocking climatology. The ...

Etienne Dunn-Sigouin; Seok-Woo Son; Hai Lin

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Formation of Southern Hemisphere Thermocline Waters: Water Mass Conversion and Subduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ventilation of the permanent thermocline of the Southern Hemisphere gyres is quantified using climatological and synoptic observational data. Ventilation is estimated with three independent methods: the kinematic method provides subduction ...

Johannes Karstensen; Detlef Quadfasel

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Splitting of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex in the Southern Hemisphere, September 2002: Dynamical Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polar vortex of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) split dramatically during September 2002. The large-scale dynamical effects were manifest throughout the stratosphere and upper troposphere, corresponding to two distinct cyclonic centers in the ...

Andrew J. Charlton; Alan O’Neill; William A. Lahoz; Paul Berrisford

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Preferred and Unpreferred Circulation Types in the Northern Hemisphere Wintertime Phase space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses two questions: 1) whether there are local density maxima and minima in the Northern Hemisphere extratropical wintertime circulation phase space and 2) if so, what the preferred circulation types are. All investigations are ...

Zoltan Toth

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Observed Decadal Changes in Downward Wave Coupling between the Stratosphere and Troposphere in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downward wave coupling dominates the intraseasonal dynamical coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere in the Southern Hemisphere. The coupling occurs during late winter and spring when the stratospheric basic state forms a well-defined ...

Nili Harnik; Judith Perlwitz; Tiffany A. Shaw

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Quasi-Linear Blocks Forced by Orography in a Hemispheric, Quasi-Geostrophic Barotropic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stationary linear perturbation responses to Northern Hemisphere orography are calculated in a quasi-geostrophic barotropic model in solid-body rotation. The stationary mountain torque induced by these perturbations is then used to construct ...

John O. Roads

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

On the Establishment of Stationary Waves in the Northern Hemisphere Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The establishment of stationary waves in the Northern Hemisphere winter is investigated using stationary and time-dependent linear primitive equation models. Confirming the results of Nigam and Lindzen, we find that small displacements of the ...

Arlindo M. Da Silva; Richard S. Lindzen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Pacific–South American Modes and Tropical Convection during the Southern Hemisphere Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric circulation features and convection patterns associated with two leading low-frequency modes in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) are examined in multiyear global reanalyses produced by NCEP–NCAR and NASA–DAO. The two leading modes, ...

Kingtse C. Mo; R. Wayne Higgins

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Relationships between Low-Frequency Variability in the Southern Hemisphere and Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term trends and interannual variations of circulation anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere are examined using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis from 1949 to 1998. The ...

Kingtse C. Mo

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Modes of Interannual Variability of the Southern Hemisphere Circulation Simulated by the CSIRO Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the capability of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) climate model in simulating the observed modes of interannual variability of the Southern Hemisphere circulation. Modes of variability ...

Wenju Cai; Ian G. Watterson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Zonal Wavenumber 3 Pattern of Northern Hemisphere Wintertime Planetary Wave Variability at High Latitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prominent pattern of variability of the Northern Hemisphere wintertime tropospheric planetary waves, referred to here as the Wave3 pattern, is identified from the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis. It is worthy of attention because its structure is similar ...

Haiyan Teng; Grant Branstator

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Numerical Weather Prediction Studies from the FGGE Southern Hemisphere Data Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of numerical weather prediction available for the Southern Hemisphere from the FGGE data base has been examined. The Australian Numerical Meteorology Research Centre (ANMRC) spectral prediction model has been initialized with analyses ...

W. Bourke; K. Puri; R. Seaman

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Diagnosis of Two Blocking Events That Occurred Simultaneously in the Midlatitude Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres Goddard Earth Observing System-1 analyses, the horizontal distribution of atmospheric forcing processes involved in the growth, maintenance, and decay of two Northern Hemisphere midlatitude blocking ...

Anthony R. Lupo

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Relationship between Tropical Heating and Subtropical Westerly Maxima in the Southern Hemisphere during SOP-1, FGGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FGGE Level III-b analyses, produced by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA, are used to investigate the relationship between tropical heating and subtropical westerly maxima in the Southern Hemisphere during SOP-1 (5 January-4 March 1979)...

James W. Hurrell; Dayton G. Vincent

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Eliassen-Palm Cross Sections for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eliassen-Palm cross sections and residual meridional circulations are presented for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for summer and winter based on the data of Newell et al. (1972, 1974). The cross sections are similar to those presented by ...

David J. Karoly

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Impact of North Atlantic–Arctic Multidecadal Variability on Northern Hemisphere Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The twentieth-century Northern Hemisphere surface climate exhibits a long-term warming trend largely caused by anthropogenic forcing, with natural decadal climate variability superimposed on it. This study addresses the possible origin and ...

Vladimir A. Semenov; Mojib Latif; Dietmar Dommenget; Noel S. Keenlyside; Alexander Strehz; Thomas Martin; Wonsun Park

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evolution of the Southern Hemisphere Subpolar Middle Atmosphere during Summer and Autumn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of zonal wind and zonal wavenumber one (wave 1) in the Southern Hemisphere subpolar middle atmosphere is described for the period December 1978–May 1979 using temperature and ozone measurements from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the ...

T. Miles; W. L. Grose; E. E. Remsberg; G. Lingenfelser

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Variations in Surface Air Temperatures: Part 1. Northern Hemisphere, 1881–1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have produced, using objective techniques, a long-term series of average Northern Hemisphere temperatures based on monthly mean station data gridded on a 5° latitude by 10° longitude grid. Difficulties in the estimation of this parameter are ...

P. D. Jones; T. M. L. Wigley; P. M. Kelly

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Patterns of Interannual Variability in the Northern Hemisphere Wintertime 850 mb Temperature Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interannual fluctuations of observed winter seasonal mean 850 mb temperatures over the Northern Hemisphere during 1958–73 are documented and compared with midtropospheric height variations. Interannual temperature variance maxima are found over ...

David S. Gutzler; Richard D. Rosen; David A. Salstein; JoséP. Peixoto

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Characteristic Patterns of Variability of Sea Level Pressure in the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal and annual mean sea level pressures for the Northern Hemisphere have been analyzed to determine the dominant modes of interannual and longer period variability using monthly sea level pressure analyses as revised by Trenberth and Paolino ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; Daniel A. Paolino Jr.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Missing Stratospheric Ozone Decrease at Southern Hemisphere Middle Latitudes after Mt. Pinatubo: A Dynamical Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although large total ozone decreases occurred in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics in the years after the volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo that are generally attributed to the eruption, comparable decreases did not emerge in the Southern ...

C. Schnadt Poberaj; J. Staehelin; D. Brunner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Estimates of the Seasonal Mean Vertical Velocity Fields of the Extratropical Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wintertime and summertime mean 500 mb vertical velocity fields for the extratropical Northern Hemisphere are calculated by several methods from general circulation statistics compiled from National Meteorological Center (NMC) operational analyses ...

Glenn H. White

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Modulation of Southern Oscillation-Northern Hemisphere Mid-Winter Climate Relationships by the QBO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A possible relationship between the phase of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) and the effect of the Southern Oscillation (SO) on the January-February climate in the Northern Hemisphere is examined. Findings suggest a preference for the ...

Anthony G. Barnston; Robert E. Livezey; Michael S. Halpert

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Surface Circulation and Kinetic Energy Distributions in the Southern Hemisphere Oceans from FGGE Drifting Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trajectories of approximately 300 satellite-tracked drifting buoys deployed throughout the Southern Hemisphere oceans during the Fiat GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) have been analyzed to infer the mean surface circulation and kinetic energy ...

Steven L. Patterson

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Pacific Center of Action of the Northern Hemisphere Annular Mode: Real or Artifact?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) of the sea level pressure (SLP) field, referred to as the Arctic Oscillation (AO) or Northern Hemisphere annular mode (NAM), consists of a dipole between the polar cap region and the surrounding ...

John M. Wallace; David W. J. Thompson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Mean Southern Hemisphere Extratropical Cyclone Behavior in the 40-Year NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new climatology of Southern Hemisphere (SH) extratropical cyclones. This has been compiled by applying a state-of-the-art cyclone tracking scheme to the 6-hourly National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center ...

Ian Simmonds; Kevin Keay

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Precipitation and Water Vapor Transport in the Southern Hemisphere with Emphasis on the South American Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

December–March climatologies of precipitation and vertically integrated water vapor transport were analyzed and compared to find the main paths by which moisture is fed to high-rainfall regions in the Southern Hemisphere in this season. The ...

Josefina Moraes Arraut; Prakki Satyamurty

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Intraseasonal and Seasonal-to-Interannual Indian Ocean Convection and Hemispheric Teleconnections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep tropical convection over the Indian Ocean leads to intense diabatic heating, a main driver of the climate system. The Northern Hemisphere circulation and precipitation associated with intraseasonal and seasonal-to-interannual components of ...

Andrew Hoell; Mathew Barlow; Roop Saini

233

Interdecadal Trend and ENSO-Related Interannual Variability in Southern Hemisphere Blocking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interdecadal trend and ENSO-related interannual variability in the frequency and intensity of atmospheric blocking in the Southern Hemisphere are analyzed by a statistical model that takes account of serial correlation in the datasets. ...

Li Dong; Timothy J. Vogelsang; Stephen J. Colucci

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Forecasting Northern Hemisphere 700-mb Geopotential Height Anomalies Using Empirical Normal Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multivariate linear prediction based on single-lag inverse modeling is developed further and critically examined. The method is applied to the National Meteorological Center analyses of Northern Hemisphere 700-mb geopotential height anomalies, ...

Cécile Penland; Michael Ghil

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Observed Southern Hemisphere Eddy Statistics at 500 mb: Frequency and Spatial Dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nearly eight years of daily Southern Hemisphere analyses at 500 mb have been used to define the spatial dependence of the variance fields of geopotential height and the two geostrophic wind components, the corresponding covariance fields, and the ...

Kevin E. Trenberth

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Comparison of Southern Hemisphere Circulation Statistics Based on GFDL and Australian Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sets of observed atmospheric circulation statistics for the Southern Hemisphere (SH) are compared. The first set was compiled at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics laboratory (GFDL) and consists of global objective analyses of circulation ...

David J. Karoly; Abraham H. Oort

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Two Types of Baroclinic Life Cycles during the Southern Hemisphere Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic eddy life cycles of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) summer are investigated with NCEP–NCAR reanalysis data. A composite analysis is performed for the years 1980 through 2004. Individual life cycles are identified by local maxima in ...

Woosok Moon; Steven B. Feldstein

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The Life Cycle of Northern Hemisphere Downward Wave Coupling between the Stratosphere and Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Northern Hemisphere downward wave coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere via wave reflection is analyzed. Downward wave coupling events are defined by extreme negative values of a wave coupling index based on the ...

Tiffany A. Shaw; Judith Perlwitz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Is the Atmosphere Interesting? A Projection Pursuit Study of the Circulation in the Northern Hemisphere Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Northern Hemisphere winter circulation is probed for deviations from Gaussianity. A projection pursuit approach is applied that searches for directions in phase space that maximize an index of interest. Different indices gauging different ...

Bo Christiansen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Detection of Inter-hemispheric Asymmetries of Brain Perfusion in SPECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an unsupervised method to help detection of significant functional inter-hemispheric asymmetries in brain SPECT. A validation of this method was performed with realistic simulated SPECT data sets with known asymmetries (in size and ...

Bérengère Aubert-Broche; Christophe Grova; Pierre Jannin; Irène Buvat; Habib Benali; Bernard Gibaud

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dynamics of Planetary-Scale Baroclinic Waves during Southern Hemisphere Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation is conducted of the characteristics of linear and finite amplitude baroclinic waves during Southern Hemisphere winter. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of planetary scale modes, which propagate into the stratosphere. Linear ...

Richard E. Young; Howard Houben

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Interannual and Decadal Variations of Planetary Wave Activity, Stratospheric Cooling, and Northern Hemisphere Annular Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using NCEP–NCAR 51-yr reanalysis data, the interannual and decadal variations of planetary wave activity and its relationship to stratospheric cooling, and the Northern Hemisphere Annular mode (NAM), are studied. It is found that winter ...

Yongyun Hu; Ka Kit Tung

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Seasonal Variations in the Vertically Integrated Water Vapor Transport Fields over the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal mean fields of precipitable water and the zonal and meridional components of the vertically integrated atmospheric water vapor transport fields are calculated from five years of Southern Hemisphere data (1 September 1973 through 31 ...

David A. Howarth

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

What Drives the Seasonal Onset and Decay of the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual heat budget of the Western Hemisphere warm pool (WHWP) is explored using the output of an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) simulation. According to the analysis, the WHWP cannot be considered as a monolithic whole with a single ...

S-K. Lee; D. B. Enfield; C. Wang

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Autumn Precipitation Trends over Southern Hemisphere Midlatitudes as Simulated by CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent decades, Southern Hemisphere midlatitude regions such as southern Africa, southeastern Australia, and southern Chile have experienced a reduction in austral autumn precipitation; the cause of which is poorly understood. This study ...

Ariaan Purich; Tim Cowan; Seung-Ki Min; Wenju Cai

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Simulation and Projection of the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode in CMIP5 Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate variability in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) extratropical regions is dominated by the SH Annular Mode (SAM). Future changes in the SAM could have a large influence on climate over broad regions. In this paper, we utilized model simulations ...

Fei Zheng; Jianping Li; Robin T. Clark; Hyacinth C. Nnamchi

247

Multiple Flow Regimes in the Northern Hemisphere Winter. Part II: Sectorial Regimes and Preferred Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an observational analysis of recurrent flow patterns in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter, based on a 37-year series of daily 700-mb height anomalies. Large-scale anomaly patterns that appear repeatedly and persist beyond ...

Masahide Kimoto; Michael Ghil

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Interannual Variability in the Southern Hemisphere Circulation Organized by Stratospheric Final Warming Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite observational analysis is presented demonstrating that austral stratospheric final warming (SFW) events provide a substantial organizing influence upon the large-scale atmospheric circulation in the Southern Hemisphere. In particular, ...

Robert X. Black; Brent A. McDaniel

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Variability in Southern Hemisphere Ocean Circulation from the 1980s to the 2000s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interannual-to-decadal variability of ocean circulation in the Southern Hemisphere was examined using data from the 1980s to the 2000s in a box inverse model to estimate transport across hydrographic sections and three ocean general circulation ...

K. Katsumata; S. Masuda

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Intraseasonal Oscillations in the Global Atmosphere. Part I: Northern Hemisphere and Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have examined systematically oscillatory modes in the Northern Hemisphere and in the tropics. The 700 mb heights were used to analyze extratropical oscillations, and the outgoing longwave radiation to study tropical oscillations in convection. ...

Michael Ghil; Kingtse Mo

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Structure and Maintenance of Stationary Waves in the Winter Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies of extratropical stationary waves in the winter Northern Hemisphere (NH) often focused on effects of orography and land–ocean thermal contrast on the formation, structure, and maintenance of these waves. In contrast, research ...

Tsing-Chang Chen

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Characteristics of Wave Packets in the Upper Troposphere. Part II: Seasonal and Hemispheric Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gridded 300-hPa meridional wind data produced by the ECMWF reanalysis project were analyzed to document the seasonal and hemispheric variations in the properties of upper-tropospheric wave packets. The properties of the wave packets are mainly ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An Observational Study of the Final Breakdown of the Southern Hemisphere Stratospheric Vortex in 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2002 Southern Hemisphere final warming occurred early, following an unusually active winter and the first recorded major warming in the Antarctic. The breakdown of the stratospheric polar vortex in October and November 2002 is examined using ...

Yvan J. Orsolini; Cora E. Randall; Gloria L. Manney; Douglas R. Allen

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Differences between the Spring and Autumn Circulation of the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase of the annual cycle in the mean temperature of the Northern Hemisphere troposphere lags the conventional meteorological seasons (centered on April and October) by about two weeds. Hence, the conventional spring season is colder and ...

Eric L. Fleming; Gyu-Ho Lim; John M. Wallace

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Intraseasonal Interactions between the Tropics and Extratropics in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanics of the interaction between tropical beating [estimated from outgoing longwave radiation (OLR)] and Southern Hemisphere (SH) subtropical and extratropical circulations on intraseasonal time scales are discussed. Base points are ...

Ernesto H. Berbery; Julia Nogués-Paegle

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Impact of Surface Forcing on Southern Hemisphere Atmospheric Blocking in the Australia-New Zealand Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of atmospheric blocking in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) are explored in atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model, version 3, with a particular focus on the Australia-New Zealand ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Peter C. McIntosh; Michael J. Pook; James S. Risbey

257

The Northern Hemisphere Sea-Level Pressure Data Set: Trends, Errors and Discontinuities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed examination of the Northern Hemisphere monthly mean sea-level grid-point pressures shows a disappointingly large number of problems. The data set extends from 1899–1977 but has originated from eight different sources and ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; Daniel A. Paolino Jr.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hemispheric Surface Air Temperature Variations: A Reanalysis and an Update to 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-based compilations of gridded monthly surface air temperature anomalies, averaged into hemispheric values for the last 140 years, have been available for climatological analyses for the last 10 years or so. The analysis techniques used in ...

P. D. Jones

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode Variability and the Role of Optimal Nonmodal Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southern annular mode is the leading mode of Southern Hemisphere circulation variability, the temporal evolution of which is characterized by large amplitudes and significant persistence. Previous investigators have suggested a positive ...

Harun A. Rashid; Ian Simmonds

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A 10-Year Climatology of Northern Hemisphere Tropical Cloud Plumes and Their Composite Flow Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-year cool season climatology of tropical cloud plumes in the Northern Hemisphere was generated by visual inspection of infrared satellite imagery. The sample included 1062 plume events during the months of October to May for the years 1974 ...

Haig Iskenderian

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An Examination of Possible Solar Cycle-QBO Effects in the Northern Hemisphere Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies of correlations between solar flux and Northern Hemisphere wintertime tropospheric fields have suggested that sun-weather effects at the solar-cycle time scale may exist and be mediated by the phase of the quasi-biennial ...

David E. Venne; Denis G. Dartt

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Autumn precipitation trends over Southern Hemisphere midlatitudes as simulated by CMIP5 models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent decades, Southern Hemisphere midlatitude regions such as southern Africa, southeastern Australia and southern Chile have experienced a reduction in austral autumn precipitation; the cause of which is poorly understood. This study focuses ...

