National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hemispheric temperature anomalies

  1. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  3. The total hemispheric emissivity of painted aluminum honeycomb at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuttle, J.; Canavan, E.; DiPirro, M.; Li, X.; Knollenberg, P.

    2014-01-29

    NASA uses high-emissivity surfaces on deep-space radiators and thermal radiation absorbers in test chambers. Aluminum honeycomb core material, when coated with a high-emissivity paint, provides a lightweight, mechanically robust, and relatively inexpensive black surface that retains its high emissivity down to low temperatures. At temperatures below about 100 Kelvin, this material performs much better than the paint itself. We measured the total hemispheric emissivity of various painted honeycomb configurations using an adaptation of an innovative technique developed for characterizing thin black coatings. These measurements were performed from room temperature down to 30 Kelvin. We describe the measurement technique and compare the results with predictions from a detailed thermal model of each honeycomb configuration.

  4. Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    topography, albedo, and thermal inertia. This approach has the potential to reduce data noise and to reveal thermal anomalies which are not distinguishable in the uncorrected...

  5. Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2 and Bruce J; published 17 June 2003) We argue that Earth's short-term temperature anomalies and the solar flare data sets that corresponds to the one that would be induced by the solar flare intermittency. The mean

  6. What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1), relative to the average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1 anomalies an example of what we can expect global warming to look like? Maps of temperature anomalies, such as Figure 1, are useful for helping people understand the role of global warming in extreme events

  7. Solar turbulence in earth's global and regional temperature anomalies Nicola Scafetta,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Solar turbulence in earth's global and regional temperature anomalies Nicola Scafetta,1,2 Paolo a study of the influence of solar activity on the earth's temperature. In particular, we focus on the repercussion of the fluctuations of the solar irradiance on the temperature of the Northern and Southern

  8. High temperature dielectric relaxation anomaly of Y³? and Mn²? doped barium strontium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Shiguang; Mao, Chaoliang E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn; Wang, Genshui; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn

    2014-10-14

    Relaxation like dielectric anomaly is observed in Y³? and Mn²? doped barium strontium titanate ceramics when the temperature is over 450 K. Apart from the conventional dielectric relaxation analysis method with Debye or modified Debye equations, which is hard to give exact temperature dependence of the relaxation process, dielectric response in the form of complex impedance, assisted with Cole-Cole impedance model corrected equivalent circuits, is adopted to solve this problem and chase the polarization mechanism in this paper. Through this method, an excellent description to temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation anomaly and its dominated factors are achieved. Further analysis reveals that the exponential decay of the Cole distribution parameter n with temperature is confirmed to be induced by the microscopic lattice distortion due to ions doping and the interaction between the defects. At last, a clear sight to polarization mechanism containing both the intrinsic dipolar polarization and extrinsic distributed oxygen vacancies hopping response under different temperature is obtained.

  9. A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, K. Shafer

    A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

  10. Quality Control of Temperature and Salinity from CTD based on Anomaly Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelão, Guilherme P

    2015-01-01

    The CTD is a set of sensors used by oceanographers to measure fundamental hydrographic properties of the oceans. It is characterized by a high precision product, only achieved if a quality control procedure identifies and removes the bad samples. Such procedure has been traditionally done by a sequence of independent tests that minimize false negatives. It is here proposed a novel approach to identify the bad samples as anomalies in respect to the typical behavior of good data. Several tests are combined into a single multidimensional evaluation to provide a more flexible classification criterion. The traditional approach is reproduced with an error of 0.04%, otherwise, the Anomaly Detection technique surpasses the reference if calibrated by visual inspection. CoTeDe is a Python package developed to apply the traditional and the Anomaly Detection quality control of temperature and salinity data from CTD, and can be extended to XBT, ARGO and other sensors.

  11. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  12. Negative thermal expansion and anomalies of heat capacity of LuB 50 at low temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Novikov, V. V.; Zhemoedov, N. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Mitroshenkov, N. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-07-20

    Heat capacity and thermal expansion of LuB50 boride were experimentally studied in the 2–300 K temperature range. The data reveal an anomalous contribution to the heat capacity at low temperatures. The value of this contribution is proportional to the first degree of temperature. It was identified that this anomaly in heat capacity is caused by the effect of disorder in the LuB50crystalline structure and it can be described in the soft atomic potential model (SAP). The parameters of the approximation were determined. The temperature dependence of LuB50 heat capacity in the whole temperature range was approximated by the sum ofmore »SAP contribution, Debye and two Einstein components. The parameters of SAP contribution for LuB50 were compared to the corresponding values for LuB66, which was studied earlier. Negative thermal expansion at low temperatures was experimentally observed for LuB50. The analysis of the experimental temperature dependence for the Gruneisen parameter of LuB50 suggested that the low-frequency oscillations, described in SAP mode, are responsible for the negative thermal expansion. Thus, the glasslike character of the behavior of LuB50 thermal characteristics at low temperatures was confirmed.« less

  13. A Statistical Analysis of Global Inter-Annual Climate Anomalies in Monthly Sea Surface Temperature Records.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellekens, Michel P.

    reports have examined connections between these so-called El-Nino and La-Nina events and anomalies the anomalies and established indices of SST climate variations, such as the El-Nino Southern Oscillation in determining weather conditions(Chelton et. al.[4, 5]). The warm (El-Nino) and cold (La-Nina) deviations from

  14. Detonation in TATB Hemispheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druce, B; Souers, P C; Chow, C; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Hrousis, C

    2004-03-17

    Streak camera breakout and Fabry-Perot interferometer data have been taken on the outer surface of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3} TATB hemispherical boosters initiated by slapper detonators at three temperatures. The slapper causes breakout to occur at 54{sup o} at ambient temperatures and 42{sup o} at -54 C, where the axis of rotation is 0{sup o}. The Fabry velocities may be associated with pressures, and these decrease for large timing delays in breakout seen at the colder temperatures. At room temperature, the Fabry pressures appear constant at all angles. Both fresh and decade-old explosive are tested and no difference is seen. The problem has been modeled with reactive flow. Adjustment of the JWL for temperature makes little difference, but cooling to -54 C decreases the rate constant by 1/6th. The problem was run both at constant density and with density differences using two different codes. The ambient code results show that a density difference is probably there but it cannot be quantified.

  15. A new water anomaly: the temperature dependence of the proton mean kinetic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Flammini; Fabio Bruni; Maria Antonietta Ricci

    2009-01-28

    The mean kinetic energy of protons in water is determined by Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments, performed above and below the temperature of maximum density and in the supercooled phase. The temperature dependence of this energy shows an anomalous behavior, as it occurs for many water properties. In particular two regions of maximum kinetic energy are identified: the first one, in the supercooled phase in the range 269 K - 272 K, and a second one above 273 K. In both these regions the measured proton kinetic energy exceedes the theoretical prediction based on a semi-classical model. Noteworthy, the proton mean kinetic energy has a maximum at 277 K, the temperature of the maximum density of water. In the supercooled metastable phase the measured mean kinetic energy and the proton momentum distribution clearly indicate proton delocalization between two H-bonded oxygens.

  16. (Aurora), Magdeburg Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zexian, Cao

    ; -- #12; Magdeburg Hemisphere CO2 #12; 77K , 30nm Karman vortex street Perry bubble 7 foam - 8 8 c 7 #12;23 4 ( 136

  17. Effects of continental-scale snow albedo anomalies on the wintertime Arctic oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, R. J; Zender, C. S

    2010-01-01

    to early?season Eurasian snow cover anomalies, Mon. Weather1973), The influence of average snow depth on monthly meanof Northern Hemisphere snow cover, Int. J. Climatol. , 16,

  18. Precipitation and Northern Hemisphere regimes Christoph C. Raiblea,*, Ute Lukschb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raible, Christoph C.

    Precipitation and Northern Hemisphere regimes Christoph C. Raiblea,*, Ute Lukschb , Klaus-correlations between the precipitation in the tropical and subtropical western Atlantic illustrate the changes of the Hadley cell with El Nin~o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO).The precipitation anomaly pattern in the north

  19. The NJL model of dense three-flavor matter with axial anomaly: the low temperature critical point and BEC-BCS diquark crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abuki, Hiroaki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    We study the QCD phase structure in the three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, incorporating the interplay between the chiral and diquark condensates induced by the axial anomaly. We demonstrate that for an appropriate range of parameters of the model, the interplay leads to the low temperature critical point in the phase structure predicted by a previous Ginzburg-Landau analysis. We also show that a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of diquark molecules emerges in the intermediate density region, and as a result, a BEC-BCS crossover is realized with increasing quark chemical potential.

  20. 6, 56715709, 2006 Hemispheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 5671­5709, 2006 Hemispheric ozone variability indices T. Erbertseder et al. Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Hemispheric ozone variability indices derived from satellite observations.erbertseder@dlr.de) 5671 #12;ACPD 6, 5671­5709, 2006 Hemispheric ozone variability indices T. Erbertseder et al. Title Page

  1. Electrical conductivity anomaly and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of YCr{sub 1?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} negative temperature coefficient ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bo; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Zhao, Qing; Chang, Aimin E-mail: wuy@alfred.edu; Li, Yiyu; Liu, Yin; Wu, Yiquan E-mail: wuy@alfred.edu

    2014-03-10

    Electrical conductivity anomaly of perovskite-type YCr{sub 1?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} negative temperature coefficient (NTC) ceramics produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been investigated by using defect chemistry theory combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. From the results of the ln?-1/T curves and the XPS analysis, it can be considered that YCr{sub 1?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} ceramics exhibit the hopping conductivity. The major carriers in YCrO{sub 3} are holes, which are compensated by the oxygen vacancies produced due to the introduction of Mn ions. The Mn{sup 4+} ion contents increase monotonically in the range of 0.2???x???0.5. The resistivity increases at first and then decreases with increasing Mn contents, which has the same varying tendency with activation energy. The electrical conductivity anomaly appearing in these ceramics may be due to the variation of Cr{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 4+} ions concentration as Mn content changes.

  2. Investigations of Possible Low-Level Temperature and Moisture Anomalies During the AMIE Field Campaign on Manus Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, CN; Holdridge, DJ

    2012-11-19

    This document discusses results stemming from the investigation of near-surface temperature and moisture “oddities” that were brought to light as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE), Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO), and Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) campaigns.

  3. Holocene climate evolution in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    temperature evolution during different seasons in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere. We find in summer a thermal optimum in the mid- Holocene (6Á/3 ka BP), with temperatures locally 38C above the preindustrial insolation by 1 to 2 months owing to the thermal inertia of the system, and (2) the long memory

  4. INV . January 2009 EASTERN HEMISPHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /6500/1998 1:6,500,000 The Mediterranean basin (bc) - C.I.A. G/5672/M4 C55/13000/2004 1:13,000,000 Geodynamic (bc) - C.I.A. G/5700/4300/1994 1:4,300,000 Europe (bc) - C.I.A. G/5700/4500/1997 non-circ 1:4,500 copies) (bc) - National Geographic Society 5671/G1/-/1986 - Eastern hemisphere narcotics - C.I.A. G/5671

  5. Anomaly in the electric resistivity of one-dimensional uneven peanut-shaped C{sub 60} polymer film at a low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryuzaki, Soh; Onoe, Jun, E-mail: jonoe@nr.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-03-17

    We performed in situ four-probe measurements of the current-voltage characteristics of one-dimensional (1D) uneven peanut-shaped C{sub 60} polymer films in the temperature range 30–350?K under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (2?×?10{sup ?7}?Pa). Arrhenius plots of the film resistance with respect to temperature showed two different electron-conduction mechanisms. While electrons are conducted via a thermal excitation hopping at temperatures above 160?K, the resistivity of the 1D polymer film exhibits an anomalous behavior that becomes fluctuated at a given value in the temperature range 40–90?K and decreases at temperatures below 40?K.

  6. Hemispheric sunspot unit area: comparison with hemispheric sunspot number and sunspot area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K. J.; Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L., E-mail: lkj@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, CAS, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-03-01

    The monthly mean northern and southern hemispheric sunspot numbers (SNs) and sunspot areas (SAs) in the time interval of 1945 January to 2012 December are utilized to construct the monthly northern and southern hemispheric sunspot unit areas (SUAs), which are defined as the ratio of hemispheric SA to SN. Hemispheric SUAs are usually found to rise at the beginning and to fall at the ending time of a solar cycle more rapidly, forming a more irregular cycle profile than hemispheric SNs and SAs, although it also presents Schwabe-cycle-like hemispheric SNs and SAs. Sunspot activity (SN, SA, and SUA) is found asynchronously and is asymmetrically distributed in the northern and southern hemispheres, and hemispheric SNs, SAs, and SUAs are not in phase in the two hemispheres. The similarity of hemispheric SNs and SAs is found to be much more obvious than that of hemispheric SUAs and SNs (or SAs), and also for their north-south asymmetry. A notable feature is found for the behavior of the SUA around the minimum time of cycle 24: the SUA rapidly decreases from the cycle maximum value to the cycle minimum value of sunspot cycles 19-24 within just 22 months.

  7. The Pioneer Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slava G. Turyshev; Viktor T. Toth

    2010-08-19

    Radio-metric Doppler tracking data received from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft from heliocentric distances of 20-70 AU has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, blue-shifted frequency drift uniformly changing with a rate of ~6 x 10^{-9} Hz/s. Ultimately, the drift was interpreted as a constant sunward deceleration of each particular spacecraft at the level of a_P = (8.74 +/- 1.33) x 10^{-10} m/s^2. This apparent violation of the Newton's gravitational inverse-square law has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the physical properties of the anomaly and the conditions that led to its detection and characterization. We review various mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and discuss the current state of efforts to determine its nature. A comprehensive new investigation of the anomalous behavior of the two Pioneers has begun recently. The new efforts rely on the much-extended set of radio-metric Doppler data for both spacecraft in conjunction with the newly available complete record of their telemetry files and a large archive of original project documentation. As the new study is yet to report its findings, this review provides the necessary background for the new results to appear in the near future. In particular, we provide a significant amount of information on the design, operations and behavior of the two Pioneers during their entire missions, including descriptions of various data formats and techniques used for their navigation and radio-science data analysis. As most of this information was recovered relatively recently, it was not used in the previous studies of the Pioneer anomaly, but it is critical for the new investigation.

  8. Anomaly for Model Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utpal Sarkar

    2006-06-19

    A simple algorithm to calculate the group theory factor entering in anomalies at four and six dimensions for SU(N) and SO(N) groups in terms of the Casimir invariants of their subgroups is presented. Explicit examples of some of the lower dimensional representations of $SU(n), n \\leq 5$ and SO(10) groups are presented, which could be used for model building in four and six dimensions.

  9. CMB Anomalies after Planck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Dominik J; Huterer, Dragan; Starkman, Glenn D

    2015-01-01

    Several unexpected features have been observed in the microwave sky at large angular scales, both by WMAP an by Planck. Among those features is a lack of both variance and correlation on the largest angular scales, alignment of the lowest multipole moments with one another and with the motion and geometry of the Solar System, a hemispherical power asymmetry or dipolar power modulation, a preference for odd parity modes and an unexpectedly large cold spot in the Southern hemisphere. The individual p-values of the significance of these features are in the per mille to per cent level, when compared to the expectations of the best-fit inflationary $\\Lambda$CDM model. Some pairs of those features are demonstrably uncorrelated, increasing their combined statistical significance and indicating a significant detection of CMB features at angular scales larger than a few degrees on top of the standard model. Despite numerous detailed investigations, we still lack a clear understanding of these large-scale features, whi...

  10. MICROSCALE THREE-DIMENSIONAL HEMISPHERICAL SHELL RESONATORS FABRICATED FROM METALLIC GLASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M'Closkey, Robert T.

    of metallic glasses combined with the ability to blow mold at relatively low temperatures (150- 400 °CMICROSCALE THREE-DIMENSIONAL HEMISPHERICAL SHELL RESONATORS FABRICATED FROM METALLIC GLASS M. Kanik.S. Abstract-- A novel use of bulk metallic glasses in microresonator applications is reported and a method

  11. Large-Angle Anomalies in the CMB

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2010-01-01

    We review the recently found large-scale anomalies in the maps of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. These include alignments of the largest modes of CMB anisotropy with each other and with geometry and direction of motion of the solar ssystem, and the unusually low power at these largest scales. We discuss these findings in relation to expectation from standard inflationary cosmology, their statistical significance, the tools to study them, and the various attempts to explain them.

  12. Large-scale anomalies from primordial dissipation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, Guido; Gobbetti, Roberto; Kleban, Matthew; Schillo, Marjorie E-mail: rg1509@nyu.edu E-mail: mls604@nyu.edu

    2013-11-01

    We analyze an inflationary model in which part of the power in density perturbations arises due to particle production. The amount of particle production is modulated by an auxiliary field. Given an initial gradient for the auxiliary field, this model produces a hemispherical power asymmetry and a suppression of power at low multipoles similar to those observed by WMAP and Planck in the CMB temperature. It also predicts an additive contribution to ?T with support only at very small l that is aligned with the direction of the power asymmetry and has a definite sign, as well as small oscillations in the power spectrum at all l.

  13. Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society Vol. 23 page 48 Southern Hemisphere regional precipitation and climate variability: Extremes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    a characteristic dipole pattern of Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, with features of both), and rainfall anomalies are shown using sun/cloud symbols. #12;Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society Vol. 23 page 49 The changed East African rainfall distribution can be explained

  14. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2000 tropical ozone climatology 2; published 31 January 2003. [1] The first view of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone variability in the Southern Hemisphere tropics is provided by a 3-year record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere

  15. NEWSLETTER October 2009 Predicted Northern-Hemisphere temperature rise due

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul

    ; glaciology; waste; energy; the built environment. · Prize money totals £500; · A certificate will also merged with web editor, and as Communication Editors, we have high standards to live up to! Environmental

  16. ASTER Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: ASTER Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from ASTER satellite imagery. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. Areas that had temperature greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered ASTER modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4547052.446651 m Left: 158917.090117 m Right: 4101162.228281 m Bottom: 4101162.228281 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  17. System for closure of a physical anomaly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bearinger, Jane P; Maitland, Duncan J; Schumann, Daniel L; Wilson, Thomas S

    2014-11-11

    Systems for closure of a physical anomaly. Closure is accomplished by a closure body with an exterior surface. The exterior surface contacts the opening of the anomaly and closes the anomaly. The closure body has a primary shape for closing the anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly. The closure body preferably comprises a shape memory polymer.

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - ISDAC - Hemispheric Flux Spectroradiometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01)govCampaignsFIRE-Arctic- Hemispheric Flux Spectroradiometer ARM

  19. Gravitational anomalies: a recipe for Hawking radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saurya Das; Sean P. Robinson; Elias C. Vagenas

    2008-03-27

    We explore the method of Robinson and Wilczek for deriving the Hawking temperature of a black hole. In this method, the Hawking radiation restores general covariance in an effective theory of near-horizon physics which otherwise exhibits a gravitational anomaly at the quantum level. The method has been shown to work for broad classes of black holes in arbitrary spacetime dimensions. These include static black holes, accreting or evaporating black holes, charged black holes, rotating black holes, and even black rings. In the case of charged and rotating black holes, the expected super-radiant current is also reproduced.

  20. ALP hints from cooling anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannotti, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We review the current status of the anomalies in stellar cooling and argue that, among the new physics candidates, an axion-like particle would represent the best option to account for the hinted additional cooling.

  1. ALP hints from cooling anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurizio Giannotti

    2015-08-30

    We review the current status of the anomalies in stellar cooling and argue that, among the new physics candidates, an axion-like particle would represent the best option to account for the hinted additional cooling.

  2. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubinsky, M.S. [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children`s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children`s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  3. On the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    On the Persistence of Cold-Season SST Anomalies Associated with the Annular Modes LAURA M. CIASTO fluxes, and Ekman currents on the persistence of cold-season extratropical sea surface temperature (SST. Observational analysis reveals that during the cold season, SST anomalies associated with the southern annular

  4. Impact of modern climate change on the intercommunication: Global ocean-land (Northern Hemisphere)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobanova, H.V.; Lobanov, V.A.; Stepanenko, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Two main temperature gradients define the synoptic and climatic conditions on the earth in general: equator-pole gradient and ocean-land gradient. The analysis of temperature on the basis of new cyclic-different-scales conception has been fulfilled in every important part of the climatic system in the Northern Hemisphere for assessment of their vulnerability to modern climate change. Historical time series of monthly surface temperature have been used for this aim in the points of regular grid over the Northern Hemisphere from 1891 to 1992. The main feature of the temperature in main climatic parts of the earth is a complexity of its spatial structure. New methods of spatial decomposition have been developed for the division of this complex fields structure into characteristics of mean value of the field and index of its non-homogeneity or spatial variation. It has been established, that the temperature gradient between ocean and land is increasing that is characterized of the increasing of an intensity of synoptic processes, their spatial non-homogeneity and more frequent appearance of the extreme synoptic events. The models of intercommunications between coefficients of temperature spatial decomposition over the ocean and land have been developed for two time period and the increasing of the relationships closeness has been established between ocean and land as well as the decrease of main planet gradient: the pole(the Polar ocean)-equator.

  5. (An)isotropy of the Hubble diagram: comparing hemispheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz; Bastian Weinhorst

    2007-09-12

    We test the isotropy of the Hubble diagram. At small redshifts, this is possible without assumptions on the cosmic inventory and provides a fundamental test of the cosmological principle. At higher redshift we check for the self-consistency of the LambdaCDM model. At small redshifts, we use public supernovae (SNe) Ia data to determine the deceleration parameter q_0 and the SN calibration on opposite hemispheres. For the complete data sets we fit Omega_M and the SN calibration on opposite hemispheres. A statistically significant anisotropy of the Hubble diagram at redshifts z 95% C.L.). While data from the North Galactic hemisphere favour the accelerated expansion of the Universe, data from the South Galactic hemisphere are not conclusive. The hemispheric asymmetry is maximal toward a direction close to the equatorial poles. The discrepancy between the equatorial North and South hemispheres shows up in the SN calibration. For the LambdaCDM model fitted to all available SNe, we find the same asymmetry. The alignment of discrepancies between hemispheric Hubble diagrams with the equatorial frame seems to point toward a systematic error in the SN search, observation, analysis or data reduction. We also find that our model independent test cannot exclude the case of the deceleration of the expansion at a statistically significant level.

  6. Effect of Sex of Subject and Experimenter on Hemispheric Balance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Joan; Wilkes, Chris; Crissman, Sue; Barchas, Pat

    2015-08-15

    stream_source_info #61 Effect of Sex of Subject and Experimenter on Hemispheric Balance.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 28922 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name #61 Effect of Sex of Subject and Experimenter... on Hemispheric Balance.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 A TECHNICAL REPORT The Laboratory for Social Research STANFORD, CALIFORNIASTANFORD UNIVERSITY EFFECT OF SEX OF SUBJECT AMD EXPERIMENTER OH HEMISPHERIC BALANCE Joan Ford Chris...

  7. Wave Patterns and Southern Hemisphere Convergence Zones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramotowski, Michelle R.

    2013-04-11

    for his unwavering support. v NOMENCLATURE CLAUS Cloud Archive User Service ECMWF European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting ENSO El Nino Southern Oscillation GPCP Global Precipitation Climatology Project MJO Madden...-Julian Oscillation P Pressure PV Potential Vorticity t Time T Temperature Tb Brightness temperature u zonal component of wind v meridional component of wind V Total wind velocity Vg Geostrophic wind ? Potential temperature ? Vertical motion vi...

  8. Stratigraphic significance of uvigerinid foraminifers in the Western Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamb, J. L.; Miller, T. H.

    1984-12-18

    OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 66 Stratigraphic Significance of Uvigerinid Foraminifers in the Western Hemisphere J. L. Lamb and T. H. Miller Harold Norman Fisk Memorial Papers Exxon Company, U.S.A. The University of Kansas Paleontological... OF UVIGERINID FORAMINIFERS IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE' J. L. LAMB and T. H. MILLER 4818 E. Laureldale Drive, Houston, Texas 77041 and Exxon Production Research Corporation, P. 0. Box 2189, Houston, Texas 77001 Abstract—Uvigerinid foraminifers increasingly...

  9. Zonal wind oscillations over the western hemisphere during winter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hundermark, Bruce William

    1991-01-01

    ZONAL WIND OSCILLATIONS OVER THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE DURING WINIER A Thesis by BRUCE WILLIAM HUNDERMARK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdiM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Meteorology ZONAL WIND OSCILLATIONS OVER THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE DURING WINIER A Thesis by BRUCE WILLIAM HUNDERMARIZ Approved as to style and content by: c Dusan Djuric (Co-Chair of Committee) haF. ' s (Co...

  10. Remotely Sensed Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Landsat Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from Landsat satellite imagery in Western Colorado. Data was obtained for two different dates. The digital numbers of each Landsat scene were converted to radiance and the temperature was calculated in degrees Kelvin and then converted to degrees Celsius for each land cover type using the emissivity of that cover type. And this process was repeated for each of the land cover types (open water, barren, deciduous forest and evergreen forest, mixed forest, shrub/scrub, grassland/herbaceous, pasture hay, and cultivated crops). The temperature of each pixel within each scene was calculated using the thermal band. In order to calculate the temperature an average emissivity value was used for each land cover type within each scene. The NLCD 2001 land cover classification raster data of the zones that cover Colorado were downloaded from USGS site and used to identify the land cover types within each scene. Areas that had temperature residual greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered Landsat modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546381.234113 m Left: 140556.857021 m Right: 573390.000000 m Bottom: 4094583.641581 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies Article Published Version Fioletov, V. E. and Shepherd, T. G. (2003) Seasonal persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies. Geophysical Research persistence of midlatitude total ozone anomalies Vitali E. Fioletov Meteorological Service of Canada, Toronto

  12. ARM: SIRS: derived, correction of downwelling shortwave diffuse hemispheric measurements using Dutton and full algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    1997-03-21

    SIRS: derived, correction of downwelling shortwave diffuse hemispheric measurements using Dutton and full algorithm

  13. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu E-mail: niharc2002@yahoo.com

    2013-12-28

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case.

  14. BEC-BCS crossover driven by the axial anomaly in the NJL model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abuki, Hiroaki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    We study the QCD phase structure in the three-flavor Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, incorporating the chiral-diquark interplay due to the axial anomaly. We demonstrate that for a certain range of model parameters, the low temperature critical point predicted by a Ginzburg-Landau analysis appears in the phase diagram. In addition, we show that the axial anomaly presents a new scenario for a possible BEC-BCS crossover in the color-flavor locked phase of QCD.