Ariaan Purich; Tim Cowan; Seung-Ki Min; Wenju Cai

263

GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky August 26, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA announced today that the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has revealed its first all-sky map in gamma rays. The onboard Large Area Telescope's (LAT) all-sky image-which shows the glowing gas of the Milky Way, blinking pulsars and a flaring galaxy billions of light-years away-was created using only 95 hours of "first light" observations, compared with past missions which took years to produce a similar image. Scientists expect the telescope will discover many new pulsars in our own galaxy, reveal powerful

264

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters P. J. Ricchiazzi and C. Gautier University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Recent studies of clear-sky radiation indicate that current radiative transfer (RT) models underestimate atmospheric absorption when standard aerosol properties are used. This so-called clear-sky anomaly is manifested in predicted levels of diffuse radiation significantly below those observed at Southern Great Plains (SGP) and other sites in the continental United States (e.g., Halthore et al. 1998 GRL). Other observations at pristine sites do not show a discrepancy (Barnard and Powell 2001, 2001; Kato et al. 1997; Halthore 1998). These results may indicate that the clear-sky anomaly is only observed at sites

265

All Sky Cameras for the characterization of the Cherenkov Telescope Array candidate sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The All Sky Camera (ASC) was developed as a universal device for the monitoring of the night sky quality. Eight ASCs are already installed and measure night sky parameters at eight of the candidate sites of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) gamma-ray observatory. The ACS system consists of an astronomical CCD camera, a fish eye lens, a control computer and associated electronics. The measurement is carried out during astronomical night. The images are automatically taken every 5 minutes and automatically processed using the control computer of the device. The analysis results are the cloud fraction (the percentage of the sky covered by clouds) and night sky brightness (in mag/arcsec$^{2}$)

Mandát, Dušan; Ebr, Jan; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Bulik, Tomasz; Allekotte, Ingomar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sky in Google Earth: The Next Frontier in Astronomical Data Discovery and Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Astronomy began as a visual science, first through careful observations of the sky using either an eyepiece or the naked eye, then on to the preservation of those images with photographic media and finally the digital encoding of that information via CCDs. This last step has enabled astronomy to move into a fully automated era -- where data is recorded, analyzed and interpreted often without any direct visual inspection. Sky in Google Earth completes that circle by providing an intuitive visual interface to some of the largest astronomical imaging surveys covering the full sky. By streaming imagery, catalogs, time domain data, and ancillary information directly to a user, Sky can provide the general public as well as professional and amateur astronomers alike with a wealth of information for use in education and research. We provide here a brief introduction to Sky in Google Earth, focusing on its extensible environment, how it may be integrated into the research process and how it can bring astronomical research to a broader community. With an open interface available on Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, applications developed within Sky are accessible not just within the Google framework but through any visual browser that supports the Keyhole Markup Language. We present Sky as the embodiment of a virtual telescope.

Ryan Scranton; Andrew Connolly; Simon Krughoff; Jeremy Brewer; Alberto Conti; Carol Christian; Brian McLean; Craig Sosin; Greg Coombe; Paul Heckbert

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ensemble Properties of Comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the ensemble properties of 31 comets (27 resolved and 4 unresolved) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample of comets represents about 1 comet per 10 million SDSS photometric objects. Five-band (u, g, r, i, z) photometry is used to determine the comets colors, sizes, surface brightness profiles, and rates of dust production in terms of the Afp formalism. We find that the cumulative luminosity function for the Jupiter Family Comets in our sample is well fit by a power law of the form N(

Solontoi, Michael; /Adler Planetarium, Chicago; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Harvard Coll. Observ.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /Boston U.; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Cloud classification using whole-sky imager data  

SciTech Connect

Clouds are one of the most important moderators of the earth radiation budget and one of the least understood. The effect that clouds have on the reflection and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation is strongly influenced by their shape, size, and composition. Physically accurate parameterization of clouds is necessary for any general circulation model (GCM) to yield meaningful results. The work presented here is part of a larger project that is aimed at producing realistic three-dimensional (3D) volume renderings of cloud scenes, thereby providing the important shape information for parameterizing GCMs. The specific goal of the current study is to develop an algorithm that automatically classifies (by cloud type) the clouds observed in the scene. This information will assist the volume rendering program in determining the shape of the cloud. Much work has been done on cloud classification using multispectral satellite images. Most of these references use some kind of texture measure to distinguish the different cloud types and some also use topological features (such as cloud/sky connectivity or total number of clouds). A wide variety of classification methods has been used, including neural networks, various types of clustering, and thresholding. The work presented here utilizes binary decision trees to distinguish the different cloud types based on cloud feature vectors.

Buch, K.A. Jr.; Sun, Chen-Hui

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.

Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Arnau, Eduard; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolas; Capellupo, Daniel; Carithers, William; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle; Delubac, Timothée; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Engelke, Philip; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nur Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Gibson, Robert R; Hall, Patrick B; Hamann, Fred; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jiang, Linhua; Kimball, Amy E; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Lee, Khee-Gan; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lundgren, Britt; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew M; Richards, Gordon T; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Sheldon, Erin S; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anze; Shelden, Alaina; Shen, Yue; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Suzuki, Nao; Tinker, Jeremy; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy In this video, NREL Principal Scientist Gary Jorgensen and SkyFuel Chief Technology Officer Randy Gee talk about their partnership to develop a thin film to substitute for bulkier glass mirrors on solar-collecting parabolic troughs. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. Credit: Fireside Production More Information For more information about NREL's partnership with SkyFuel, read Award-Winning Reflector to Cut Solar Cost and New Solar Technology Concentrates on Cost, Efficiency. Learn more about NREL's Concentrating Solar Power Research. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities

272

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or to other data-validated radiation models. This work extends the clear-sky shortwave (SW) GCM evaluation presented by Iacono et al. (2001) to computations including clouds. The rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) SW radiation model accurately reproduces clear-sky direct beam fluxes from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer

273

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2013 Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of...

274

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

Lidar Determinations of Atmospheric Ice Crystal Layers at South Pole during Clear-Sky Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of lidar measurements of atmospheric ice crystal layers during 36 clear-sky precipitation events at South Pole (2850 m MSL) during the winter over the period March-November 1975 are presented and correlated with ice crystal replicator, ...

Vern N. Smiley; Bruce M. Whitcomb; Bruce M. Morley; Joseph A. Warburton

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Network-ready Camera System Development for All-Sky Observing System Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be located on a rooftop and continually monitors the sky for flashes such as bright meteor fireballs, accuracy of time stamping 2. Research autonomous power options (e.g., solar cells). Considerations include

Johnson, Eric E.

277

The Transmission of Sunlight through Cloudy Skies: An Analysis Based on Standard Meteorological Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work examines the use of standard meteorological information to describe the attenuation of sunlight associated with cloudy skies. Datasets consisting of broadband ultraviolet and total spectrally integrated solar irradiance are available ...

John E. Frederick; H. Donnan Steele

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

Sullivan, Peter William

279

Climate Model–Simulated Diurnal Cycles in HIRS Clear-Sky Brightness Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear-sky brightness temperature measurements from the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) are simulated with two climate models via a radiative transfer code. The models are sampled along the HIRS orbit paths to derive diurnal ...

Ian A. MacKenzie; Simon F. B. Tett; Anders V. Lindfors

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The universe at extreme scale: multi-petaflop sky simulation on the BG/Q  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remarkable observational advances have established a compelling cross-validated model of the Universe. Yet, two key pillars of this model -- dark matter and dark energy -- remain mysterious. Next-generation sky surveys will map billions of galaxies to ...

Salman Habib; Vitali Morozov; Hal Finkel; Adrian Pope; Katrin Heitmann; Kalyan Kumaran; Tom Peterka; Joe Insley; David Daniel; Patricia Fasel; Nicholas Frontiere; Zarija Luki?

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Improved Simulation of Clear-Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer in the CCC-GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of mean July clear-sky solar radiation in the Canadian Climate Centre second-generation general circulation model (CCC-GCMII) was analyzed by comparing top of the atmosphere (TOA) net fluxes with earth radiation budget experiment (...

Howard W. Barker; Zhanqing Li

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Clear-Sky Direct-Beam Solar Radiation Versus Altitude: A Proposal for Standard Soundings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author reexamines Klein's (1948) quantitative statements relating clear-sky direct-beam solar radiation to altitude for the lower troposphere, which are of the form (transmissivity) = B + A log (altitude). Klein's summaries are judged to be ...

William P. Lowry

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis within Three-Dimensional Clouds Subjected to Solar and Sky Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional radiative heat transfer analysis of an arbitrary-shaped modeled cloud subjected to solar and sky irradiation has been performed. The Radiation Element Method by Ray Emission Model (REM2) was used for numerical simulation. ...

Toru Nishikawa; Shigenao Maruyama; Seigo Sakai

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bergin, M.H. From weather forecasting to exploring the solarWai, et al. "Intra-hour forecasting with a total sky imagerand Impact on Solar Forecasting A Thesis submitted in

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Clear-Sky Window Channel Radiances: A Comparison between Observations and the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of clear-sky radiances of the Meteosat window channel with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model results is presented, aiming to assess both the model's performance and the quality of the observations. ...

Isabel F. Trigo; Pedro Viterbo

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Comparison of Computed and Observed Insolation under Clear Skies over the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to verify computational methods for ocean heat budgets, observations of insulation under clear skies for 26 days were compared with values computed by a formula previously derived from the Smithsonian Tables. The agreement between ...

R. K. Reed; R. E. Brainard

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

On the Relationship between Clear-Sky Planetary and Surfae Albedos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on simulations, a simple linear relationship is derived between planetary albedo and the surface albedo for the case of clear skies. This relationship enables one to estimate the planetary albedo, given only the surface albedo, and vice ...

T. S. Chen; George Ohring

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NERSC's Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe - NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Sky Project Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe Deep Sky Project Provides a Portal into Data Universe March 30, 2009 STARLIGHT: This image of the Coma cluster was made by combining over 500 images collected between 2001 and 2007. Every night approximately 3,000 astronomical files flow to the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center from automated sky scanning systems all over the world for archiving. After a decade of collecting, the center currently holds over 8 million images, making this one of the largest troves of ground-based celestial images available. Now, a multidisciplinary team of astronomers, computer scientists, and engineers from NERSC are collaborating to develop a user-friendly database system and interface to instantly serve up high-resolution cosmic reference

289

US dollar quantification of the Western Hemisphere gasoline market: US dollar value of gasoline consumption, 1994 United States, Canada, Latin America, and total Western Hemisphere ex-tax, tax, and combined dollar value  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While each individual nation`s gasoline market -- as to number of gallons, and the market value of those gallons -- is directly significant only to that nation, this report treats the Western Hemisphere gasoline markets in a regional manner. The Western Hemisphere gasoline markets currently amounts to nearly US $206 billion per year.

NONE

1995-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

IS THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY CLUSTERING DIPOLE CONVERGENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a long-standing controversy about the convergence of the dipole moment of the galaxy angular distribution (the so-called clustering dipole). Is the dipole convergent at all, and if so, what is the scale of the convergence? We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies as a function of the limiting flux of the sample from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Contrary to some earlier claims, we find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e., up to 13.5 mag in the near-infrared K{sub s} band (equivalent to an effective distance of 300 Mpc h{sup -1}). We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional one (i.e., given the velocity of the Local Group relative to the cosmic microwave background), for the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The observed growth turns out to be within 1{sigma} confidence level of its theoretical counterpart once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux-limited catalog is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges (within the errors) to its final value for a distance of about 300 Mpc h{sup -1}. By comparing the observational windows, we show that for a given flux limit and a corresponding distance limit, the 2MASS flux-weighted window passes less large-scale signal than the top-hat one. We conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole for effective distances greater than 200 Mpc h{sup -1} is only apparent. On the other hand, for a distance of 80 Mpc h{sup -1} (mean depth of the 2MASS Redshift Survey) and the {Lambda}CDM power spectrum, the true dipole is expected to reach only {approx}80% of its final value. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate {beta} {identical_to} {Omega}{sub m}{sup 0.55}/b. The result is {beta} = 0.38 {+-} 0.04, which leads to an estimate of the density parameter {Omega}{sub m} = 0.20 {+-} 0.08.

Bilicki, Maciej; Chodorowski, Michal [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716, Warsaw (Poland); Jarrett, Thomas [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mamon, Gary A., E-mail: bilicki@camk.edu.pl [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris - UMR 7095 CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ray, P. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375-5382 (United States); Wood, D. [Praxis, Inc., 5845 Richmond Highway, Suite 700, Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States); York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A. [Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, P.O. Box 8029, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States); Dalal, N. Paravastu [American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Cohen, A. S. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Erickson, W. C., E-mail: Joseph.Lazio@jpl.nasa.go [School of Mathematics and Science, University of Tasmania, Churchill Ave., Sandy Bay, Tasmania 7005 (Australia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Changing Northern Hemisphere Storm Tracks in an Ensemble of IPCC Climate Change Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter storm-track activity over the Northern Hemisphere and its changes in a greenhouse gas scenario (the Special Report on Emission Scenarios A1B forcing) are computed from an ensemble of 23 single runs from 16 coupled global climate models (...

U. Ulbrich; J. G. Pinto; H. Kupfer; G. C. Leckebusch; T. Spangehl; M. Reyers

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Global and Hemispheric Temperature Trends: Uncertainties Related to Inadequate Spatial Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term (50 to 100 years) and short-term (10 to 30 years) global and hemispheric trends of temperature have an inherent unknown error due to incomplete and nonrandom spatial sampling. A number of experiments have been conducted to help quantify ...

Thomas R. Karl; Richard W. Knight; John R. Christy

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Space–Time Spectral Analysis of the Southern Hemisphere Daily 500-hPa Geopotential Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors use the NCEP–Department of Energy (DOE) Reanalysis 2 (NCEP2) data from 1979 to 2004 to expand the daily 500-hPa geopotential height in the Southern Hemisphere (SH, 90°–20°S) into a double Fourier series, and analyze the ...

Cheng Sun; Jianping Li

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

Offermann, Dustin T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A 15-Year Climatology of Northern Hemisphere 500 mb Closed Cyclone and Anticyclone Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 15-year (1963–77) Northern Hemisphere 2 × 5 degree latitude-longitude gridded dataset of 500 mb geopotential heights has been used to construct a climatology of 500 mb closed circulation centers. These centers, defined by at least one closed 30 ...

Gerald D. Bell; Lance F. Bosart

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Use of Passive Tracers as a Diagnostic Tool in Coupled Model Simulations—Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on the uptake of a passive idealized tracer in the Northern Hemisphere oceans from two coupled ocean–atmosphere simulations: a standard horizontal diffusion case and the second case including the Gent and McWilliams (GM) eddy ...

Siobhan P. O'Farrell

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Wave–Zonal Mean Flow Interaction in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the wave–zonal mean flow interaction in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and in an SH- like model atmosphere. During the SH winter, when there exist both subtropical and polar front jets, growing baroclinic waves are found between ...

Hyun-kyung Kim; Sukyoung Lee

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quasi-Stationary Waves in the Southern Hemisphere. Part I: Observational Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Part I presents selected major features of the quasi-stationary (monthly mean) wave field in the troposphere and stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere. It is confirmed that the quasi-stationary wave with zonal wavenumber 1 (QS-wave 1) is ...

Arturo I. Quintanar; Carlos R. Mechoso

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Life Cycle of a Cyclone Wave in the Southern Hemisphere. Part I: Eddy Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energetics of a Southern Hemisphere cyclone wave have been analyzed using ECMWF data and the results of a limited-area model simulation. An analysis of the energy budget for a storm that developed in the eastern Pacific on 4–6 September 1987 ...

I. Orlanski; J. Katzfey

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Effect of Urban Warming on the Northern Hemisphere Temperature Average  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The significance of the urban warming effect on large-scale and hemispheric mean temperature series is assessed using estimates of the urbanization bias for stations in the United States produced by Karl et al. It is concluded that the Northern ...

P. D. Jones; P. M. Kelly; C. M. Goodess; T. Karl

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The relationship of Weddell polynya and open-ocean deep convection to the Southern Hemisphere westerlies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weddell polynya of the mid 1970s is simulated in an Energy Balance Model (EBM) sea-ice/ocean coupled General Circulation Model (GCM) with an abrupt 20% increase in intensity of Southern Hemisphere (SH) westerlies. This small up-shift of ...

Woo Geun Cheon; Young-Gyu Park; J. R. Toggweiler; Sang-Ki Lee

303

A Simplified Linear Framework for Interpreting Patterns of Northern Hemisphere Wintertime Climate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal patterns of variability of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere (NH) wintertime circulation are examined, based on 42 yr of data from the NCAR–NCEP reanalyses. The two-dimensional phase space defined by the two leading PCs of the ...

Roberta Quadrelli; John M. Wallace

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Open Skies and monitoring a fissile materials cut-off treaty  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies (Open Skies) is intended among other things to provide, in the words of its preamble, means ``to facilitate the monitoring of compliance with existing or future arms control agreements.`` Open Skies permits overflights of the territory of member states by aircraft equipped with an array of sensors of various types. Their types and capabilities are treaty-limited. To find useful application in monitoring a cut-off treaty Open Skies would need to be amended. The number of signatories would need to be expanded so as to provide greater geographical coverage, and restrictions on sensor-array capabilities would need to be relaxed. To facilitate the detection of impending violations of a cut-off convention by Open Skies overflights, the data base provided by parties to the former should include among other things an enumeration of existing and former fuel cycle and research facilities including those converted to other uses, their precise geographic location, and a site plan.

Allentuck, J.; Lemley, J.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Optical Sky Brightness at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory from 1992 to 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical UBVRI sky brightness measures from 1992 through 2006. The data are based on CCD imagery obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m, 1.3-m, and 1.5-m telescopes. The B- and V-band data are in reasonable agreement with measurements previously made at Mauna Kea, though on the basis of a small number of images per year there are discrepancies for the years 1992 through 1994. Our CCD-based data are not significantly different than values obtained at Cerro Paranal. We find that the yearly averages of V-band sky brightness are best correlated with the 10.7-cm solar flux taken 5 days prior to the sky brightness measures. This implies an average speed of 350 km/sec for the solar wind. While we can measure an enhancement of the night sky levels over La Serena 10 degrees above the horizon, at elevation angles above 45 degrees we find no evidence that the night sky brightness at Cerro Tololo is affected by artificial light of nearby towns and cities.