  15. Spurious Anomalies in Dimensional Renormalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. L. Trueman

    1995-04-17

    A set of procedures is given for avoiding the spurious anomalies that are generated when the 't Hooft - Veltman definition of gamma5 is used in conjunction with renormalization by minimal subtraction. These procedures are derived from the standard procedure, which requires in addition various finite renormalizations to remove spurious violations of chiral symmetry. They apply to open fermion lines, including flavor changing currents, to closed fermion loops, including those which contain true anomalous currents, and to anomalous loops connected to open fermion lines, to all orders in QCD.

  16. CMB hemispherical asymmetry: long mode modulation and non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir

    2014-08-01

    The observed hemispherical asymmetry in CMB map can be explained by modulation from a long wavelength super horizon mode which non-linearly couples to the CMB modes. We address the criticism in [1] about the role of non-Gaussianities in squeezed and equilateral configurations in generating hemispherical asymmetry from the long mode modulation. We stress that the modulation is sensitive to the non-Gaussianity in the squeezed limit. In addition, we demonstrate the validity of our approach in providing a consistency condition relating the amplitude of dipole asymmetry to f{sub NL} in the squeezed limit.

  17. Galilean Anomalies and Their Effect on Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akash Jain

    2015-09-18

    We extend the null background construction of [arXiv:1505.05677,arXiv:1509.04718] to include torsion and a conserved spin current, and use it to study gauge and gravitational anomalies in Galilean theories coupled to torsional Newton-Cartan backgrounds. We establish that the relativistic anomaly inflow mechanism with an appropriately modified anomaly polynomial, can be used to generate these anomalies. Similar to relativistic case, we find that Galilean anomalies also survive only in even dimensions. Further, these anomalies only effect the gauge and rotational symmetries of a Galilean theory; in particular the Milne boost symmetry remains non-anomalous. We also extend the transgression machinery used in relativistic fluids to fluids on null backgrounds, and use it to determine how these anomalies affect the constitutive relations of a Galilean fluid. Unrelated to Galilean fluids, we propose an analogue of the off-shell second law of thermodynamics for relativistic fluids introduced by [arXiv:1106.0277], to include torsion and a conserved spin current in Vielbein formalism. Interestingly, we find that even in absense of spin and torsion the entropy currents in two formalisms are different; while the usual entropy current gets a contribution from gravitational anomaly, the entropy current in Vielbein formalism does not have any anomaly induced part.

  18. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982004 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2004 tropical ozone climatology: 3 more than 3000 ozone profiles from 14 tropical and subtropical sites using balloon- borne technique might cause small station-to-station biases in the total ozone measurement. We present further

  19. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2000 tropical ozone climatology 1. Comparison with Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and ground-based measurements Anne M. Thompson,1 Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project and established from operational sites, provided over 1000 ozone

  20. Functional dependence of axial anomaly via mesonic fluctuations in the three flavor linear sigma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fejos, G

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the $U_A(1)$ anomaly is investigated by taking into account mesonic fluctuations in the $U(3)\\times U(3)$ linear sigma model. A field dependent anomaly coefficient function of the effective potential is calculated within the finite temperature functional renormalization group approach. The applied approximation scheme is a generalization of the chiral invariant expansion technique developed in [G. Fej\\H{o}s, Phys. Rev. D 90, 096011 (2014)]. We provide an analytic expression and also numerical evidence that depending on the relationship between the two quartic couplings, mesonic fluctuations can either strengthen of weaken the anomaly as a function of the temperature. Role of the six-point invariant of the $U(3)\\times U(3)$ group, and therefore the stability of the chiral expansion is also discussed in detail.

  1. Functional dependence of axial anomaly via mesonic fluctuations in the three flavor linear sigma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fejos

    2015-08-31

    Temperature dependence of the $U_A(1)$ anomaly is investigated by taking into account mesonic fluctuations in the $U(3)\\times U(3)$ linear sigma model. A field dependent anomaly coefficient function of the effective potential is calculated within the finite temperature functional renormalization group approach. The applied approximation scheme is a generalization of the chiral invariant expansion technique developed in [G. Fejos, Phys. Rev. D 90, 096011 (2014)]. We provide an analytic expression and also numerical evidence that depending on the relationship between the two quartic couplings, mesonic fluctuations can either strengthen of weaken the anomaly as a function of the temperature. The role of the six-point invariant of the $U(3)\\times U(3)$ group, and therefore the stability of the chiral expansion is also discussed in detail.

  2. Functional dependence of axial anomaly via mesonic fluctuations in the three flavor linear sigma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fejos

    2015-06-29

    Temperature dependence of the $U_A(1)$ anomaly is investigated by taking into account mesonic fluctuations in the $U(3)\\times U(3)$ linear sigma model. A field dependent anomaly coefficient function of the effective potential is calculated within the finite temperature functional renormalization group approach. The applied approximation scheme is a generalization of the chiral invariant expansion technique developed in [G. Fejos, Phys. Rev. D 90, 096011 (2014)]. We provide an analytic expression and also numerical evidence that depending on the relationship between the two quartic couplings, mesonic fluctuations can either strengthen of weaken the anomaly as a function of the temperature. Role of the six-point invariant of the $U(3)\\times U(3)$ group, and therefore the stability of the chiral expansion is also discussed in detail.

  3. The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achterberg, A.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    see also the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Page: http://from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA A.Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA The IceCube

  4. 2004 AGU Fall Meeting SM42A-05 Hemispheric Asymmetries in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fillingim, Matthew

    2004 AGU Fall Meeting SM42A-05 Hemispheric Asymmetries in the Dayside Aurora M. O. Fillingim, M of California, Berkeley Southern Hemisphere Polar UVI Northern Hemisphere IMAGE WIC #12;2004 AGU Fall Meeting SM #12;2004 AGU Fall Meeting SM42A-05 Introduction (cont'd) Previous conjugate observations limited

  5. ISOTROPIC ETCHING OF 111 SCS FOR WAFER-SCALE MANUFACTURING OF PERFECTLY HEMISPHERICAL SILICON MOLDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshari, Ehsan

    ISOTROPIC ETCHING OF 111 SCS FOR WAFER-SCALE MANUFACTURING OF PERFECTLY HEMISPHERICAL SILICON MOLDS as sacrificial molds for micro-scale hemispherical resonator gyroscopes (HRGs) made using hemispherical shell resonators. Geometric uniformity of the mold is critical for HRG applications in order to achieve degenerate

  6. Galilean Anomalies and Their Effect on Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Akash

    2015-01-01

    We extend the null background construction of [arXiv:1505.05677,arXiv:1509.04718] to include torsion and a conserved spin current, and use it to study gauge and gravitational anomalies in Galilean theories coupled to torsional Newton-Cartan backgrounds. We establish that the relativistic anomaly inflow mechanism with an appropriately modified anomaly polynomial, can be used to generate these anomalies. Similar to relativistic case, we find that Galilean anomalies also survive only in even dimensions. Further, these anomalies only effect the gauge and rotational symmetries of a Galilean theory; in particular the Milne boost symmetry remains non-anomalous. We also extend the transgression machinery used in relativistic fluids to fluids on null backgrounds, and use it to determine how these anomalies affect the constitutive relations of a Galilean fluid. Unrelated to Galilean fluids, we propose an analogue of the off-shell second law of thermodynamics for relativistic fluids introduced by [arXiv:1106.0277], to i...

  7. Film Boiling on Downward Quenching Hemisphere of Varying Sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan S. Kim; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-04-01

    Film boiling heat transfer coefficients for a downward-facing hemispherical surface are measured from the quenching tests in DELTA (Downward-boiling Experimental Laminar Transition Apparatus). Two test sections are made of copper to maintain low Biot numbers. The outer diameters of the hemispheres are 120 mm and 294 mm, respectively. The thickness of all the test sections is 30 mm. The effect of diameter on film boiling heat transfer is quantified utilizing results obtained from the test sections. The measured data are compared with the numerical predictions from laminar film boiling analysis. The measured heat transfer coefficients are found to be greater than those predicted by the conventional laminar flow theory on account of the interfacial wavy motion incurred by the Helmholtz instability. Incorporation of the wavy motion model considerably improves the agreement between the experimental and numerical results in terms of heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the interfacial wavy motion and the quenching process are visualized through a digital camera.

  8. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turcotte, Melissa

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the communication counts. In a sequential analysis, anomalous behavior is then identified from outlying behavior with respect to the fitted predictive probability models. Seasonality is again incorporated into the model and is treated as a changepoint model on the transition probabilities of a discrete time Markov process. Second stage analytics are then developed which combine anomalous edges to identify anomalous substructures in the network.

  9. A search for anomalies in the palladium-deuterium system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, D.J.; Kamm, G.N.; Ehrlich, A.C. ); Mart, P.L. )

    1989-12-01

    A polycrystalline palladium rod is electrolytically charged with deuterium up to a deuterium/palladium ratio of 0.81 while several sample parameters are simultaneously measured in situ, including electrical resistivity, sample dimensions, cell temperature, and neutron production. Various charging rates are used in an attempt to provoke any anomalous behavior, such as a previously unknown crystallographic or chemical phase change, that might account for reports of heat or neutron production. Neither the electrical resistivity nor sample dimensions manifest evidence of any anomaly.

  10. Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar andDetailed Planning

  11. CP-violating CFT and trace anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Nakayama

    2012-01-26

    It is logically possible that the trace anomaly in four dimension includes the Hirzebruch-Pontryagin density in CP violating theories. Although the term vanishes at free conformal fixed points, we realize such a possibility in the holographic renormalization group and show that it is indeed possible. The Hirzebruch-Pontryagin term in the trace anomaly may serve as a barometer to understand how much CP is violated in conformal field theories.

  12. Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a hemispherical wave breakout test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooks, Daniel E; Morris, John S; Hill, Larry G; Francois, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse shape to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A hemispherical wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional hemispherical geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.

  13. Superconductivity-induced phonon anomalies in high-Tc superconductors: A Raman intensity study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sipe,J. E.

    Superconductivity-induced phonon anomalies in high-Tc superconductors: A Raman intensity study O. V of a number of Raman-active phonons below the superconducting transition temperature in YBa2Cu3O7 x , Bi2Sr2Ca to obtain information about the superconducting state.4 Several years ago, Friedl et al.5 ob- served

  14. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  15. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  16. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  17. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  18. Observed hemispheric asymmetry in global sea ice changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalieri, D.J.; Gloersen, P.; Parkinson, C.L.; Comiso, J.C.; Zwally, H.J.

    1997-11-07

    From November 1978 through December 1996, the areal extent of sea ice decreased by 2.9 {+-} 0.4 percent decade in the Arctic and increased by 1.3 {+-} 0.2 percent per decade in the Antarctic. The observed hemispheric asymmetry in these trends is consistent with a modeled response to a carbon dioxide-induced climate warming. The interannual variations, which are 2.3 percent of the annual mean in the Arctic, with a predominant period of about 5 years, and 3.4 percent of the annual mean in the Antarctic, with a predominant period of about 3 years, are uncorrelated. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Trace Anomaly and Dimension Two Gluon Condensate Above the Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megias,E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.; Salcedo, L.L.

    2008-02-04

    The dimension two gluon condensate has been used previously within a simple phenomenological model to describe power corrections from available lattice data for the renormalized Polyakov loop and the heavy quark-antiquark free energy in the deconfined phase of QCD. The QCD trace anomaly of gluodynamics also shows unequivocal inverse temperature power corrections which may be encoded as dimension two gluon condensate. We analyze lattice data of the trace anomaly and compare with other determinations of the condensate from previous references, yielding roughly similar numerical values.

  20. Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Hemispheres Reflected by Steel and Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Darrell Bess

    2008-06-01

    During the period from June 1967 through September 1969 a series of critical experiments was performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory with spherical and hemispherical plutonium assemblies as nested hemishells as part of a Nuclear Safety Facility Experimental Program to evaluate operational safety margins for the Rocky Flats Plant. These assemblies were both bare and fully or partially oil-reflected. Many of these experiments were subcritical with an extrapolation to critical configurations or critical at a particular oil height. Existing records reveal that 167 experiments were performed over the course of 28 months. Unfortunately, much of the data was not recorded. A reevaluation of the experiments had been summarized in a report for future experimental and computational analyses. This report examines only fifteen partially oil-reflected hemispherical assemblies. Fourteen of these assemblies also had close-fitting stainless-steel hemishell reflectors, used to determine the effective critical reflector height of oil with varying steel-reflector thickness. The experiments and their uncertainty in keff values were evaluated to determine their potential as valid criticality benchmark experiments of plutonium.

  1. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a steer's head.'' it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  2. Density variations and anomalies in palladium compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, D.; Jones, T.; Ransick, M.; Walburg, T.; Werkmeister, D.

    1992-05-14

    Low-density compacts of palladium powder have relative densities of about 30{plus_minus}10% TD. The variations in density are of concern for operations such as chemical/hydrogen pump systems because heat, mass, and momentum transport properties can be affected. Variations in density result from the inherent nature and interacting forces of UASA compaction of powder in cylinders. In addition to these expected variations, discontinuous density anomalies, such as cracks or high density ridges, are also found. An anomaly of particular concern was found to resemble a ``steer`s head.`` it is a symmetrical region of low density located at or near the center of a compact. Typically, this region is surrounded by a band of high density, compacted palladium that sometimes exceeds the density of the surrounding compact matrix by a factor of three. This report examines these density variations and anomalies both theoretically and empirically.

  3. Trace anomaly on a quantum spacetime manifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais; Nicolini, Piero

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we investigate the trace anomaly in a space-time where single events are delocalized as a consequence of short distance quantum coordinate fluctuations. We obtain a modified form of heat kernel asymptotic expansion which does not suffer from short distance divergences. Calculation of the trace anomaly is performed using an IR regulator in order to circumvent the absence of UV infinities. The explicit form of the trace anomaly is presented and the corresponding 2D Polyakov effective action and energy-momentum tensor are obtained. The vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua is explicitly calculated in a rt section of a recently found, noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like solution of the Einstein equations. The standard short distance divergences in the vacuum expectation values are regularized in agreement with the absence of UV infinities removed by quantum coordinate fluctuations.

  4. Understanding water's anomalies with locally favored structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, John

    2013-01-01

    Water is a complex structured liquid of hydrogen-bonded molecules that displays a surprising array of unusual properties, also known as water anomalies, the most famous being the density maximum at about $4^\\circ$C. The origin of these anomalies is still a matter of debate, and so far a quantitative description of water's phase behavior starting from the molecular arrangements is still missing. Here we provide a simple physical description from microscopic data obtained through computer simulations. We introduce a novel structural order parameter, which quantifies the degree of translational order of the second shell, and show that this parameter alone, which measures the amount of locally favored structures, accurately characterizes the state of water. A two-state modeling of these microscopic structures is used to describe the behavior of liquid water over a wide region of the phase diagram, correctly identifying the density and compressibility anomalies, and being compatible with the existence of a second ...

  5. Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

    2013-08-20

    A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

  6. Chiral anomaly of antisymmetric tensor fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1988-03-15

    For antisymmetric tensor gauge fields of rank 2n-1 coupled to gravity in 4n dimensions it is shown that the symmetry under duality rotations is broken by quantum effects. The anomaly is related to a local version of the signature index theorem. The zeta-function technique, Fujikawa's method, and the stochastic regularization scheme are discussed.

  7. A "Poisoning" Attack Against Online Anomaly Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freytag, Johann-Christoph

    A "Poisoning" Attack Against Online Anomaly Detection Marius Kloft Department of Computer Science it is robust against targeted "poisoning" attacks. The latter have been first investigated by Nelson et al. [1 of all data points observed so far. The key idea of a poisoning attack is to insert specially crafted

  8. AUTOMATIC MIXED PIXEL CLASSIFICATIO (AMPC): ANOMALY CLASSIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    14 AUTOMATIC MIXED PIXEL CLASSIFICATIO (AMPC): ANOMALY CLASSIFICATION In Chapter 13, one type of AMPC, automatic target detection and classification (ATDC) is investigated, which does not require any, an automatic thresholding method and four target discrimination measures are introduced in this chapter

  9. Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In...

  10. Chiral anomaly in the Schwinger-Symanzik formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittrich, W.; Reuter, M.

    1985-03-15

    It is shown how chiral anomalies appear nonperturbatively in the Schwinger-Symanzik functional formalism of quantum field theory.

  11. Sensitivity of LR 115 detectors in hemispherical chambers for radon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Sensitivity of LR 115 detectors in hemispherical chambers for radon measurements D. Nikezic 1 , F, if the radius is larger than 3 cm, the effects of the deposition fraction of radon progeny will come into effect, which will again introduce uncertainties in radon measurements. For the hemispherical chamber

  12. Right Hemisphere Activation of Joke-related Information: An Event-related Brain Potential Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulson, Seana

    Right Hemisphere Activation of Joke-related Information: An Event-related Brain Potential Study-relevant information was more active in the right hemisphere. The anterior positivity was ob- served with RVF Seana Coulson and Ying Choon Wu Abstract & Two studies tested the hypothesis that the right hemi- sphere

  13. Forcing of Ocean and Sea Ice Variability by the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    hemisphere ocean. 1 #12;1 The atmospheric jet stream and southern hemisphere geography If the earth's surface in solar forcing would also be zonally-symmetric. This would generate, in turn, a mid-latitude jet stream the well-known wavenumber 2 stationary wave pattern in the climatological mean state of the NH jet stream

  14. The influence of Southern Hemisphere seaice extent on the latitude of the midlatitude jet stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidston, Joseph

    The influence of Southern Hemisphere seaice extent on the latitude of the midlatitude jet stream J midlatitude jet stream, but that the amplitude of the atmospheric response depends critically on the location), The influence of Southern Hemisphere seaice extent on the latitude of the midlatitude jet stream, Geophys. Res

  15. Forcing of Ocean and Sea Ice Variability by the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    hemisphere ocean. 1 #12; 1 The atmospheric jet stream and southern hemisphere geography If the earth in solar forcing would also be zonally­symmetric. This would generate, in turn, a mid­latitude jet stream the well­known wavenumber 2 stationary wave pattern in the climatological mean state of the NH jet stream

  16. Impact of Antarctic Ozone Depletion and Recovery on Southern Hemisphere Precipitation, Evaporation, and Extreme Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Seok-Woo

    Impact of Antarctic Ozone Depletion and Recovery on Southern Hemisphere Precipitation, Evaporation) ABSTRACT The possible impact of Antarctic ozone depletion and recovery on Southern Hemisphere (SH) mean- tercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3). By grouping models into four sets, those with and without ozone depletion

  17. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.; Lambert, J.

    1999-04-06

    A capsule is disclosed containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor. 3 figs.

  18. ANTIDOTE: Understanding and Defending against Poisoning of Anomaly Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Benjamin

    ANTIDOTE: Understanding and Defending against Poisoning of Anomaly Detectors Benjamin I. P poisoning techniques and develop a defense, in the context of a particular anomaly detector--namely the PCA-subspace method for detecting anomalies in backbone networks. For three poisoning schemes, we show how at- tackers

  19. On the statistical modeling of persistence in total ozone anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    On the statistical modeling of persistence in total ozone anomalies Article Published Version in total ozone anomalies. Journal of Geophysical Research, 115. D16306. ISSN 0148-0227 doi: 10.1029/2009JD the statistical modeling of persistence in total ozone anomalies D. I. Vyushin,1 T. G. Shepherd,1 and V. E

  20. Salary Anomalies pursuant to Article 15 of the Collective Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Salary Anomalies pursuant to Article 15 of the Collective Agreement Dates Description Article ~ Human Resources will distribute the Salary Anomalies Advisory Committee Guidelines to the Deans. 15 online at: http://www.ucalgary.ca/hr/salary-anomalies 15.6 by January 30, 2015 ~ Deans will identify

  1. Automatic detection of UXO magnetic anomalies using extended Euler deconvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic detection of UXO magnetic anomalies using extended Euler deconvolution Kristofer Davis1 , Yaoguo Li1 , and Misac Nabighian1 ABSTRACT We have developed an algorithm for the automatic detec- tion of compact and iso- lated anomalies; it has enabled us to perform automatic anomaly selection for further

  2. The covariation of Northern Hemisphere summertime CO2 with surface temperature in boreal regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    in the Community Earth System Model: evaluation anduncertainties in Earth system models and for diagnosing the

  3. Remark on the Consistent Gauge Anomaly in Supersymmetric Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohshima, Y; Suzuki, H; Yasuta, H; Ohshima, Yoshihisa; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Yasuta, Hirofumi

    1999-01-01

    We present a direct field theoretical calculation of the consistent gauge anomaly in the superfield formalism, on the basis of a definition of the effective action through the covariant gauge current. The scheme is conceptually and technically simple and the gauge covariance in intermediate steps reduces calculational labors considerably. The resultant superfield anomaly, being proportional to the anomaly $d^{abc}=\\tr T^a\\{T^b,T^c\\}$, is minimal even without supplementing any counterterms. Our anomaly coincides with the anomaly obtained by Marinkovi\\'c as the solution of the Wess-Zumino consistency condition.

  4. System and method for anomaly detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scherrer, Chad

    2010-06-15

    A system and method for detecting one or more anomalies in a plurality of observations is provided. In one illustrative embodiment, the observations are real-time network observations collected from a stream of network traffic. The method includes performing a discrete decomposition of the observations, and introducing derived variables to increase storage and query efficiencies. A mathematical model, such as a conditional independence model, is then generated from the formatted data. The formatted data is also used to construct frequency tables which maintain an accurate count of specific variable occurrence as indicated by the model generation process. The formatted data is then applied to the mathematical model to generate scored data. The scored data is then analyzed to detect anomalies.

  5. Chiral anomalies and zeta-function regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1985-03-15

    The zeta-function method for regularizing determinants is used to calculate the chiral anomalies of several field-theory models. In SU(N) gauge theories without ..gamma../sub 5/ couplings, the results of perturbation theory are obtained in an unambiguous manner for the full gauge theory as well as for the corresponding external-field problem. If axial-vector couplings are present, different anomalies occur for the two cases. The result for the full gauge theory is again uniquely determined; for its nongauge analog, however, ambiguities can arise. The connection between the basic path integral and the operator used to construct the heat kernel is investigated and the significance of its Hermiticity and gauge covariance are analyzed. The implications of the Wess-Zumino conditions are considered.

  6. Holographic Trace Anomaly and Local Renormalization Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Srivatsan; Zhu, Yechao

    2015-01-01

    The Hamilton-Jacobi method in holography has produced important results both at a renormalization group (RG) fixed point and away from it. In this paper we use the Hamilton-Jacobi method to compute the holographic trace anomaly for four- and six-dimensional boundary conformal field theories (CFTs), assuming higher-derivative gravity and interactions of scalar fields in the bulk. The scalar field contributions to the anomaly appear in CFTs with exactly marginal operators. Moving away from the fixed point, we show that the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism provides a deep connection between the holographic and the local RG. We derive the local RG equation holographically, and verify explicitly that it satisfies Weyl consistency conditions stemming from the commutativity of Weyl scalings. We also consider massive scalar fields in the bulk corresponding to boundary relevant operators, and comment on their effects to the local RG equation.

  7. Holographic Trace Anomaly and Local Renormalization Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivatsan Rajagopal; Andreas Stergiou; Yechao Zhu

    2015-08-19

    The Hamilton-Jacobi method in holography has produced important results both at a renormalization group (RG) fixed point and away from it. In this paper we use the Hamilton-Jacobi method to compute the holographic trace anomaly for four- and six-dimensional boundary conformal field theories (CFTs), assuming higher-derivative gravity and interactions of scalar fields in the bulk. The scalar field contributions to the anomaly appear in CFTs with exactly marginal operators. Moving away from the fixed point, we show that the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism provides a deep connection between the holographic and the local RG. We derive the local RG equation holographically, and verify explicitly that it satisfies Weyl consistency conditions stemming from the commutativity of Weyl scalings. We also consider massive scalar fields in the bulk corresponding to boundary relevant operators, and comment on their effects to the local RG equation.

  8. Gravity tests and the Pioneer anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc-Thierry Jaekel; Serge Reynaud

    2005-11-04

    Experimental tests of gravity performed in the solar system show a good agreement with general relativity. The latter is however challenged by the Pioneer anomaly which might be pointing at some modification of gravity law at ranges of the order of the size of the solar system. We introduce a metric extension of general relativity which, while preserving the equivalence principle, modifies the coupling between curvature and stress tensors and, therefore, the metric solution in the solar system. The ``post-Einsteinian extension'' replaces Newton gravitation constant by two running coupling constants, which depend on the scale and differ in the sectors of traceless and traced tensors, so that the metric solution is characterized by two gravitation potentials. The extended theory has the capability to preserve compatibility with gravity tests while accounting for the Pioneer anomaly. It can also be tested by new experiments or, maybe, by having a new look at data of already performed experiments.

  9. Trace anomaly of the conformal gauge field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sladkowski, J

    1993-01-01

    The proposed by Bastianelli and van Nieuwenhuizen new method of calculations of trace anomalies is applied in the conformal gauge field case. The result is then reproduced by the heat equation method. An error in previous calculation is corrected. It is pointed out that the introducing gauge symmetries into a given system by a field-enlarging transformation can result in unexpected quantum effects even for trivial configurations.

  10. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  11. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  12. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  13. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  14. THE SAGITTARIUS STREAMS IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC HEMISPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Gieles, M.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Niederste-Ostholt, M.; Penarrubia, J. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Smith, M. C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Bizyaev, D. [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Universitetskiy pr. 13, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V. [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Schneider, D. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wyse, R. F. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3900 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The structure of the Sagittarius stream in the southern Galactic hemisphere is analyzed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. Parallel to the Sagittarius tidal track, but {approx}10 Degree-Sign away, there is another fainter and more metal-poor stream. We provide evidence that the two streams follow similar distance gradients but have distinct morphological properties and stellar populations. The brighter stream is broader, contains more metal-rich stars, and has a richer color-magnitude diagram with multiple turnoffs and a prominent red clump as compared to the fainter stream. Based on the structural properties and the stellar population mix, the stream configuration is similar to the Northern 'bifurcation'. In the region of the South Galactic Cap, there is overlapping tidal debris from the Cetus stream, which crosses the Sagittarius stream. Using both photometric and spectroscopic data, we show that the blue straggler population belongs mainly to Sagittarius and the blue horizontal branch stars belong mainly to the Cetus stream in this confused location in the halo.