Krisciunas, Kevin; Sanhueza, Pedro; Schwarz, Hugo E; Semler, Dylan R; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Vera, Sergio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Use of Aeronet Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to AERONET Aerosol Retrievals to Calculate Clear-Sky Irradiance at the Surface G. L. Schuster National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia O. Dubovik National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics Greenbelt, Maryland Motivation The worldwide aerosol robotic network (AERONET) of ground-based radiometers was developed (in part) as a satellite validation tool (Holben et al. 1998). These sites utilize spectral sky-scanning radiometers, providing more information for aerosol retrievals than conventional sunphotometer measurements. The use of the almucantar sky radiance scans in conjunction with the aerosol optical thicknesses are the basis of the AERONET Dubovik retrievals, which provide the aerosol size

307

Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky Tracking Santa With Our Eyes in the Sky December 24, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis The Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab is tracking Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. The Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab is tracking Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Every year since 1998, the Energy Department's Los Alamos National Lab has been using state-of-the-art technology to track Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. You'll be able to monitor St. Nick's journey here starting at 6 a.m. ET on Christmas Eve. Since Santa doesn't file his flight path with the Federal Aviation

308

Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First Long-Term Climate Experiment Bluer Skies and Brighter Days: The U.S. and India Collaborate in First Long-Term Climate Experiment June 27, 2011 - 12:42pm Addthis ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is installed in June 2011 at the ARIES Observatory in Nainital, India, for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). | Courtesy of ARM.gov ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is installed in June 2011 at the ARIES Observatory in Nainital, India, for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). | Courtesy of ARM.gov Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Energy Department's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility recently deployed its mobile facility to

309

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

310

3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky 3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky 3.2B Pixel Camera to Shed Light on Southern Sky July 24, 2012 - 10:56am Addthis This is an artist's rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the 8.4 meter wide-field telescope that the National Science Board recently approved to advance to its final design stage. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 and take about five years. | Photo courtesy of LSST Corporation. This is an artist's rendering of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the 8.4 meter wide-field telescope that the National Science Board recently approved to advance to its final design stage. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 and take about five years. | Photo courtesy of LSST Corporation. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

311

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

312

A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS  

SciTech Connect

In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and {chi}{sup 2} statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian {Lambda}CDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Triggering of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes: PMT trigger rates due to night-sky photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging air Cherenkov telescopes are usually triggered on a coincidence of two or sometimes more pixels, with discriminator thresholds in excess of 20 photoelectrons applied for each pixel. These thresholds required to suppress night-sky background are significantly higher than expected on the basis of a Poisson distribution in the number of night-sky photoelectrons generated during the characteristic signal integration time. We studied noise trigger rates under controlled conditions using an artificial background light source. Large tails in the PMT amplitude response to single photoelectrons are identified as a dominant contribution to noise triggers. The rate of such events is very sensitive to PMT operating parameters.

G. Hermann; C. Köhler; T. Kutter; W. Hofmann

1995-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTABILITY WITH DEEP SMALL-SKY COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We use the Bayesian estimation on direct T - Q - U cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps to forecast errors on the tensor-to-scalar power ratio r, and hence on primordial gravitational waves, as a function of sky coverage f{sub sky}. This map-based likelihood filters the information in the pixel-pixel space into the optimal combinations needed for r detection for cut skies, providing enhanced information over a first-step linear separation into a combination of E, B, and mixed modes, and ignoring the latter. With current computational power and for typical resolutions appropriate for r detection, the large matrix inversions required are accurate and fast. Our simulations explore two classes of experiments, with differing bolometric detector numbers, sensitivities, and observational strategies. One is motivated by a long duration balloon experiment like Spider, with pixel noise {proportional_to}{radical}(f{sub sky}) for a specified observing period. This analysis also applies to ground-based array experiments. We find that, in the absence of systematic effects and foregrounds, an experiment with Spider-like noise concentrating on f{sub sky} {approx} 0.02-0.2 could place a 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.014 boundary ({approx}95% confidence level), which rises to 0.02 with an l-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. We contrast this with a Planck-like fixed instrumental noise as f{sub sky} varies, which gives a Galaxy-masked (f{sub sky} = 0.75) 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.015, rising to Almost-Equal-To 0.05 with the foreground residuals. Using as the figure of merit the (marginalized) one-dimensional Shannon entropy of r, taken relative to the first 2003 WMAP CMB-only constraint, gives -2.7 bits from the 2012 WMAP9+ACT+SPT+LSS data, and forecasts of -6 bits from Spider (+ Planck); this compares with up to -11 bits for CMBPol, COrE, and PIXIE post-Planck satellites and -13 bits for a perfectly noiseless cosmic variance limited experiment. We thus confirm the wisdom of the current strategy for r detection of deeply probed patches covering the f{sub sky} minimum-error trough with balloon and ground experiments.

Farhang, M.; Bond, J. R.; Netterfield, C. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Dore, O. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Full-sky correlation functions for CMB experiments with asymmetric window functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss full-sky convolution of the instrumental beam with the CMB sky signal in CMB single-dish and interferometry experiments, using the method (Challinor et al. 2000) that the measured temperature and polarization anisotropies are defined globally on the group manifold of the three-dimensional rotation by means of Wigner D-functions. We re-derive the anisotropy and polarization correlation functions incorporated with asymmetric window functions, which are then explicitly calculated for a single-dish elliptical Gaussian beam and an interferometric Gaussian beam.

Kin-Wang Ng

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Large Scale Soft X-ray Loops And Their Magnetic Chirality In Both Hemispheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The magnetic chirality in solar atmosphere has been studied based on the soft X-ray and magnetic field observations. It is found that some of large-scale twisted soft X-ray loop systems occur for several months in the solar atmosphere, before the disappearance of the corresponding background large-scale magnetic field. It provides the observational evidence of the helicity of the large-scale magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and the reverse one relative to the helicity rule in both hemispheres with solar cycles. The transfer of the magnetic helicity from the subatmosphere is consistent with the formation of large-scale twisted soft X-ray loops in the both solar hemispheres.

Zhang, Hongqi; Gao, Yu; Su, Jiangtao; Sokoloff, D D; Kuzanyan, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and Gross Merchantable Volume: 1890-1990 (DB1017) data Data DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.db1017 Contributors A. N. D. Auclair, J. A. Bedford, and C. Revenga Description This database lists annual changes in areal extent (Ha) and gross merchantable wood volume (m3) produced by depletion and accrual processes in boreal and temperate forests in Alaska, Canada, Europe, Former Soviet Union, Non-Soviet temperate Asia, and the contiguous United States for the years 1890 through 1990. Forest depletions (source terms for atmospheric CO2) are identified as forest pests, forest dieback, forest fires, forest harvest, and land-use changes (predominantly the conversion of forest, temperate woodland, and shrubland to cropland). Forest accruals (sink terms

318

A 15-year Simulation of the Clear-Sky Greenhouse Effect Using the ECMWF Reanalyses: Fluxes and Comparisons with ERBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the project Clear-sky Longwave from ERA (CLERA), in which simulations were performed of clear-sky longwave fluxes and heating rates for the period 1979–93, based on data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ...

A. Slingo; J. A. Pamment; M. J. Webb

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

Barsotti, Lisa

320

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky. The algorithm, based on the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) technique, is aimed at recovering both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations, without any a priori assumption on properties of the components to be separated, except that all of them, but at most one, must have non-Gaussian distributions. The analysis starts from very simple toy-models of the sky emission in order to assess the quality of the reconstruction when inputs are well known and controlled. In particular we study the dependence of the results of separation conducted on and off the Galactic plane independently, showing that optimal separation is achieved for sky regions where components are smoothly distributed. Then we move to more realistic applications on simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; L. Bedini

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Cloud Coverage Based on All-Sky Imaging and Its Impact on Surface Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Lauder, Central Otago, New Zealand, two all-sky imaging systems have been in operation for more than 1 yr, measuring the total, opaque, and thin cloud fraction, as well as indicating whether the sun is obscured by clouds. The data provide a ...

G. Pfister; R. L. McKenzie; J. B. Liley; A. Thomas; B. W. Forgan; C. N. Long

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Analog Sky Condition Forecasting Based on a k-nn Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very short-range, cloudy–clear sky condition forecasts are important for a variety of military, civil, and commercial activities. In this investigation, an approach based on a k-nearest neighbors (k-nn) algorithm was developed and implemented to ...

Timothy J. Hall; Rachel N. Thessin; Greg J. Bloy; Carl N. Mutchler

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sky View Factors from High-Resolution Scanned Fish-eye Lens Photographic Negatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computerized method for calculating the sky view factor from fish-eye lens photographic negatives is presented. The images are scanned and stored on CD ROM, each CD holding 100 images. The images can be retrieved at very high resolutions of up ...

Kristina Blennow

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Grenier, Isabelle (University Paris Diderot and CEA Saclay, France)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Clear-Sky Longwave Irradiance at the Earth’s Surface—Evaluation of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the clear-sky longwave irradiance at the earth’s surface (LI) simulated in climate models and in satellite-based global datasets is presented. Algorithm-based estimates of LI, derived from global observations of column water ...

J. R. Garratt

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Treaty on Open Skies sensor technologies with potential international safeguards applications  

SciTech Connect

The Treaty on Open Skies is a precedent-setting agreement that allows signatory states to fly aircraft over each other`s territory with sensor systems. The purpose of the Treaty is to improve confidence and security with respect to military activities of the signatories. This paper reviews the sensor technology that is currently allowed by the Treaty on Open Skies and potential future sensor technology. The Treaty on Open Skies does have provisions to allow for the improvement of the technology of the current sensor systems and for the proposal of new sensors after a period of time. This can occur only after the Treaty has been ratified and has entered into force. If this regime was to be used for other than Treaty on Open Skies applications some modifications to the allowed sensor technology should be examined. This paper presents some ideas on potential improvements to existing allowed sensor technology as well as some suggested new advanced sensor systems that would be useful for future potential monitoring of safeguard`s related activities. This paper addresses advanced imaging sensors and non-imaging sensors for potential use in aerial remote sensing roles that involve international data sharing.

Sandoval, M.B.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Measuring Total Column Water Vapor by Pointing an Infrared Thermometer at the Sky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2-yr study affirms that the temperature indicated by an inexpensive ($20–$60) IR thermometer pointed at the cloud-free zenith sky (Tz) is a proxy for total column water vapor [precipitable water (PW)]. From 8 September 2008 to 18 October 2010 Tz was ...

Forrest M. Mims III; Lin Hartung Chambers; David R. Brooks

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Comparison of Regional Clear-Sky Albedos Inferred from Satellite Observations and Model Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have taken an important first step in validating climate models by comparing model and satellite inferred clear sky TOA (top-of-atmosphere) albedos. Model albodos were computed on a 1° × 1° latitude-longitude grid, allowing for variations in ...

B. P. Briegleb; P. Minnis; V. Ramanathan; E. Harrison

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Investigation of astrophysical phenomena in short time scales with "Pi of the Sky" apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis the data analysis designed by author for the "Pi of the Sky" experiment is presented. The data analysis consists of data reduction and specific algorithms for identification of short time scale astrophysical processes. The algorithms have been tested and their efficiency has been determined and described. The "Pi of the Sky" prototype is collecting data since June 2004 and algorithms could be intensively studied and improved during over 700 nights. A few events of confirmed astrophysical origin and above 100 events in 10s time scale of unknown nature have been discovered. During the data collection period 3 Gamma Ray Bursts (out of 231) occurred in the field of view of the telescope, but no optical counterpart has been found. The upper limits for brightness of the optical counterpart have been determined. The continuous monitoring of the sky and own trigger for optical flashes allowed to determine limits on the number of GRBs without corresponding gamma-ray detection. This allowed determining limits on the ratio of emission collimation in optical and gamma bands, which is R >= 4.4. The perspectives of the full "Pi of the Sky" system has been studied and number of positive detections has been estimated on the level of ~ 2.5 events per year.

Marcin Sokolowski

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

330

Evaluation of a Ground-Based Sky Camera System for Use inSurface Irradiance Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the evaluation of a ground-based sky camera system for studying the effect of clouds on the level of the ambient ultraviolet radiation. The system has been developed for research in the characterization of the effect of ...

Jeff Sabburg; Joe Wong

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Statistical Exmination of Sky Cover Changes in the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sette Weather Chart constructed in 1939 with data from 1900 to 1936 was used to describe the climatology of cloudless days and to predict cloudless days in the United States for 14 regions. When the data for days having 0.1 sky cover or less ...

William L. Seaver; James E. Lee

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Feature Extraction from Whole-Sky Ground-Based Images for Cloud-Type Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several features that can be extracted from digital images of the sky and that can be useful for cloud-type classification of such images are presented. Some features are statistical measurements of image texture, some are based on the Fourier ...

Josep Calbó; Jeff Sabburg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Solar Irradiance Anomalies Caused by Clear-Sky Transmission Variations above Mauna Loa: 1958–99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clear-sky transmission of the atmosphere contributes to determining the amount of solar irradiance that reaches various levels in the atmosphere, which in turn is fundamental to defining the climate of the earth. As of the end of 1999, ...

Ellsworth G. Dutton; Barry A. Bodhaine

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ARM - Datastreams - xsacrhsrhi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsxsacrhsrhi Datastreamsxsacrhsrhi Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : XSACRHSRHI X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals) Active Dates 2011.09.14 - 2013.05.31 Measurement Categories Cloud Properties Originating Instrument X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Altitude m altitude Altitude above ground level m altitude_agl Antenna transition indicator, 1 if between sweeps, otherwise 0 unitless antenna_transition ( time )

335

The Leading Modes of 10–30 Day Variability in the Extratropics of the Northern Hemisphere during the Cold Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 10–30 day variability of extratropical, cold season (November–March) 700 mb geopotential height data of the Northern Hemisphere was studied through the use of rotated complex principal component (RCPC) analysis. The intramonthly modes (IMMs), ...

John R. Lanzante

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Volcanic Eruptions, Large-Scale Modes in the Northern Hemisphere, and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author analyzes the impact of 13 major stratospheric aerosol producing volcanic eruptions since 1870 on the large-scale variability modes of sea level pressure in the Northern Hemisphere winter. The paper focuses on the Arctic Oscillation (AO)...

Bo Christiansen

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Annual Range of Southern Hemisphere SST: Comparison with Surface Heating and Possible Reasons for the High-Latitude Falloff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, the seasonal cycle is the largest single component of observed sea surface temperature (SST) variability, yet it is still not fully understood. Herein, the degree to which the structure of the seasonal cycle of Southern Hemisphere SST ...

A. M. Chiodi; D. E. Harrison

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Northern Hemispheric Trends of Pressure Indices and Atmospheric Circulation Patterns in Observations, Reconstructions, and Coupled GCM Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decadal trend behavior of the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation is investigated utilizing long-term simulations with different state-of-the-art coupled general circulation models (GCMs) for present-day climate conditions (1990), ...

C. C. Raible; T. F. Stocker; M. Yoshimori; M. Renold; U. Beyerle; C. Casty; J. Luterbacher

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Trends in Southern Hemisphere Circulation in IPCC AR4 Models over 1950–99: Ozone Depletion versus Greenhouse Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) models on the Southern Hemisphere (SH) circulation are assessed over the period 1950–99, focusing on the seasonality of the trend and the level of ...

Wenju Cai; Tim Cowan

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Impact of Land Surface Initialisation Approach on Sub–seasonal Forecast Skill: A Regional Analysis in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use a sophisticated coupled land–atmosphere modelling system for a Southern Hemisphere sub–domain centred over South East Australia to evaluate differences in simulation skill from two different land surface initialisation approaches. The first ...

Annette L. Hirsch; Jatin Kala; Andy J. Pitman; Claire Carouge; Jason P. Evans; Vanessa Haverd; David Mocko

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Southern Hemisphere Using ISCCP C2 and NCEP–NCAR Climatological Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal shortwave radiation budget at the surface of the Southern Hemisphere was estimated, for 10° latitudinal zones, using a radiative transfer model with long-term mean monthly climatological data from the International Satellite Cloud ...

N. Hatzianastassiou; I. Vardavas

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Troposphere-Stratosphere (Surface-55 km) Monthly Winter General Circulation Statistics for the Northern Hemisphere-Four Year Averages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean Northern Hemisphere general circulation statistics are presented for the four-year average December, January and February months of the winters 1978–79 through 1981–82. These calculations start with daily maps for eighteen pressure ...

Marvin A. Geller; Mao-Fou Wu; Melvyn E. Gelman

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Gravity Wave Characteristics in the Southern Hemisphere Revealed by a High-Resolution Middle-Atmosphere General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravity wave characteristics in the middle- to high-latitude Southern Hemisphere are analyzed using simulation data over 3 yr from a high-resolution middle-atmosphere general circulation model without using any gravity wave parameterizations. ...

Kaoru Sato; Satoshi Tateno; Shingo Watanabe; Yoshio Kawatani

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Projected Changes to the Southern Hemisphere Ocean and Sea Ice in the IPCC AR4 Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fidelity and projected changes in the climate models, used for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), are assessed with regard to the Southern Hemisphere extratropical ocean and sea ice systems. While ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Agus Santoso; Andréa S. Taschetto; Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Jessica Trevena; Matthew H. England

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

joint Spatiotemporal Modes of Surface Temperature and Sea Level Pressure Variability in the Northern Hemisphere during the Last Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent spatiotemporal modes of climatic variability are isolated based on a multivariate frequency domain singular value decomposition (SVD) of nearly a century of monthly Northern Hemisphere sea level pressure (SLP) and surface temperature ...

Michael E. Mann; Jeffrey Park

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Trends in Cyclone and Anticyclone Frequency and Comparison with Periods of Warming and Cooling over the Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available datasets and pertinent climatological studies have been examined to show the statistical trends in frequency of cyclone and anticyclone events for the Northern Hemisphere during periods of warming and cooling this century (as determined ...

Ernest M. Agee

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Northern Hemisphere Winter Atmospheric Transient Eddy Heat Fluxes and the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal co-variability between the atmospheric transient eddy heat fluxes (i.e. and ) in the Northern Hemisphere winter (January-March) and the paths of the Gulf Stream (GS), Kuroshio Extension (KE), and Oyashio Extension ...

Young-Oh Kwon; Terrence M. Joyce

348

The role of the right cerebral hemisphere in processing novel metaphoric expressions: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous research suggests that the right hemisphere (RH) may contribute uniquely to the processing of metaphoric language. However, causal relationships between local brain activity in the RH and metaphors comprehension were never established. In addition, ...

Gorana Pobric; Nira Mashal; Miriam Faust; Michal Lavidor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

On the Maintenance of Short-Term Subtropical Wind Maxima in the Southern Hemisphere during SOP-1, FGGF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extent to which divergent circulations, induced by tropical heating, help to maintain westerly maxima in the Southern Hemisphere subtropics during the SOP-1 of FGGE is explored using Level Bib analyses from the Goddard Laboratory for ...

James W. Hurrell; Dayton G. Vincent

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Midtropospheric Circulation Patterns Associated with Extreme Dry and Wet Episodes over Equatorial Eastern Africa during the Northern Hemisphere Spring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anomaly circulation patterns of contrasting wet and dry episodes over the equatorial eastern Africa (EEA) region are studied using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses. The study focuses on the Northern Hemisphere ...

Raphael E. Okoola

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Seasonal Variations in the Southern Hemisphere Storm Tracks and Jet Streams as Revealed in a Reanalysis Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional characteristics of the climatological seasonal variations in Southern Hemisphere (SH) storm tracks are examined based on a reanalysis dataset. When differences in vertical structure between the subpolar and subtropical jet streams (SPJ ...

Hisashi Nakamura; Akihiko Shimpo

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Dynamical Processes Related to the Appearance of Quasi-Stationary Waves on the Subtropical Jet in the Midsummer Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical features of quasi-stationary planetary waves were examined on the subtropical jet in the midsummer Northern Hemisphere by using objectively analyzed data and satellite data. As a result, a quasi-stationary wave train that is highly ...

Naoki Sato; Masaaki Takahashi

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Southern Hemisphere Synoptic Behavior in Extreme Phases of SAM, ENSO, Sea Ice Extent, and Southern Australia Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association between Southern Hemisphere cyclones and anticyclones and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), southern annular mode (SAM), Antarctic sea ice extent (SIE), and rainfall in Perth and Melbourne is explored. Those cities are, ...

Alexandre Bernardes Pezza; Tom Durrant; Ian Simmonds; Ian Smith

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Northern Hemisphere Winter Atmospheric Transient Eddy Heat Fluxes and the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio–Oyashio Extension Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal covariability between the atmospheric transient eddy heat fluxes (i.e., ??T? and ??q?) in the Northern Hemisphere winter (January–March) and the paths of the Gulf Stream (GS), Kuroshio Extension (KE), and Oyashio Extension ...

Young-Oh Kwon; Terrence M. Joyce

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The Roles of CO2 and Orbital Forcing in Driving Southern Hemispheric Temperature Variations during the Last 21 000 Yr  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient climate model simulations covering the last 21 000 yr reveal that orbitally driven insolation changes in the Southern Hemisphere, combined with a rise in atmospheric pCO2, were sufficient to jump-start the deglacial warming around ...

Axel Timmermann; Oliver Timm; Lowell Stott; Laurie Menviel

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Large Scale, Low Frequency Variability of the 1979 FGGE Surface Buoy Drifts and Winds over the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface response of the Southern Hemisphere's oceans to the large spatial scale, interseasonal changes in wind forcing during the FGGE year of 1979 is investigated. The primary data are the analyzed daily wind fields, and the trajectories of ...

W. G. Large; H. Van Loon

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Impact of Manually Derived Southern Hemisphere Sea Level Pressure Data upon Forecasts from a Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted within the framework of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's global data assimilation and prediction system to assess the forecast impact of Southern Hemisphere sea level pressure estimates [paid observations (...

R. Seaman; P. Steinle; W. Bourke; T. Hart

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Southern Hemisphere Winter Extratropical Cyclone Characteristics and Vertical Organization Observed with the ERA-40 Data in 1979–2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean characteristics and trends of Southern Hemisphere (SH) winter extratropical cyclones occurring at six levels of the troposphere over the period 1979–2001 have been investigated using the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) data. Cyclonic ...

Eun-Pa Lim; Ian Simmonds

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The MOXE X-ray all-sky monitor for Spectrum-X-Gamma  

SciTech Connect

MOXE is an X-ray all-sky monitor to be flown on the Russian Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite, to be launched in a few years. It will monitor several hundred X-ray sources on a daily basis, and will be the first instrument to monitor most of the X-ray sky most of the time. MOXE will alert users of more sensitive instruments on Russia`s giant high energy astrophysics observatory and of other instruments to transient activity. MOXE consists of an array of 6 X-ray pinhole cameras, sensitive from 3 to 25 keV, which views 4{pi} steradians (except for a 20{degree} {times} 80{degree} patch which includes the Sun). The pinhole apertures of 0.625 {times} 2.556 cm{sup 2} imply an angular resolution of 2{degree}.4 {times} 9{degree}.7 (on-axis). The MOXE hardware program includes an engineering model, now delivered, and a flight model. The flight instrument will mass approximately 118 kg and draw 38 Watts. For a non-focusing all-sky instrument that is limited by sky background, the limiting sensitivity is a function only of detector area. MOXE, with 6,000 cm{sup 2} of detector area, will, for a 24 hrs exposure, have a sensitivity of approximately 2 mCrab. MOXE distinguishes itself with respect to other all-sky monitors in its high duty cycle, thus being particularly sensitive to transient phenomena with time scales between minutes and hours.

In`t Zand, J.J.M.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Moss, C.E. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Freque...

Maino, D; Baccigalupi, C; Perrotta, F; Banday, A J; Bedini, L; Burigana, C; Zotti, G D; Górski, K M; Salerno, E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Evgueni Kassianov Evgueni Kassianov NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent Holben Holben , , & AERONET Team & AERONET Team Collaboration involving: Collaboration involving: NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC 4S 4S TAR TAR : : S S pectrometer for pectrometer for S S ky ky - - S S canning, canning, S S un un - - T T racking racking A A tmospheric tmospheric R R esearch esearch 4STAR: 4STAR: Spectrometer Spectrometer for for Sky Sky - - Scanning Scanning , , Sun Sun - - Tracking Tracking Atmospheric Research Atmospheric Research

362

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey of Galactic Ionized Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a one-degree resolution, velocity-resolved northern sky survey of H-alpha emission from our Galaxy. The unprecedented sensitivity of the instrument and accurate spectral subtraction of atmospheric features allow us to detect Galactic features as faint as 0.1 Rayleighs (EM ~ 0.25 cm^{-6} pc). This survey allows a direct comparison of the ionized and neutral components of the ISM on a global scale for the first time. All-sky maps of H-alpha emission in select velocity bands highlight the rich kinematic structure of the Galaxy's ionized gas. The full set of data from the WHAM survey is now available at http://www.astro.wisc.edu/wham/. (abridged)

G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

CGRaBS: An All-Sky Survey of Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a uniform all-sky survey of bright blazars, selected primarily by their flat radio spectra, that is designed to provide a large catalog of likely gamma-ray AGN. The defined sample has 1625 targets with radio and X-ray properties similar to those of the EGRET blazars, spread uniformly across the |b| > 10 deg sky. We also report progress toward optical characterization of the sample; of objects with known R < 23, 85% have been classified and 81% have measured redshifts. One goal of this program is to focus attention on the most interesting (e.g., high redshift, high luminosity, ...) sources for intensive multiwavelength study during the observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST.

Healey, Stephen E; Cotter, Garret; Michelson, Peter F; Schlafly, Edward F; Readhead, Anthony C S; Giommi, Paolo; Chaty, Sylvain; Grenier, Isabelle A; Weintraub, Lawrence C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

On the Estimation of Clear-Sky Upwelling Shortwave and Longwave  

SciTech Connect

Previous work (Long and Ackerman 2000; Long 2004) has concentrated on estimation of the downwelling clear-sky irradiances and the calculation of the effect of clouds on the downwelling radiative energy budget. However, cloud forcing is defined for the difference between clear- and cloudy-sky net radiation, which includes the upwelling components. Thus, if we are to estimate the surface radiative cloud forcing, the means must be developed to estimate what the upwelling shortwave and longwave irradiance would be if the clouds were not present. Estimation of the upwelling longwave (LW) is particularly troublesome in that the emitted upwelling LW is a function of the total surface energy exchange including latent and sensible heat, which is related to but not necessarily always totally driven by the radiative exchange alone, but also involves the evolving soil and vegetation properties and changes in soil moisture amounts.

Long, C.N.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

365

Tests for Non-Gaussian Statistics in the DMR Four-Year Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search the high-latitude portion of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 4-year sky maps for evidence of a non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background. The genus, 3-point correlation function, and 2-point correlation function of temperature maxima and minima are all in excellent agreement with the hypothesis that the CMB anisotropy on angular scales of 7 degrees or larger represents a random-phase Gaussian field. A likelihood comparison of the DMR sky maps to a set of random-phase non-Gaussian toy models selects the exact Gaussian model as most likely. Monte Carlo simulations show that the 2-point correlation of the peaks and valleys in the maps provides the greatest discrimination among the class of models tested.

A. Kogut; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; K. Gorski; G. Hinshaw; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Frequency scalings and normalization have been recovered with better than percent precision for all the components at frequencies and in sky regions where their signal-to-noise ratio exceeds 1.5; the error increases at ten percent level for signal-to-noise ratios about 1. Runs have been performed on a Pentium III 600 MHz computer; FastICA typically took a time of the order of 10 minutes for all-sky simulations with 3.5 arcminutes pixel size. We conclude that FastICA is an extremly promising technique for analyzing the maps that will be obtained by the forthcoming high resolution CMB experiments.

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; A. J. Banday; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; K. M. Gorski; E. Salerno

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Software standards, methods and quality control for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Collaboration involves upwards of 50 scientists, many of whom are involved in the development and use of the software needed to acquire, process and archive the image and spectroscopic data sets. Fermilab has major responsibilities in the development and maintenance of the project`s software and for its software engineering practices. The authors report on the standards and methodologies they have developed in support of these activities.

Pordes, R.; Berman, E.; Petravick, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). Computing Div.] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Neural networks and separation of background and foregrounds in astrophysical sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To have a first insight into the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the Planck Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the Planck satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

2011-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

THE 70 MONTH SWIFT-BAT ALL-SKY HARD X-RAY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14-195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8{sigma}, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 50% of the sky and 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be active galactic nuclei, with over 700 in the catalog. As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available eight-channel spectra and monthly sampled light curves for each object detected in the survey in the online journal and at the Swift-BAT 70 month Web site.

Baumgartner, W. H.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mushotzky, R. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Evans, P. A., E-mail: whbaumga@alum.mit.edu [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group/Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The July, 2008 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

373

Power Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity Determined from the 4-Year COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fourier analysis and power spectrum estimation of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on an incompletely sampled sky developed by Gorski (1994) has been applied to the high-latitude portion of the 4-year COBE DMR 31.5, 53 and 90 GHz sky maps. Likelihood analysis using newly constructed Galaxy cuts (extended beyond |b| = 20deg to excise the known foreground emission) and simultaneously correcting for the faint high latitude galactic foreground emission is conducted on the DMR sky maps pixelized in both ecliptic and galactic coordinates. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation from the foreground corrected 4-year COBE DMR data renders n ~ 1.2 +/- 0.3, and Q_{rms-PS} ~ 15.3^{+3.7}_{-2.8} microK (projections of the two-parameter likelihood). These results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model of amplitude Q_{rms-PS} ~ 18 microK detected with significance exceeding 14sigma (dQ/Q < 0.07). (A small power spectrum amplitude drop below the published 2-year results is predominantly due to the application of the new, extended Galaxy cuts.)

K. M. Gorski; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; G. Hinshaw; A. Kogut; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the first joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from an all-sky search for unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO, GEO 600 and Virgo detectors between November 2006 and October 2007. The search is performed by three ...

Weiss, Rainer

375

Satellite-based reconstruction of the tropical oceanic clear sky outgoing longwave radiation and comparison with climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in clear-sky conditions have been calculated using High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) observations from 1979 to 2004. After applying corrections for satellite orbital drift and ...

Guillaume Gastineau; Brian J. Soden; Darren L. Jackson; Chris W. O’Dell

376

The Use of Euclidean Geometric Distance on RGB Color Space for the Classification of Sky and Cloud Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current work describes the use of multidimensional Euclidean geometric distance (EGD) and Bayesian methods to characterize and classify the sky and cloud patterns present in image pixels. From specific images and using visualization tools, it ...

Sylvio Luiz Mantelli Neto; Aldo von Wangenheim; Enio Bueno Pereira; Eros Comunello

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evaluating Cloud Contamination in Clear-Sky MODIS Terra Daytime Land Surface Temperatures Using Ground-Based Meteorology Station Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environment Canada meteorological station hourly sampled air temperatures Tair at four stations in the southwest Yukon were used to identify cloud contamination in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra clear-sky daytime ...

Scott N. Williamson; David S. Hik; John A. Gamon; Jeffrey L. Kavanaugh; Saewan Koh

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Starlight's Story: What can the light we see in the night sky tell us about the universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deal about an object from the light it emits. R eferencess S tory what can the light we see in the night sky tell usGriffin Rodgers a Visible light is a small band of

Rodgers, Griffen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Earth’s Clear-Sky Radiation Budget and Water Vapor Absorption in the Far Infrared  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed observational data are used to simulate the sensitivity of clear-sky outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) to water vapor perturbations in order to investigate the effect of uncertainties in water vapor measurements and spectroscopic ...

Ashok Sinha; John E. Harries

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Performance of Observation-Based Prediction Algorithms for Very Short-Range, Probabilistic Clear-Sky Condition Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very short-range sky condition forecasts are produced to support a variety of military, civil, and commercial activities. In this investigation, six advanced, observation (obs)-based prediction algorithms were developed and tested that generated ...

Timothy J. Hall; Carl N. Mutchler; Greg J. Bloy; Rachel N. Thessin; Stephanie K. Gaffney; Jonathan J. Lareau

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

Koester, B P; Annis, J; Wechsler, R H; Evrard, A; Bleem, L; Becker, M; Johnston, D; Sheldon, E; Nichol, R; Miller, C; Scranton, R; Bahcall, N; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Schneider, D; Sneddin, S; Voges, W; York, D; 10.1086/509599

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

B. P. Koester; T. A. McKay; J. Annis; R. H. Wechsler; A. Evrard; L. Bleem; M. Becker; D. Johnston; E. Sheldon; R. Nichol; C. Miller; R. Scranton; N. Bahcall; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; D. Schneider; S. Sneddin; W. Voges; D. York; SDSS collaboration

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

INFORMATION ON THE MILKY WAY FROM THE 2MASS ALL SKY STAR COUNT: BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The J - K{sub s} color distributions (CDs) with a bin size of 0.05 mag has been carried out for the entire Milky Way using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The CDs are bimodal, with a red peak at 0.8 < J - K{sub s} < 0.85 and a blue peak at 0.3 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4. The colors of the red peak are more or less the same for the whole sky, but those of the blue peak depend on Galactic latitude (J - K{sub s} {approx} 0.35 at low Galactic latitudes and 0.35 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4 for other sky areas). The blue peak dominates the bimodal CDs at low Galactic latitudes and becomes comparable with the red peak in other sky regions. In order to explain the bimodal distribution and the global trend shown by the all-sky 2MASS CDs, we assemble an empirical Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, which is composed of observational-based near-infrared H-R diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams, and incorporate a Milky Way model. In the empirical H-R diagram, the main-sequence turn-off for stars in the thin disk is relatively bluer, (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.31, compared with that of the thick disk which is (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.39. The age of the thin/thick disk is roughly estimated to be around 4-5/8-9 Gyr according to the color-age relation of the main-sequence turn-off. In general, the 2MASS CDs can be treated as a tool to measure the age of the stellar population of the Milky Way in a statistical manner and to our knowledge it is the first attempt to do so.

Chang, Chan-Kao; Lai, Shao-Yu; Peng, Ting-Hung [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China); Ko, Chung-Ming, E-mail: rex@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics and Center of Complex Systems, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

Cloudy Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Radiative Forcing andFeedback Analysis of Cloud Radiative Forcing andFeedback in a Climate General Circulation Model A. A. lacis NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Institute for Space Studies New York, NY 10225 The principal objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) are 1) to improve and validate the radiation parameterizations in the GISS general circulation model (GCM) through model intercomparisons with line-by-line calculations and through comparisons with ARM observations, 2) to improve the GCM diagnostic output to enable more effective comparisons to global cloud/radiation data sets, and 3) to use ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) data to develop improved parameterization of clouds in the GCM and to study the

385

Cloudy Skies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. linn J. linn Space Science and Technology Division Los Alamos National Laboratory iLos Alamos, NM 87545 The earth's weather and climate are influenced strongly by phenomena associated with clouds. Therefore, a general circulation model (GCM) that models the evolution of weather and climate must include an accurate physical model of the clouds. This paper describes our efforts to develop a suitable cloud model. It concentrates on the microphysical processes that determine the evolution of droplet and ice crystal size distributions, precipitation rates, total and condensed water content, and radiative extinction coefficients. We assume a fixed temperature, acloud vertical thickness, and concentrations and size distributions of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice condensation nuclei

386

Comparison of Direct Normal Irradiance Derived from Silicon and Thermopile Global Hemispherical Radiation Detectors: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating solar applications utilize direct normal irradiance (DNI) radiation, a measurement rarely available. The solar concentrator industry has begun to deploy numerous measurement stations to prospect for suitable system deployment sites. Rotating shadowband radiometers (RSR) using silicon photodiodes as detectors are typically deployed. This paper compares direct beam estimates from RSR to a total hemispherical measuring radiometer (SPN1) multiple fast thermopiles. These detectors simultaneously measure total and diffuse radiation from which DNI can be computed. Both the SPN1 and RSR-derived DNI are compared to DNI measured with thermopile pyrheliometers. Our comparison shows that the SPN1 radiometer DNI estimated uncertainty is somewhat greater than, and on the same order as, the RSR DNI estimates for DNI magnitudes useful to concentrator technologies.