  15. Investigations of low-temperature geothermal potential in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S.; De Rito, R.; Hifiker, K.; Morgan, P.; Swanberg, C.A.

    1981-09-01

    Temperature gradient map and published heat flow data indicate a possible potential for a geothermal resource in western and central New York State. A new analysis of bottom-hole temperature data for New York State confirms the existence of three positive gradient anomalies: the East Aurora, Cayuga, and Elmira anomalies, with gradients as high as 32/sup 0/C/km, 36/sup 0/C/km, and 36/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Ground waters from two of these anomalies are enriched in silica relative to surrounding areas. Heat flows based on silica geothermometry are 50 to 70 mWm/sup -2/ for the anomalies and 41.4 mWm/sup -2/ for bordering regional flux. A correlation between Bouguer gravity anomalies and the temperature gradient map suggests that the geothermal anomalies may occur above radioactive granites in the basement.

  16. AT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    an important role in an area's local vertical temperature distribution. Below, Figure 1 shows the verticalAT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3) Question #1: Seasons (20 pts) A. In your own words, describe the cause of the seasons. B. In the Northern Hemisphere we are closer to the sun during

  17. Global Temperature in 2014 and 2015 16 January 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    uncertainty of measurement. The eastern two-thirds of the contiguous United States was persistently cool temperature anomaly on the planet, except for a region in Antarctica, as shown by the map in the upper left

  18. Monitoring and evaluation of the ceramic hemispheric filter in Northern Ghanaian households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Kristine M. (Kristine Marie)

    2013-01-01

    The village of Yipelgu in the Northern Region of Ghana was the recipient of a 1,000-ceramic hemispheric water filter distribution, which was supplied by Pure Home Water (PHW) and funded by UNICEF-Ghana. The distribution ...

  19. LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569 TWINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    LEFT VERSUS RIGHT HEMISPHERE DIFFERENCES IN BRAIN CONNECTIVITY: 4-TESLA HARDI TRACTOGRAPHY IN 569) and 112 adolescents (age 12-16) with 4-Tesla 105-gradient high- angular resolution diffusion imaging. We

  20. Supersymmetric Casimir Energy and the Anomaly Polynomial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobev, Nikolay; Kim, Hee-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    We conjecture that for superconformal field theories in even dimensions, the supersymmetric Casimir energy on a space with topology $S^1\\times S^{D-1}$ is equal to an equivariant integral of the anomaly polynomial. The equivariant integration is defined with respect to the Cartan subalgebra of the global symmetry algebra that commutes with a given supercharge. We test our proposal extensively by computing the supersymmetric Casimir energy for large classes of superconformal field theories, with and without known Lagrangian descriptions, in two, four and six dimensions.

  1. Inversion of marine magnetic anomalies by deconvolution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry, Dennis Lee

    1983-01-01

    magnetization, j(x), with a transfer function, g(x), which is dependant upon the location and orientation of the anomaly profile and the ridge axis relative to the earth's present magnetic field [Bott, 1967]. This is expressed as f(x) f g(x-C) ](C) d0... and Cox, 1972]. The inversion procedure used is to; 1) Numerically transform f(x) into the wavenumber domain, 2) Divide F(k) by the analytical expression for G(k) to obtain J(k), 3) Numerically inverse transform J(k) to obtain J(x). The normalized...

  2. The Pioneer Anomaly and a Machian Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo Samuel Berman

    2008-08-06

    We discuss astronomical and astrophysical evidence, which we relate to the principle of zero-total energy of the Universe, that imply several relations among the mass M, the radius R and the angular momentum L of a "large" sphere representing a Machian Universe. By calculating the angular speed, we find a peculiar centripetal acceleration for the Universe. This is an ubiquituous property that relates one observer to any observable. It turns out that this is exactly the anomalous acceleration observed on the Pioneers spaceships. We have thus, shown that this anomaly is to be considered a property of the Machian Universe. We discuss several possible arguments against our proposal.

  3. 3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3D Magnetotelluric Characterization Of The Geothermal Anomaly In The Llucmajor Aquifer System (Majorca, Spain) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  4. IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sensing and field data is intended to evaluate the performance of remote sensing as a cost-effective geothermal exploration tool. We reason that if reliable thermal anomalies...

  5. TEMPORAL PATTERN DISCOVERY FOR ANOMALY DETECTION IN A SMART HOME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    TEMPORAL PATTERN DISCOVERY FOR ANOMALY DETECTION IN A SMART HOME Vikramaditya Jakkula , Diane J, cook}@eecs.wsu.edu Keywords: Knowledge discovery, smart homes, anomaly detection, temporal relations and relations on smart home datasets [10]. This paper describes a method of discovering temporal relations

  6. Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Organizers: Centre for the Study of Civil War, International Peace Research Institute, Oslo (PRIO) & Centre Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Series

  7. Parity-violating anomalies and the stationarity of stochastic averages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1988-01-15

    Within the framework of stochastic quantization the parity-violating anomalies in odd space-time dimensions are derived from the asymptotic stationarity of the stochastic average of a certain fermion bilinear. Contrary to earlier attempts, this method yields the correct anomalies for both massive and massless fermions.

  8. Chameleon effect and the Pioneer anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John D. Anderson; J. R. Morris

    2012-04-12

    The possibility that the apparent anomalous acceleration of the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft may be due, at least in part, to a chameleon field effect is examined. A small spacecraft, with no thin shell, can have a more pronounced anomalous acceleration than a large compact body, such as a planet, having a thin shell. The chameleon effect seems to present a natural way to explain the differences seen in deviations from pure Newtonian gravity for a spacecraft and for a planet, and appears to be compatible with the basic features of the Pioneer anomaly, including the appearance of a jerk term. However, estimates of the size of the chameleon effect indicate that its contribution to the anomalous acceleration is negligible. We conclude that any inverse-square component in the anomalous acceleration is more likely caused by an unmodelled reaction force from solar-radiation pressure, rather than a chameleon field effect.

  9. Scalar potential model of the Pioneer Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John C. Hodge

    2007-01-20

    The unexplained sunward acceleration $a_\\mathrm{P}$ of the Pioneer 10 (P10) and the Pioneer 11 (P11) spacecraft remains a mystery. A scalar potential model (SPM) that derived from considerations of galaxy clusters, of redshift, and of H{\\scriptsize{I}} rotation curves of spiral galaxies is applied to the Pioneer Anomaly. Matter is posited to warp the scalar potential $\\rho$ field. The changing $\\rho$ field along the light path causes the Pioneer Anomaly. The SPM is consistent with the general value of $a_\\mathrm{P}$; with the annual periodicity; with the differing $a_\\mathrm{P}$ between the spacecraft; with the discrepancy between {\\textit{Sigma}} and CHASMP programs at P10 (I) and their closer agreement at P10 (III); with the slowly declining $a_\\mathrm{P}$; with the low value of $a_\\mathrm{P}$ immediately before the P11's Saturn encounter; with the high uncertainty in the value of $a_\\mathrm{P}$ obtained during and after the P11's Saturn encounter; and with the cosmological connection suggested by $a_\\mathrm{P} \\approx cH_\\mathrm{o}$. The effect of the $\\rho$ field warp appears as the curvature of space proposed by general relativity (GR). The Hubble Law and $a_\\mathrm{P} \\approx cH_\\mathrm{o}$ are manifestations of the Newtonian spherical property. Therefore, gravitational attraction, the equivalence principle, and the planet ephemeris remain as described by GR. GR corresponds to the SPM in the limit in which the Sources and Sinks may be replaced by a flat and static $\\rho$ field such as between cluster cells and on the Solar System scale at a relatively large distance from a Source or Sink.

  10. Page 1: Atanas Radenski: Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radenski, Atanas

    Page 1: Atanas Radenski: Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Atanas Radenski Chapman University Department of Computer Science://www.chapman.edu/~radenski/ Abstract Software components can be implemented and distributed as collections of classes, then adapted

  11. Lyapunov exponents at anomalies of SL(2,R)-actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermann Schulz-Baldes

    2006-07-12

    Anomalies are known to appear in the perturbation theory for the one-dimensional Anderson model. A systematic approach to anomalies at critical points of products of random matrices is developed, classifying and analysing their possible types. The associated invariant measure is calculated formally. For an anomaly of so-called second degree, it is given by the groundstate of a certain Fokker-Planck equation on the unit circle. The Lyapunov exponent is calculated to lowest order in perturbation theory with rigorous control of the error terms.

  12. Solar Eclipse Anomalies and Wave Refraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alasdair Macleod

    2006-10-23

    There is some inconclusive evidence that measurement devices sensitive to local gravitation exhibit anomalous behaviour during solar eclipses. We investigate if these findings can be incorporated into the standard general relativistic model of gravitation. The General Theory of Relativity (GTR) describes gravitation as the response of an object to local spacetime curvature. Gravitational waves travelling at the speed of light are then a necessary mechanism to maintain the required consistency between local curvature and distant gravitating mass. Gravitational waves will certainly be subject to refraction by bodies such as the moon and we explore if such an effect can result in an error in the apparent position of the sources and thereby give rise to the characteristic pattern of response associated with the eclipse anomaly. It is found there are phenomenological similarities, but only if gravitational waves are considered not merely to respond to spacetime curvature but are also significantly affected by the presence of mass, perhaps in a manner analogous to electromagnetic waves propagating through matter.

  13. Aero-Optical Investigation of Transonic Flow Features And Shock Dynamics on Hemisphere-On-Cylinder Turrets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordeyev, Stanislav

    Aero-Optical Investigation of Transonic Flow Features And Shock Dynamics on Hemisphere, Notre Dame, IN, 46545 Aero-optical environment around a hemisphere-on-cylinder turret with both flat, causing additional aero-optical distortions at side- looking angles. The instantaneous shock locations

  14. The isotopic record of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric carbon monoxide1 since 1950; implications for the CO budget Supplementary Material2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 The isotopic record of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric carbon monoxide1 since 1950 as a supplement to `The isotopic record of Northern Hemisphere23 atmospheric carbon monoxide since 1950 combustion, methane oxidation, NMHC oxidation, biofuel burning, biomass burning, direct57 biogenic

  15. A jet streak circulation associated with a low-latitude jet in the Southern Hemisphere over Africa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Sharon E.

    A jet streak circulation associated with a low-latitude jet in the Southern Hemisphere over Africa 2007 #12;2 Abstract In the Southern Hemisphere over Africa a mid-tropospheric easterly jet stream exists during some months that is analogous to the African Easterly Jet over West Africa. In this note

  16. Diagnosing Northern Hemisphere Jet Portrayal in 17 CMIP3 Global Climate Models: Twenty-First-Century Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    an intensified midlatitude jet stream and an elevated tropopause, as well as a poleward-shifted jet. While both to impact modeled Northern Hemisphere jet stream changes. In particular, El Nin~o­Southern Oscillation in the Northern Hemisphere zonal wind response to climate change. 1. Background Understanding how jet streams

  17. A Cavity-backed Slot Antenna with High Upper Hemisphere Efficiency for Sewer Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    A Cavity-backed Slot Antenna with High Upper Hemisphere Efficiency for Sewer Sensor Network of Technology Atlanta, GA Abstract--A wireless sewer sensor network has been widespread to monitor combined sewer overflow (CSO) causing human health and environmental hazards. To enable the wireless

  18. Negative running of the spectral index, hemispherical asymmetry and the consistency of Planck with large r

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2014-11-01

    Planck favours a negative running of the spectral index, with the likelihood being dominated by low multipoles l ?< 50 and no preference for running at higher l. A negative spectral index is also necessary for the 2- Planck upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r to be consistent with values significantly larger than 0.1. Planck has also observed a hemispherical asymmetry of the CMB power spectrum, again mostly at low multipoles. Here we consider whether the physics responsible for the hemispherical asymmetry could also account for the negative running of the spectral index and the consistency of Planck with a large value of r. A negative running of the spectral index can be generated if the hemispherical asymmetry is due to a scale- and space-dependent modulation which suppresses the CMB power spectrum at low multipoles. We show that the observed hemispherical asymmetry at low l can be generated while satisfying constraints on the asymmetry at higher l and generating a negative spectral index of the right magnitude to account for the Planck observation and to allow Planck to be consistent with a large value of r.

  19. Spray and microjets produced by focusing a laser pulse into a hemispherical drop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Spray and microjets produced by focusing a laser pulse into a hemispherical drop S. T. Thoroddsen,1 surface and the Nd:YAG yttrium aluminum garnet laser pulse propagates through the drop and is focused near applications of laser disrup- tion of droplets is for generation of fine spray to improve combustion efficiency

  20. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny (Bolingbrook, IL); Lambert, John (Wheaton, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A capsule containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

  1. Cortical Projection Topography of the Human Splenium: Hemispheric Asymmetry and Individual Differences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Michael

    Cortical Projection Topography of the Human Splenium: Hemispheric Asymmetry and Individual topography of the human splenium. Homotopic and heterotopic connections were revealed between the splenium difficult to trace the cortical projection topographies of long white matter fiber tracts of the human brain

  2. Neural interactions between motor cortical hemispheres during bimanual and unimanual arm movements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donchin, Opher

    Neural interactions between motor cortical hemispheres during bimanual and unimanual arm movements to address this issue, we simultaneously recorded neuronal activity at multiple sites within the arm area related to the mode of coupling between the two arms. Both the correlations between the movements

  3. eschweizerbart_xxx Are Greenhouse Gas Signals of Northern Hemisphere winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raible, Christoph C.

    eschweizerbart_xxx Are Greenhouse Gas Signals of Northern Hemisphere winter extra-tropical cyclone, Russia 4 Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia 5 Institute of Global Climate and Ecology, Roshydromet and Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia 6 Climate Research

  4. Similarities and Differences in Aero-Optical Structure over Cylindrical and Hemispherical Turrets with a Flat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordeyev, Stanislav

    Similarities and Differences in Aero-Optical Structure over Cylindrical and Hemispherical Turrets, Missouri, USA This paper discusses similarities and differences for aft-looking angles of the aero- optical turret. Both fluid-mechanic and aero-optical data for the base- line flows over the turrets and with two

  5. Future climate change in the Southern Hemisphere: Competing effects of ozone and greenhouse gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arblaster, Julie

    Future climate change in the Southern Hemisphere: Competing effects of ozone and greenhouse gases J 2010; accepted 19 October 2010; published 19 January 2011. [1] Future anthropogenic climate change simulations. Citation: Arblaster, J. M., G. A. Meehl, and D. J. Karoly (2011), Future climate change

  6. Ozone hole and Southern Hemisphere climate change Seok-Woo Son,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Seok-Woo

    Ozone hole and Southern Hemisphere climate change Seok-Woo Son,1 Neil F. Tandon,2 Lorenzo M cooling resulting from ozone depletion has only recently been examined and a comprehensive picture on the stratospheric ozone forcing used, we here show that stratospheric ozone affects the entire atmospheric

  7. Getting it right: Word learning across the hemispheres Arielle Borovsky a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutas, Marta

    Getting it right: Word learning across the hemispheres Arielle Borovsky a,n , Marta Kutas a 20 November 2012 Accepted 31 January 2013 Available online 14 February 2013 Keywords: ERPs N400 Word information about an unknown word's meaning from a highly constraining sentence context with minimal exposure

  8. Climatology of wave breaking and mixing in the Northern Hemisphere summer stratosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Richard Emmett

    1999-01-01

    The cause of loge zonal ozone variations observed by POAM II (Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement II) in the Northern Hemisphere summer stratosphere between 55N?-65N? and ~20-30 km is investigated using the United Kingdom Meteorological Office...

  9. An ERP investigation of the co-development of hemispheric lateralization of face and word recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaut, David C.

    An ERP investigation of the co-development of hemispheric lateralization of face and word observed the standard finding of greater accuracy and a larger N170 ERP component in the left over right event- related potentials (ERPs) have observed a N170 component that is stronger in the LH than

  10. Robust Multivariate Autoregression for Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Product Ratings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the product "coconut-water" over time. Right: De- tected base behavior without anomalies. A real world example for a "coconut water" sold on Amazon (more details about the data are given in the experimental section

  11. Anomaly Cancellation: A Retrospective From a Modern Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2001-07-09

    The mechanism by which gauge and gravitational anomalies cancel in certain string theories is reviewed. The presentation is aimed at theorists who do not necessarily specialize in string theory.

  12. Heterotic instantons and solitons in anomaly-free supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Pesando; A. Tollsten

    1991-10-29

    We extend the classical heterotic instanton solutions to all orders in $\\alpha'$ using the equations of anomaly-free supergravity, and discuss the relation between these equations and the string theory $\\beta$-functions.

  13. Isotopic Anomalies in CP Stars: Helium, Mercury, Platinum, and Calcium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. R. Cowley; S. Hubrig; F. Castelli

    2007-11-15

    We review the classical observational results for isotopic abundance variations for several elements in CP stars. We concentrate on the "newest" anomaly, in calcium. The cosmically very rare isotope, Ca-48 can rival and even dominate the more common, alpha nuclide, Ca-40. Relevant examples are found in the hot, non-magnetic HgMn stars, and the field horizontal-branch star, Feige 86. The calcium anomaly is also present in cool, magnetic stars, including the notorious HD 101065, Przybylski's star.

  14. Fluid/Gravity Correspondence, Second Order Transport and Gravitational Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugenio Megias; Francisco Pena-Benitez

    2013-07-29

    We study the transport properties of a relativistic fluid affected by chiral and gauge-gravitational anomalies. The computation is performed in the framework of the fluid/gravity correspondence for a 5 dim holographic model with Chern-Simons terms in the action. We find new anomalous and non anomalous transport coefficients, as well as new contributions to the existing ones coming from the mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. Consequences for the shear waves dispersion relation are analyzed.

  15. Stress Tensors from Trace Anomalies in Conformal Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Herzog; Kuo-Wei Huang

    2013-04-08

    Using trace anomalies, we determine the vacuum stress tensors of arbitrary even dimensional conformal field theories in Weyl flat backgrounds. We demonstrate a simple relation between the Casimir energy on the real line times a sphere and the type A anomaly coefficient. This relation generalizes earlier results in two and four dimensions. These field theory results for the Casimir are shown to be consistent with holographic predictions in two, four, and six dimensions.

  16. Pioneer Anomaly and the Kuiper Belt mass distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Bertolami; P. Vieira

    2006-06-18

    Pioneer 10 and 11 were the first probes sent to study the outer planets of the Solar System and Pioneer 10 was the first spacecraft to leave the Solar System. Besides their already epic journeys, Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft were subjected to an unaccounted effect interpreted as a constant acceleration toward the Sun, the so-called Pioneer anomaly. One of the possibilities put forward for explaining the Pioneer anomaly is the gravitational acceleration of the Kuiper Belt. In this work we examine this hypothesis for various models for the Kuiper Belt mass distribution. We find that the gravitational effect due to the Kuiper Belt cannot account for the Pioneer anomaly. Furthermore, we have also studied the hypothesis that drag forces can explain the the Pioneer anomaly; however we conclude that the density required for producing the Pioneer anomaly is many orders of magnitude greater than those of interplanetary and interstellar dust. Our conclusions suggest that only through a mission, the Pioneer anomaly can be confirmed and further investigated. If a mission with these aims is ever sent to space, it turns out, on account of our results, that it will be also a quite interesting probe to study the mass distribution of the Kuiper Belt.

  17. TEST OF THE HEMISPHERIC RULE OF MAGNETIC HELICITY IN THE SUN USING THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER (HMI) DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Sun, X.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic twist in solar active regions (ARs) has been found to have a hemispheric preference in sign (hemisphere rule): negative in the northern hemisphere and positive in the southern. The preference reported in previous studies ranges greatly, from ? 58% to 82%. In this study, we examine this hemispheric preference using vector magnetic field data taken by Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and find that 75% ± 7% of 151 ARs studied obey the hemisphere rule, well within the preference range in previous studies. If the sample is divided into two groups—ARs having magnetic twist and writhe of the same sign and having opposite signs—the strength of the hemispheric preference differs substantially: 64% ± 11% for the former group and 87% ± 8% for the latter. This difference becomes even more significant in a sub-sample of 82 ARs having a simple bipole magnetic configuration: 56% ± 16% for the ARs having the same signs of twist and writhe, and 93% with lower and upper confidence bounds of 80% and 98% for the ARs having the opposite signs. The error reported here is a 95% confidence interval. This may suggest that, prior to emergence of magnetic tubes, either the sign of twist does not have a hemispheric preference or the twist is relatively weak.

  18. A hemispherical Langmuir probe array detector for angular resolved measurements on droplet-based laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gambino, Nadia Brandstätter, Markus; Rollinger, Bob; Abhari, Reza

    2014-09-15

    In this work, a new diagnostic tool for laser-produced plasmas (LPPs) is presented. The detector is based on a multiple array of six motorized Langmuir probes. It allows to measure the dynamics of a LPP in terms of charged particles detection with particular attention to droplet-based LPP sources for EUV lithography. The system design permits to temporally resolve the angular and radial plasma charge distribution and to obtain a hemispherical mapping of the ions and electrons around the droplet plasma. The understanding of these dynamics is fundamental to improve the debris mitigation techniques for droplet-based LPP sources. The device has been developed, built, and employed at the Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zürich. The experimental results have been obtained on the droplet-based LPP source ALPS II. For the first time, 2D mappings of the ion kinetic energy distribution around the droplet plasma have been obtained with an array of multiple Langmuir probes. These measurements show an anisotropic expansion of the ions in terms of kinetic energy and amount of ion charge around the droplet target. First estimations of the plasma density and electron temperature were also obtained from the analysis of the probe current signals.

  19. Automatic Construction of Anomaly Detectors from Graphical Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Darmon, David M [ORNL; Shue, Craig A [ORNL; Kelley, Stephen [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Detection of rare or previously unseen attacks in cyber security presents a central challenge: how does one search for a sufficiently wide variety of types of anomalies and yet allow the process to scale to increasingly complex data? In particular, creating each anomaly detector manually and training each one separately presents untenable strains on both human and computer resources. In this paper we propose a systematic method for constructing a potentially very large number of complementary anomaly detectors from a single probabilistic model of the data. Only one model needs to be trained, but numerous detectors can then be implemented. This approach promises to scale better than manual methods to the complex heterogeneity of real-life data. As an example, we develop a Latent Dirichlet Allocation probability model of TCP connections entering Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We show that several detectors can be automatically constructed from the model and will provide anomaly detection at flow, sub-flow, and host (both server and client) levels. This demonstrates how the fundamental connection between anomaly detection and probabilistic modeling can be exploited to develop more robust operational solutions.

  20. Detection of data taking anomalies for the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Castro Vargas Fernandes, Julio; The ATLAS collaboration; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The physics signals produced by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN are acquired and selected by a distributed Trigger and Data AcQuistition (TDAQ) system, comprising a large number of hardware devices and software components. In this work, we focus on the problem of online detection of anomalies along the data taking period. Anomalies, in this context, are defined as an unexpected behaviour of the TDAQ system that result in a loss of data taking efficiency: the causes for those anomalies may come from the TDAQ itself or from external sources. While the TDAQ system operates, it publishes several useful information (trigger rates, dead times, memory usage…). Such information over time creates a set of time series that can be monitored in order to detect (and react to) problems (or anomalies). Here, we approach TDAQ operation monitoring through a data quality perspective, i.e, an anomaly is seen as a loss of quality (an outlier) and it is reported: this information can be used to rea...

  1. Scale-dependent hemispherical asymmetry from general initial state during inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan Firouzjahi; Jinn-Ouk Gong; Mohammad Hossein Namjoo

    2014-11-21

    We consider a general initial state for inflation as the mechanism for generating scale-dependent hemispherical asymmetry. An observable scale-dependent non-Gaussianity is generated that leads to observable hemispherical asymmetry from the super-horizon long mode modulation. We show that the amplitude of dipole asymmetry falls off exponentially on small angular scales which can address the absence of dipole asymmetry at these scales.In addition, depending on the nature of non-vaccum initial state, the amplitude of the dipole asymmetry has oscillatory features which can be detected in a careful CMB map analysis. Furthermore, we show that the non-vacuum initial state provides a natural mechanism for enhancing the super horizon long mode perturbation as required to generate the dipole asymmetry.

  2. Parity-violating anomalies from stochastic quantization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1987-05-15

    It is shown that the anomalous contribution to the vacuum current in (2n+1)-dimensional theories of massive fermions interacting with classical Yang-Mills and gravitational fields at zero and finite temperature is correctly reproduced by the stochastic quantization procedure. For massless fermions an ambiguity arises. This can be traced to the fact that the stochastic time acts as an additional IR cutoff.

  3. Milagro: A TeV Gamma-Ray Monitor of the Northern Hemisphere Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    transients, such as gamma-ray bursts, and all sky surveys are diÆcult. A new type of TeV -ray observatoryMilagro: A TeV Gamma-Ray Monitor of the Northern Hemisphere Sky B.L. Dingus 1 , R. Atkins 1 , W type of very high energy (> a few 100 GeV) gamma-ray observatory, Milagro, has been built with a large

  4. A New Measurement of the Muon Magnetic Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Jungmann; :; g-2 collaboration

    2000-02-08

    The muon magnetic anomaly may contain contributions from physics beyond the standard model. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) a precision experiment aims for a measurement of the muon magnetic anomaly $a_{\\mu}$ to 0.35 ppm, where conclusions about various theoretical approaches beyond standard theory can be expected. The difference between the spin precession and cyclotron frequencies is measured in a magnetic storage ring with highly homogeneous field. Data taking is in progress and part of all recorded data has been analyzed. Combining all experimental results to date yields preliminarily $a_{\\mu}(expt)=1~165~921(5) \\cdot 10^{-9}$ (4 ppm) in agreement with standard theory.

  5. Search for a Standard Explanation of the Pioneer Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John D. Anderson; Eunice L. Lau; Slava G. Turyshev; Philip A. Laing; Michael Martin Nieto

    2002-06-12

    The data from Pioneer 10 and 11 shows an anomalous, constant, Doppler frequency drift that can be interpreted as an acceleration directed towards the Sun of a_P = (8.74 \\pm 1.33) x 10^{-8} cm/s^2. Although one can consider a new physical origin for the anomaly, one first must investigate the contributions of the prime candidates, which are systematics generated on board. Here we expand upon previous analyses of thermal systematics. We demonstrate that thermal models put forth so far are not supported by the analyzed data. Possible ways to further investigate the nature of the anomaly are proposed.