Myers, D. R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Neural networks and separation of Cosmic Microwave Background and astrophysical signals in sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To test the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the {\\sc Planck} Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the {\\sc Planck} satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each signal, with precision going from 10% for the Galactic components to percent for CMB; radio sources are almost completely recovered down to a flux limit corresponding to $0.7\\sigma_{CMB}$, where $\\sigma_{CMB}$ is the rms level of CMB fluctuations. The signal recovering possesses equal quality on all the scales larger then the pixel size. In addition, we show that the frequency scalings of the input signals can be partially inferred from the ICA outputs, at the percent precision for the dominant components, radio sources and CMB.

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

HARMONIC IN-PAINTING OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND SKY BY CONSTRAINED GAUSSIAN REALIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The presence of astrophysical emissions between the last scattering surface and our vantage point requires us to apply a foreground mask on cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky maps, leading to large cuts around the Galactic equator and numerous holes. Since many CMB analysis, in particular on the largest angular scales, may be performed on a whole-sky map in a more straightforward and reliable manner, it is of utmost importance to develop an efficient method to fill in the masked pixels in a way compliant with the expected statistical properties and the unmasked pixels. In this Letter, we consider the Monte Carlo simulation of a constrained Gaussian field and derive it CMB anisotropy in harmonic space, where a feasible implementation is possible with good approximation. We applied our method to simulated data, which shows that our method produces a plausible whole-sky map, given the unmasked pixels, and a theoretical expectation. Subsequently, we applied our method to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe foreground-reduced maps and investigated the anomalous alignment between quadrupole and octupole components. From our investigation, we find that the alignment in the foreground-reduced maps is even higher than the Internal Linear Combination map. We also find that the V-band map has higher alignment than other bands, despite the expectation that the V-band map has less foreground contamination than other bands. Therefore, we find it hard to attribute the alignment to residual foregrounds. Our method will be complementary to other efforts on in-painting or reconstructing the masked CMB data, and of great use to Planck surveyor and future missions.

Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel [Niels Bohr Institute and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mandolesi, Nazzareno, E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk [INAF/IASF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The WHAM Northern Sky Survey and the Nature of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H-alpha emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between HI and HII in the diffuse ISM.

Madsen, G J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

THE WHAM NORTHERN SKY SURVEY AND THE NATURE OF THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM IN THE GALAXY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H? emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between H I and H II in the diffuse ISM. 1.

G. J. Madsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The WHAM Northern Sky Survey and the Nature of the Warm Ionized Medium in the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a velocity-resolved map of diffuse H-alpha emission of the entire northern sky, providing the first comprehensive picture of both the distribution and kinematics of diffuse ionized gas in the Galaxy. WHAM continues to advance our understanding of the physical conditions of the warm ionized medium through observations of other optical emission lines throughout the Galactic disk and halo. We discuss some highlights from the survey, including an optical window into the inner Galaxy and the relationship between HI and HII in the diffuse ISM.

G. J. Madsen

2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

392

Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)  

SciTech Connect

The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

New Neutrino Mass Bounds from Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Data Release 8 Photometric Luminous Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present neutrino mass bounds using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts measured from Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Data Release Eight (SDSS DR8). The galaxies have photometric redshifts between $z = 0.45$ and $z = 0.65$, and cover 10,000 square degrees and thus probe a volume of 3$h^{-3}$Gpc$^3$, enabling tight constraints to be derived on the amount of dark matter in the form of massive neutrinos. A new bound on the sum of neutrino masses $\\sum m_\

de Putter, Roland; Giusarma, Elena; Ho, Shirley; Cuesta, Antonio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley; White, Martin; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Kirkby, David; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Percival, Will J; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

On the Speed of the Eddy-Driven Jet and the Width of the Hadley Cell in the Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong correlation between the speed of the eddy-driven jet and the width of the Hadley cell is found to exist in the Southern Hemisphere, both in reanalysis data and in twenty-first-century integrations from the Intergovernmental Panel on ...

Paulo Ceppi; Dennis L. Hartmann

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

ECMWF Analyses and Forecasts of Stratospheric Winter Polar Vortex Breakup: September 2002 in the Southern Hemisphere and Related Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breakup of the polar stratospheric vortex in the Northern Hemisphere is an event that is known to be predictable for up to a week or so ahead. This is illustrated using data from the 45-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-40) for the sudden warmings of ...

Adrian Simmons; Mariano Hortal; Graeme Kelly; Anthony McNally; Agathe Untch; Sakari Uppala

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Zonal-Wind Oscillations over the Western Hemisphere during Winter: Further Evidence of a Zonal-Eddy Relationship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 500-mb height analyses and 7-day forecasts are examined during ten winters (1981–90) for oscillations of geostrophic zonal wind over the western hemisphere. A well-defined zonal-wind ...

Steven W. Lyons; Bruce Hundermark

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Effect of the Divergent Circulation on Some Aspects of the 1978/79 Southern Hemisphere Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two aspects of the 1978/79 Southern Hemisphere (SH) monsoon are examined: (i) A double-low (double-high) structure in the lower (upper) levels of the troposphere, which appears over the region adjacent to Australia; and (ii) the poleward shift in ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Ming-Cheng Yen; Harryvan Loon

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The computation of cloud base height from paired whole-sky imaging cameras  

SciTech Connect

A major goal for global change studies is to improve the accuracy of general circulation models (GCMs) capable of predicting the timing and magnitude of greenhouse gas-induced global warming. Research has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climate responses to human activity. Of particular value to reducing the uncertainties associated with cloud-radiation interactions is the measurement of cloud base height (CBH), both because it is a dominant factor in determining the infrared radiative properties of clouds with respect to the earth`s surface and lower atmosphere and because CBHs are essential to measuring cloud cover fraction. We have developed a novel approach to the extraction of cloud base height from pairs of whole sky imaging (WSI) cameras. The core problem is to spatially register cloud fields from widely separated WSI cameras; this complete, triangulation provides the CBH measurements. The wide camera separation (necessary to cover the desired observation area) and the self-similarity of clouds defeats all standard matching algorithms when applied to static views of the sky. To address this, our approach is based on optical flow methods that exploit the fact that modern WSIs provide sequences of images. We will describe the algorithm and present its performance as evaluated both on real data validated by ceilometer measurements and on a variety of simulated cases.

Allmen, M.C.; Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Earth Occultation Imaging of the Low Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with GBM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) has been applied to Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to perform all-sky monitoring for a predetermined catalog of hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray sources. Imaging with a Differential filter using the Earth Occultation Method (IDEOM) has been developed to search for sources not in the catalog, thus completing the catalog and reducing a source of systematic error in EOT. IDEOM is a tomographic imaging method that takes advantage of the orbital precession of the Fermi satellite. Using IDEOM, all-sky images have been generated for ~4 years of GBM data in the 12-50 keV, 50-100 keV and 100-300 keV energy bands in search of sources otherwise unmodeled by the GBM occultation analysis. Analysis resulted in the detection of 43 sources in the 12-50 keV energy band, 23 sources in the 50-100 keV energy band, and 7 sources in the 100-300 keV energy band. IDEOM analysis has resulted in the addition of 16 sources to the GBM-EOT catalog. We also present the first joined averaged spectra fo...

Rodi, J; Case, G L; Camero-Arranz, A; Chaplin, C; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Wilson-Hodge, C A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Influence of sky radiance measurement errors on inversion-retrieved aerosol properties  

SciTech Connect

Remote sensing of the atmospheric aerosol is a well-established technique that is currently used for routine monitoring of this atmospheric component, both from ground-based and satellite. The AERONET program, initiated in the 90's, is the most extended network and the data provided are currently used by a wide community of users for aerosol characterization, satellite and model validation and synergetic use with other instrumentation (lidar, in-situ, etc.). Aerosol properties are derived within the network from measurements made by ground-based Sun-sky scanning radiometers. Sky radiances are acquired in two geometries: almucantar and principal plane. Discrepancies in the products obtained following both geometries have been observed and the main aim of this work is to determine if they could be justified by measurement errors. Three systematic errors have been analyzed in order to quantify the effects on the inversion-derived aerosol properties: calibration, pointing accuracy and finite field of view. Simulations have shown that typical uncertainty in the analyzed quantities (5% in calibration, 0.2 Degree-Sign in pointing and 1.2 Degree-Sign field of view) yields to errors in the retrieved parameters that vary depending on the aerosol type and geometry. While calibration and pointing errors have relevant impact on the products, the finite field of view does not produce notable differences.

Torres, B.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V. E.; Bennouna, Y. S.; Fuertes, D.; Gonzalez, R.; Frutos, A. M. de [Atmospheric Optics Group (GOA), University of Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Berjon, A. J. [Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Meteorological State Agency of Spain (AEMET), Sta. Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Blarel, L. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Optics, Universite Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Multi-wavelength study of 14000 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We studied a large sample of ~14000 dwarf star-forming galaxies with strong emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and distributed in the redshift range of z~0-0.6. We modelled spectral energy distributions (SED) of all galaxies which were based on the SDSS spectra in the visible range of 0.38-0.92 micron and included both the stellar and ionised gas emission. These SEDs were extrapolated to the UV and mid-infrared ranges to cover the wavelength range of 0.1-22 micron. The SDSS spectroscopic data were supplemented by photometric data from the GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, and NVSS all-sky surveys. We derived global characteristics of the galaxies, such as their element abundances, luminosities, and stellar masses. The luminosities and stellar masses range within the sample over ~5 orders of magnitude, thereby linking low-mass and low-luminosity blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies to luminous galaxies, which are similar to high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). The lumi...

Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

On Determining the Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity from the COBE DMR Sky Maps: II. Results of Two Year Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new technique of Fourier analysis on a cut sky (Gorski, 1994) has been applied to the two year COBE DMR sky maps. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model. The maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the power spectrum of primordial perturbations are n=1.22 (1.02) and Q_{rms-PS}=17 (20) uK including (excluding) the quadrupole anisotropy. The marginal likelihood function on n renders n=1.10 \\pm 0.32 (0.87 \\pm 0.36).

K. M. Gorski; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; E. L. Wright; A. Kogut; G. F. Smoot; P. Lubin

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

THE MILKY WAY TOMOGRAPHY WITH SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. IV. DISSECTING DUST  

SciTech Connect

We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry of 73 million stars to simultaneously constrain best-fit main-sequence stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) and amount of dust extinction along the line of sight toward each star. Using a subsample of 23 million stars with Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry, whose addition enables more robust results, we show that SDSS photometry alone is sufficient to break degeneracies between intrinsic stellar color and dust amount when the shape of extinction curve is fixed. When using both SDSS and 2MASS photometry, the ratio of the total to selective absorption, R{sub V} , can be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 for most stars in high-extinction regions. These fits enable detailed studies of the dust properties and its spatial distribution, and of the stellar spatial distribution at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 30 Degree-Sign ). Our results are in good agreement with the extinction normalization given by the Schlegel et al. (SFD) dust maps at high northern Galactic latitudes, but indicate that the SFD extinction map appears to be consistently overestimated by about 20% in the southern sky, in agreement with recent study by Schlafly et al. The constraints on the shape of the dust extinction curve across the SDSS and 2MASS bandpasses disfavor the reddening law of O'Donnell, but support the models by Fitzpatrick and Cardelli et al. For the latter, we find a ratio of the total to selective absorption to be R{sub V} = 3.0 {+-} 0.1(random){+-}0.1 (systematic) over most of the high-latitude sky. At low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 5 Degree-Sign ), we demonstrate that the SFD map cannot be reliably used to correct for extinction because most stars are embedded in dust, rather than behind it, as is the case at high Galactic latitudes. We analyze three-dimensional maps of the best-fit R{sub V} and find that R{sub V} = 3.1 cannot be ruled out in any of the 10 SEGUE stripes at a precision level of {approx}0.1-0.2. Our best estimate for the intrinsic scatter of R{sub V} in the regions probed by SEGUE stripes is {approx}0.2. We introduce a method for efficient selection of candidate red giant stars in the disk, dubbed 'dusty parallax relation', which utilizes a correlation between distance and the extinction along the line of sight. We make these best-fit parameters, as well as all the input SDSS and 2MASS data, publicly available in a user-friendly format. These data can be used for studies of stellar number density distribution, the distribution of dust properties, for selecting sources whose SED differs from SEDs for high-latitude main-sequence stars, and for estimating distances to dust clouds and, in turn, to molecular gas clouds.

Berry, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brooks, Keira J.; Gibson, Robert R.; Jones, Lynne; Yoachim, Peter; Krughoff, Simon; Connolly, Andrew J.; Loebman, Sarah [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Juric, Mario [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bellovary, Jillian [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vrbanec, Dijana [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kimball, Amy [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Bond, Nicholas A. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Schlegel, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS 50R5032, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog enters or exits occultation by the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results can be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation

Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Camero-Arranz, A; Case, G; Cherry, M; Rodi, J; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Haynes, R H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

R. J. Reynolds; V. Chaudhary; G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

406

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

Reynolds, R J; Madsen, G J; Haffner, L M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Simplified clear sky model for direct and diffuse insolation on horizontal surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed comparison was made between five simple broadband models for clear sky global insolation. Compared models were those of Atwater and Ball, Davies and Hay, Watt, Hoyt, and Lacis and Hansen. A sixth simple model, called the Bird model, has been formulated by using parts of these five models and by comparison with the results from three rigorous radiative transfer codes. All of the simple models provide results that agree within < 10% with the three rigorous codes when the sun is in the zenith position. The Bird and Hoyt models agree within 3% with each other and with the results of the rigorous codes. However, the Bird model is easier to implement and has broader application than the Hoyt model.

Bird, R.E.; Hulstrom, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Catalogue of RR Lyrae Stars from the Northern Sky Variability Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for RR Lyrae stars has been conducted in the publicly available data of the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Candidates have been selected by the statistical properties of their variation; the standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis with appropriate limits determined from a sample 314 known RRab and RRc stars listed in the GCVS. From the period analysis and light curve shape of over 3000 candidates 785 RR Lyrae have been identified of which 188 are previously unknown. The light curves were examined for the Blazhko effect and several new stars showing this were found. Six double-mode RR Lyrae stars were also found of which two are new discoveries. Some previously known variables have been reclassified as RR Lyrae stars and similarly some RR Lyrae stars have been found to be other types of variable, or not variable at all.

Patrick Wils; Christopher Lloyd; Klaus Bernhard

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

409

Improving the Accuracy of Using Pyranometers to Measure the Clear Sky Global Solar Irradiance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyranometer users have customarily applied one responsivity value when calculating the global solar irradiance. Usually, the responsivity value is reported by either the manufacturer or a calibration facility. Many pyranometer calibrations, made both at NREL and elsewhere, have shown that the responsivity of a pyranometer changes with the change in solar zenith and azimuth angles. Depending on how well the pyranometer sensor is radiometrically leveled, these changes can exceed +/-5% of the reported responsivity, which means that errors in the calculated global solar irradiance can exceed +/-5% from the nominal values. This paper describes a method to decrease the errors resulting from the change of the solar zenith angle under clear sky conditions. Two responsivity functions, morning and afternoon, were used instead of one responsivity value. The two functions have been chosen because of asymmetry of the morning and afternoon cosine responses demonstrated by some pyranometers.

Reda, I.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Searching for Spurious Solar and Sky Lines in the Fermi-LAT Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for a unified instrumental explanation of the spectral features seen near $E_\\gamma=130$ GeV in photons collected by Fermi-LAT from the galactic center and from the Earth's limb. We report for the first time a similar feature in photons originating from the vicinity of the Sun, and examine the instrumental characteristics of this Solar feature. To test an instrumental hypothesis, we identify the range of photon incident angles where most of the peak photons are observed in these three spectral features. An examination of the spectrum of photons from the rest of the sky with this characteristic angular range reveals a hint of a spectral feature near $E_\\gamma=130$ GeV. These results cast further doubt on the dark-matter-annihilation interpretation of the galactic center peak.

Daniel Whiteson

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 sq. deg. region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometr...

Sako, Masao; Becker, A; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Frieman, J A; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Reiss, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Subba-Rao, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Choi, C; Dembicky, J; Harnavek, M; Ihara, Y; Im, M; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; KrzesiÅ?ski, J; Long, D C; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Pan, K; Saurage, G; Snedden, S A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A CATALOG OF QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a compilation of properties of the 105,783 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (DR7) quasar catalog. In this product, we compile continuum and emission line measurements around the H{alpha}, H{beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions, as well as other quantities such as radio properties, and flags indicating broad absorption line quasars, disk emitters, etc. We also compile virial black hole mass estimates based on various calibrations. For the fiducial virial mass estimates we use the Vestergaard and Peterson (VP06) calibrations for H{beta} and C IV, and our own calibration for Mg II which matches the VP06 H{beta} masses on average. We describe the construction of this catalog and discuss its limitations. The catalog and its future updates will be made publicly available online.

Shen Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Hall, Patrick B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM, 88349 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory. These calibrations, dubbed "ubercalibration", are now public with SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS data releases.

N. Padmanabhan; D. J. Schlegel; D. P. Finkbeiner; J. C. Barentine; M. R. Blanton; H. J. Brewington; J. E. Gunn; M. Harvanek; D. W. Hogg; Z. Ivezic; D. Johnston; S. M. Kent; S. J. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; E. H. Neilsen; A. Nitta; C. Loomis; R. H. Lupton; S. Roweis; S. A. Snedden; M. A. Strauss; D. L. Tucker

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

414

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital SkySurvey Imaging Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate widefield optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for thecalibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlappingobservations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative"calibrations from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolutecalibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entiresurvey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of thecalibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes indownstream analyses. Applying this to the SloanDigital Sky Survey imagingdata, we achieve ~;1 percent relative calibration errors across 8500sq.deg/ in griz; the errors are ~;2 percent for the u band. These errorsare dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache PointObservatory. These calibrations, dubbed ubercalibration, are now publicwith SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS datareleases.

Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brewington, Howard J.; Gunn, JamesE.; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S.J.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen Jr., Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Loomis, Craig; Lupton,Robert H.; Roweis, Sam; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas L.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Discovery of New Ultracool White Dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of five very cool white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Four are ultracool, exhibiting strong collision induced absorption (CIA) from molecular hydrogen and are similar in color to the three previously known coolest white dwarfs, SDSS J1337+00, LHS 3250 and LHS 1402. The fifth, an ultracool white dwarf candidate, shows milder CIA flux suppression and has a color and spectral shape similar to WD 0346+246. All five new white dwarfs are faint (g > 18.9) and have significant proper motions. One of the new ultracool white dwarfs, SDSS J0947, appears to be in a binary system with a slightly warmer (T_{eff} ~ 5000K) white dwarf companion.

Evalyn Gates; Geza Gyuk; Hugh C. Harris; Mark Subbarao; Scott Anderson; S. J. Kleinman; James Liebert; Howard Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Michael Harvanek; Jurek Krzesinski; Don Q. Lamb; Dan Long; Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Peter R. Newman; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Catalog of Spectroscopically Confirmed White Dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of 9316 spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. We have selected the stars through photometric cuts and spectroscopic modeling, backed up by a set of visual inspections. Roughly 6000 of the stars are new discoveries, roughly doubling the number of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs. We analyze the stars by performing temperature and surface gravity fits to grids of pure hydrogen and helium atmospheres. Among the rare outliers are a set of presumed helium-core DA white dwarfs with estimated masses below 0.3 Msun, including two candidates that may be the lowest masses yet found. We also present a list of 928 hot subdwarfs.

Eisenstein, D J; Harris, H C; Kleinmann, S J; Nitta, A; Silvestri, N M; Anderson, S A; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Schneider, D P; Snedden, S A; Neilsen, E H; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Liebert, James; Harris, Hugh C.; Nitta, Atsuko; Silvestri, Nicole; Anderson, Scott A.; Brewington, Howard J.; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Schneider, Donald P.; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Catalog of Spectroscopically Confirmed White Dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of 9316 spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. We have selected the stars through photometric cuts and spectroscopic modeling, backed up by a set of visual inspections. Roughly 6000 of the stars are new discoveries, roughly doubling the number of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs. We analyze the stars by performing temperature and surface gravity fits to grids of pure hydrogen and helium atmospheres. Among the rare outliers are a set of presumed helium-core DA white dwarfs with estimated masses below 0.3 Msun, including two candidates that may be the lowest masses yet found. We also present a list of 928 hot subdwarfs.

Daniel J. Eisenstein; James Liebert; Hugh C. Harris; S. J. Kleinmann; Atsuko Nitta; Nicole Silvestri; Scott A. Anderson; J. C. Barentine; Howard J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Michael Harvanek; Jurek Krzesinski; Eric H. Neilsen Jr.; Dan Long; Donald P. Schneider; Stephanie A. Snedden

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative" calibrations, from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve ~1% relative calibration errors across 8500 sq.deg. in griz; the errors are ~2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

Padmanabhan, N; Finkbeiner, D P; Barentine, J C; Blanton, M R; Brewington, H J; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hogg, D W; Ivezic, Z; Johnston, D; Kent, S M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Nitta, A; Loomis, C; Lupton, R H; Roweis, S; Snedden, S A; Strauss, M A; Tucker, D L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Discovery of New Ultracool White Dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of five very cool white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Four are ultracool, exhibiting strong collision induced absorption (CIA) from molecular hydrogen and are similar in color to the three previously known coolest white dwarfs, SDSS J1337+00, LHS 3250 and LHS 1402. The fifth, an ultracool white dwarf candidate, shows milder CIA flux suppression and has a color and spectral shape similar to WD 0346+246. All five new white dwarfs are faint (g > 18.9) and have significant proper motions. One of the new ultracool white dwarfs, SDSS J0947, appears to be in a binary system with a slightly warmer (T_{eff} ~ 5000K) white dwarf companion.

Gates, E; Harris, H C; Subba-Rao, M; Anderson, S; Kleinman, S J; Liebert, J; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Lamb, D Q; Long, D; Neilsen, E H; Newman, P R; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Gates, Evalyn; Gyuk, Geza; Harris, Hugh C.; Subbarao, Mark; Anderson, Scott; Liebert, James; Brewington, Howard; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Lamb, Don Q.; Long, Dan; Neilsen, Eric H.; Newman, Peter R.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of ''relative'' calibrations from that of ''absolute'' calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve {approx}1% relative calibration errors across 8500 deg{sup 2} in griz; the errors are {approx}2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodeled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, D.J.; Finkbeiner, D.P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, M.R.; Brewington, H.J.; Gunn, J.E.; Harvanek, M.; Hogg, D.W.; Ivezic, Z.; Johnston, D.; /LBL, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Texas U., Astron. Dept. /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Caltech, JPL /Fermilab /Subaru Telescope /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Search For Unresolved Sources In The COBE-DMR Two-Year Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have searched the temperature maps from the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) first two years of data for evidence of unresolved sources. The high-latitude sky (|b| > 30\\deg) contains no sources brighter than 192 uK thermodynamic temperature (322 Jy at 53 GHz). The cumulative count of sources brighter than threshold T, N(> T), is consistent with a superposition of instrument noise plus a scale-invariant spectrum of cosmic temperature fluctuations normalized to Qrms-PS = 17 uK. We examine the temperature maps toward nearby clusters and find no evidence for any Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, \\Delta y S) < 2 x 10^4 (S/1 Jy)^{-2} sr^{-1}.

A. Kogut; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; G. Hinshaw; K. Loewenstein; P. Lubin; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1994-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

422

Extrapolated experimental critical parameters of unreflected and steel-reflected massive enriched uranium metal spherical and hemispherical assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Sixty-nine critical configurations of up to 186 kg of uranium are reported from very early experiments (1960s) performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory near Denver, Colorado. Enriched (93%) uranium metal spherical and hemispherical configurations were studied. All were thick-walled shells except for two solid hemispheres. Experiments were essentially unreflected; or they included central and/or external regions of mild steel. No liquids were involved. Critical parameters are derived from extrapolations beyond subcritical data. Extrapolations, rather than more precise interpolations between slightly supercritical and slightly subcritical configurations, were necessary because experiments involved manually assembled configurations. Many extrapolations were quite long; but the general lack of curvature in the subcritical region lends credibility to their validity. In addition to delayed critical parameters, a procedure is offered which might permit the determination of prompt critical parameters as well for the same cases. This conjectured procedure is not based on any strong physical arguments.

Rothe, R.E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

OPTICALLY SELECTED BL LACERTAE CANDIDATES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE SEVEN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a sample of 723 optically selected BL Lac candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) spectroscopic database encompassing 8250 deg{sup 2} of sky; our sample constitutes one of the largest uniform BL Lac samples yet derived. Each BL Lac candidate has a high-quality SDSS spectrum from which we determine spectroscopic redshifts for {approx}60% of the objects. Redshift lower limits are estimated for the remaining objects utilizing the lack of host galaxy flux contamination in their optical spectra; we find that objects lacking spectroscopic redshifts are likely at systematically higher redshifts. Approximately 80% of our BL Lac candidates match to a radio source in FIRST/NVSS, and {approx}40% match to a ROSAT X-ray source. The homogeneous multiwavelength coverage allows subdivision of the sample into 637 radio-loud BL Lac candidates and 86 weak-featured radio-quiet objects. The radio-loud objects broadly support the standard paradigm unifying BL Lac objects with beamed radio galaxies. We propose that the majority of the radio-quiet objects may be lower-redshift (z < 2.2) analogs to high-redshift weak line quasars (i.e., active galactic nucleus with unusually anemic broad emission line regions). These would constitute the largest sample of such objects, being of similar size and complementary in redshift to the samples of high-redshift weak line quasars previously discovered by the SDSS. However, some fraction of the weak-featured radio-quiet objects may instead populate a rare and extreme radio-weak tail of the much larger radio-loud BL Lac population. Serendipitous discoveries of unusual white dwarfs, high-redshift weak line quasars, and broad absorption line quasars with extreme continuum dropoffs blueward of rest-frame 2800 A are also briefly described.

Plotkin, Richard M.; Anderson, Scott F.; Kimball, Amy E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hall, Patrick B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 (Canada); Richmond, Michael W. [Physics Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Shemmer, Ohad [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Voges, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); York, Donald G. [University of Chicago and the Fermi Institute, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bahcall, Neta A. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Snedden, Stephanie; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)], E-mail: plotkin@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: anderson@astro.washington.edu (and others)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Sky-maps of the sidereal anisotropy of galactic cosmic ray intensity and its energy dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the sidereal daily variations observed between 1985 and 2006 at Matsushiro, Japan (MAT) and between 1993 and 2005 at Liapootah, Tasmania (LPT). These stations comprise the two hemisphere network (THN) of underground muon detectors in Japan and Australia. Yearly mean harmonic vectors at MAT and LPT are more or less stable without any significant change in phase and amplitude in correlation with either the solar activity- or magnetic-cycles. In this paper, therefore, we analyze the average anisotropy over the entire observation periods, i.e. 1985-2006 for MAT and 1993-2005 for LPT. We apply to the THN data a best-fitting analysis based on a model anisotropy in space identical to that adopted by Amenomori et al. (2007) for Tibet III data. The median energies of primary cosmic rays recorded are ~0.5 TeV for THN and ~5 TeV for the Tibet III experiment. It is shown that the intensity distribution of the best-fit anisotropy is quite similar to that derived from Tibet III data, regardless of the order of magnitude difference in energies of primary particles. This, together with the THN observations, confirms that the analysis by Amenomori et al. (2007) based on the Tibet III experiment in the northern hemisphere is not seriously biased. The best-fit amplitudes of the anisotropy, on the other hand, are only one third or less of those reported by the Tibet III experiment, indicating attenuation due to solar modulation. The rigidity dependence of the anisotropy amplitude in the sub-TeV region is consistent with the spectrum reported by Hall et al. (1999), smoothly extending to the Tibet III result in the multi-TeV region. The amplitude at higher energies appears almost constant or gradually decreasing with increasing rigidity.

K. Munakata; N. Matsumoto; S. Yasue; C. Kato; S. Mori; M. Takita; M. L. Duldig; J. E. Humble; J. Kota

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a hemispherical wave breakout test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse shape to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A hemispherical wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional hemispherical geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.

Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Monthly average clear-sky broadband irradiance database for worldwide solar heat gain and building cooling load calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper establishes the formulation of a new clear-sky solar radiation model appropriate for algorithms calculating cooling loads in buildings. The aim is to replace the ASHRAE clear-sky model of 1967, whose limitations are well known and are reviewed. The new model is derived in two steps. The first step consists of obtaining a reference irradiance dataset from the REST2 model, which uses a high-performance, validated, two-band clear-sky algorithm. REST2 requires detailed inputs about atmospheric conditions such as aerosols, water vapor, ozone, and ground albedo. The development of global atmospheric datasets used as inputs to REST2 is reviewed. For the most part, these datasets are derived from space observations to guarantee universality and accuracy. In the case of aerosols, point-source terrestrial measurements were also used as ground truthing of the satellite data. The second step of the model consists of fits derived from a REST2-based reference irradiance dataset. These fits enable the derivation of compact, but relatively accurate expressions, for beam and diffuse clear-sky irradiance. The fitted expressions require the tabulation of only two pseudo-optical depths for each month of the year. The resulting model, and its tabulated data, are expected to be incorporated in the 2009 edition of the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals. (author)

Gueymard, Christian A. [Solar Consulting Services, P.O. Box 392, Colebrook, NH 03576 (United States); Thevenard, Didier [Numerical Logics Inc., 498 Edenvalley Cres., Waterloo, Ont. (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Climatological Diurnal Cycles in Clear-Sky Brightness Temperatures from the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatology of the diurnal cycles of HIRS clear-sky brightness temperatures was developed based on measurements over the period 2002–07. This was done by fitting a Fourier series to monthly gridded brightness temperatures of HIRS channels 1–12. ...

Anders V. Lindfors; Ian A. Mackenzie; Simon F. B. Tett; Lei Shi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Regional Characteristics of the Northern Hemisphere Wintertime Circulation: A Comparison of the Simulation of a GFDL General Circulation Model with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hemispheric distributions of a selected set of temporal mean, variance and covariance statistics produced by a general circulation model developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory are compared with observations. The fields ...

Maurice L. Blackmon; Ngar-Cheung Lau

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Roles of External Forcings and Internal Variabilities in the Northern Hemisphere Atmospheric Circulation Change from the 1960s to the 1990s  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation change from the 1960s to the 1990s shows a strong positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and a deepening of the Aleutian low. The issue regarding the contributions of external forcings and ...

Martin P. King; Fred Kucharski; Franco Molteni

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Response of the Wintertime Northern Hemisphere Atmospheric Circulation to Current and Projected Arctic Sea Ice Decline: A Numerical Study with CAM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wintertime Northern Hemisphere (NH) atmospheric circulation response to current (2007–12) and projected (2080–99) Arctic sea ice decline is examined with the latest version of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM5). The numerical experiments ...

Yannick Peings; Gudrun Magnusdottir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

An Energetics Study of Wintertime Northern Hemisphere Storm Tracks under 4 × CO2 Conditions in Two Ocean–Atmosphere Coupled Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different possible behaviors of winter Northern Hemisphere storm tracks under 4 × CO2 forcing are considered by analyzing the response of two of the ocean–atmosphere coupled models that were run for the fourth Assessment Report of the ...

Alexandre Laîné; Masa Kageyama; David Salas-Mélia; Gilles Ramstein; Serge Planton; Sébastien Denvil; Sophie Tyteca

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Evaluation of Interior Circulation in a High-Resolution Global Ocean Model. Part II: Southern Hemisphere Intermediate, Mode, and Thermocline Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution, offline ocean general circulation model, incorporating a realistic parameterization of mixed layer convection, is used to diagnose pathways and time scales of Southern Hemisphere intermediate, mode, and lower thermocline water ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Matthew H. England

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Assessing the Increasing Trend in Northern Hemisphere Winter Storm Track Activity Using Surface Ship Observations and a Statistical Storm Track Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies, based largely on analyses of reanalysis datasets, suggest that the Northern Hemisphere winter storm track activity has increased significantly during the second half of the twentieth century. In this study, this increasing trend, ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Interannual Variability in the Northern Hemisphere Winter Middle Atmosphere in Control and Perturbed Experiments with the GFDL SKYHI General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on interannual variability of the Northern Hemisphere winter stratospheric circulation as simulated by the 40-level GFDL “SKYHI” general circulation model. A 31-year control simulation was performed using a climatological ...

Kevin Hamilton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Wave Packets and Life Cycles of Troughs in the Upper Troposphere: Examples from the Southern Hemisphere Summer Season of 1984/85  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, reanalysis data for the Southern Hemisphere summer season of 1984/85, produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, have been analyzed to examine wave packets and life cycles of baroclinic waves. A ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Transfer of Sensible Heat by Transient Eddies in the Atmosphere on the Southern Hemisphere: An Appraisal of the Data before and during FGGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the numerical, daily operational analyses for the Southern Hemisphere, in particular those made in Australia since 1972, can be used to describe large-scale features in time and space, they are not suited to computations of quantities ...

Harry Van Loon

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Sloan Digital Sky Survey's (SDSS) Supernova Data and the Stripe82 Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already.

The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).[taken and edited from Supernova Survey page at http://www.sdss.org/supernova/aboutsupernova.html]

All three surveys summarized are:

  • Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees.
  • SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sightlines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way.
  • Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4.
The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publically accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.[Copied from http://www.sdss.org/dr7/start/aboutdr7.html

SDSS Collaboration

438

Actively Star Forming Elliptical Galaxies at Low Redshifts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report discovery of actively star forming elliptical galaxies in a morphologically classified sample of bright galaxies at a low redshift obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The emission lines of these galaxies do not show the characteristics of active galactic nuclei, and thus their strong H$\\alpha$ emission is ascribed to star formation with a rate nearly as high as that is seen in typical late spiral galaxies. This is taken as evidence against the traditional view that all elliptical galaxies formed early and now evolve only passively. The frequency of such star forming elliptical galaxies is a few tenths of a percent in the sample, but increases to 3% if we include active S0 galaxies. We may identify these galaxies as probable progenitors of so-called E+A galaxies that show the strong Balmer absorption feature of A stars superimposed on an old star population. The approximate match of the abundance of active elliptical plus S0 galaxies with that of E+A galaxies indicates that the duration of such late star formation episodes is of the order of $\\gsim 1$ Gyr. If we interpret these galaxies as new additions to the early-type galaxy population, and if we assume a power law for their number evolution, the abundance of early-type galaxies at $z=1$ is about 30% less than that at $z=0$.

Masataka Fukugita; Osamu Nakamura; Edwin L. Turner; Joe Helmboldt; R. C. Nichol

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 x 10^-9, 1.1 x 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 152.5 Hz, we can exclude the presence of signals with h0 greater than 7.6 x 10^-25 with a 90% confidence level.

J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; Y. Bao; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; C. Bond; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endröczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; B. F. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. A. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gelencser; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Keitel; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. K. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; J. Kline; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Spiral Disk Opacity from Occulting Galaxy Pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spiral galaxy partially ovelapping a more distant elliptical offers an unique opportunity to measure the dust extinction in the foreground spiral. From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR4 spectroscopic sample, we selected 83 occulting galaxy pairs and measured disk opacity over the redshift range z = 0.0-0.2 with the goal to determine the recent evolution of disk dust opacity. The enrichment of the ISM changes over the lifetime of a disk and it is reasonable to expect the dust extinction properties of spiral disks as a whole to change over their lifetime. When they do, the change will affect our measurements of galaxies over the observable universe. From the SDSS pairs we conclude that spiral disks show evidence of extinction to ~2 effective radii. However, no evidence for recent evolution of disk opacity is evident, due to the limited redshift range and our inability to distinguish other factors on disk opacity such as the presence of spiral arms and Hubble type. Such effects also mask any relation between su...

Holwerda, B W; Bolton, A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Spiral Disk Opacity from Occulting Galaxy Pairs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spiral galaxy partially ovelapping a more distant elliptical offers an unique opportunity to measure the dust extinction in the foreground spiral. From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR4 spectroscopic sample, we selected 83 occulting galaxy pairs and measured disk opacity over the redshift range z = 0.0-0.2 with the goal to determine the recent evolution of disk dust opacity. The enrichment of the ISM changes over the lifetime of a disk and it is reasonable to expect the dust extinction properties of spiral disks as a whole to change over their lifetime. When they do, the change will affect our measurements of galaxies over the observable universe. From the SDSS pairs we conclude that spiral disks show evidence of extinction to ~2 effective radii. However, no evidence for recent evolution of disk opacity is evident, due to the limited redshift range and our inability to distinguish other factors on disk opacity such as the presence of spiral arms and Hubble type. Such effects also mask any relation between surface brightness and optical depth that has been found in nearby galaxies. Hence, we conclude that the SDSS spectral catalog is an excellent way to find occulting pairs and construct a uniform local sample. However, higher resolution than the SDSS images is needed to disentangle the effects of spiral arms and Hubble type from evolution since z = 0.2.

B. W. Holwerda; W. C. Keel; A. Bolton

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 7 SPECTROSCOPIC M DWARF CATALOG. II. STATISTICAL PARALLAX ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a statistical parallax analysis of low-mass dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We calculate absolute r-band magnitudes (M{sub r} ) as a function of color and spectral type and investigate changes in M{sub r} with location in the Milky Way. We find that magnetically active M dwarfs are intrinsically brighter in M{sub r} than their inactive counterparts at the same color or spectral type. Metallicity, as traced by the proxy {zeta}, also affects M{sub r} , with metal-poor stars having fainter absolute magnitudes than higher metallicity M dwarfs at the same color or spectral type. Additionally, we measure the velocity ellipsoid and solar reflex motion for each subsample of M dwarfs. We find good agreement between our measured solar peculiar motion and previous results for similar populations, as well as some evidence for differing motions of early and late M-type populations in U and W velocities that cannot be attributed to asymmetric drift. The reflex solar motion and the velocity dispersions both show that younger populations, as traced by magnetic activity and location near the Galactic plane, have experienced less dynamical heating. We introduce a new parameter, the independent position altitude (IPA), to investigate populations as a function of vertical height from the Galactic plane. M dwarfs at all types exhibit an increase in velocity dispersion when analyzed in comparable IPA subgroups.

Bochanski, John J. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hawley, Suzanne L. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); West, Andrew A., E-mail: jjb29@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

IRAS-based whole-sky upper limit on Dyson Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Dyson Sphere is a hypothetical construct of a star purposely cloaked by a thick swarm of broken-up planetary material to better utilize all of the stellar energy. A clean Dyson Sphere identification would give a significant signature for intelligence at work. A search for Dyson Spheres has been carried out using the 250,000 source database of the IRAS infrared satellite which covered 96% of the sky. The search has used the Calgary data collection of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) to look for fits to blackbody spectra. Searches have been conducted for both pure (fully cloaked) and partial Dyson Spheres in the blackbody temperature region 100 {le} T {le} 600 K. Other stellar signatures that resemble a Dyson Sphere are reviewed. When these signatures are used to eliminate sources that mimic Dyson Spheres very few candidates remain and even these are ambiguous. Upper limits are presented for both pure and partial Dyson Spheres. The sensitivity of the LRS was enough to find solar-sized Dyson Spheres out to 300 pc, a reach that encompasses a million solar-type stars.

Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A 250 GHz Survey of High Redshift QSOs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations at 250 GHz (1.2 mm), 43 GHz, and 1.4 GHz of a sample of 41 QSOs at z > 3.7 found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We detect 16 sources with a 250 GHz flux density greater than 1.4 mJy. The combination of centimeter and millimeter wavelength observations indicates that the 250 GHz emission is most likely thermal dust emission. Assuming a dust temperature of 50 K, the implied dust masses for the 16 detected sources are in the range 1.5e8 to 5.9e8 Msun, and the dust emitting regions are likely to be larger than 1 kpc in extent. The radio-through-optical spectral energy distributions for these sources are within the broad range defined by lower redshift, lower optical luminosity QSOs. We consider possible dust heating mechanisms, including UV emission from the active nucleus (AGN) and a starburst concurrent with the AGN, with implied star formation rates between 500 and 2000 Msun/year.

Carilli, C L; Rupen, M P; Fan, X; Strauss, M A; Menten, K M; Kreysa, E; Schneider, D P; Bertarini, A; Yun, M S; Zylka, R; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 \\times 10^-9, 1.1 \\times 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 15...

Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner}, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Analysis of RR Lyrae Stars in the Northern Sky Variability Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS), obtained from the first generation Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE-I), to identify and study RR Lyrae variable stars in the solar neighborhood. We initially identified 1197 RRab (RR0) candidate stars brighter than the ROTSE median magnitude V = 14. Periods, amplitudes, and mean V magnitudes are determined for a subset of 1188 RRab stars with well defined light curves. Metallicities are determined for 589 stars by the Fourier parameter method and by the relationship between period, amplitude, and [Fe/H]. We comment upon the difficulties of clearly classifying RRc (RR1) variables in the NSVS dataset. Distances to the RRab stars are calculated using an adopted luminosity-metallicity relation with corrections for interstellar extinction. The 589 RRab stars in our final sample are used to study the properties of the RRab population within 5 kpc of the Sun. The Bailey diagram of period versus amplitude shows that the largest component o...

Kinemuchi, K; Wozniak, P R; McKay, T A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DISTRIBUTION OF MAXIMAL LUMINOSITY OF GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

Extreme value statistics is applied to the distribution of galaxy luminosities in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We analyze the DR8 Main Galaxy Sample (MGS), as well as the luminous red galaxies (LRGs). Maximal luminosities are sampled from batches consisting of elongated pencil beams in the radial direction of sight. For the MGS, results suggest a small and positive tail index {xi}, effectively ruling out the possibility of having a finite maximum cutoff luminosity, and implying that the luminosity distribution function may decay as a power law at the high-luminosity end. Assuming, however, {xi} = 0, a non-parametric comparison of the maximal luminosities with the Fisher-Tippett-Gumbel distribution (limit distribution for variables distributed by the Schechter fit) indicates a good agreement provided that uncertainties arising from both the finite batch size and the batch-size distribution are accounted for. For a volume-limited sample of LRGs, results show that they can be described as being the extremes of a luminosity distribution with an exponentially decaying tail, provided that the uncertainties related to batch-size distribution are taken care of.

Taghizadeh-Popp, M.; Szalay, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ozogany, K.; Racz, Z. [Institute for Theoretical Physics-HAS, Eoetvoes University, Pazmany setany 1/a, 1117 Budapest (Hungary); Regoes, E., E-mail: mtaghiza@pha.jhu.edu [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

"Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the ARM 2003 Aerosol Intensive Observation Period"  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large intensive observation period (IOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this IOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky periods on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are less than 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 2%.

J. J. Michalsky, G. P. Anderson, J. Barnard, J. Delamere, C. Gueymard, S. Kato, P. Kiedron, A. McComiskey, and P. Ricchiazzi

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) and Data Release Nine from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) has issued Data Release 9 (DR9), the first public release of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). In this release BOSS, the largest of SDSS-III’s four surveys, provides spectra for 535,995 newly observed galaxies, 102,100 quasars, and 116,474 stars, plus new information about objects in previous Sloan surveys (SDSS-I and II). Spectroscopy yields a wealth of information about astronomical objects including their motion (called redshift and written z), their composition, and sometimes also the density of the gas and other material that lies between them and observers on Earth. The new release lists spectra for galaxies with redshifts up to z = 0.8 (roughly 7 billion light years away) and quasars with redshifts between z = 2.1 and 3.5 (from 10 to 11.5 billion light years away). When BOSS is complete it will have measured 1.5 million galaxies and at least 150,000 quasars, as well as many thousands of stars and other ancillary objects for scientific projects other than BOSS’s main goal. [extracts copied from LBL news release of August 8, 2012

SDSS Collaboration

450

The age of the Milky Way halo stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determined the age of the stellar content of the Galactic halo by considering main-sequence turn-off stars. From the large number of halo stars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we could accurately detect the turn-off as a function of metallicity, which was done by looking at the hottest (bluest) stars of a population. Using isochrones with turn-off temperatures and metallicites of the stars we found that our stellar sample consisted of one dominating stellar population, with no age gradient as a function of metallicity. This would mean that the dominating population of the Galactic halo formed rapidly, probably during the collapse of the proto-Galactic gas. Moreover, we could find a significant number of stars with hotter temperatures than the turn-off, which might be explained as young stars formed in external galaxies and accreted later on to our Milky Way. Motivated by the current debate about the efficiency of gravitational settling (atomic diffusion) in the interior of old solar-type stars, we us...

Jofre, Paula

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Cross Terms and Weak Frequency Dependent Signals in the CMB Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the amplification of weak frequency dependent signals in the CMB sky due to their cross correlation to intrinsic anisotropies. In particular, we center our attention on mechanisms generating some weak signal, of peculiar spectral behaviour, such as resonant scattering in ionic, atomic or molecular lines, thermal SZ effect or extragalactic foreground emissions, whose typical amplitude (denoted by $\\epsilon$) is sufficiently smaller than the intrinsic CMB fluctuations. We find that all these effects involve either the autocorrelation of anisotropies generated during recombination ($z_{rec}$) or the cross-correlation of those anisotropies with fluctuations arising at some later redshift $z_i$. The degree of this correlation can be computed under the assumption that density fluctuations were generated as standard inflationary models dictate and that they evolved in time according to linear theory. In case that the weak signal is frequency dependent, we show that, by substracting power spectra at different frequencies, it is possible to avoid the limit associated to Cosmic Variance and unveil weaker terms linear in $\\epsilon$. We find that the correlation term shows a different spectral dependence than the squared ($\\propto \\epsilon^2$) term considered usually, making its extraction particularly straightforward for the thermal SZ effect. Furthermore, we find that in most cases the correlation terms are particularly relevant at low multipoles and must be taken into account when characterising the power spectrum associated to weak signals in the large angular scales.

C. Hernandez-Monteagudo; R. A. Sunyaev; MPA; IKI

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey: I. Source selection and observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) is an international collaborative program which has obtained high-resolution radio images of over 10000 flat-spectrum radio sources in order to create the largest and best studied statistical sample of radio-loud gravitationally lensed systems. With this survey, combined with detailed studies of the lenses found therein, constraints can be placed on the expansion rate, matter density, and dark energy (e.g. cosmological constant, quintessence) content of the Universe that are complementary to and independent of those obtained through other methods. CLASS is aimed at identifying lenses where multiple images are formed from compact flat-spectrum radio sources, which should be easily identifiable in the radio maps. Because CLASS is radio-based, dust obscuration in lensing galaxies is not a factor, and the relative insensitivity of the instrument to environmental conditions leads to nearly uniform sensitivity and resolution over the entire survey. In four observing seasons from 1994-1999, CLASS has observed 13783 radio sources with the VLA at 8.4 GHz at 0.2 arcsecond resolution. When combined with the JVAS survey, the CLASS sample contains over 16,000 images. A complete sample of 11685 flat-spectrum sources was observed, selected from GB6 catalogue at 4.85 GHz and the NVSS at 1.4 GHz. So far, CLASS has found 16 new gravitational lens systems, and the JVAS/CLASS survey contains a total of 22 lenses. (Abridged)

S. T. Myers; N. J. Jackson; I. W. A. Browne; A. G. de Bruyn; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; P. N. Wilkinson; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; C. D. Fassnacht; L. V. E. Koopmans; D. R. Marlow; J. P. McKean; M. A. Norbury; P. M. Phillips; D. Rusin; M. C. Shepherd; C. M. Sykes

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

453

NEW 145 MHz SOURCE MEASUREMENTS BY PAPER IN THE SOUTHERN SKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present observations from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa, observed in 2010 May and September. Using two nights of drift scanning with PAPER's 60{sup 0} FWHM beam we have made a map covering the entire sky below +10{sup 0} declination with an effective center frequency of 145 MHz, a 70 MHz bandwidth, and a resolution of 26'. A 4800 deg{sup 2} region of this large map with the lowest Galactic emission reaches an rms of 0.7 Jy. We establish an absolute flux scale using sources from the 160 MHz Culgoora catalog. Using the 408 MHz Molonglo Reference Catalog (MRC) as a finding survey, we identify counterparts to 480 sources in our maps and compare our fluxes to the MRC and to 332 sources in the Culgoora catalog. For both catalogs, the ratio of PAPER to catalog flux averages to 1, with a standard deviation of 50%. This measured variation is consistent with comparisons between independent catalogs observed at different bands. The PAPER data represent new 145 MHz flux measurements for a large number of sources in the band expected to encompass cosmic reionization and represents a significant step toward establishing a model for removing foregrounds to the reionization signal.

Jacobs, Daniel C.; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Parsons, Aaron R.; Pober, Jonathan C. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United Kingdom); Bradley, Richard F.; Parashare, Chaitali R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Gugliucci, Nicole E. [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Manley, Jason R.; Van der Merwe, Carel, E-mail: jacobsda@sas.upenn.edu [Karoo Array Telescope, Capetown (South Africa)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH. II. STATISTICAL LENS SAMPLE FROM THETHIRD DATA RELEASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the first results of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars using the spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Among 46,420 quasars from the SDSS Data Release 3 ({approx}4188 deg{sup 2}), we select a subsample of 22,683 quasars that are located at redshifts between 0.6 and 2.2 and are brighter than the Galactic extinction corrected i-band magnitude of 19.1. We identify 220 lens candidates from the quasar subsample, for which we conduct extensive and systematic follow-up observations in optical and near-infrared wavebands, in order to construct a complete lensed quasar sample at image separations between 1-inch and 20-inch and flux ratios of faint to bright lensed images larger than 10{sup -0.5}. We construct a statistical sample of 11 lensed quasars. Ten of these are galaxy-scale lenses with small image separations ({approx} 1-inch - 2-inch) and one is a large separation (15-inch) system which is produced by a massive cluster of galaxies, representing the first statistical sample of lensed quasars including both galaxy- and cluster-scale lenses. The Data Release 3 spectroscopic quasars contain an additional 11 lensed quasars outside the statistical sample.

Inada, N; Oguri, M; Becker, R H; Shin, M; Richards, G T; Hennawi, J F; White, R L; Pindor, B; Strauss, M A; Kochanek, C S; Johnston, D E; Gregg, M D; Kayo, I; Eisenstein, D; Hall, P B; Castander, F J; Clocchiatti, A; Chiu, K; Kawano, Y; Scranton, R; Frieman, J; Keeton, C R; Morokuma, T; Rix, H; Turner, E L; Burless, S; Brunner, R J; Sheldon, E S; Bahcall, N A; Fukugita, M

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i > 15.0 and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of 9380 deg^2. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than five. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i< 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1" r...

Schneider, Donald P; Hall, Patrick B; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Boroson, Todd A; Ross, Nicholas P; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Fan, Xiaohui; Inada, Naohisa; Jester, Sebastian; Knapp, G R; Krawczyk, Coleman M; Thakar, Anirudda R; Berk, Daniel E Vanden; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G; Bahcall, Neta A; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, Daniel; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E; Hibon, Pascale; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent, Stephen M; Kron, Richard G; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lupton, Robert H; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, K; Pier, Jeffrey R; Price, Ted N; Saxe, David H; Schlegel, David J; Simmons, Audry; Snedden, Stephanie A; SubbaRao, Mark U; Szalay, Alexander S; Weinberg, David H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large ...

Frieman, Joshua A; Becker, A; Choi, C; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Im, M; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Marshall, J L; McGinnis, D; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Riess, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Annis, J; Assef, R J; Barentine, J; Bender, R; Blandford, R D; Boroski, W N; Bremer, M; Brewington, H; Collins, C A; Crotts, A; Dembicky, J; Eastman, J; Edge, A; Edmondson, E; Elson, E; Eyler, M E; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frank, S; Goobar, A; Gueth, T; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hopp, U; Ihara, Y; IveziÄ?, Ž; Kahn, S; Kaplan, J; Kent, S; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Kollatschny, W; Kron, R G; KrzesiÅ?ski, J; Lamenti, D; Leloudas, G; Lin, H; Long, D C; Lucey, J; Lupton, R H; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Méndez, J; Morgan, C W; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Ostman, L; Pan, K; Rockosi, C M; Romer, A K; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Saurage, G; Schlesinger, K; Snedden, S A; Sollerman, J; Stoughton, C; Stritzinger, M; Subba-Rao, M; Tucker, D; Väisänen, P; Watson, L C; Watters, S; Wheeler, J C; Yanny, B; York, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog III. Third Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 4188 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties o...

Schneider, D P; Richards, G T; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, S F; Fan, X; Jester, S; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Subba-Rao, M; Brandt, W; Gunn, J E; Yanny, B; Bahcall, Neta A; Barentine, J C; Blanton, M R; Boroski, W N; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, R; Csabai, I; Doi, M; Eisenstein, D J; Frieman, J A; Fukugita, M; Gray, J; Harvanek, M; Heckman, T M; Ivezic, Z; Kent, S; Kleinman, S; Knapp, G R; Kron, R G; Krzesínski, J; Long, D C; Loveday, J; Lupton, R H; Margon, B; Munn, J A; Neilsen, E H; Newberg, H J; Newman, P R; Nichol, R; Nitta, A; Pier, J R; Rockosi, C M; Saxe, D H; Schlegel, D J; Snedden, S A; Szalay, A S; Thakar, A R; Uomoto, A; York, D G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog IV. Fifth Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i=15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 5740 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry...

Schneider, Donald P; Richards, Gordon T; Strauss, Michael A; Berk, Daniel E Vanden; Anderson, Scott F; Brandt, W N; Fan, Xiaohui; Jester, Sebastian; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E; SubbaRao, Mark U; Thakar, Anirudda R; Stoughton, Chris; Szalay, Alexander S; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G; Bahcall, Neta A; Barentine, J; Blanton, Michael R; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Castander, Francisco J; Csabai, Istvan; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Daniel C; Lupton, Robert H; Nitta, Atsuko; Pier, Jeffrey R; Saxe, David H; Shen, Yue; Snedden, Stephanie A; Weinberg, David H; Wu, Jian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Optically Selected BL Lacertae Candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a sample of 723 optically selected BL Lac candidates from the SDSS DR7 spectroscopic database encompassing 8250 deg^2 of sky; our sample constitutes one of the largest uniform BL Lac samples yet derived. Each BL Lac candidate has a high-quality SDSS spectrum from which we determine spectroscopic redshifts for ~60% of the objects. Redshift lower limits are estimated for the remaining objects utilizing the lack of host galaxy flux contamination in their optical spectra; we find that objects lacking spectroscopic redshifts are likely at systematically higher redshifts. Approximately 80% of our BL Lac candidates match to a radio source in FIRST/NVSS, and ~40% match to a ROSAT X-ray source. The homogeneous multiwavelength coverage allows subdivision of the sample into 637 radio-loud BL Lac candidates and 86 weak-featured radio-quiet objects. The radio-loud objects broadly support the standard paradigm unifying BL Lac objects with beamed radio galaxies. We propose that the majority of the radio-quiet obj...