  6. Specific heat anomalies of open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gert-Ludwig Ingold; Peter Hänggi; Peter Talkner

    2009-05-21

    The evaluation of the specific heat of an open, damped quantum system is a subtle issue. One possible route is based on the thermodynamic partition function which is the ratio of the partition functions of system plus bath and of the bath alone. For the free damped particle it has been shown, however, that the ensuing specific heat may become negative for appropriately chosen environments. Being an open system this quantity then naturally must be interpreted as the change of the specific heat obtained as the difference between the specific heat of the heat bath coupled to the system degrees of freedom and the specific heat of the bath alone. While this difference may become negative, the involved specific heats themselves are always positive; thus, the known thermodynamic stability criteria are perfectly guaranteed. For a damped quantum harmonic oscillator, instead of negative values, under appropriate conditions one can observe a dip in the difference of specific heats as a function of temperature. Stylized minimal models containing a single oscillator heat bath are employed to elucidate the occurrence of the anomalous temperature dependence of the corresponding specific heat values. Moreover, we comment on the consequences for the interpretation of the density of states based on the thermal partitionfunction.

  7. Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for total global heat flow Venus, geotherm for total global heat flow, 500 Ma #12;Temperature, Temperature, #12;Earth's modern regional continental geotherms Venusian Geotherms, 500 Ma Temperature, Temperature, After Blatt, Tracy, and Owens Petrology #12;Ca2Mg5Si8

  8. Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Bagchi, Biman, E-mail: bbagchi@sscu.iisc.ernet.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-04-28

    The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments.

  9. Electric Power System Anomaly Detection Using Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    to hijacking of measures, changes in the power network topology (i.e. transmission lines breaking) and unexElectric Power System Anomaly Detection Using Neural Networks Marco Martinelli1 , Enrico Tronci1. The aim of this work is to propose an approach to monitor and protect Electric Power System by learning

  10. Anomaly of Tensionless String in Light-cone Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenta Murase

    2015-03-04

    The classical tensionless string theory has the spacetime conformal symmetry. We expect and require that the quantum tensionless string theory has it too. In the BRST quantization method, the theory has no spacetime conformal anomaly in two dimensions. On the other hand, in the light-cone gauge quantization without the mode expansion, the theory in $D>3$ has the spacetime conformal anomaly in the traceless part of $[\\mathcal{J}^{-I}, \\mathcal{K}^{J}]$ in some operator order. In this paper, we consider a tensionless closed bosonic string in the light-cone gauge and investigate the spacetime conformal anomaly in the theory with the mode expansion. The appearance of the spacetime conformal anomaly in the light-cone gauge is different between the case of $D>3$ and the case of $D=3$ and depends on the choice of the operator order. Therefore we must consider dangerous commutators in the spacetime conformal symmetry of $D>3$ and $D=3$ in each operator order separately. Specifically we calculate dangerous commutators, $[\\mathcal{J}^{-I},\\mathcal{K}^{K}]$ in $D>3$ and $\\tilde{\\mathcal{K}}^{-}\\equiv -i[\\mathcal{J}^{-}, \\tilde{\\mathcal{K}}^{-}]$ and $[\\mathcal{J}^{-}, \\tilde{\\mathcal{K}}^{-}]$ in $D=3$, in two types of the operator order.

  11. Anomaly of Tensionless String in Light-cone Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murase, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    The classical tensionless string theory has the spacetime conformal symmetry. We expect and require that the quantum tensionless string theory has it too. In the BRST quantization method, the theory has no spacetime conformal anomaly in two dimensions. On the other hand, in the light-cone gauge quantization without the mode expansion, the theory in $D>3$ has the spacetime conformal anomaly in the traceless part of $[\\mathcal{J}^{-I}, \\mathcal{K}^{J}]$ in some operator order. In this paper, we consider a tensionless closed bosonic string in the light-cone gauge and investigate the spacetime conformal anomaly in the theory with the mode expansion. The appearance of the spacetime conformal anomaly in the light-cone gauge is different between the case of $D>3$ and the case of $D=3$ and depends on the choice of the operator order. Therefore we must consider dangerous commutators in the spacetime conformal symmetry of $D>3$ and $D=3$ in each operator order separately. Specifically we calculate dangerous commutators...

  12. Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Freshwater Availability Anomalies and Outbreak of Internal War: Results from a Global Spatial Time, Asker, near Oslo, 21­23 June 2005 Organizers: Centre for the Study of Civil War, International Peace War: Results from a Global Spatial Time Series Analysis1 Abstract We investigated the relationship

  13. Stealthy Poisoning Attacks on PCA-based Anomaly Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tygar, Doug

    Stealthy Poisoning Attacks on PCA-based Anomaly Detectors Benjamin I. P. Rubinstein1 Blaine Nelson1 detection, we present and evaluate short-term and long-term data poison- ing schemes that trade-off between poisoning duration and the volume of traffic injected for poisoning. Stealthy Boil- ing Frog attacks

  14. Multivariate SVD Analyses For Network Anomaly Detection Lingsong Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Haipeng

    Multivariate SVD Analyses For Network Anomaly Detection Lingsong Zhang Haipeng Shen Zhengyuan Zhu components analysis on multivariate data rather than univariate data. A multivariate approach allows us by the multivariate outliers, being more representative of anomalous behavior. We can define the signifi- cance

  15. Anomaly-free representations of the holonomy-flux algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SangChul Yoon

    2008-09-07

    We work on the uniqueness, gr-qc/0504147, of representations of the holonomy-flux algebra in loop quantum gravity. We argue that for analytic diffeomorphisms, the flux operators can be only constants as functions on the configuration space in representations with no anomaly, which are zero in the standard representation.

  16. Detecting Anomalies in Unmanned Vehicles Using the Mahalanobis Distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminka, Gal A.

    the vehicles deviations from nominal behavior. I. INTRODUCTION Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and UnmannedDetecting Anomalies in Unmanned Vehicles Using the Mahalanobis Distance Raz Lin, Eliyahu Khalastchi 52900 {linraz,galk}@cs.biu.ac.il Abstract-- The use of unmanned autonomous vehicles is becoming more

  17. The Pioneer Anomaly and a Rotating Gödel Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas L. Wilson; Hans-Joachim Blome

    2009-08-27

    Based upon a simple cosmological model with no expansion, we find that the rotational terms appearing in the G/"odel universe are too small to explain the Pioneer anomaly. Although it contributes, universal rotation is not the cause of the Pioneer effect.

  18. Interpretation of Self-Potential Anomalies Using Constitutive Relationships for Electrochemical and Thermoelectric Coupling Coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R. B.; Kasameyer, P. W.

    1988-01-01

    Constitutive relationships for electrochemical and thermoelectric cross-coupling coefficients are derived using ionic mobilities, applying a general derivative of chemical potential and employing the zero net current condition. The general derivative of chemical potential permits thermal variations which give rise to the thermoelectric effect. It also accounts for nonideal solution behavior. An equation describing electric field strength is similarly derived with the additional assumption of electrical neutrality in the fluid Planck approximation. The Planck approximation implies that self-potential (SP) is caused only by local sources and also that the electric field strength has only first order spatial variations. The derived relationships are applied to the NaCl-KCl concentration cell with predicted and measured voltages agreeing within 0.4 mV. The relationships are also applied to the Long Valley and Yellowstone geothermal systems. There is a high degree of correlation between predicted and measured SP response for both systems, giving supporting evidence for the validity of the approach. Predicted SP amplitude exceeds measured in both cases; this is a possible consequence of the Planck approximation. Electrochemical sources account for more than 90% of the predicted response in both cases while thermoelectric mechanisms account for the remaining 10%; electrokinetic effects are not considered. Predicted electrochemical and thermoelectric voltage coupling coefficients are comparable to values measured in the laboratory. The derived relationships are also applied to arbitrary distributions of temperature and fluid composition to investigate the geometric diversity of observed SP anomalies. Amplitudes predicted for hypothetical saline spring and hot spring environments are less than 40 mV. In contrast, hypothetical near surface steam zones generate very large amplitudes, over 2 V in one case. These results should be viewed with some caution due to the uncertain validity of the Planck approximation for these conditions. All amplitudes are controlled by electrochemical mechanisms. Polarities are controlled by the curvature of the concentration or thermal profile. Concave upward thermal profiles produce positive anomalies, for constant fluid concentrations, whereas concave upward concentration profiles produce negative anomalies. Concave downward concentration profiles are characterized by small negative closures bounding a larger, positive SP anomaly.

  19. Diagenetic and Detrial Origin of Moretane Anomalies through the Permian-Triassic Boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Katherine L.

    Many biogeochemical anomalies coincide with the Late Permian Extinction (LPE; 252.28 Ma). Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the moretane/hopane anomaly that has been identified in samples from Meishan GSSP ...

  20. Interannual variations in the North American monsoon and SST anomalies: A general circulation model study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrara, J. D.; Yu, J.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    the recent notable Midwest summer flood ( drought) events ofdrought in particular—the rain- fall anomalies in the Midwest

  1. Anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors using symbolic time series analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    pulse combustor. Results are presented to exemplify early detection of combustion instability due339 Anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors using symbolic time series analysis S Gupta1 for anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors. The anomaly detection method has been tested on the time

  2. Seasonal persistence of northern low-and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases) Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other trace gases outputs online #12;Seasonal persistence of northern low- and middle-latitude anomalies of ozone and other

  3. Dynamics and instantaneous normal modes in a liquid with density anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Pica Ciamarra; Peter Sollich

    2015-08-19

    We investigate the relation between the dynamical features of a supercooled liquid and those of its potential energy landscape, focusing on a model liquid with density anomalies. We consider, at fixed temperature, pairs of state points with different density but the same diffusion constant, and find that surprisingly they have identical dynamical features at all length and time scales. This is shown by the collapse of their mean square displacements and of their self--intermediate scattering functions at different wavevectors. We then investigate how the features of the energy landscape change with density, and establish that state points with equal diffusion constant have different landscapes. In particular, we find a correlation between the fraction of instantaneous normal modes connecting different energy minima and the diffusion constant, but unlike in other systems these two quantities are not in one--to--one correspondence with each other, showing that additional landscape features must be relevant in determining the diffusion constant.

  4. Phonon anomalies and superconductivity in the Heusler compound YPd?Sn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tütüncü, H. M. [Sakarya Üniversitesi, Fen-Edebiyat Fakültesi, Fizik Bölümü, 54187, Adapazar? (Turkey); Srivastava, G. P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-07

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties of YPd?Sn in the Heusler structure using a generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory and the ab initio pseudopotential method. The electronic results indicate that the density of states at the Fermi level is primarily derived from Pd d states, which hybridize with Y d and Sn p states. Using our structural and electronic results, phonons and electron-phonon interactions have been studied by employing a linear response approach based on the density functional theory. Phonon anomalies have been observed for transverse acoustic branches along the [110] direction. This anomalous dispersion is merely a consequence of the strong coupling. By integrating the Eliashberg spectral function, the average electron-phonon coupling parameter is found to be ?=0.99. Using this value, the superconducting critical temperature is calculated to be 4.12 K, in good accordance with the recent experimental value of 4.7 K.

  5. Position space CMB anomalies from multi-stream inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi, E-mail: yi.wang@ipmu.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Temporary domain walls are produced during the bifurcation era of multi-stream inflation. The observational effects from such a domain wall to spectator field perturbations are calculated, and we expect the inflationary perturbations share similarities with the case of spectator field. A domain wall induces a preferred direction in the sky, affecting the angular distribution of perturbations. A correlated suppression of multipoles together with an alignment of multipole moments on the preferred direction are generated. Other observational aspects of multi-stream inflation, including hemispherical asymmetry and cold spot are also briefly reviewed.

  6. Probing the Local Bubble with Diffuse Interstellar Bands. I. Project overview and Southern hemisphere survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Mandy; Farhang, Amin; Javadi, Atefeh; Khosroshahi, Habib G; Sarre, Peter J; Smith, Keith T

    2015-01-01

    We have conducted a high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of 670 nearby early-type stars, to map Diffuse Interstellar Band (DIB) absorption in and around the Local Bubble. The project started with a Southern hemisphere survey conducted at the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope and has since been extended to an all-sky survey using the Isaac Newton Telescope. In this first paper in the series, we introduce the overall project and present the results from the Southern hemisphere survey. We make available a catalogue of equivalent-width measurements of the DIBs at 5780, 5797, 5850, 6196, 6203, 6270, 6283 \\& 6614 \\AA, the interstellar Na\\,{\\sc i} D lines at 5890 \\& 5896 \\AA, and the stellar He\\,{\\sc i} line at 5876 \\AA. We find that the 5780 \\AA\\ DIB is relatively strong throughout, as compared to the 5797 \\AA\\ DIB, but especially within the Local Bubble and at the interface with more neutral medium. The 6203 \\AA\\ DIB shows a similar behaviour, but with respect to the 6196 \\AA\\ D...

  7. Global surface temperature changes since the 1850s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Temperature data from land and marine areas form the basis for many studies of climatic variations on local, regional and hemispheric scales, and the global mean temperature is a fundamental measure of the state of the climate system. In this paper it is shown that the surface temperature of the globe has warmed by about 0.5{degrees}C since the mid-nineteenth century. This is an important part of the evidence in the {open_quote}global warming{close_quote} debate. How certain are we about the magnitude of the warming? Where has it been greatest? In this paper, these and related issues will be addressed.

  8. ${\\cal N} = 1$ Euler Anomaly Flow from Dilaton Effective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochazka, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We consider ${\\cal N} =1$ supersymmetric gauge theories in the conformal window. The running of the gauge coupling is absorbed into the metric by applying a suitable matter superfield- and Weyl-transformation. The computation becomes equivalent to one of a free theory in a curved background carrying the information of the renormalisation group flow. We use the techniques of conformal anomaly matching and dilaton effective action, by Komargodski and Schwimmer, to rederive the difference of the Euler anomaly coefficient $\\Delta a \\equiv a_{\\rm UV} - a_{\\rm IR} $ for the ${\\cal N} =1$ theory. The structure of $\\Delta a $ is therefore in one-to-one correspondence with the Wess-Zumino dilaton action.

  9. Anomaly-Free Supersymmetric Models in Six Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    1995-12-11

    The conditions for the cancellation of all gauge, gravitational, and mixed anomalies of $N=1$ supersymmetric models in six dimensions are reviewed and illustrated by a number of examples. Of particular interest are models that cannot be realized perturbatively in string theory. An example of this type, which we verify satisfies the anomaly cancellation conditions, is the K3 compactification of the $SO(32)$ theory with small instantons recently proposed by Witten. When the instantons coincide it has gauge group $SO(32) \\times Sp(24)$. Two new classes of models, for which non-perturbative string constructions are not yet known, are also presented. They have gauge groups $SO(2n+8)\\times Sp(n)$ and $SU(n)\\times SU(n)$, where $n$ is an arbitrary positive integer.

  10. Anomaly and the self-energy of electric charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeri P. Frolov; Andrei Zelnikov

    2012-10-26

    We study the self energy of a charged particle located in a static D-dimensional gravitational field. We show that the energy functional for this problem is invariant under an infinite dimensional (gauge) group of transformations parameterized by one scalar function of (D-1)-variables. We demonstrate that the problem of the calculation of the self energy for a pointlike charge is equivalent to the calculation of the fluctuations $$ for an effective (D-1)-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory. Using point-splitting regularization we obtain an expression for the self energy and show, that it possesses anomalies. Explicit calculation of the self energy and its anomaly is done for the higher dimensional Majumdar-Papapetrou spacetimes.

  11. Geometric Phase and Chiral Anomaly in Path Integral Formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuo Fujikawa

    2007-11-16

    All the geometric phases, adiabatic and non-adiabatic, are formulated in a unified manner in the second quantized path integral formulation. The exact hidden local symmetry inherent in the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation defines the holonomy. All the geometric phases are shown to be topologically trivial. The geometric phases are briefly compared to the chiral anomaly which is naturally formulated in the path integral.

  12. Structure order, local potentials, and physical anomalies of water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q Sun

    2014-07-11

    Hydrogen-bond forms a pair of asymmetric, coupled, H-bridged oscillators with ultra-short-range interactions and memory. hydrogen bond cooperative relaxation and the associated binding electron entrapment and nonbonding electron polarization discriminate water and ice from other usual materials in the physical anomalies. As a strongly correlated fluctuating system, water prefers the statistically mean of tetrahedrally-coordinated structure with a supersolid skin that is elastic, polarized, ice like, hydrophobic, with 3/4 density.

  13. Automatic anomaly detection in high energy collider data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon de Visscher; Michel Herquet

    2011-04-13

    We address the problem of automatic anomaly detection in high energy collider data. Our approach is based on the random generation of analytic expressions for kinematical variables, which can then be evolved following a genetic programming procedure to enhance their discriminating power. We apply this approach to three concrete scenarios to demonstrate its possible usefulness, both as a detailed check of reference Monte-Carlo simulations and as a model independent tool for the detection of New Physics signatures.

  14. Conjecture on the physical implications of the scale anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher T.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Murray Gell-Mann, after co-inventing QCD, recognized the interplay of the scale anomaly, the renormalization group, and the origin of the strong scale, {Lambda}{sub QCD}. I tell a story, then elaborate this concept, and for the sake of discussion, propose a conjecture that the physical world is scale invariant in the classical, {h_bar}, limit. This principle has implications for the dimensionality of space-time, the cosmological constant, the weak scale, and Planck scale.

  15. On the possible onset of the Pioneer anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael R. Feldman; John D. Anderson

    2015-06-24

    We explore the possibility that the observed onset of the Pioneer anomaly after Saturn encounter by Pioneer 11 is not necessarily due to mismodeling of solar radiation pressure but instead reflects a physically relevant characteristic of the anomaly itself. We employ the principles of a recently proposed cosmological model termed "the theory of inertial centers" along with an understanding of the fundamental assumptions taken by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to attempt to model this sudden onset. Due to an ambiguity that arises from the difference in the DSN definition of expected light-time with light-time according to the theory of inertial centers, we are forced to adopt a seemingly arbitrary convention to relate DSN-assumed clock-rates to physical clock-rates for this model. We offer a possible reason for adopting the convention employed in our analysis; however, we remain skeptical. Nevertheless, with this convention, one finds that this theory is able to replicate the previously reported Hubble-like behavior of the "clock acceleration" for the Pioneer anomaly as well as the sudden onset of the anomalous acceleration after Pioneer 11 Saturn encounter. While oscillatory behavior with a yearly period is also predicted for the anomalous clock accelerations of both Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11, the predicted amplitude is an order of magnitude too small when compared with that reported for Pioneer 10.

  16. Observation of the Chern-Simons gauge anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunil Mittal; Sriram Ganeshan; Jingyun Fan; Abolhassan Vaezi; Mohammad Hafezi

    2015-04-22

    Topological Quantum Field Theories (TQFTs) are powerful tools to describe universal features of topological orders. A hallmark example of a TQFT is the 2+1 D Chern-Simons (CS) theory which describes topological properties of both integer and fractional quantum Hall effects. The gauge invariant form of the CS theory with boundaries, encompassing both edge and bulk terms, provides an unambiguous way to relate bulk topological invariants to the edge dynamics. This bulk-edge correspondence is manifested as a gauge anomaly of the chiral dynamics at the edge, and provides a direct insight into the bulk topological order. Such an anomaly has never been directly observed in an experiment. In this work, we experimentally implement the integer quantum Hall model in a photonic system, described by the corresponding CS theory. By selectively manipulating and probing the edge, we exploit the gauge anomaly of the CS theory, for the first time. The associated spectral edge flow allows us to unambiguously measure topological invariants, i.e., the winding number of the edge states. This experiment provides a new approach for direct measurement of topological invariants, independent of the microscopic details, and thus could be extended to probe strongly correlated topological orders.

  17. An Analysis of Anomaly Cancellation for Theories in D=10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Antonelli

    2015-07-21

    We prove that the swampland for D=10 N=1 SUGRA coupled to D=10 N=1 SYM is only populated by U(1)^496 and E_8 x U(1)^248. With this goal in mind, we review the anomalies for classical and exceptional groups, retrieving trace identities up to the sixth power of the curvature for each class of groups. We expand this idea for low-dimensional groups, for which the trace of the sixth power is known to factorize, and we retrieve such factorization. We obtain the total anomaly polynomials for individual low dimensional groups and combinations of them and finally we investigate their non-factorization, in such a way that U(1)^496and E_8 xU(1)^248 are non-trivially shown to be the only anomaly-free theories allowed in D=10. Using the method developed for checking the factorization of gauge theories, we retrieve the Green-Schwarz terms for the two theories populating the swampland.

  18. Anomaly Mediated Gaugino Mass and Path-Integral Measure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keisuke Harigaya; Masahiro Ibe

    2014-09-16

    In recent years, there have been controversy concerning the anomaly mediated gaugino mass in the superspace formalism of supergravity. In this paper, we reexamine the gaugino mass term in this formalism by paying particular attention to symmetry which controls gaugino masses in supergravity. We first discuss super-Diffeomorphism invariance of path-integral measures of charged superfields. As we will show, the super-Diffeomorphism invariant measure is not invariant under a super-Weyl transformation, which is the origin of the anomaly mediated gaugino mass. We show how the anomaly mediated gaugino mass is expressed as a local operator in a Wilsonian effective action in a super-Diffeomorphism covariant way. We also obtain a gaugino mass term independent of the gauge choice of the fictitious super-Weyl symmetry in the super-Weyl compensator formalism, which reproduces the widely accepted result. Besides, we discuss how to reconcile the gaugino mass term in the local Wilsonian effective action and the gaugino mass term appearing in a non-local 1PI quantum effective action.

  19. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  20. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-09-14

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  1. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-05-24

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  2. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  3. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  4. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  5. Spin and phonon anomalies in epitaxial self-assembled CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-BaTiO{sub 3} multiferroic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, C. Y.; Chen, H. R.; Hsieh, W. F., E-mail: wfhsieh@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta Hsueh Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Cheng, H. M.; Tsai, L. N. [Material and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan (China); Huang, K. F.; Lai, C. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 31013, Taiwan (China); Chu, Y. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-23

    Temperature dependent magnetic and phonon anomalies in epitaxial self-assembled CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) rods embedded in BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) matrix nanostructures were investigated. The temperature dependence of A{sub 1}(2TO) phonon frequency of BTO indicates that the BTO matrix experiences structural transformations. The lattice strain produced during the structural transformations drives spin reorientation in CFO rods, resulting in anomalous changes of magnetization. Through correlating the phonon anomalies with the increase of in-plane spin ordering, we show the spin-phonon coupling induces the softening of A{sub 1g} and A{sub 1}(2TO) phonons. It suggests that spin strongly couples with lattice strain and phonons in this nanostructure.

  6. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformationBio-GasIllinois:EnergyIdahoTechnology Venture(Redirected

  7. 2013 IEEE INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON MACHINE LEARNING FOR SIGNAL PROCESSING, SEPT. 2225, 2013, SOUTHAMPTON, UK SPARSE CODING WITH ANOMALY DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hel-Or, Yacov

    ] utilized sparse representations to analyze stochastic processes over graphs for anomaly detection in SmartGrids

  8. A coaxial waveguide opening into a ground plane and covered by a dielectric hemisphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Joseph Edward

    1985-01-01

    ) Substituting Es into (24), multiplying through by P?(cos8)sin8d8 and integrating over [0, x] gives f Q [A J?'(k, () ? B?H?P(k, 8)]P?'(cos8)P' (cos8)sfn8d8 = u 2~ 1 f 8(8- ?;) P' (cos8)sr'n8 d8. o (26) Using the orthogonality relation for Legendre functions.... the surface of the dielectric hemisphere. The relations are lim [He ] ? He ) e] = 0 lim [Ee(, , +e ? Ee]l?, e] = 0 (37) where He=He +He (3s) 18 Es = Es + Es (39) which after some simplification gives the equa. tions C?J?(k, c) ? D?H (k, c) = ? B...

  9. Further Observational Evidence of Hadley Cell Widening in the Southern Hemisphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jung; Son, Seok-Woo; Lu, Jian; Min, Seung-Ki

    2014-04-16

    Various observational and modeling studies have shown that the Hadley cell (HC) has widened during the past few decades. Here, we present further observational evidence of the widening of the HC in the Southern Hemisphere by tracking the location of the subtropical ridge. A robust and significant poleward shift of the southern edge of the HC has been observed during the austral summer over the past three decades with a shift of 0.22 degrees per decade having occurred between 1980 and 2012, primarily from the South Atlantic Ocean to Australia. In other seasons, significant changes in the southern edge of the HC have not been observed, with a discernable regional trend having only occurred in a limited region. The comparison of these results with those derived from reanalysis data and possible causes for the summer HC expansion are briefly discussed.

  10. CHINESE JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICS Vol.49, No.3, 2006, pp: 588598 REGIONAL DIFFERENCE OF SUMMER AIR TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE TEMPERATURE SUN Jian-Qi1,2 WANG Hui-Jun1 1 State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling, the temporal- spatial distributions of summer air temperature (SAT) are investigated. It is found TEMPERATURE ANOMALIES IN NORTHEAST CHINA AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO ATMOSPHERIC GENERAL CIRCULATION AND SEA

  11. 2008 Global Surface Temperature in GISS Analysis James Hansen, Makiko Sato, Reto Ruedy, Ken Lo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of the year. La Nina and El Nino are opposite phases of a natural oscillation of tropical temperatures, La oscillation is made clear by the average temperature anomaly over the global ocean (Figure 2, bottom). The "El Nino of the century", in 1997-98, stands out, as well as the recent La Nina. Figure 3 compares 2008

  12. Multivariate forecast of winter monsoon rainfall in India using SST anomaly as a predictor: Neurocomputing and statistical approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goutami Chattopadhyay; Surajit Chattopadhyay; Rajni Jain

    2009-10-28

    In this paper, the complexities in the relationship between rainfall and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies during the winter monsoon (November-January) over India were evaluated statistically using scatter plot matrices and autocorrelation functions.Linear as well as polynomial trend equations were obtained and it was observed that the coefficient of determination for the linear trend was very low and it remained low even when polynomial trend of degree six was used. An exponential regression equation and an artificial neural network with extensive variable selection were generated to forecast the average winter monsoon rainfall of a given year using the rainfall amounts and the sea surface temperature anomalies in the winter monsoon months of the previous year as predictors. The regression coefficients for the multiple exponential regression equation were generated using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The artificial neural network was generated in the form of a multiplayer perceptron with sigmoid non-linearity and genetic-algorithm based variable selection. Both of the predictive models were judged statistically using the Willmott index, percentage error of prediction, and prediction yields. The statistical assessment revealed the potential of artificial neural network over exponential regression.

  13. TeV GAMMA-RAY SURVEY OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY R. Atkins,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to search the entire northern hemisphere for such objects. The search for short bursts of TeV gamma rays hasTeV GAMMA-RAY SURVEY OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY R. Atkins,1,2 W) are presented. The data have been searched for steady point sources of TeV gamma rays between declinations of 1

  14. REDUCING STRUCTURAL VARIATION TO DETERMINE THE GENETICS OF WHITE MATTER INTEGRITY ACROSS HEMISPHERES A DTI STUDY OF 100 TWINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    HEMISPHERES ­ A DTI STUDY OF 100 TWINS Neda Jahanshad1 , Agatha D. Lee1 , Natasha Lepore1 , Yi-Yu Chou1 , Margaret J. Wright3 , Guillermo Sapiro4 , Christophe Lenglet4,5 , Paul M. Thompson1 1 Laboratory of Neuro

  15. On the vacuum fluctuations, Pioneer Anomaly and Modified Newtonian Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

    2011-02-08

    We argue that the so-called "Pioneer Anomaly" is related to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Our approach is based on the hypothesis of the gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter, what allows considering, the virtual particle-antiparticle pairs in the physical vacuum, as gravitational dipoles. Our simplified calculations indicate that the anomalous deceleration of the Pioneer spacecrafts could be a consequence of the vacuum polarization in the gravitational field of the Sun. At the large distances, the vacuum polarization by baryonic matter could mimic dark matter what opens possibility that dark matter do not exist, as advocated by the Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND).

  16. Electromagnetic triangle anomaly and neutral pion condensation in QCD vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Gaoqing

    2015-01-01

    We study the QCD vacuum structure under the influence of an electromagnetic field with a nonzero second Lorentz invariant $I_2=\\vec{E}\\cdot{\\vec B}$. We show that the presence of $I_2$ can induce neutral pion ($\\pi^0$) condensation in the QCD vacuum through the electromagnetic triangle anomaly. Within the frameworks of chiral perturbation theory at leading small-momenta expansion as well as the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model at leading $1/N_c$ expansion, we quantify the dependence of the $\\pi^0$ condensate on $I_2$. The stability of the $\\pi^0$-condensed vacuum against the Schwinger charged pair production due to electric field is also discussed.

  17. Investigating the Spectral Anomaly with Different Reactor Antineutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Buck; Antoine P. Collin; Julia Haser; Manfred Lindner

    2015-12-21

    The spectral shape of reactor antineutrinos measured in recent experiments shows anomalies in the neutrino flux predictions. New precision measurements of the reactor neutrino spectra as well as more complete input in nuclear data bases are needed to resolve the observed discrepancies between flux models and experimental results. We combine experiments at reactors which are highly enriched in ${}^{235}$U with commercial reactors with typically lower enrichment to gain new insights into the origin of the anomalous neutrino spectrum. As an example, we discuss the option of a direct comparison of the measured shape in the currently running Double Chooz near detector and the upcoming Stereo experiment.

  18. Ward identities and chiral anomalies for coupled fermionic chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, L. C.; Ferraz, A.; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2013-12-15

    Coupled fermionic chains are usually described by an effective model written in terms of bonding and anti-bonding fermionic fields with linear dispersion in the vicinities of the respective Fermi points. We derive for the first time exact Ward Identities (WI) for this model, proving the existence of chiral anomalies which verify the Adler-Bardeen non-renormalization property. Such WI are expected to play a crucial role in the understanding of the thermodynamic properties of the system. Our results are non-perturbative and are obtained analyzing Grassmann functional integrals by means of constructive quantum field theory methods.

  19. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung [W& M

    2014-11-01

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  20. Diffraction anomalies in hybrid structures based on chalcogenide-coated opal photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voronov, M M; Yakovlev, S A; Kurdyukov, D A; Golubev, V G

    2014-01-01

    The results of spectroscopic studies of the diffraction anomalies (the so-called resonant Wood anomalies) in spatially-periodic hybrid structures based on halcogenide (GST225)-coated opal films of various thickness are presented. A theoretical analysis of spectral-angular dependencies of the Wood anomalies has been made by means of a phenomenological approach using the concept of the effective refractive index of waveguiding surface layer.

  1. Phase Diagram and Waterlike Anomalies in Core-Softened Shoulder-Dumbbell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    ). Consequently, very complex thermodynamic, dynamic or macroscopic features in principle could be captured density anomaly. Liquid sulfur displays a sharp minimum in the density (Sauer & Borst, 1967), related

  2. Primordial quantum nonequilibrium and large-scale cosmic anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Colin; Antony Valentini

    2015-06-12

    We study incomplete relaxation to quantum equilibrium at long wavelengths, during a pre-inflationary phase, as a possible explanation for the reported large-scale anomalies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Our scenario makes use of the de Broglie-Bohm pilot-wave formulation of quantum theory, in which the Born probability rule has a dynamical origin. The large-scale power deficit could arise from incomplete relaxation for the amplitudes of the primordial perturbations. We show, by numerical simulations for a spectator scalar field, that if the pre-inflationary era is radiation dominated then the deficit in the emerging power spectrum will have a characteristic shape (an inverse-tangent dependence on wavenumber k, with oscillations). It is found that our scenario is able to produce a power deficit in the observed region and of the observed (approximate) magnitude for an appropriate choice of cosmological parameters. We also discuss the large-scale anisotropy, which might arise from incomplete relaxation for the phases of the primordial perturbations. We present numerical simulations for phase relaxation, and we show how to define characteristic scales for amplitude and phase nonequilibrium. The extent to which the data might support our scenario is left as a question for future work. Our results suggest that we have a potentially viable model that might explain two apparently independent cosmic anomalies by means of a single mechanism.

  3. Rate of gravitational inflaton decay via gauge trace anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Watanabe

    2011-04-26

    We analyze decay processes of the inflaton field, phi, during the coherent oscillation phase after inflation in f(phi)R gravity. It is inevitable that the inflaton decays gravitationally into gauge fields in the presence of f(phi)R coupling. We show a concrete calculation of the rate that the inflaton field decays into a pair of gauge fields via the trace anomaly. Comparing this new decay channel via the anomaly with the channels from the tree-level analysis, we find that the branching ratio crucially depends on masses and the internal multiplicities (flavor quantum number) of decay product particles. While the inflaton decays exclusively into light fields, heavy fields still play a role in quantum loops. We argue that this process in principle allows us to constrain the effects of arbitrary heavy particles in the reheating. We also apply our analysis to Higgs inflation, and find that the gravitational decay rate would never exceed gauge interaction decay rates if quantum gravity is unimportant.

  4. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Othman, M. N. K. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  5. Deep-tow study of magnetic anomalies in the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tominaga, Masako

    2006-10-30

    The Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) is a region of low amplitude, difficult-to-correlate magnetic anomalies located over Jurassic oceanic crust. We collected 1200 km of new deep-tow magnetic anomaly profiles over the Pacific JQZ that complement 2 deep...

  6. Gravity anomalies of the Northern Hawaiian Islands: Implications on the shield evolutions of Kauai and Niihau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    Gravity anomalies of the Northern Hawaiian Islands: Implications on the shield evolutions of Kauai reveal two positive residual gravity anomalies in the Northern Hawaiian Islands: one over Kaua'i, the other between the islands of Kaua'i and Ni'ihau. These gravitational highs are similar in size

  7. Anomalies in 2008 Upwelled Water Properties on the Newport Hydrographic Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    the Earth's rotation and southward winds drive warm and relatively fresh surface water offshore being of the start of sustained southward winds. A comparison of anomalies in ocean properties and cumulative along-shore wind stress anomalies during the upwelling season aims to quantify how the coastal ocean responds

  8. Optical response of grating-coupler-induced intersubband resonances: The role of Wood's anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Optical response of grating-coupler-induced intersubband resonances: The role of Wood's anomalies L of Wood's anomalies. S0163-1829 97 05403-9 I. INTRODUCTION The optical and electronic properties at, e.g., a modulation- doped semiconductor heterojunction have been widely stud- ied in the recent

  9. Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoso, Agus

    Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination Shayne), Meridional movement of wind anomalies during ENSO events and their role in event termination, Geophys. Res, setting up conditions favorable for the termination of ENSO warm events. The basic principles of the RDO

  10. Anomaly Detection Based on Indicators Aggregation Tsirizo Rabenoro Jer^ome Lacaille Marie Cottrell Fabrice Rossi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Fabrice

    ) and helping the engine owner to implement efficiently the adapted maintenance operations (fixing the source of the anomaly) are of crucial importance to reduce the costs attached to unscheduled maintenance. This paper a vast scientific literature [1]. Among the possible choices, statistical tech- niques for anomaly

  11. Geophys. J. Int. (1995) 122,982-990 Topography and geoid due to lithospheric mass anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01

    the broad seismic velocity anomalies in the interior of the Earth. Geophysicists have related them). Nevertheless, the interpretation of the global geoid in terms of mantle mass anomalies was less successful topography undulations. However, geological records indicate that the relative sea-level variations recorded

  12. Superconnections, Anomalies and Non-BPS Brane Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Szabo

    2001-10-09

    The properties of brane-antibrane systems and systems of unstable D-branes in Type II superstring theory are investigated using the formalism of superconnections. The low-energy open string dynamics is shown to be probed by generalized Dirac operators. The corresponding index theorems are used to compute the chiral gauge anomalies in these systems, and hence their gravitational and Ramond-Ramond couplings. A spectral action for the generalized Dirac operators is also computed and shown to exhibit precisely the expected processes of tachyon condensation on the brane worldvolumes. The Chern-Simons couplings are thereby shown to be naturally related to Fredholm modules and bivariant K-theory, confirming the expectations that D-brane charge is properly classified by K-homology.

  13. Superconnections, Anomalies and Non-BPS Brane Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szabó, R J

    2001-01-01

    The properties of brane-antibrane systems and systems of unstable D-branes in Type II superstring theory are investigated using the formalism of superconnections. The low-energy open string dynamics is shown to be probed by generalized Dirac operators. The corresponding index theorems are used to compute the chiral gauge anomalies in these systems, and hence their gravitational and Ramond-Ramond couplings. A spectral action for the generalized Dirac operators is also computed and shown to exhibit precisely the expected processes of tachyon condensation on the brane worldvolumes. The Chern-Simons couplings are thereby shown to be naturally related to Fredholm modules and bivariant K-theory, confirming the expectations that D-brane charge is properly classified by K-homology.

  14. Anderson localization and Brewster anomalies in photonic disordered quasiperiodic lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes-Gomez, E.; Bruno-Alfonso, A.; Cavalcanti, S. B.; Oliveira, L. E.

    2011-09-15

    A comprehensive study of the properties of light propagation through one-dimensional photonic disordered quasiperiodic superlattices, composed of alternating layers with random thicknesses of air and a dispersive metamaterial, is theoretically performed. The superlattices consist of the successive stacking of N quasiperiodic Fibonacci or Thue-Morse heterostructures. The width of the slabs in the photonic superlattice may randomly fluctuate around its mean value, which introduces a structural disorder into the system. It is assumed that the left-handed layers have a Drude-type dispersive response for both the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability, and Maxwell's equations are solved for oblique incidence by using the transfer-matrix formalism. The influence of both quasiperiodicity and structural disorder on the localization length and Brewster anomalies are thoroughly discussed.

  15. Pair creation in an electric flux tube and chiral anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi [International Economics and Politics, Nishogakusha University, Ohi Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8585 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Using the chiral anomaly, we discuss the pair creation of massless fermions under the effect of a magnetic field B-vector when an electric flux tube E-vector parallel to B-vector is switched on. The tube is axially symmetric and infinitely long. For the constraint B>>E, we can analytically obtain the spatial and temporal behaviors of the number density of the fermions, the azimuthal magnetic field generated by the fermions, and so on. We find that the lifetime t{sub c} of the electric field becomes shorter as the width of the tube becomes narrower. Applying it to the plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, we find that the color electric field decays quickly such that t{sub c}{approx_equal}Q{sub s}{sup -1}, in which Q{sub s} is the saturation momentum.

  16. Hydrocarbon anomaly in soil gas as near-surface expressions of upflows and outflows in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, H.L.; Higashihara, M.; Klusman, R.W.; Voorhees, K.J.; Pudjianto, R.; Ong, J

    1996-01-24

    A variety of hydrocarbons, C1 - C12, have been found in volcanic gases (fumarolic) and in geothermal waters and gases. The hydrocarbons are thought to have come from products of pyrolysis of kerogen in sedimentary rocks or they could be fed into the geothermal system by the recharging waters which may contain dissolved hydrocarbons or hydrocarbons extracted by the waters from the rocks. In the hot geothermal zone, 300°+ C, many of these hydrocarbons are in their critical state. It is thought that they move upwards due to buoyancy and flux up with the upflowing geothermal fluids in the upflow zones together with the magmatic gases. Permeability which could be provided by faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures are thought to provide pathways for the upward flux. A sensitive technique (Petrex) utilizing passive integrative adsorption of the hydrocarbons in soil gas on activated charcoal followed by desorption and analysis of the hydrocarbons by direct introduction mass spectrometry allows mapping of the anomalous areas. Surveys for geothermal resources conducted in Japan and in Indonesia show that the hydrocarbon anomaly occur over known fields and over areas strongly suspected of geothermal potential. The hydrocarbons found and identified were n-paraffins (C7-C9) and aromatics (C7-C8). Detection of permeable, i.e. active or open faults, parts of older faults which have been reactivated, e.g. by younger intersecting faults, and the area surrounding these faulted and permeable region is possible. The mechanism leading to the appearance of the hydrocarbon in the soil gas over upflow zones of the geothermal reservoir is proposed. The paraffins seems to be better pathfinders for the location of upflows than the aromatics. However the aromatics may, under certain circumstances, give better indications of the direction of the outflow of the geothermal system. It is thought that an upflow zone can be defined when conditions exist where the recharging waters containing the hydrocarbons feed into the geothermal kitchen. The existence of open and active faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures allow sufficient permeability for the gases to flux up and express themselves at the surface as hydrocarbon anomaly in the soil gas. When any of the requirements is absent, i.e. in the absence of the recharging waters, hydrocarbons, temperature, or permeability, no anomaly can be expected. It assumes a dynamic convective system, i.e. recharging waters, upflow and outflow. The anomalies however can define to a certain extent, regions of geothermal upflow, buoyant transport of gases, and frequently down-gradient of cooling waters.

  17. IceVeto: Extended PeV neutrino astronomy in the Southern Hemisphere with IceCube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auffenberg, Jan; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    IceCube, the world's largest high-energy neutrino observatory, built at the South Pole, recently reported evidence of an astrophysical neutrino flux extending to PeV energies in the Southern Hemisphere. This observation raises the question of how the sensitivity in this energy range could be further increased. In the down-going sector, in IceCube's case the Southern Hemisphere, backgrounds from atmospheric muons and neutrinos pose a challenge to the identification of an astrophysical neutrino flux. The IceCube analysis, that led to the evidence for astrophysical neutrinos, is based on an in-ice veto strategy for background rejection. One possibility available to IceCube is the concept of an extended surface detector, IceVeto, which could allow the rejection of a large fraction of atmospheric backgrounds, primarily for muons from cosmic ray (CR) air showers as well as from neutrinos in the same air showers. Building on the experience of IceTop/IceCube, possibly the most cost-effective and sensitive way to build IceVeto is as an extension of the IceTop detector, with simple photomultiplier based detector modules for CR air shower detection. Initial simulations and estimates indicate that such a veto detector will significantly increase the sensitivity to an astrophysical flux of ?{sub ?} induced muon tracks in the Southern Hemisphere compared to current analyses. Here we present the motivation and capabilities based on initial simulations. Conceptual ideas for a simplified surface array will be discussed briefly.

  18. Elastic models of the glass transition applied to a liquid with density anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pica Ciamarra; Peter Sollich

    2015-08-19

    Elastic models of the glass transition relate the relaxation dynamics and the elastic properties of structural glasses. They are based on the assumption that the relaxation dynamics occurs through activated events in the energy landscape whose energy scale is set by the elasticity of the material. Here we investigate whether such elastic models describe the relaxation dynamics of systems of particles interacting via a purely repulsive harmonic potential, focusing on a volume fraction and temperature range that is characterized by entropy--driven water--like density anomalies. We do find clear correlations between relaxation time and diffusivity on the one hand, and plateau shear modulus and Debye--Waller factor on the other, thus supporting the validity of elastic models of the glass transition. However, we also show that the plateau shear modulus is not related to the features of the underlying energy landscape of the system, at variance with recent results for power--law potentials. This challenges the common potential energy landscape interpretation of elastic models.

  19. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 265.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 265.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probable of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecendented rate. The average change in phase is not coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration.

  20. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, D.J. [AT& T Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1995-04-07

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 365.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 365.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probably of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecedented rate. The average change in phase is now coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. 80 refs., 13 figs.

  1. Cold Weather I usually start my climate presentations with a chart showing maps of the surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    . The 10-11 year cycle of solar irradiance has a just barely detectable effect on global temperature in the Illinois Wesleyan presentation. A global warming much smaller than weather fluctuations has the potential. Figure 1. Global distributions of surface temperature anomalies of the last four months (GISS analysis

  2. Deep-Sea Research I 51 (2004) 13471366 The Bering Strait's grip on the northern hemisphere climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Boer, Agatha M.

    2004-01-01

    engine. Here, warm surface water is transformed to deep water by releasing great quantities of heat that, during interglacial periods (when the BS is open) perturbations in North Atlantic Deep Water, 2002). The accompanying salinity anomaly renders the surface water too fresh for deep convection

  3. Comparison of observed and general circulation model derived continental subsurface heat flux in the Northern Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    and compared to those obtained from subsurface geothermal data. Since GCMs have bottom boundary conditions. In addition, the agreement between the LSM surface fluxes and the borehole temperature reconstructed fluxes

  4. SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon Rueff; Lyle Roybal; Denis Vollmer

    2013-01-01

    There is a significant need to protect the nation’s energy infrastructures from malicious actors using cyber methods. Supervisory, Control, and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems may be vulnerable due to the insufficient security implemented during the design and deployment of these control systems. This is particularly true in older legacy SCADA systems that are still commonly in use. The purpose of INL’s research on the SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) project was to determine if and how data compression techniques could be used to identify and protect SCADA systems from cyber attacks. Initially, the concept was centered on how to train a compression algorithm to recognize normal control system traffic versus hostile network traffic. Because large portions of the TCP/IP message traffic (called packets) are repetitive, the concept of using compression techniques to differentiate “non-normal” traffic was proposed. In this manner, malicious SCADA traffic could be identified at the packet level prior to completing its payload. Previous research has shown that SCADA network traffic has traits desirable for compression analysis. This work investigated three different approaches to identify malicious SCADA network traffic using compression techniques. The preliminary analyses and results presented herein are clearly able to differentiate normal from malicious network traffic at the packet level at a very high confidence level for the conditions tested. Additionally, the master dictionary approach used in this research appears to initially provide a meaningful way to categorize and compare packets within a communication channel.

  5. Large scale CMB anomalies from thawing cosmic strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Ringeval; Daisuke Yamauchi; Jun'ichi Yokoyama; Francois R. Bouchet

    2015-10-07

    Cosmic strings formed during inflation are expected to be either diluted over super-Hubble distances, i.e., invisible today, or to have crossed our past light cone very recently. We discuss the latter situation in which a few strings imprint their signature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies after recombination. Being almost frozen in the Hubble flow, these strings are quasi static and evade almost all of the previously derived constraints on their tension while being able to source large scale anisotropies in the CMB sky. Using a local variance estimator on thousand of numerically simulated Nambu-Goto all sky maps, we compute the expected signal and show that it can mimic a dipole modulation at large angular scales while being negligible at small angles. Interestingly, such a scenario generically produces one cold spot from the thawing of a cosmic string loop. Mixed with anisotropies of inflationary origin, we find that a few strings of tension GU = O(1) x 10^(-6) match the amplitude of the dipole modulation reported in the Planck satellite measurements and could be at the origin of other large scale anomalies.

  6. Effects of nanopore and fluid structure on anomalies and phase transitions of confined core-softened fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leandro B. Krott; José Rafael Bordin; Ney Marçal Barraz Jr; Marcia C. Barbosa

    2015-02-11

    We use Molecular Dynamics simulations to study how the nanopore and the fluid structures affects the dynamic, thermodynamic and structural properties of a confined anomalous fluid. The fluid is modeled using an effective pair potential derived from the ST4 atomistic model for water. This system exhibits density, structural and dynamical anomalies and the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points similar to the quantities observed in bulk water. The confinement is modeled both by smooth and structured walls. The temperatures of extremum density and diffusion for the confined fluid show a shift to lower values while the pressures move to higher amounts for both smooth and structured confinement. In the case of smooth walls, the critical points and the limit between fluid and amorphous phases show a non-monotonic change in the temperatures and pressures when the the nanopore size is increase. In the case of structured walls the pressures and temperatures of the critical points varies monotonicaly with the porous size. Our results are explained on basis of the competition between the different length scales of the fluid and the wall-fluid interaction.

  7. Basin Research (1999) 11, 285290 Gravity anomalies, subsidence history and the tectonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    1999-01-01

    Basin Research (1999) 11, 285­290 DISCUSSION Gravity anomalies, subsidence history and the tectonic' (Madon &and calculate the stretching factor (b), Madon & Watts (1998) conducted subsidence time were then matched to best-fit DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS ANDtheoretical subsidence curves

  8. Z' Bosons, the NuTeV Anomaly, and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanowitz, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    NuTeV Anomaly, and the Higgs Boson Mass Michael S. Chanowitzpredicted value of the Higgs boson mass, from ? 60 to ? 120from an increase in the Higgs boson mass. There is a vast

  9. Empirical vertical structure of density anomaly in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Current, Carole Louise

    1993-01-01

    Climatological vertical structure of density anomaly in the Gulf of Mexico is realistically characterized in a form useful for calibration and/or verification of numerical circulation models, employing a new method that ...

  10. Anomalies in the theory of viscous energy losses due to shear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    resonators. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalies in the theory of viscous energy losses due to shear in rotational MEMS resonators. In this paper, the effect of...

  11. Self-energy anomaly of an electric pointlike dipole in three-dimensional static spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeri P. Frolov; Andrey A. Shoom; Andrei Zelnikov

    2013-03-07

    We calculate the self-energy anomaly of a pointlike electric dipole located in a static $(2+1)$-dimensional curved spacetime. The energy functional for this problem is invariant under an infinite-dimensional (gauge) group of transformations parameterized by one scalar function of two variables. We demonstrate that the problem of the calculation of the self-energy anomaly for a pointlike dipole can be reduced to the calculation of quantum fluctuations of an effective two-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory. We reduced the problem in question to the calculation of the conformal anomaly of an effective scalar field in two dimensions and obtained an explicit expression for the self-energy anomaly of an electric dipole in an asymptotically flat, regular $(2+1)$-dimensional spacetime which may have electrically neutral black-hole-like metrics with regular Killing horizon.

  12. Temperature System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1 Soil Water and Temperature

  13. Addressing the Challenges of Anomaly Detection for Cyber Physical Energy Grid Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A; Melin, Alexander M; Czejdo, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of cyber communications networks and physical control systems within the energy smart grid introduces a number of new risks. Unfortunately, these risks are largely unknown and poorly understood, yet include very high impact losses from attack and component failures. One important aspect of risk management is the detection of anomalies and changes. However, anomaly detection within cyber security remains a difficult, open problem, with special challenges in dealing with false alert rates and heterogeneous data. Furthermore, the integration of cyber and physical dynamics is often intractable. And, because of their broad scope, energy grid cyber-physical systems must be analyzed at multiple scales, from individual components, up to network level dynamics. We describe an improved approach to anomaly detection that combines three important aspects. First, system dynamics are modeled using a reduced order model for greater computational tractability. Second, a probabilistic and principled approach to anomaly detection is adopted that allows for regulation of false alerts and comparison of anomalies across heterogeneous data sources. Third, a hierarchy of aggregations are constructed to support interactive and automated analyses of anomalies at multiple scales.

  14. An Anzatz about Gravity, Cosmology, and the Pioneer Anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murad, Paul [Morningstar Applied Physics Inc., LLC, Vienna, VA 22182 (Austria)

    2010-01-28

    The Pulsar 1913+16 binary system may represent a 'young' binary system where previously it is claimed that the dynamics are due to either a third body or a gravitational vortex. Usually a binary system's trajectory could reside in a single ellipse or circular orbit; the double ellipse implies that the 1913+16 system may be starting to degenerate into a single elliptical trajectory. This could be validated only after a considerably long time period. In a majority of binary star systems, the weights of both stars are claimed by analysis to be the same. It may be feasible that the trajectory of the primary spinning star could demonstrate repulsive gravitational effects where the neutron star's high spin rate induces a repulsive gravitational source term that compensates for inertia. If true, then it provides evidence that angular momentum may be translated into linear momentum as a repulsive source that has propulsion implications. This also suggests mass differences may dictate the neutron star's spin rate as an artifact of a natural gravitational process. Moreover, the reduced matter required by the 'dark' mass hypothesis may not exist but these effects could be due to repulsive gravity residing in rotating celestial bodies.The Pioneer anomaly observed on five different deep-space spacecraft, is the appearance of a constant gravitational force directed toward the sun. Pioneer spacecraft data reveals that a vortex-like magnetic field exists emanating from the sun. The spiral arms of the Sun's magnetic vortex field may be causal to this constant acceleration. This may profoundly provide a possible experimental verification on a cosmic scale of Gertsenshtein's principle relating gravity to electromagnetism. Furthermore, the anomalous acceleration may disappear once the spacecraft passes out into a magnetic spiral furrow, which is something that needs to be observed in the future. Other effects offer an explanation from space-time geometry to the Yarkovsky thermal effects are discussed.