Plotkin, Richard M; Brandt, W N; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Fan, X; Hall, P B; Kimball, A E; Richmond, M W; Schneider, D P; Shemmer, O; Voges, W; York, D G; Bahcall, N A; Snedden, S; Bizyaev, D; Brewington, H; Malanushenko, V; Malanushenko, E; Oravetz, D; Pan, K; Simmonds, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 sq. deg. region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

Masao Sako; B. Bassett; A. Becker; D. Cinabro; F. DeJongh; D. L. Depoy; B. Dilday; M. Doi; J. A. Frieman; P. M. Garnavich; C. J. Hogan; J. Holtzman; S. Jha; R. Kessler; K. Konishi; H. Lampeitl; J. Marriner; G. Miknaitis; R. C. Nichol; J. L. Prieto; A. G. Riess; M. W. Richmond; R. Romani; D. P. Schneider; M. Smith; M. SubbaRao; N. Takanashi; K. Tokita; K. van der Heyden; N. Yasuda; C. Zheng; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; C. Choi; J. Dembicky; M. Harnavek; Y. Ihara; M. Im; W. Ketzeback; S. J. Kleinman; J. Krzesi?ski; D. C. Long; E. Malanushenko; V. Malanushenko; R. J. McMillan; T. Morokuma; A. Nitta; K. Pan; G. Saurage; S. A. Snedden

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hemispherical sky rhi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Portsmouth U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Bristol U. /Apache Point Observ. /Liverpool John Moores U., ARI /Columbia U., CBA /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Durham U. /Portsmouth U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Naval Academy, Annapolis /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /New Mexico State U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Jefferson Lab /Apache Point Observ. /Gottingen U. /Chicago U. /San Francisco State U. /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Fermilab /Apache Point Observ. /Durham U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Barcelona U. /Stockholm U. /Apache Point Observ. /Lick Observ. /Sussex U. /Barcelona U. /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Fermilab /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Chicago U. /Fermilab /South African Astron. Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Texas U., McDonald Observ. /Fermilab

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

462

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

Joshua A. Frieman; B. Bassett; A. Becker; C. Choi; D. Cinabro; F. DeJongh; D. L. Depoy; B. Dilday; M. Doi; P. M. Garnavich; C. J. Hogan; J. Holtzman; M. Im; S. Jha; R. Kessler; K. Konishi; H. Lampeitl; J. Marriner; J. L. Marshall; D. McGinnis; G. Miknaitis; R. C. Nichol; J. L. Prieto; A. G. Riess; M. W. Richmond; R. Romani; M. Sako; D. P. Schneider; M. Smith; N. Takanashi; K. Tokita; K. van der Heyden; N. Yasuda; C. Zheng; J. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Annis; R. J. Assef; J. Barentine; R. Bender; R. D. Blandford; W. N. Boroski; M. Bremer; H. Brewington; C. A. Collins; A. Crotts; J. Dembicky; J. Eastman; A. Edge; E. Edmondson; E. Elson; M. E. Eyler; A. V. Filippenko; R. J. Foley; S. Frank; A. Goobar; T. Gueth; J. E. Gunn; M. Harvanek; U. Hopp; Y. Ihara; Ž. Ivezi?; S. Kahn; J. Kaplan; S. Kent; W. Ketzeback; S. J. Kleinman; W. Kollatschny; R. G. Kron; J. Krzesi?ski; D. Lamenti; G. Leloudas; H. Lin; D. C. Long; J. Lucey; R. H. Lupton; E. Malanushenko; V. Malanushenko; R. J. McMillan; J. Mendez; C. W. Morgan; T. Morokuma; A. Nitta; L. Ostman; K. Pan; C. M. Rockosi; A. K. Romer; P. Ruiz-Lapuente; G. Saurage; K. Schlesinger; S. A. Snedden; J. Sollerman; C. Stoughton; M. Stritzinger; M. SubbaRao; D. Tucker; P. Vaisanen; L. C. Watson; S. Watters; J. C. Wheeler; B. Yanny; D. York

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Use of Weighting in Periodicity Searches in All-Sky Monitor Data: Applications to the GLAST LAT  

SciTech Connect

The light curves produced by all-sky monitors, such as the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor and the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), generally have non-uniform error bars. In searching for periodic modulation in this type of data using power spectra it can be important to use appropriate weighting of data points to achieve the best sensitivity. It was recently demonstrated that for Swift BAT data a simple weighting scheme can actually sometimes reduce the sensitivity of the power spectrum depending on source brightness. Instead, a modified weighting scheme, based on the Cochran semi-weighted mean, gives improved results independent of source brightness. We investigate the benefits of weighting power spectra in period searches using simulated GLAST LAT observations of {gamma}-ray binaries.

Corbet, Robin; /NASA, Goddard; Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

464

Seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect: The role of changes in atmospheric temperatures and humidities  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of the factors which control the seasonal variations of the clear-sky greenhouse effect, based on satellite observations and radiative transfer simulations. The satellite observations include the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment and the total column moisture content derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager. The simulations were performed with the SAMSON system described in an earlier paper, using atmospheric temperatures and humidities from operational analyses produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. At low latitudes, the magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is dominated by the strong thermodynamic link between the total column moisture content of the atmosphere and sea surface temperatures, with minimal seasonal variations. In contrast, at middle to high latitudes there are strong seasonal variations, the clear-sky greenhouse effect being largest in winter and smallest in summer. These variations cannot be explained by the seasonal cycle in the total column moisture content, as this is largest in summer and smallest in winter. The variations are controlled instead by the seasonal changes in atmospheric temperatures. The colder atmosphere in winter enhances the temperature differential between the atmosphere and the sea surface, leading to a larger greenhouse effect despite the lower moisture contents. The magnitude of the clear-sky greenhouse effect is thus controlled by atmospheric humidity at low latitudes, but by atmospheric temperature at middle and high latitudes. These controls are illustrated by results from sensitivity experiments with SAMSON and are interpreted in terms of a simple model.

Webb, M.J.; Slingo, A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Stephens, G.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

"Blue Sky" Approaches to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: An Initial Assessment of Potential New Types of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an initial assessment of potential new approaches to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that might be capable of generating large-scale GHG emissions offsets at relatively low cost compared to other GHG mitigation options. The nine potential blue sky approaches assessed in this report include biochar, destruction of ozone depleting substances, control of natural fugitive methane seeps from coal seams, control of fugitive natural gas emissions associated with hydraulic fracturing...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Volume 4 Issue 5 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis May 2009 Under a dry, hot Florida sky, space shuttle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlantis roars off Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida with its crew of sevenVolume 4 Issue 5 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis May 2009 Under a dry, hot Florida sky, space shuttle for a rendezvous with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The launch was on time at 1:01 p.m. on May 11. With a perfect

467

More Frequent Cloud-Free Sky and Less Surface Solar Radiation in China from 1955 to 2000  

SciTech Connect

Newly available data from extended weather stations and time period reveal that much of China has experienced statistically significant decreases in total cloud cover and low cloud cover over roughly the last half of the Twentieth century. This conclusion is supported by our recent analysis of the more reliably observed frequency of cloud-free sky and overcast sky. The total cloud cover and low cloud cover have decreased 0.88% and 0.33% per decade, respectively, and cloud-free days have increased 0.60% and overcast days decreased 0.78% per decade in China from 1954-2001. Meanwhile, both solar radiation and pan evaporation have decreased in most parts of China, with solar radiation decreasing 3.1 W/m2 and pan evaporation decreasing 39 mm per decade. Combined with other evidences documented in previous studies, we conjectured that increased air pollution may have produced a fog-like haze that reflected/absorbed radiation from the sun and resulted in less solar radiation reaching the surface, despite concurrent upward trends in cloud-free skies over China.

Qian, Yun; Kaiser, Dale P.; Leung, Lai R.; Xu, Ming

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

468

DETECTING VARIABILITY IN MASSIVE ASTRONOMICAL TIME-SERIES DATA. II. VARIABLE CANDIDATES IN THE NORTHERN SKY VARIABILITY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present variability analysis of data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS). Using the clustering method, which defines variable candidates as outliers from large clusters, we cluster 16,189,040 light curves having data points at more than 15 epochs as variable and non-variable candidates in 638 NSVS fields. Variable candidates are selected depending on how strongly they are separated from the largest cluster and how rarely they are grouped together in eight-dimensional space spanned by variability indices. All NSVS light curves are also cross-correlated with IRAS, AKARI, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and GALEX objects, as well as known objects in the SIMBAD database. The variability analysis and cross-correlation results are provided in a public online database, which can be used to select interesting objects for further investigation. Adopting conservative selection criteria for variable candidates, we find about 1.8 million light curves as possible variable candidates in the NSVS data, corresponding to about 10% of our entire NSVS sample. Multi-wavelength colors help us find specific types of variability among the variable candidates. Moreover, we also use morphological classification from other surveys such as SDSS to suppress spurious cases caused by blending objects or extended sources due to the low angular resolution of the NSVS.

Shin, Min-Su [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yi, Hahn; Kim, Dae-Won; Chang, Seo-Won [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Yong-Ik, E-mail: msshin@umich.edu, E-mail: yihahn@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: dakim@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: seowony@galaxy.yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: ybyun@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and University Observatory, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

On the RMS Anisotropy at 7 degrees and 10 degrees Observed in the COBE-DMR Two Year Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The frequency-independent RMS temperature fluctuations determined from the COBE-DMR two year sky maps are used to infer the parameter Q_{rms-PS}, which characterizes the normalization of power law models of primordial cosmological temperature anisotropy. In particular, a 'cross'-RMS statistic is used to determine Q_{rms-PS} for a forced fit to a scale-invariant Harrison-Zel'dovich (n = 1) spectral model. Using a joint analysis of the 7 degree and 10 degree RMS temperature derived from both the 53 and 90 GHz sky maps, we find Q_{rms-PS} = 17.0^{+2.5}_{-2.1} uK when the low quadrupole is included, and Q_{rms-PS} = 19.4^{+2.3}_{-2.1} uK excluding the quadrupole. These results are consistent with the n = 1 fits from more sensitive methods (e.g. power spectrum, correlation function). The effect of the low quadrupole derived from the COBE-DMR data on the inferred Q_{rms-PS} normalization is investigated. A bias to lower Q_{rms-PS} is found when the quadrupole is included. The higher normalization for a forced n = 1 fit is then favored by the cross-RMS technique. As initially pointed out in Wright et al. (1994a) and further discussed here, analytic formulae for the RMS sky temperature fluctuations will NOT provide the correct normalization amplitude.

A. J. Banday; K. M. Gorski; L. Tenorio; E. L. Wright; G. F. Smoot; C. H. Lineweaver; A. Kogut; G. Hinshaw; C. L. Bennett

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Temperature–Moisture Biases in ECMWF Analyses Based on Clear Sky Longwave Simulations Constrained by SSMI and MSU Measurements and Comparisons to ERBE Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear sky longwave radiation fluxes for the summer of 1988 and winter of 1989 have been simulated with a radiative transfer model that includes detailed treatment of atmospheric gas absorption. The input data to the model are humidity and ...

Byung-Ju Sohn

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Ground-Based Temperature and Humidity Profiling Using Spectral Infrared and Microwave Observations. Part I: Simulated Retrieval Performance in Clear-Sky Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two independent ground-based passive remote sensing methods are used to retrieve lower-tropospheric temperature and humidity profiles in clear-sky cases. A simulation study for two distinctly different climatic zones is performed to evaluate the ...

Ulrich Löhnert; D. D. Turner; S. Crewell

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A Satellite-Derived Climate-Quality Data Record of the Clear-Sky Surface Temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a climate-quality data record of the clear-sky surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ice-surface temperature (IST) algorithm. Daily and monthly ...

Dorothy K. Hall; Josefino C. Comiso; Nicolo E. DiGirolamo; Christopher A. Shuman; Jeffrey R. Key; Lora S. Koenig

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

An Extended and More Sensitive Search for Periodicities in Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/all-sky Monitor X-ray Light Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a systematic search in ~14 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor (ASM) data for evidence of periodicities. Two variations of the commonly used Fourier analysis search method have ...

Levine, Alan M.

474

Estimating Clear-Sky Regional Surface Fluxes in the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site with Ground Measurements and Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compared methods for estimating surface fluxes under clear-sky conditions over a large heterogeneous area from a limited number of ground measurements and from satellite observations using data obtained from the southern Great Plains ...

W. Gao; R. L. Coulter; B. M. Lesht; J. Qiu; M. L. Wesely

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Performance characteristics of a perforated shadow band under clear sky conditions  

SciTech Connect

A perforated, non-rotating shadow band is described for separating global solar irradiance into its diffuse and direct normal components using a single pyranometer. Whereas shadow bands are normally solid so as to occult the sensor of a pyranometer throughout the day, the proposed band has apertures cut from its circumference to intermittently expose the instrument sensor at preset intervals. Under clear sky conditions the device produces a saw tooth waveform of irradiance data from which it is possible to reconstruct separate global and diffuse curves. The direct normal irradiance may then be calculated giving a complete breakdown of the irradiance curves without need of a second instrument or rotating shadow band. This paper describes the principle of operation of the band and gives a mathematical model of its shading mask based on the results of an optical ray tracing study. An algorithm for processing the data from the perforated band system is described and evaluated. In an extended trial conducted at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, the band coupled with a thermally corrected Eppley PSP produced independent curves for diffuse, global and direct normal irradiance with low mean bias errors of 5.6 W/m{sup 2}, 0.3 W/m{sup 2} and -2.6 W/m{sup 2} respectively, relative to collocated reference instruments. Random uncertainties were 9.7 W/m{sup 2} (diffuse), 17.3 W/m{sup 2} (global) and 19.0 W/m{sup 2} (direct). When the data processing algorithm was modified to include the ray trace model of sensor exposure, uncertainties increased only marginally, confirming the effectiveness of the model. Deployment of the perforated band system can potentially increase the accuracy of data from ground stations in predominantly sunny areas where instrumentation is limited to a single pyranometer. (author)

Brooks, Michael J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Analysis of RR Lyrae Stars in the Northern Sky Variability Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from the Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS), obtained from the first generation Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE-I), to identify and study RR Lyrae variable stars in the solar neighborhood. We initially identified 1197 RRab (RR0) candidate stars brighter than the ROTSE median magnitude V = 14. Periods, amplitudes, and mean V magnitudes are determined for a subset of 1188 RRab stars with well defined light curves. Metallicities are determined for 589 stars by the Fourier parameter method and by the relationship between period, amplitude, and [Fe/H]. We comment upon the difficulties of clearly classifying RRc (RR1) variables in the NSVS dataset. Distances to the RRab stars are calculated using an adopted luminosity-metallicity relation with corrections for interstellar extinction. The 589 RRab stars in our final sample are used to study the properties of the RRab population within 5 kpc of the Sun. The Bailey diagram of period versus amplitude shows that the largest component of this sample belongs to Oosterhoff type I. Metal-rich ([Fe/H] > -1) RRab stars appear to be associated with the Galactic disk. Our metal-rich RRab sample may include a thin disk as well as a thick disk population, although the uncertainties are too large to establish this. There is some evidence among the metal-rich RRab stars for a decline in scale height with increasing [Fe/H], as was found by Layden (1995). The distribution of RRab stars with -1 < [Fe/H] < -1.25 indicates that within this metallicity range the RRab stars are a mixture of stars belonging to halo and disk populations.

K. Kinemuchi; H. A. Smith; P. R. Wozniak; T. A. McKay; the ROTSE Collaboration.

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

477

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog III. Third Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 4188 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution about 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

D. P. Schneider; P. B. Hall; G. T. Richards; D. E. Vanden Berk; S. F. Anderson; X. Fan; S. Jester; C. Stoughton; M. A. Strauss; M. SubbaRao; W. Brandt; J. E. Gunn; B. Yanny; N. A. Bahcall; J. Barentine; M. R. Blanton; W. N. Boroski; H. J. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; R. Brunner; I. Csabai; M. Doi; D. J. Eisenstein; J. A. Frieman; M. Fukugita; J. Gray; M. Harvanek; T. M. Heckman; Željko Ivezi?; S. Kent; S. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; R. G. Kron; J. Krzesinski; D. C. Long; J. Loveday; R. H. Lupton; B. Margon; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen; H. Jo Newberg; P. R. Newman; R. Nichol; A. Nitta; J. R. Pier; C. M. Rockosi; D. H. Saxe; D. J. Schlegel; S. A. Snedden; A. S. Szalay; A. R. Thakar; A. Uomoto; D. G. York

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog IV. Fifth Data Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7) have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i=15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 5740 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution of ~2000. The spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.

Donald P. Schneider; Patrick B. Hall; Gordon T. Richards; Michael A. Strauss; Daniel E. Vanden Berk; Scott F. Anderson; W. N. Brandt; Xiaohui Fan; Sebastian Jester; Jim Gray; James E. Gunn; Mark U. SubbaRao; Anirudda R. Thakar; Chris Stoughton; Alexander S. Szalay; Brian Yanny; Donald G. York; Neta A. Bahcall; J. Barentine; Michael R. Blanton; Howard Brewington; J. Brinkmann; Robert J. Brunner; Francisco J. Castander; Istvan Csabai; Joshua A. Frieman; Masataka Fukugita; Michael Harvanek; David W. Hogg; Zeljko Ivezic; Stephen M. Kent; S. J. Kleinman; G. R. Knapp; Richard G. Kron; Jurek Krzesinski; Daniel C. Long; Robert H. Lupton; Atsuko Nitta; Jeffrey R. Pier; David H. Saxe; Yue Shen; Stephanie A. Snedden; David H. Weinberg; Jian Wu

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z