  15. High-resolution multifluid simulations of the plasma environment near the Martian magnetic anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnett , Erika

    ] and solar wind electrons rapidly lose energy through impact ionization with exospheric neutrals [Crider et simulations of the solar wind interaction at Mars during the southern hemisphere summer solstice indicate, with less solar wind and more of ionospheric origin. The solar wind density is reduced by a factor of 3

  16. Finite Temperature Sum Rules in Lattice Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2007-11-05

    We derive non-perturbative sum rules in SU($N$) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature. They relate the susceptibilities of the trace anomaly and energy-momentum tensor to temperature derivatives of the thermodynamic potentials. Two of them have been derived previously in the continuum and one is new. In all cases, at finite latttice spacing there are important corrections to the continuum sum rules that are only suppressed by the bare coupling $g_0^2$. We also show how the discretization errors affecting the thermodynamic potentials can be controlled by computing these susceptibilities.

  17. Beryllium anomalies in solar-type field stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; G. Israelian; S. Randich; R. J. Garcia Lopez; R. Rebolo

    2004-08-05

    We present a study of beryllium (Be) abundances in a large sample of field solar-type dwarfs and sub-giants spanning a large range of effective temperatures. The analysis shows that Be is severely depleted for F stars, as expected by the light-element depletion models. However, we also show that Beryllium abundances decrease with decreasing temperature for stars cooler than $\\sim$6000 K, a result that cannot be explained by current theoretical models including rotational mixing, but that is, at least in part, expected from the models that take into account internal wave physics. In particular, the light element abundances of the coolest and youngest stars in our sample suggest that Be, as well as lithium (Li), has already been burned early during their evolution. Furthermore, we find strong evidence for the existence of a Be-gap for solar-temperature stars. The analysis of Li and Be abundances in the sub-giants of our sample also shows the presence of one case that has still detectable amounts of Li, while Be is severely depleted. Finally, we compare the derived Be abundances with Li abundances derived using the same set of stellar parameters. This gives us the possibility to explore the temperatures for which the onset of Li and Be depletion occurs.

  18. Multiscale Variability of the River Runoff System in China and Its Long-Term Link to Precipitation and Sea Surface Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    and Sea Surface Temperature YONGKANG XUE,*, SHUFEN SUN,# K.-M. LAU,@ JINJUN JI,*, ISABELLE POCCARD,* RENHE with precipitation and sea surface temperature (SST) at the continental scale. Monthly mean data from 72 runoff­north dipole anomaly patterns for the first two runoff EOF's spatial distributions have been identified

  19. Apparatus and method for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1981-05-22

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  20. Improving Cyber-Security of Smart Grid Systems via Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Domain Knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

    2012-08-01

    The planned large scale deployment of smart grid network devices will generate a large amount of information exchanged over various types of communication networks. The implementation of these critical systems will require appropriate cyber-security measures. A network anomaly detection solution is considered in this work. In common network architectures multiple communications streams are simultaneously present, making it difficult to build an anomaly detection solution for the entire system. In addition, common anomaly detection algorithms require specification of a sensitivity threshold, which inevitably leads to a tradeoff between false positives and false negatives rates. In order to alleviate these issues, this paper proposes a novel anomaly detection architecture. The designed system applies the previously developed network security cyber-sensor method to individual selected communication streams allowing for learning accurate normal network behavior models. Furthermore, the developed system dynamically adjusts the sensitivity threshold of each anomaly detection algorithm based on domain knowledge about the specific network system. It is proposed to model this domain knowledge using Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic rules, which linguistically describe the relationship between various features of the network communication and the possibility of a cyber attack. The proposed method was tested on experimental smart grid system demonstrating enhanced cyber-security.

  1. Susceptibility and Knight-shift anomalies in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, J.; Tewari, S.; Ruvalds, J.; Rieck, C.T.

    1995-06-01

    The unconventional temperature variation of the static susceptibility {chi}({ital T}) that has been discovered in various copper oxide superconductors is explained in terms of a model density of states that has a step shape at an energy threshold {ital E}{sub 0} along with a logarithmic Van Hove singularity at the same {ital E}{sub 0}. Calculations of {chi}({ital T}) and the Knight shift above the superconducting transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} yield good fits to the YBCO, BSCCO, and LSCO data by adjusting only the Fermi energy {mu} in correspondence to the oxygen or Sr content, respectively. When {mu} is right on or slightly below the Van Hove singularity, an upturn in {chi} occurs as the temperature {ital T} is lowered. By contrast, when {mu} is slightly above the threshold energy {ital E}{sub 0}, a downturn in {chi} is achieved as {ital T} is lowered. A correlation of these phenomena with experimental data provides insight into the proximity of the Van Hove singularity to {mu} in several cuprate superconductors. The YBCO and TBCO cuprates with the higher {ital T}{sub {ital c}} values exhibit a nearly constant susceptibility that suggests a Fermi energy well removed from the Van Hove singularity. The sensitivity of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} as well as the susceptibility to chemical changes may provide tests of electronic mechanisms of electron pairing as well as the BCS theory.

  2. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  3. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO? climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modestmore »reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO? induced global warming.« less

  4. New Horizons in Gravity: The Trace Anomaly, Dark Energy and Condensate Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottola, Emil

    2010-01-01

    General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at macroscopic distance scales and near event horizons. These arise from the conformal scalar degrees of freedom in the extended effective field theory of gravity generated by the trace anomaly of massless quantum fields in curved space. The origin of these conformal scalar degrees of freedom as massless poles in two-particle intermediate states of anomalous amplitudes in flat space is exposed. At event horizons the conformal anomaly scalar degrees of freedom can have macroscopically large effects on the geometry, potentially removing the classical event horizon of black hole and cosmological spacetimes, replacing them with a quantum boundary layer where the effective value of the gravitational vacuum energy density can change. In the effective theory, the cosmological term becomes a dynamical condensate, whose value depends upon boundary conditions near the horizon. In the conformal phase where the anomaly induced fluctutations dominate, and the conden...

  5. Electric/magnetic duality for chiral gauge theories with anomaly cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan De Rydt; Torsten T. Schmidt; Mario Trigiante; Antoine Van Proeyen; Marco Zagermann

    2009-02-07

    We show that 4D gauge theories with Green-Schwarz anomaly cancellation and possible generalized Chern-Simons terms admit a formulation that is manifestly covariant with respect to electric/magnetic duality transformations. This generalizes previous work on the symplectically covariant formulation of anomaly-free gauge theories as they typically occur in extended supergravity, and now also includes general theories with (pseudo-)anomalous gauge interactions as they may occur in global or local N=1 supersymmetry. This generalization is achieved by relaxing the linear constraint on the embedding tensor so as to allow for a symmetric 3-tensor related to electric and/or magnetic quantum anomalies in these theories. Apart from electric and magnetic gauge fields, the resulting Lagrangians also feature two-form fields and can accommodate various unusual duality frames as they often appear, e.g., in string compactifications with background fluxes.

  6. Saharan dust as a causal factor of hemispheric asymmetry in aerosols and cloud cover over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Da Sliva, Arlindo; Starobinets, Boris; Long, Charles N.; Kalashnikova, Olga; Alpert, Pinhas

    2015-07-09

    Meridional distribution of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30°N – 30°S) was analyzed to assess seasonal variations of meridional AOT asymmetry. Ten-year MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero) data (July 2002 – June 2012) confirms that the Sahara desert emits a significant amount of dust into the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean. Only over the Atlantic Ocean did MERRAero show that desert dust dominates other aerosol species and is responsible for meridional aerosol asymmetry between the tropical North and South Atlantic. Over the 10-year period under consideration, both MISR measurements and MERRAero data showed a pronounced meridional AOTmore »asymmetry. The meridional AOT asymmetry, characterized by the hemispheric ratio (RAOT) of AOT averaged separately over the North and over the South Atlantic, was about 1.7. Seasonally, meridional AOT asymmetry over the Atlantic was the most pronounced between March and July, when dust presence is maximal (RAOT ranged from 2 to 2.4). There was no noticeable meridional aerosol asymmetry in total AOT from September to October. During this period the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to total AOT in the South Atlantic was comparable to the contribution of dust aerosols to total AOT in the North Atlantic. During the same 10-year period, MODIS cloud fraction (CF) data showed that there was no noticeable asymmetry in meridional CF distribution in different seasons (the hemispheric ratio of CF ranged from 1.0 to 1.2). MODIS CF data illustrated significant cloud cover (CF of 0.7 – 0.9) with limited precipitation ability along the Saharan Air Layer.« less

  7. Planck CMB anomalies: astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects and the curse of masking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Paykari, P.; Sureau, F.; Bobin, J. E-mail: jstarck@cea.fr E-mail: florent.sureau@cea.fr

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes will be made available for download here http://www.cosmostat.org/anomaliesCMB.html.

  8. Self-potential, soil co2 flux, and temperature on masaya volcano, nicaragua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Connor, C.; St-Amand, K.; Stix, J.; Spinner, W.

    2003-07-01

    We investigate the spatial relationship between self-potential (SP), soil CO{sub 2} flux, and temperature and the mechanisms that produce SP anomalies on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua. We measured SP, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes (<1 to 5.0 x 10{sup 4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), and temperatures (26 to 80 C) within an area surrounding a normal fault, adjacent to Comalito cinder cone (2002-2003). These variables are well spatially correlated. Wavelengths of SP anomalies are {le}100 m, and high horizontal SP gradients flank the region of elevated flux and temperature. Carbon isotopic compositions of soil CO{sub 2} ({delta}{sup 13}C = -3.3 to -1.1{per_thousand}) indicate a deep gas origin. Given the presence of a deep water table (100 to 150 m), high gas flow rates, and subsurface temperatures above liquid boiling points, we suggest that rapid fluid disruption is primarily responsible for positive SP anomalies here. Concurrent measurement of SP, soil CO{sub 2} flux, and temperature may be a useful tool to monitor intrusive activity.

  9. Path-Integral Derivation of the Non-relativistic Scale Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris L. Lin; Carlos. R. Ordonez

    2015-04-21

    In this paper we calculate the scale anomaly for a quantum field theoretic 2D-nonrelativistic Bose gas with contact interactions using Fujikawa's method, both in vacuum and in many-body systems. The use of path integrals for these problems is novel and motivated by a recently developed path-integral framework for addressing questions about scaling in these systems. A natural class of regulators is found that produces the correct value of the anomaly traditionally calculated via other methods, e.g., diagrammatically via the beta function.

  10. Rayleigh lidar observations of mesosphere temperature structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Dao, P.D.; Mcnutt, R.T.; Klemetti, W.; Moskowitz, W.; Davidson, G. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)]|[PhotoMetrics, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Ground-based observations of atmospheric density profiles to 92 km were obtained for four successive seasons between summer 1989 and spring 1990. These results were obtained with a powerful Rayleigh lidar facility located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, Ohio). This instrument combined a 14-W XeF laser transmitter with a 2.54-m receiver mirror to observe returns from altitudes between 40 and 95 km. Analysis of the scale height dependence of the density profiles produced temperatures with a measurement error of about 5 K (approximately 2.5%) at 90 km when the lidar data was averaged for 20 min. and smoothed in height over 2.7 km. Examination of these profiles for the total of 18 nights showed that there often existed in the mesophere a layer of enhanced temperatures when compared with the U.S. standard profile. The layer centroid height was about 85 km for summer and 70 to 75 km for winter. Data obtained for the equinoctial periods showed the amplitude of these layers to be weak. The winter temperature profiles showed evidence for long-period waves passing through the region of the thermal anomaly while the equinox profiles revealed more sporadic wave activity with shorter vertical wavelengths. Both the winter and summer temperature data displayed regions where the observed lapse rate approached the adiabatic lapse rate. In the summer the wave activity near the iversion layer was weak.

  11. Variability and Predictability of West African Droughts: A Review on the Role of Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    study in climate and desertification. J. Hydrol. , 188– 189,regional climate? Global Desertification: Do Humans Cause

  12. High-temperature phase transformation and topochemical nature in ferroelastic (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kwang-Sei; Oh, In-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon

    2014-04-01

    The electrical conductivity of ferroelastic ammonium sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} revealed an anomaly at around 130 °C (=403 K, T{sub P}) on heating with large and irreversible thermal hysteresis through thermal cycle. Ferroelastic domain walls and surface morphology of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} were investigated by hot-stage polarizing microscopy. Structural phase transition from an orthorhombic ferroelastic phase to a hexagonal paraelastic phase was not identified at T{sub P} upon heating. On further heating above T{sub P}, microscopic spots appeared and grew on the crystal surface, suggesting that the high-temperature anomaly at T{sub P} was an indication of an onset of thermal decomposition controlled by topochemical factors. The increase of electrical conductivity above T{sub P} was attributed to proton migration. - Graphical abstract: Surface morphology of the (100) face of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} on heating, showing chemical reaction at the surface. - Highlights: • We investigate the high-temperature phase transformation of ammonium sulfate. • The increasing conductivity upon heating is attributed to proton migration. • Structural phase transition from orthorhombic to hexagonal phase is not confirmed. • High-temperature anomaly is related to an onset of thermal decomposition. • The nature of the high-temperature anomaly is topochemical controlled by defects.

  13. El Nino et les anomalies de hauteur de mer dans l'ocan pacifique en Novembre 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dintrans, Boris

    « El Nino et les anomalies de hauteur de mer dans l'océan pacifique en Novembre 2009 » (En cm) Les anomalies de hauteur de mer dans l'océan pacifique permettent d'anticiper l'intensité du phénomène El Nino. Au début de l'été 2009, les modèles de prévisions avaient anticipé un phénomène El Nino modéré pour L

  14. Uranium groundwater anomalies and active normal faulting W. Plastino G. F. Panza C. Doglioni M. L. Frezzotti A. Peccerillo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uranium groundwater anomalies and active normal faulting W. Plastino · G. F. Panza · C. Doglioni to crustal defor- mation. It is shown in this paper that uranium groundwater anomalies, which were observed of the area, these measurements indicate that uranium may be used as a possible strain meter in extensional

  15. Crustal structure and thermal anomalies of the Dunedin Region, South Island, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okaya, David

    Crustal structure and thermal anomalies of the Dunedin Region, South Island, New Zealand Nicola J to investigate a transect along the southeast coast of South Island, New Zealand. The specific focus mantle-melting event. High heat flow recorded in the Dunedin region is consistent with a hot body

  16. The contributions of atmosphere and ocean to North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water volume anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The formation of Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) in the western North Atlantic has been attributed to both are the subject of a study, the CLIvar MOde Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE), which includes a large fieldThe contributions of atmosphere and ocean to North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water volume anomalies

  17. Anomaly Detection Using Temporal Data Mining in a Smart Home Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Anomaly Detection Using Temporal Data Mining in a Smart Home Environment V. Jakkula and D.J. Cook of smart home technologies, many people with cognitive and physical disabilities can lead independent lives to automatically learn models of resident behaviour in a smart home, and that the results can be used to perform

  18. THEMIS observations of a hot flow anomaly: Solar wind, magnetosheath, and ground-based measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mende, Stephen B.

    solar wind, and it has been suggested that they have a significant impact on the mag- netosphere [eTHEMIS observations of a hot flow anomaly: Solar wind, magnetosheath, and ground-based measurements and the subsequent downstream response. THEMIS-A, in the solar wind, observed classic HFA signatures. Isotropic

  19. The anomaly-free quantization of two-dimensional relativistic string. I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Vergeles

    1998-12-21

    An anomaly-free quantum theory of a relativistic string is constructed in two-dimensional space-time. The states of the string are found to be similar to the states of a massless chiral quantum particle. This result is obtained by generalizing the concept of an ``operator'' in quantum field theory.

  20. Characterization and removal of errors due to local magnetic anomalies in directional drilling Nathan Hancock*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization and removal of errors due to local magnetic anomalies in directional drilling of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines Summary Directional drilling has evolved over the last few decades utilizes a technique known as magnetic Measurement While Drilling (MWD). Vector measurements of geomagnetic

  1. Quantum chaos in hydrogen: Dynamical-group approach and a resonance anomaly in the Brody parameter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegerfeldt, G.C.; Henneberg, R. (Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Goettingen, West Germany (DE))

    1990-01-15

    We apply the dynamical group of the hydrogen atom to level statistics of hydrogen in strong magnetic fields and study the transition region between regularity and chaos in detail. We find a resonancelike anomaly in the Brody parameter which coincides to an amazing accuracy with the appearance of a low rational winding number.

  2. CORRELATION OF METEOSAT-3 ANOMALIES WITH DATA FROM THE SPACE ENVIRONMENT MONITOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    CORRELATION OF METEOSAT-3 ANOMALIES WITH DATA FROM THE SPACE ENVIRONMENT MONITOR D.J.Rodgers1 , A Meteosat satellite, Meteosat-2, carried a space environment monitor (SEM-1) (Ref. 11) that measured origins. This study was carried out to see what parameters measured by the on-board Space Environment

  3. Gravity/Topography Transfer Function and Isostatic Geoid Anomalies (Copyright 2002, David T. Sandwell)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 Gravity/Topography Transfer Function and Isostatic Geoid Anomalies (Copyright 2002, David T to develop a linear relationship between gravity and topography. This relationship can be used in a variety of ways. (1) If both the topography and gravity are measured over an area that is several times greater

  4. Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Local Frequency Based Estimators for Anomaly Detection in Oil and Gas Applications Alexander Singh industrial applications such as the smart grid and oil and gas are continuously monitored. The massive to positively impact the bottom line. In the oil and gas industry, modern oil rigs are outfitted with thousands

  5. Topographically-Based Real-Time Traffic Anomaly Detection in a Metropolitan Highway System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    Topographically-Based Real-Time Traffic Anomaly Detection in a Metropolitan Highway System Rajmonda metropolitan area. Our Chicago Alert System (CAS) considers both the spatial and temporal aspects of the data of attack, the need for real-time traffic management is crucial. Real-time traffic management encompasses

  6. HPNAIDM: The High-Performance Network Anomaly/Intrusion Detection and Mitigation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yan [Northwesten University] [Northwesten University

    2013-12-05

    Identifying traffic anomalies and attacks rapidly and accurately is critical for large network operators. With the rapid growth of network bandwidth, such as the next generation DOE UltraScience Network, and fast emergence of new attacks/virus/worms, existing network intrusion detection systems (IDS) are insufficient because they: • Are mostly host-based and not scalable to high-performance networks; • Are mostly signature-based and unable to adaptively recognize flow-level unknown attacks; • Cannot differentiate malicious events from the unintentional anomalies. To address these challenges, we proposed and developed a new paradigm called high-performance network anomaly/intrustion detection and mitigation (HPNAIDM) system. The new paradigm is significantly different from existing IDSes with the following features (research thrusts). • Online traffic recording and analysis on high-speed networks; • Online adaptive flow-level anomaly/intrusion detection and mitigation; • Integrated approach for false positive reduction. Our research prototype and evaluation demonstrate that the HPNAIDM system is highly effective and economically feasible. Beyond satisfying the pre-set goals, we even exceed that significantly (see more details in the next section). Overall, our project harvested 23 publications (2 book chapters, 6 journal papers and 15 peer-reviewed conference/workshop papers). Besides, we built a website for technique dissemination, which hosts two system prototype release to the research community. We also filed a patent application and developed strong international and domestic collaborations which span both academia and industry.

  7. Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil A. B profile across the Parnaiba cratonic basin in NorthEast Brazil. The purpose of this project is to acquire margin of Parnaíba Basin, Brazil. Geophysics 64: 337-356. Ussami N, Cogo de Sa N, Molina EC. 1993

  8. Design and Evaluation of an Online Anomaly Detector for Distributed Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xubin "Ben"

    Design and Evaluation of an Online Anomaly Detector for Distributed Storage Systems Xin Chen1, and storage devices, are difficult to diagnose and isolate in distributed storage systems. In this paper, we and accurately identify the faulty sources in a system node of a distributed storage system. Our method exploits

  9. Seismo-geomagnetic anomalies and M P 5.0 earthquakes observed in Taiwan during 19882001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    Seismo-geomagnetic anomalies and M P 5.0 earthquakes observed in Taiwan during 1988­2001 J.Y. Liu a, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan b Center for Space and Remote Sensing Research, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan c Institute of Geophysics, National Central University

  10. Author's personal copy Imaging of Vp, Vs, and Poisson's ratio anomalies beneath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seno, Tetsuzo

    and Kirishima. The subducting Philippine Sea slab is imaged generally as a high-velocity anomaly down to a depth's ratio could be caused by fluid-filled cracks induced by dehydration from the Philippine Sea slab; Shikoku; Philippine Sea; Seismic tomography; Poisson's ratio; Serpentinized forearc mantle; Low

  11. Genesis of the Iceland Melt Anomaly by Plate Tectonic G. R. Foulger1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Don L.

    Genesis of the Iceland Melt Anomaly by Plate Tectonic Processes G. R. Foulger1 , James H. Natland3 252-21, Pasadena, CA 91125, dla@gps.caltech.edu Abstract Iceland is the best-studied, currently erupted in Iceland has geochemistry little different from normal mid-ocean ridge basalt and the detailed

  12. Nucleosynthetic osmium isotope anomalies in acid leachates of the Murchison meteorite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucleosynthetic osmium isotope anomalies in acid leachates of the Murchison meteorite L. Reisberg a of the total leachable osmium (weighted average of the leachates) is close to that of bulk chondrites in meteorites in sufficient quantities to influence the Os isotopic compositions of the leachates. Nevertheless

  13. GBAS Differentially Corrected Positioning Service Ionospheric Anomaly Errors Evaluated in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . Young Shin Park is a Ph.D. Candidate in Aeronautics and Astronautics in the Global Positioning System after application of differential corrections is small. However, during solar storms and in geomagnetic done to mitigate the potential impact of errors induced by ionospheric anomalies on the precision

  14. Commensurability effects in one-dimensional Anderson localization: Anomalies in eigenfunction statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravtsov, V.E., E-mail: kravtsov@ictp.it [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 586, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, 2 Kosygina st., 117940 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yudson, V.I., E-mail: yudson@isan.troitsk.ru [Institute for Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Troitsk, Moscow reg. (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Statistics of normalized eigenfunctions in one-dimensional Anderson localization at E = 0 is studied. > Moments of inverse participation ratio are calculated. > Equation for generating function is derived at E = 0. > An exact solution for generating function at E = 0 is obtained. > Relation of the generating function to the phase distribution function is established. - Abstract: The one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model (AM), i.e. a tight-binding chain with random uncorrelated on-site energies, has statistical anomalies at any rational point f=(2a)/({lambda}{sub E}) , where a is the lattice constant and {lambda}{sub E} is the de Broglie wavelength. We develop a regular approach to anomalous statistics of normalized eigenfunctions {psi}(r) at such commensurability points. The approach is based on an exact integral transfer-matrix equation for a generating function {Phi}{sub r}(u, {phi}) (u and {phi} have a meaning of the squared amplitude and phase of eigenfunctions, r is the position of the observation point). This generating function can be used to compute local statistics of eigenfunctions of 1d AM at any disorder and to address the problem of higher-order anomalies at f=p/q with q > 2. The descender of the generating function P{sub r}({phi}){identical_to}{Phi}{sub r}(u=0,{phi}) is shown to be the distribution function of phase which determines the Lyapunov exponent and the local density of states. In the leading order in the small disorder we derived a second-order partial differential equation for the r-independent ('zero-mode') component {Phi}(u, {phi}) at the E = 0 (f=1/2 ) anomaly. This equation is nonseparable in variables u and {phi}. Yet, we show that due to a hidden symmetry, it is integrable and we construct an exact solution for {Phi}(u, {phi}) explicitly in quadratures. Using this solution we computed moments I{sub m} = N< vertical bar {psi} vertical bar {sup 2m}> (m {>=} 1) for a chain of the length N {yields} {infinity} and found an essential difference between their m-behavior in the center-of-band anomaly and for energies outside this anomaly. Outside the anomaly the 'extrinsic' localization length defined from the Lyapunov exponent coincides with that defined from the inverse participation ratio ('intrinsic' localization length). This is not the case at the E = 0 anomaly where the extrinsic localization length is smaller than the intrinsic one. At E = 0 one also observes an anomalous enhancement of large moments compatible with existence of yet another, much smaller characteristic length scale.

  15. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg1/ #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. #12;MORE EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  16. Critical Heat Flux for Downward-Facing Boiling on a Coated Hemispherical Vessel Surrounded by an Insulation Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-05-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate the effects of surface coating and an enhanced insulation structure on the downward facing boiling process and the critical heat flux on the outer surface of a hemispherical vessel. Steady-state boiling tests were conducted in the Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling (SBLB) facility using an enhanced vessel/insulation design for the cases with and without vessel coatings. Based on the boiling data, CHF correlations were obtained for both plain and coated vessels. It was found that the nucleate boiling rates and the local CHF limits for the case with micro-porous layer coating were consistently higher than those values for a plain vessel at the same angular location. The enhancement in the local CHF limits and nucleate boiling rates was mainly due to the micro-porous layer coating that increased the local liquid supply rate toward the vaporization sites on the vessel surface. For the case with thermal insulation, the local CHF limit tended to increase from the bottom center at first, then decrease toward the minimum gap location, and finally increase toward the equator. This nonmonotonic behavior, which differed significantly from the case without thermal insulation, was evidently due to the local variation of the two-phase motions in the annular channel between the test vessel and the insulation structure.

  17. Contribution of circulation changes to recent and future temperature extremes in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contribution of circulation changes to recent and future temperature extremes in Europe J. Cattiaux.cattiaux@meteo.fr The exceptionally mild autumn 2006 T2m anomaly: on average 2.5K (3.2 ), and exceeding 5K over North-Western Europe = 0.7) misses the recent warming (Fig 4). Recent warming and extremes in Europe Figure 2. T2m (left

  18. Supplemental Fig. S1: Angle maps (left hemisphere). The color overlay on the inflated occipital-parietal cortical surface shows the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wandell, Brian A.

    posterior dorsal Supplemental Fig. S1: Angle maps (left hemisphere). The color overlay TO-1 TO-2 V3d LO-1 LO-2 TO-1 TO-2 V3d #12;12° Supplemental Fig. S2: Eccentricity maps (left effective stimulus eccentricity. Other aspects as in Supplemental Fig. S1. S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S7 S6 LO-1 LO-2 TO

  19. Capacitance probe for detection of anomalies in non-metallic plastic pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Spenik, James L. (Morgantown, WV); Condon, Christopher M. (Morgantown, WV); Anderson, Rodney (Grafton, WV); Driscoll, Daniel J. (Morgantown, WV); Fincham, Jr., William L. (Fairmont, WV); Monazam, Esmail R. (Morgantown, WV)

    2010-11-23

    The disclosure relates to analysis of materials using a capacitive sensor to detect anomalies through comparison of measured capacitances. The capacitive sensor is used in conjunction with a capacitance measurement device, a location device, and a processor in order to generate a capacitance versus location output which may be inspected for the detection and localization of anomalies within the material under test. The components may be carried as payload on an inspection vehicle which may traverse through a pipe interior, allowing evaluation of nonmetallic or plastic pipes when the piping exterior is not accessible. In an embodiment, supporting components are solid-state devices powered by a low voltage on-board power supply, providing for use in environments where voltage levels may be restricted.

  20. Finite-time singularities in f(R, T) gravity and the effect of conformal anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. S. Houndjo; C. E. M. Batista; J. P. Campos; O. F. Piattella

    2013-03-24

    We investigate $f(R,T)$ gravity models ($R$ is the curvature scalar and $T$ is the trace of the stress-energy tensor of ordinary matter) that are able to reproduce the four known types of future finite-time singularities. We choose a suitable expression for the Hubble parameter in order to realise the cosmic acceleration and we introduce two parameters, $\\alpha$ and $H_s$, which characterise each type of singularity. We address conformal anomaly and we observe that it cannot remove the sudden singularity or the type IV one, but, for some values of $\\alpha$, the big rip and the type III singularity may be avoided. We also find that, even without taking into account conformal anomaly, the big rip and the type III singularity may be removed thanks to the presence of the $T$ contribution of the $f(R,T)$ theory.

  1. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project is to develop a down-hole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole temperature up to 300 °C for measuring motor temperature; pump discharge pressure; and formation temperature and pressure.

  2. Finite Temperature Schrödinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bai-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Qing-Cai Wang; Yan Wang

    2011-06-11

    We know Schr\\"{o}dinger equation describes the dynamics of quantum systems, which don't include temperature. In this paper, we propose finite temperature Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature. When the temperature T=0, it become Shr\\"{o}dinger equation.

  3. Magnetic Anomalies on Io and Their Relationship to the Spatial Distribution of Volcanic Centers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knicely, Joshua

    2015-04-23

    and observation altitude ...................................................... 43 1 1. INTRODUCTION Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system due to tidal heating. The intense heating is produced by a Laplace orbital resonance with Jupiter..., for example, indicates the past presence of a powerful magnetic field and an early stage of plate tectonics as deduced from observed magnetic stripes and apparent transform faults. The magnetic anomaly pattern on Mars contributes to the hypothesis that many...

  4. The Expanding Universe, Planetary Motion and the Pioneer 10/11 Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2001-02-26

    The effect of the expanding universe on planetary motion is considered to first order in the Hubble constant H. Orbital elements are shown to be unaffected, but there is a small change in the connection between planetary proper time and coordinate time. This can produce an apparent anomalous acceleration in velocities inferred from echo-ranging, but the effect is too small by many orders of magnitude to account for the Pioneer 10/11 anomaly.

  5. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen A.; Henkel, Carsten [Theoretical Division, MS B213, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  6. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  7. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  8. Faults and gravity anomalies over the East Mesa hydrothermal-geothermal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Carle, S.

    1986-05-01

    Detailed interpretations of gravity anomalies over geothermal systems may be extremely useful for mapping the fracture or fault systems that control the circulation of the thermal waters. This approach seems to be particularly applicable in areas like the Salton Trough where reactions between the thermal waters and the porous sediments produce authigenic-hydrothermal minerals in sufficient quantity to cause distinct gravity anomalies at the surface. A 3-D inversion of the residual Bouguer gravity anomaly over the East Mesa geothermal field was made to examine the densified volume of rock. We show that the data not only resolve a north-south and an intersecting northwest structure, but that it may be possible to distinguish between the active present-day hydrothermal system and an older and cooler part of the system. The densified region is compared spatially to self-potential, thermal and seismic results and we find a good concordance between the different geophysical data sets. Our results agree with previous studies that have indicated that the main feeder fault recharging the East Mesa reservoir dips steeply to the west.

  9. Structure of the southern Keweenawan rift from COCORP surveys across the Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly in northeastern Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serpa, L.; Setzer, T.; Farmer, H.; Brown, L.; Oliver, J.; Kaufman, S.; Sharp, J.; Steeples, Don W.

    1984-06-01

    COCORP profiling across the midcontinent geophysical anomaly in northeastern Kansas reveals structural basins and other features of the Precambrian Keweenawan rift buried beneath the Phanerozoic cover. The 40-km-wide main basin is asymmetric, with a...

  10. Seasonal variations in the subauroral electron temperature enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fok, M.C.; Kozyra, J.U.; Warren, M.F. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)); Brace, L.H. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The subauroral nightside electron temperature peak is one of the phenomena showing the response of the subauroral ionosphere to the influx of magnetic storm energy in the vicinity of the plasmapause. A statistical study of the seasonal variations of the subauroral electron temperature enhancement was undertaken using data from the Langmuir probe experiment on the DE 2 satellite throughout most of the mission (1981-1982). In the winter hemisphere the nighttime background electron temperature is the highest and the magnitude of the peak T{sub e} responds most weakly to the geomagnetic activity. This behavior can be explained by seasonal trends in the nighttime downward heat flux due to conjugate photoelectrons. Moreover, model results indicate that a factor of {approximately}3 increase in heat inflow during equinox relative to solstice is required to raise the electron temperature to a given level. This is a consequence of the higher electron densities at the T{sub e} peak near equinox. The T{sub e} peak occurs on field lines which thread the outer plasmasphere in the vicinity of the plasmapause and thus can be used as a tracer of the plasmapause position. Correlating the position of the T{sub e} peak with K{sub p} (the highest value of 3-hour K{sub p} in the preceding 12 hours) indicates a trend toward a more expanded quiet time plasmasphere and one which is more easily compressed by magnetic storms at equinox than during the solstice period.

  11. Measuring & Modulating Hemispheric Attention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Andrew Robert

    2012-01-01

    1 and Session 5 of EEG BFB: Hill Dissertation: AssessmentERPs)……………………. 92 Fig1: ERP to BFB Reward Signal at Central92 Fig2: Vertex Waveform BFB ERP drop per Session by

  12. Measuring & Modulating Hemispheric Attention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Andrew Robert

    2012-01-01

    NeuroScan, other platforms. ERP, EEG, & ICA analysis of EEGvisuospatial attention: an ERP study. BMC Neuroscience. 6(M. , & Robertson, I. H. (2011). ERP measures indicate both

  13. Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.J. (Total Minatome Corporation, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the anomaly may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the anomaly closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the anomaly is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the anomaly continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the anomaly is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.

  14. Temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in WTe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Yun; Jo, Na Hyun; Ochi, Masayuki; Huang, Lunan; Mou, Daixiang; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, P. C.; Trivedi, Nandini; Arita, Ryotaro; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we use ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet laser-based, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), temperature- and field-dependent resistivity, and thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements to study the electronic properties of WTe2, a compound that manifests exceptionally large, temperature-dependent magnetoresistance. The Fermi surface consists of two pairs of electron and two pairs of hole pockets along the X–?–X direction. Using detailed ARPES temperature scans, we find a rare example of a temperature-induced Lifshitz transition at T?160 K, associated with the complete disappearance of the hole pockets. Our electronic structure calculations show a clear and substantial shift of the chemical potential ?(T)more »due to the semimetal nature of this material driven by modest changes in temperature. This change of Fermi surface topology is also corroborated by the temperature dependence of the TEP that shows a change of slope at T?175 K and a breakdown of Kohler’s rule in the 70–140 K range. Our results and the mechanisms driving the Lifshitz transition and transport anomalies are relevant to other systems, such as pnictides, 3D Dirac semimetals, and Weyl semimetals.« less

  15. Fingerprints of anthropogenic and natural variability in global-mean surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.M.; Zhang, Yuan

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis designed to detect greenhouse warming by distinguishing between temperature rises induced by increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and those induced by background variability that are present without changes in atmospheric composition. The strategy is based on the surface temperature field. At each observation time, the projection of the anomalous temperature field on the presumed anthropogenic fingerprint is removed in order to obtain a temperature deviation field; i.e., the temperature anomalies in the phase space orthogonal to the anthropogenic fingerprint, which are presumed to be entirely natural. The time series of the expansion coefficients of the fingerprint a(t) is then regressed on this temperature deviation field to identify the axis in the orthogonal phase space along which the variations are most strongly correlated, and an index n(t) of the temporal variations along that axis is generated. The index a(t) is then regressed upon n(t) and the resulting least squares fit is regarded as the component of a(t) that can be ascribed to natural causes. The analysis was performed for monthly global surface temperature anomaly fields for the period 1900-95. Results indicate that two well defined patterns of natural variability contribute to variations in global mean temperature: the synthetic cold ocean-warm land (COWL) pattern and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In domains that include surface air temperature over Eurasia and North America, the COWL pattern tends to be dominant. The ENSO signature emerges as the pattern most strongly linearly correlated with global sea surface temperature and with tropospheric layer-averaged temperatures. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  16. WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY 1939-1948 Marine Biological i STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;a WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM arid to avoid delay in publication. Washington D. CWATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

  17. Halden In-Reactor Test to Exhibit PWR Axial Offset Anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.Bennett, B. Beverskog, R.Suther

    2004-12-01

    Many PWRs have encountered the axial offset anomaly (AOA) since the early 1990s, and these experiences have been reported widely. AOA is a phenomenon associated with localized boron hideout in corrosion product deposits (crud) on fuel surfaces. Several mitigation approaches have been developed or are underway to either delay the onset of AOA or avoid it entirely. This study describes the first phase of an experimental program designed to investigate whether the use of enriched boric acid (EBA) in the reactor coolant can mitigate AOA.

  18. Correlation of gravity anomalies and geology in the San Antonio region, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Patrick Thomas

    1968-01-01

    ?al, Kendall? Bl;!nco, encl Gil- lc. spic cour?tie . It is bouncled b? latitudes 29 00 ' encl 30o 07 ' 30" ir], and long. ' tiides 98c' 22 ' 30" V and 98o '5 ' iri. C] ties w] thin i l?c. ai-ea are Sar. Ant, nio, Bocrrnc r Blat?co, anrlr dohnson Ci Ly... zone of the Ouachita belt. The axis of this maximum is located at about 29o 00 ' N latitude in the area shown on the gravity map (Pl. I). South of thc axis the gravity anomaly values decrease gently toward the Gulf. coast, according to regional...

  19. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  20. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  1. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    with data) mean. Jun-Jul-Aug (Northern Hemisphere summer) surface temperature anomalies relative to the base the notorious variability of local weather and climate from day to day and year to year? This question assumes-year base period. Below we will show

  2. DETECTING REGIMES IN TEMPERATURE TIME SERIES PATRICK J. CLEMINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    , such as the northern hemisphere during the winter, tend to follow a regime structure. The El Nino cycle, which has two

  3. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 98±12 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  4. Electroweak Gauge-Boson Production at Small q_T: Infrared Safety from the Collinear Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Becher; Matthias Neubert; Daniel Wilhelm

    2011-09-27

    Using methods from effective field theory, we develop a novel, systematic framework for the calculation of the cross sections for electroweak gauge-boson production at small and very small transverse momentum q_T, in which large logarithms of the scale ratio M_V/q_T are resummed to all orders. These cross sections receive logarithmically enhanced corrections from two sources: the running of the hard matching coefficient and the collinear factorization anomaly. The anomaly leads to the dynamical generation of a non-perturbative scale q_* ~ M_V e^{-const/\\alpha_s(M_V)}, which protects the processes from receiving large long-distance hadronic contributions. Expanding the cross sections in either \\alpha_s or q_T generates strongly divergent series, which must be resummed. As a by-product, we obtain an explicit non-perturbative expression for the intercept of the cross sections at q_T=0, including the normalization and first-order \\alpha_s(q_*) correction. We perform a detailed numerical comparison of our predictions with the available data on the transverse-momentum distribution in Z-boson production at the Tevatron and LHC.

  5. Stress Tensor from the Trace Anomaly in Reissner-Nordstrom Spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul R. Anderson; Emil Mottola; Ruslan Vaulin

    2007-07-25

    The effective action associated with the trace anomaly provides a general algorithm for approximating the expectation value of the stress tensor of conformal matter fields in arbitrary curved spacetimes. In static, spherically symmetric spacetimes, the algorithm involves solving a fourth order linear differential equation in the radial coordinate r for the two scalar auxiliary fields appearing in the anomaly action, and its corresponding stress tensor. By appropriate choice of the homogeneous solutions of the auxiliary field equations, we show that it is possible to obtain finite stress tensors on all Reissner-Nordstrom event horizons, including the extreme Q=M case. We compare these finite results to previous analytic approximation methods, which yield invariably an infinite stress-energy on charged black hole horizons, as well as with detailed numerical calculations that indicate the contrary. The approximation scheme based on the auxiliary field effective action reproduces all physically allowed behaviors of the quantum stress tensor, in a variety of quantum states, for fields of any spin, in the vicinity of the entire family (0 le Q le M) of RN horizons.

  6. Nucleosynthetic osmium isotope anomalies in acid leachates of the Murchison meteorite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisberg, L; Luguet, A; Pearson, D G; Gallino, R; Zimmermann, C

    2008-01-01

    We present osmium isotopic results obtained by sequential leaching of the Murchison meteorite, which reveal the existence of very large internal anomalies of nucleosynthetic origin. The Os isotopic anomalies are correlated, and can be explained by the variable contributions of components derived from the s, r and p-processes of nucleosynthesis. Much of the s-process rich osmium is released by relatively mild leaching, suggesting the existence of an easily leachable s-process rich presolar phase, or alternatively, of a chemically resistant r-process rich phase. The s-process composition of Os released by mild leaching diverges slightly from that released by aggressive digestion techniques, perhaps suggesting that the presolar phases attacked by these differing procedures condensed in different stellar environments. The correlation between 190Os and 188Os can be used to constrain the s-process 190Os/188Os ratio to be 1.275 pm 0.043. Such a ratio can be reproduced in a nuclear reaction network for a MACS value f...

  7. Nucleosynthetic osmium isotope anomalies in acid leachates of the Murchison meteorite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Reisberg; N. Dauphas; A. Luguet; D. G. Pearson; R. Gallino; C. Zimmermann

    2008-12-15

    We present osmium isotopic results obtained by sequential leaching of the Murchison meteorite, which reveal the existence of very large internal anomalies of nucleosynthetic origin. The Os isotopic anomalies are correlated, and can be explained by the variable contributions of components derived from the s, r and p-processes of nucleosynthesis. Much of the s-process rich osmium is released by relatively mild leaching, suggesting the existence of an easily leachable s-process rich presolar phase, or alternatively, of a chemically resistant r-process rich phase. The s-process composition of Os released by mild leaching diverges slightly from that released by aggressive digestion techniques, perhaps suggesting that the presolar phases attacked by these differing procedures condensed in different stellar environments. The correlation between 190Os and 188Os can be used to constrain the s-process 190Os/188Os ratio to be 1.275 pm 0.043. Such a ratio can be reproduced in a nuclear reaction network for a MACS value for 190Os of ~200 pm 22 mbarn at 30 keV. We also present evidence for extensive internal variation of 184Os abundances in the Murchison meteorite. This suggests that p process rich presolar grains (e.g., supernova condensates) may be present in meteorites in sufficient quantities to influence the Os isotopic compositions of the leachates.

  8. Can residuals of the solar system foreground explain low multipole anomalies of the CMB?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, M.; Kim, J.; Frejsel, A.M.; Ramazanov, S.; Naselsky, P.; Zhao, W. [Niels Bohr Institute and DISCOVERY Center, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 Copenhagen, Ø (Denmark); Burigana, C., E-mail: kirstejn@nbi.dk, E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk, E-mail: annemett@nbi.dk, E-mail: sabir_ra@nbi.dk, E-mail: naselsky@nbi.dk, E-mail: wzhao7@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: burigana@iasfbo.inaf.it [INAF/IASF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via P. Gobetti 101, 40129, Bologna (Italy)

    2012-10-01

    The low multipole anomalies of the Cosmic Microwave Background has received much attention during the last few years. It is still not ascertained whether these anomalies are indeed primordial or the result of systematics or foregrounds. An example of a foreground, which could generate some non-Gaussian and statistically anisotropic features at low multipole range, is the very symmetric Kuiper Belt in the outer solar system. In this paper, expanding upon the methods presented in [1], we investigate the contributions from the Kuiper Belt objects (KBO) to the WMAP ILC 7 map, whereby we can minimize the contrast in power between even and odd multipoles in the CMB, discussed in [2,3]. We submit our KBO de-correlated CMB signal to several tests, to analyze its validity, and find that incorporation of the KBO emission can decrease the quadrupole-octupole alignment and parity asymmetry problems, provided that the KBO signals has a non-cosmological dipole modulation, associated with the statistical anisotropy of the ILC 7 map. Additionally, we show that the amplitude of the dipole modulation, within a 2? interval, is in agreement with the corresponding amplitudes, discussed in [4].

  9. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  10. Superconductivity at Any Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anber, Mohamed M; Sabancilar, Eray; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We construct a 2+1 dimensional model that sustains superconductivity at all temperatures. This is achieved by introducing a Chern Simons mixing term between two Abelian gauge fields A and Z. The superfluid is described by a complex scalar charged under Z, whereas a sufficiently strong magnetic field of A forces the superconducting condensate to form at all temperatures. In fact, at finite temperature, the theory exhibits Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition due to proliferation of topological vortices admitted by our construction. However, the critical temperature is proportional to the magnetic field of A, and thus, the phase transition can be postponed to high temperatures by increasing the strength of the magnetic field. This model can be a step towards realizing the long sought room temperature superconductivity.

  11. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  12. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  13. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  14. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I. Processing procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  15. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  16. Thermoelectric Temperature Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    NOTE 201TM TECHNICAL Optimizing Thermoelectric Temperature Control Systems #12;2 May 1995 92-040000A © 1995 Wavelength Electronics, Inc. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs) are used in a variety understanding of thermal management techniques and carefully select the thermoelectric module, temperature

  17. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  18. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  19. Auburn low-temperature geothermal well. Volume 6. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, R.S.; Castor, T.P.

    1983-12-01

    The Auburn well was drilled to explore for low temperature geothermal resources in central New York State. The Auburn site was selected based on: its proximity to the Cayuga County anomaly (30/sup 0/C/km), its favorable local geological conditions and the potential to provide hot water and space heating to two educational facilities. The well was drilled to a total depth of 5250 feet and into the Pre-Cambrian Basement. The well was extensively logged, flow and stress tested, hydraulically stimulated, and pump (pressure transient analysis) tested. The low-temperature geothermal potential was assessed in terms of: geological environment; hydrological conditions; reservoir characteristics; and recoverable hydrothermal reserves. The average geothermal gradient was measured to be as high as 26.7/sup 0/C/km with a bottom-hole temperature of 126/sup 0/ +- 1/sup 0/F. The proved volumetric resources were estimated to be 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ stock tank barrels (STB) with a maximum initial deliverability of approx.11,600 STB/D and a continuous deliverability of approx.3400 STB/D. The proved hydrothermal reserves were estimated to be 21.58 x 10/sup 10/ Btu based on a volumetric component (4.13 x 10/sup 10/ Btu), and a reinjection component (17.45 x 10/sup 10/ Btu). The conclusion was made that the Auburn low-temperature reservoir could be utilized to provide hot water and space heating to the Auburn School District.

  20. Screening digital relay data to detect power network fault response anomalies D. W. Kosy, V. S. Grinberg, and M. W. Siegel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Mel

    are specific to the ABB Relay Division MDAR relay family. However, the techniques used are generalizableScreening digital relay data to detect power network fault response anomalies D. W. Kosy, V. S to detecting anomalies using data from microprocessor-based digital protective relays. At present, the systems

  1. Uranium groundwater anomalies and L'Aquila earthquake, 6th April 2009 (Italy) Wolfango Plastino a,b,*, Pavel P. Povinec c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uranium groundwater anomalies and L'Aquila earthquake, 6th April 2009 (Italy) Wolfango Plastino a Accepted 17 August 2009 Available online 2 September 2009 Keywords: Uranium Groundwater Earthquake a b and strain processes. Uranium (U) groundwater anomalies were observed during the preparation phases

  2. Bottom-trapped currents as statistical equilibrium states above topographic anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venaille, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic geostrophic turbulence is mostly forced at the surface, yet strong bottom-trapped flows are commonly observed along topographic anomalies. Here we consider the case of a freely evolving, initially surface-intensified velocity field above a topographic bump, and show that the self-organization into a bottom-trapped current can result from its turbulent dynamics. Using equilibrium statistical mechanics, we explain this phenomenon as the most probable outcome of turbulent stirring. We compute explicitly a class of solutions characterized by a linear relation between potential vorticity and streamfunction, and predict when the bottom intensification is expected. Using direct numerical simulations, we provide an illustration of this phenomenon that agrees qualitatively with theory, although the ergodicity hypothesis is not strictly fulfilled.

  3. System and method for the detection of anomalies in an image

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Lakshman; Swaminarayan, Sriram

    2013-09-03

    Preferred aspects of the present invention can include receiving a digital image at a processor; segmenting the digital image into a hierarchy of feature layers comprising one or more fine-scale features defining a foreground object embedded in one or more coarser-scale features defining a background to the one or more fine-scale features in the segmentation hierarchy; detecting a first fine-scale foreground feature as an anomaly with respect to a first background feature within which it is embedded; and constructing an anomalous feature layer by synthesizing spatially contiguous anomalous fine-scale features. Additional preferred aspects of the present invention can include detecting non-pervasive changes between sets of images in response at least in part to one or more difference images between the sets of images.

  4. Multiscale spatial density smoothing: an application to large-scale radiological survey and anomaly detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tansey, Wesley; Reinhart, Alex; Scott, James G

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating a spatially varying density function, motivated by problems that arise in large-scale radiological survey and anomaly detection. In this context, the density functions to be estimated are the background gamma-ray energy spectra at sites spread across a large geographical area, such as nuclear production and waste-storage sites, military bases, medical facilities, university campuses, or the downtown of a city. Several challenges combine to make this a difficult problem. First, the spectral density at any given spatial location may have both smooth and non-smooth features. Second, the spatial correlation in these density functions is neither stationary nor locally isotropic. Third, the spatial correlation decays at different length scales at different locations in the support of the underlying density. Finally, at some spatial locations, there is very little data. We present a method called multiscale spatial density smoothing that successfully addresses these challenges. ...

  5. Could the width of the diphoton anomaly signal a three-body decay ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jérémy Bernon; Christopher Smith

    2015-12-18

    The recently observed diphoton anomaly at the LHC appears to suggest the presence of a rather broad resonance. In this note, it is pointed out that this does not hold if the two photons are produced along with an extra state. Specifically, the diphoton invariant mass arising from various $A \\to B\\gamma\\gamma$ processes, with $A,B$ being scalars, fermions, or vectors, though peaked at a rather large value, would naturally be broad and could fit rather well the observed deviations. This interpretation has a number of advantages over the two-photon resonance hypothesis, for example with respect to the compatibility with the 8 TeV diphoton, dilepton or dijet searches, and opens many new routes for New Physics model construction.

  6. Fuzzy Logic Based Anomaly Detection for Embedded Network Security Cyber Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Todd Vollmer; Jason Wright; Milos Manic

    2011-04-01

    Resiliency and security in critical infrastructure control systems in the modern world of cyber terrorism constitute a relevant concern. Developing a network security system specifically tailored to the requirements of such critical assets is of a primary importance. This paper proposes a novel learning algorithm for anomaly based network security cyber sensor together with its hardware implementation. The presented learning algorithm constructs a fuzzy logic rule based model of normal network behavior. Individual fuzzy rules are extracted directly from the stream of incoming packets using an online clustering algorithm. This learning algorithm was specifically developed to comply with the constrained computational requirements of low-cost embedded network security cyber sensors. The performance of the system was evaluated on a set of network data recorded from an experimental test-bed mimicking the environment of a critical infrastructure control system.

  7. Investigations of the torque anomaly in an annular sector. I. Global calculations, scalar case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton, Kimball A; Parashar, Prachi; Abalo, E K; Fulling, Stephen A; Bouas, Jeffrey D; Carter, Hamilton; Kirsten, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to understand a recently discovered torque anomaly in quantum field theory with boundaries, we calculate the Casimir energy and torque of a scalar field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on an annular sector defined by two coaxial cylinders intercut by two planes through the axis. In this model the particularly troublesome divergence at the cylinder axis does not appear, but new divergences associated with the curved boundaries are introduced. All the divergences associated with the volume, the surface area, the corners, and the curvature are regulated by point separation either in the direction of the axis of the cylinder or in the (Euclidean) time; the full divergence structure is isolated, and the remaining finite energy and torque are extracted. Formally, only the regulator based on axis splitting yields the expected balance between energy and torque. Because of the logarithmic curvature divergences, there is an ambiguity in the linear dependence of the energy on the wedge angle; if t...

  8. Mining Building Energy Management System Data Using Fuzzy Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Descriptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger

    2014-08-01

    Building Energy Management Systems (BEMSs) are essential components of modern buildings that utilize digital control technologies to minimize energy consumption while maintaining high levels of occupant comfort. However, BEMSs can only achieve these energy savings when properly tuned and controlled. Since indoor environment is dependent on uncertain criteria such as weather, occupancy, and thermal state, performance of BEMS can be sub-optimal at times. Unfortunately, the complexity of BEMS control mechanism, the large amount of data available and inter-relations between the data can make identifying these sub-optimal behaviors difficult. This paper proposes a novel Fuzzy Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Description (Fuzzy-ADLD) based method for improving the understandability of BEMS behavior for improved state-awareness. The presented method is composed of two main parts: 1) detection of anomalous BEMS behavior and 2) linguistic representation of BEMS behavior. The first part utilizes modified nearest neighbor clustering algorithm and fuzzy logic rule extraction technique to build a model of normal BEMS behavior. The second part of the presented method computes the most relevant linguistic description of the identified anomalies. The presented Fuzzy-ADLD method was applied to real-world BEMS system and compared against a traditional alarm based BEMS. In six different scenarios, the Fuzzy-ADLD method identified anomalous behavior either as fast as or faster (an hour or more), that the alarm based BEMS. In addition, the Fuzzy-ADLD method identified cases that were missed by the alarm based system, demonstrating potential for increased state-awareness of abnormal building behavior.

  9. H??? as a Triangle Anomaly: Possible Implications for the Hierarchy Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Gouvea, Andre; Kile, Jennifer; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2013-06-24

    The Standard Model calculation of H??? has the curious feature of being finite but regulator-dependent. While dimensional regularization yields a result which respects the electromagnetic Ward identities, additional terms which violate gauge invariance arise if the calculation is done setting d = 4. This discrepancy between the d=4 – ? and d = 4 results is recognized as a true ambiguity which must be resolved using physics input; as dimensional regularization respects gauge invariance, the d = 4 – ? calculation is accepted as the correct SM result. However, here we point out another possibility; working in analogy with the gauge chiral anomaly, we note that it is possible that the individual diagrams do violate the electromagnetic Ward identities, but that the gauge-invariance-violating terms cancel when all contributions to H???, both from the SM and from new physics, are included. We thus examine the consequences of the hypothesis that the d = 4 calculation is valid, but that such a cancellation occurs. We work in general renormalizable gauge, thus avoiding issues with momentum routing ambiguities. We point out that the gauge-invariance-violating terms in d = 4 arise not just for the diagram containing a SM $W^{\\pm}$ boson, but also for general fermion and scalar loops, and relate these terms to a lack of shift invariance in Higgs tadpole diagrams. We then derive the analogue of "anomaly cancellation conditions", and find consequences for solutions to the hierarchy problem. In particular, we find that supersymmetry obeys these conditions, even if it is softly broken at an arbitrarily high scale.

  10. Model-based Thermal Anomaly Detection in Cloud Datacenters Eun Kyung Lee, Hariharasudhan Viswanathan, and Dario Pompili

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompili, Dario

    Model-based Thermal Anomaly Detection in Cloud Datacenters Eun Kyung Lee, Hariharasudhan datacenters make them prone to strategic attacks, misconfigurations, and failures (cooling as well) and observed thermal maps (obtained using thermal cameras) of datacenters is proposed. In addition, a Thermal

  11. Superconductivityand absence of a Kohn anomaly in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor : (TMTSF)2AsF6 (+)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-607 Superconductivityand absence of a Kohn anomaly in the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor Kohn à 2 kF à basse température et à pression atmosphérique. Abstract. 2014 Superconductivity has been under 12 kbar. The establishment of the superconducting state is apparently not related to the existence

  12. Plasma Barodiffusion in Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Implosions: Application to Observed Yield Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures Peter Amendt, O. L. Landen, and H. F. Robey Lawrence Livermore. Herrmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuel mixtures and Ar-doped deu- terium fuels [J. D. Lindl with deuterium (D2 or DD) fuel [5] in direct-drive ICF implo- sions at the OMEGA laser facility [6]. Compared

  13. Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies in the Perth Abyssal Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granot, Roi

    Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies the early spreading history between India and Australia during the Mesozoic breakup of Gondwana. However from Australia with Greater India during initial breakup at ~130 Ma, then rifted from India following

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 58, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2011 277 Anomaly Detection in Nuclear Power Plants via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    by the U.S. Department of Energy under NERI-C Grant DE-FG07-07ID14895 and by NASA under Co- operative an automated con- dition monitoring system to assist the plant operator to detect the anomalies and isolate of physical interpretation, their reliability and computa- tional efficiency for condition monit

  15. Tracing Freshwater Anomalies Through the Air-Land-Ocean System: A Case Study from the Mackenzie River Basin and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Tracing Freshwater Anomalies Through the Air-Land-Ocean System: A Case Study from the Mackenzie, Seattle, WA 98195 USA 3Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, National Snow and Ice-E and precipitation, recycled summer precipitation, and dry sur- face conditions immediately prior to the water year

  16. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  17. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  18. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  19. Temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  20. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  1. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. This peculiar electronic mechanisms is in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  2. Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai Junyi; Xing Zengping; Dong Shuxiang; Li Jiefang; Viehland, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2006-02-06

    The measurement of low-frequency (10{sup -2}-10{sup 3} Hz) minute magnetic field variations (10{sup -12} Tesla) at room temperature in a passive mode of operation would be critically enabling for deployable neurological signal interfacing and magnetic anomaly detection applications. However, there is presently no magnetic field sensor capable of meeting all of these requirements. Here, we present new bimorph and push-pull magneto-electric laminate composites, which incorporate a charge compensation mechanism (or bridge) that dramatically enhances noise rejection, enabling achievement of such requirements.

  3. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  4. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  5. Three-loop HTLpt thermodynamics at finite temperature and isospin chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Jens O; Mustafa, Munshi G; Strickland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In a previous paper (JHEP {\\bf 05} (2014) 27), we calculated the three-loop thermodynamic potential of QCD at finite temperature $T$ and quark chemical potentials $\\mu_q$ using the hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt) reorganization of finite temperature and density QCD. The result allows us to study the thermodynamics of QCD at finite temperature and isospin chemical potential $\\mu_I$. We calculate the pressure, energy density, and entropy density, the trace anomaly, and the speed of sound at zero and nonzero $\\mu_I$. The second, fourth, and sixth-order isospin susceptibilities are calculated at zero $\\mu_I$. Our results can be directly compared to lattice QCD without Taylor expansions around $\\mu_q=0$ since QCD has no sign problem at finite isospin chemical potential.

  6. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  7. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  8. High temperature lubricating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Shell, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    It has been difficult to provide adaquate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475.degree. C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface (14), such as in an engine (10) being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475.degree. C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining steps. A gas phase (42) is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant. The gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface. The load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant. The solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  9. Low temperature reactive bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Bionta, R.M.

    1995-01-17

    The joining technique is disclosed that requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process. 5 figures.

  10. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  11. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  12. NASA's satellite orbit anomaly problem can be solved precisely in the frame of Einstein's special theory of relativity. Anomaly confirms that gravity fields propagate with velocity of light as Einstein predicted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor M. Bogdan

    2009-10-17

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory put on You Tube a problem that has been baffling the scientists for sometime. It involves an unexpected force acting on the space probes. The author proves that NASA'S satellite orbit anomaly problem can be solved in the frame of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. The anomaly confirms that gravity fields propagate with velocity of light as Einstein predicted. The proof is based on the authors discovery of the relativistic version of Newton's gravity field. The author provides formulas for relativistic equation of motion for a spacecraft in the joint gravitational field of the Earth and the Sun in a Lorentzian frame attached to the Earth. The formulas are suitable for digital computers and can be easily implemented. He also shows how to find solutions of the relativistic equations of motion for the spacecraft.

  13. High temperature storage battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1988-06-07

    A high temperature electrochemical cell is described comprising: a solid-state divalent cation conducting electrolyte; a positive electrode in contact with the electrolyte; a solid-state negative electrode contacting a divalent cation conducting molten salt mediating agent providing ionic mediation between the solid-state negative electrode and the solid-state electrolyte.

  14. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  15. Transition temperature in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.; Christ, N. H.; Mawhinney, R. D. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Datta, S.; Jung, C.; Schmidt, C.; Umeda, T. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Heide, J. van der; Kaczmarek, O.; Laermann, E.; Miao, C. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Karsch, F. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Petreczky, P. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Petrov, K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-09-01

    We present a detailed calculation of the transition temperature in QCD with two light and one heavier (strange) quark mass on lattices with temporal extent N{sub {tau}}=4 and 6. Calculations with improved staggered fermions have been performed for various light to strange quark mass ratios in the range, 0.05{<=}m-circumflex{sub l}/m-circumflex{sub s}{<=}0.5, and with a strange quark mass fixed close to its physical value. From a combined extrapolation to the chiral (m-circumflex{sub l}{yields}0) and continuum (aT{identical_to}1/N{sub {tau}}{yields}0) limits we find for the transition temperature at the physical point T{sub c}r{sub 0}=0.457(7) where the scale is set by the Sommer-scale parameter r{sub 0} defined as the distance in the static quark potential at which the slope takes on the value (dV{sub qq}(r)/dr){sub r=r{sub 0}}=1.65/r{sub 0}{sup 2}. Using the currently best known value for r{sub 0} this translates to a transition temperature T{sub c}=192(7)(4) MeV. The transition temperature in the chiral limit is about 3% smaller. We discuss current ambiguities in the determination of T{sub c} in physical units and also comment on the universal scaling behavior of thermodynamic quantities in the chiral limit.

  16. Detection of submicron scale cracks and other surface anomalies using positron emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, Thomas E.; Howell, Richard H.; Colmenares, Carlos A.

    2004-02-17

    Detection of submicron scale cracks and other mechanical and chemical surface anomalies using PET. This surface technique has sufficient sensitivity to detect single voids or pits of sub-millimeter size and single cracks or fissures of millimeter size; and single cracks or fissures of millimeter-scale length, micrometer-scale depth, and nanometer-scale length, micrometer-scale depth, and nanometer-scale width. This technique can also be applied to detect surface regions of differing chemical reactivity. It may be utilized in a scanning or survey mode to simultaneously detect such mechanical or chemical features over large interior or exterior surface areas of parts as large as about 50 cm in diameter. The technique involves exposing a surface to short-lived radioactive gas for a time period, removing the excess gas to leave a partial monolayer, determining the location and shape of the cracks, voids, porous regions, etc., and calculating the width, depth, and length thereof. Detection of 0.01 mm deep cracks using a 3 mm detector resolution has been accomplished using this technique.

  17. NASA's astonishing evidence that c is not constant: The pioneer anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. D. Greaves

    2007-01-11

    For over 20 years NASA has struggled to find an explanation to the Pioneer anomaly. Now it becomes clear the solution to the riddle is that they have uncovered evidence that c, the speed of light, is not quite a universal constant. Using J. C. Cure s hypothesis that the index of refraction is a function of the gravitational energy density of space and straightforward Newtonian mechanics, NASA s measurements provide compelling evidence that the speed of light depends on the inverse of the square root of the gravitational energy density of space. The magnitude of the Pioneer anomalous acceleration leads to the value of the primordial energy density of space due to faraway stars and galaxies: 1.0838. x 10^15 Joule/m3. A value which almost miraculously coincides with the same quantity: 1.09429 x 10^15 Joule/m3 derived by J. C. Cure from a completely different phenomenon: the bending of starlight during solar eclipses.

  18. Tracing Remnants of the Baryon Vector Current Anomaly in Neutron Radiative Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susan Gardner; Daheng He

    2011-01-06

    Harvey, Hill, and Hill have found that unexpected interactions involving the nucleon, photon, and weak gauge bosons at low energies emerge from gauging the axial anomaly of QCD under the full electroweak symmetry of the Standard Model (SM). In this contribution we consider how such interactions can be isolated through a triple-product momentum correlation in neutron radiative beta-decay. The correlation is both parity- and naively time-reversal-odd, so that it vanishes in the Standard Model save for effects induced by final-state interactions (FSI). Nevertheless, the correlation can be generated by sources of CP violation beyond the Standard Model, and such couplings, being spin-independent, are not constrained by the nonobservation of the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM). We consider the sorts of limits on its strength which can be determined at existing and anticipated facilities, as well as the size of induced correlations from known FSI. We also briefly consider the possibility of nuclear beta-decay studies as well as the prospects for muon-induced reaction studies.

  19. Correlating anomalies of the microwave sky: The Good, the Evil and the Axis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandar Rakic; Dominik J. Schwarz

    2007-05-11

    At the largest angular scales the presence of a number of unexpected features has been confirmed by the latest measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Among them are the anomalous alignment of the quadrupole and octopole with each other as well as the stubborn lack of angular correlation on scales >60deg. We search for correlations between these two phenomena and demonstrate their absence. A Monte Carlo likelihood analysis confirms previous studies and shows that the joint likelihood of both anomalies is incompatible with the best-fit Lambda Cold Dark Matter model at >99.95% C.L. At the same time, a presumed special axis (the `Axis of Evil') identified on the microwave sky demands additional contributions to multipole power on top of the primordial standard inflationary ones. We find that the notion of a preferred axis in the CMB is misleading and inconsistent with three-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). Rather the data require a preferred plane, whereupon the axis is just the normal direction to that plane. Rotational symmetry within that plane is inconsistent with the observations and is ruled out at high confidence.

  20. Magnetization anomaly of Nb3Al strands and instability of Nb3Al Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Ryuji; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, Akihiro; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-08-01

    Using a Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb{sub 3}Al strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large magnetization behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B{sub c2} {approx} 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the magnetization data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this magnetization anomaly, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect.

  1. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  2. Low Frequency Modulation of Extreme Temperature Regimes in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Robert X.

    2014-11-24

    The project examines long-term changes in extreme temperature episodes (ETE) associated with planetary climate modes (PCMs) in both the real atmospheric and climate model simulations. The focus is on cold air outbreaks (CAOs) and warm waves (WWs) occurring over the continental US during the past 60 winters. No significant long-term trends in either WWs or CAOs are observed over the US. The annual frequency of CAOs is affected by the (i) North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) over the Southeast US and (ii) Pacific–North American (PNA) pattern over the Northwest US. WW frequency is influenced by the (i) NAO over the eastern US and (ii) combined influence of PNA, Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), and ENSO over the southern US. The collective influence of PCMs accounts for as much as 50% of the regional variability in ETE frequency. During CAO (WW) events occurring over the southeast US, there are low (high) pressure anomalies at higher atmospheric levels over the southeast US with oppositely-signed pressure anomalies in the lower atmosphere over the central US. These patterns lead to anomalous northerly (for CAOs) or southerly (for WWs) flow into the southeast leading to cold or warm surface air temperature anomalies, respectively. One distinction is that CAOs involve substantial air mass transport while WW formation is more local in nature. The primary differences among event categories are in the origin and nature of the pressure anomaly features linked to ETE onset. In some cases, PCMs help to provide a favorable environment for event onset. Heat budget analyses indicate that latitudinal transport in the lower atmosphere is the main contributor to regional cooling during CAO onset. This is partly offset by adiabatic warming associated with subsiding air. Additional diagnoses reveal that this latitudinal transport is partly due to the remote physical influence of a shallow cold pool of air trapped along the east side of the Rocky Mountains. ETE and PCM behavior is also studied in (CMIP5) climate model simulations. Although the climate models considered are able to represent the overall behavior of ETEs, the frequency of WWs (CAOs) is too high (low) in many models. While all models qualitatively replicate the overall structure of the PNA pattern, a small minority of models fails to properly simulate the NAO pattern. Model shortcomings in representing the NAO and PNA patterns have important consequences for simulating associated regional variability in surface air temperature and storm track behavior. The influence of PCMs on ETEs is underestimated in most CMIP5 models. In particular, none of the models are able to accurately simulate observed linkages between ETEs and the PDO, due to a gross misrepresentation of the PDO pattern in most models. Our results indicate that predictions of future CAO and WW behavior are currently limited by the ability of climate models to accurately represent PCM characteristics. Our study also considers the behavior of PCMs known as annular modes. It is determined that north-south movements in the stratospheric jet stream (related to the Polar Annular Mode) result in long-lasting impacts upon surface weather conditions including regional air temperature anomalies. The structure and dynamics of the stratospheric northern annular mode (or SNAM, related to changes in the strength of the stratospheric jet stream) was studied in CMIP5 models. In models with poorly-resolved stratospheres, the amplitude of SNAM at stratospheric altitudes is typically too weak, consistent with weaker stratospheric jet variability. However, this distinction does not carry over to the associated tropospheric signature of SNAM. A regional analysis illustrates that most CMIP5 models (regardless of whether the stratosphere is well-resolved) have anomalously weak and eastward shifted (compared to observed SNAM events) storm track and sea level pressure anomaly patterns during SNAM events. Analyses of stratosphere–troposphere coupling reveal that large-scale wave activity in the stratosphere is anomalously weak in CMIP5 model

  3. The global climate for December 1990-February 1991: Strong temperature and precipitation contrasts over North America and Eurasia; mixed ENSO conditions in the tropics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelliah, M. )

    1993-07-01

    During most of the December 1990-February 1991 season sharp transcontinental temperature anomaly contrasts were evident in North America, Eurasia, and Australia. Large-scale atmospheric precipitations are more difficult to characterize. In the equatorial tropics there was some evidence of conditions similar to ENSO near the date line, but an almost complete failure of other ENSO components to appear in the east Pacific and in the tropical atmospheric circulation. 12 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A statistical study of ionospheric earthquake precursors monitored by using equatorial ionization anomaly of GPS TEC in Taiwan during 20012007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    anomaly of GPS TEC in Taiwan during 2001­2007 J.Y. Liu a,c,*, C.H. Chen b , Y.I. Chen d , W.H. Yang a , K.I. Oyama a , K.W. Kuo e a Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Chung-Li, Taiwan b and Remote Sensing Research, National Central University, Chung-Li, Taiwan d Institute of Statistics

  5. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the outer part of the self-consistent potential in such a way that in the final state after photoexcitation or photoionization the newly occupied orbital sees the hole left in the initial state. This is very important to account for the large number of Rydberg states in the case of low densities. In the next Section we show calculated photoabsorptions compared with experimental data in figures with some rudimentary explanations.

  6. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  7. Dirac Equation at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bo-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Si-Qi Zhang; Jing Wang; Chun-Hong Li

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose finite temperature Dirac equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature for a relativistic particle of spin-1/2. When the temperature T=0, it become Dirac equation. With the equation, we can study the relativistic quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature.

  8. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  9. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  10. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overeem, A.

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

  11. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  12. Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

  13. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  14. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  15. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  16. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Kayo, Issha; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 ?m and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ? (?L){sub 100} {sub ?m}/(?L) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1 mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  17. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  18. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  19. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  2. Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liqiang Wei

    2006-05-23

    In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

  3. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian

    2000-01-31

    The Online Measurement of Decontamination project team received a commitment for a demonstration in May from the Sacramento (California) Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Rancho Seco site. Since this site is a member of the DOE Commercial Utilities Consortium, the demonstration will fulfill the DOE and commercial technology demonstration requirements. Discussion on deployment of the Integrated Vertical and Overhead Decontamination (IVOD) System at Rancho Seco was conducted; date for deployment tentatively scheduled for early spring. Based upon fictional requirements from SRS for a shiny monitor in a high-level waste tank, FIU-HCET developed and delivered a draft slurry monitor design and draft test plan. Experiments measuring slurry settling time for SRS slurry simulant at 10 wt% have been completed on FIU-HCET'S flow loop with SRS dip. The completed design package of the test mockup for evaluating Non-Intrusive Location of Buried Items Technologies was sent to Fluor Fernald and the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program for review. Comments are due at the end of January. Preliminary experiments to determine size distribution of aerosols generated during metal cutting were performed. A 1/4-inch-thick iron plate was cut using a plasma arc torch, and the size distribution of airborne particles was measured using a multistage impactor. Per request of DOE-Ohio, FIU-HCET participated in a weeklong value engineering study for the characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement of their critical path facility.

  4. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-07-31

    FIU-HCET personnel visited the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) for discussions with the Principal Investigator (PI) of Laser Induced Fluorescence Imaging (LIFI) and for training in LIFI. Mr. Peter Gibbons, Tanks Retrieval Technology Integration Manager, visited FIU-HCET on July 20, 1999. Mr. Gibbons inspected the pipeline unplugging experimental facility at the HCET testing field. The detailed test bed construction, testing plan, and plugging material specifications were discussed.

  5. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-01-31

    FIU-HCET participated in an ICT meeting at Mound during the second week of December and presented a brief videotape of the testing of the Robotic Climber technology. During this meeting, FIU-HCET proposed the TechXtract technology for possible testing at Mound and agreed to develop a five-page proposal for review by team members. FIU-HCET provided assistance to Bartlett Inc. and General Lasertronics Corporation in developing a proposal for a Program Opportunity Notice (PON). The proposal was submitted by these companies on January 5, 1999. The search for new equipment dismantlement technologies is continuing. The following vendors have responded to requests for demonstration: LUMONICS, Laser Solutions technology; CRYO-BEAM, Cryogenic cutting technology; Waterjet Technology Association, Waterjet Cutting technology; and DIAJET, Waterjet Cutting technology. Based on the tasks done in FY98, FIU-HCET is working closely with Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to revise the plan and scope of work of the pipeline plugging project in FY99, which involves activities of lab-scale flow loop experiments and a large-scale demonstration test bed.

  6. Western Hemisphere Oil Products Balance

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa.E.DRAFT0,WelcomeWestern

  7. Design principle and calculations of a Scheffler fixed focus concentrator for medium temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munir, A.; Hensel, O. [Department of Agricultural Engineering,University of Kassel, Nordbahnhofstr. 1 a 37213 Witzenhausen (Germany); Scheffler, W. [Solar Bruecke G.v.Werdenbergstr.6 D-89344 Aislingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Scheffler fixed focus concentrators are successfully used for medium temperature applications in different parts of the world. These concentrators are taken as lateral sections of paraboloids and provide fixed focus away from the path of incident beam radiations throughout the year. The paper presents a complete description about the design principle and construction details of an 8 m{sup 2} surface area Scheffler concentrator. The first part of the paper presents the mathematical calculations to design the reflector parabola curve and reflector elliptical frame with respect to equinox (solar declination = 0) by selecting a specific lateral part of a paraboloid. Crossbar equations and their ellipses, arc lengths and their radii are also calculated to form the required lateral section of the paraboloid. Thereafter, the seasonal parabola equations are calculated for two extreme positions of summer and winter in the northern hemisphere (standing reflectors). The slopes of the parabola equations for equinox (solar declination = 0), summer (solar declination = +23.5) and winter (solar declination = -23.5) for the Scheffler reflector (8 m{sup 2} surface area) are calculated to be 0.17, 0.28, and 0.13 respectively. The y-intercepts of the parabola equations for equinox, summer and winter are calculated as 0, 0.54, and -0.53 respectively. By comparing with the equinox parabola curve, the summer parabola is found to be smaller in size and uses the top part of the parabola curve while the winter parabola is bigger in size and uses the lower part of the parabola curve to give the fixed focus. For this purpose, the reflector assembly is composed of flexible crossbars and a frame to induce the required change of the parabola curves with the changing solar declination. The paper also presents the calculation procedure of seasonal parabola equations for standing reflectors in the southern hemisphere as well as for laying reflectors in the northern and southern hemispheres. Highly reflective aluminium sheets are used on the crossbar profiles to complete the concentrator. The reflector is installed at the required site by setting its axis of rotation at an angle equal to the latitude of the site. For daily tracking, these concentrators rotate along an axis parallel to the polar axis of the earth at an angular velocity of one revolution per day with the help of simpler and cheaper self-tracking devices. For seasonal tracking, the reflector rotates at half the solar declination angle with the help of a telescopic clamp mechanism. The design procedure is simple, flexible and does not need any special computational setup, thus offering the prospect of potential application in domestic as well as industrial configurations. (author)

  8. Meson properties at finite temperature in a three flavor nonlocal chiral quark model with Polyakov loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contrera, G. A.; Dumm, D. Gomez; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2010-03-01

    We study the finite temperature behavior of light scalar and pseudoscalar meson properties in the context of a three-flavor nonlocal chiral quark model. The model includes mixing with active strangeness degrees of freedom, and takes care of the effect of gauge interactions by coupling the quarks with the Polyakov loop. We analyze the chiral restoration and deconfinement transitions, as well as the temperature dependence of meson masses, mixing angles and decay constants. The critical temperature is found to be T{sub c{approx_equal}}202 MeV, in better agreement with lattice results than the value recently obtained in the local SU(3) PNJL model. It is seen that above T{sub c} pseudoscalar meson masses get increased, becoming degenerate with the masses of their chiral partners. The temperatures at which this matching occurs depend on the strange quark composition of the corresponding mesons. The topological susceptibility shows a sharp decrease after the chiral transition, signalling the vanishing of the U(1){sub A} anomaly for large temperatures.

  9. Specific heat anomalies of small quantum systems subjected to finite baths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Hasegawa

    2011-11-19

    We have studied the specific heat of the $(N_S+N_B)$ model for an $N_S$-body harmonic oscillator (HO) system which is strongly coupled to an $N_B$-body HO bath without dissipation. The system specific heat of $C_S(T)$ becomes $N_S k_B$ at $T \\rightarrow \\infty$ and vanishes at $T = 0$ in accordance with the third law of thermodynamics. The calculated $C_S(T)$ at low temperatures is not proportional to $N_S$ and shows an anomalous temperature dependence, strongly depending on $N_S$, $N_B$ and the system-bath coupling. In particular at very low (but finite) temperatures, it may become {\\it negative} for a strong system-bath coupling, which is in contrast with {\\it non-negative} specific heat of an HO system with $N_S=1$ reported by G-L. Ingold, P. H\\"{a}nggi and P. Talkner [Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 79}, 061105 (2005)]. Our calculation indicates an importance of taking account of finite $N_S$ in studying open quantum systems which may include an arbitrary number of particles in general.

  10. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  11. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  12. Two-day wave observations of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder mesospheric water vapor and temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpasuvan, Varavut

    of phase. Poleward heat flux associated with upward wave energy propagation in the Southern Hemisphere Carolina, USA Dong L. Wu Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

  13. The neutron anomaly in the gamma N --> eta N cross section through the looking glass of the flavour SU(3) symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Boika; V. Kuznetsov; M. V. Polyakov

    2014-11-17

    We study the implications of the flavour SU(3) symmetry for various interpretations of the neutron anomaly in the $\\gamma N\\to\\eta N$ cross section. We show that the explanation of the neutron anomaly due to interference of known N(1535) and N(1650) resonances implies that N(1650) resonance should have a huge coupling to $\\phi$-meson -- at least 5 times larger than the corresponding $\\rho^0$ coupling. In terms of quark degrees of freedom this means that the well-known N(1650) resonance must be a "cryptoexotic pentaquark"-- its wave function should contain predominantly an $s\\bar s$ component. It turns out that the "conventional" interpretation of the neutron anomaly by the interference of known resonances metamorphoses into unconventional physics picture of N(1650).

  14. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I: processing procedures. [National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  15. Quantum Chaos at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Caron; H. Jirari; H. Kröger; X. Q. Luo; G. Melkonyan; K. J. M. Moriarty

    2001-06-23

    We use the quantum action to study quantum chaos at finite temperature. We present a numerical study of a classically chaotic 2-D Hamiltonian system - harmonic oscillators with anharmonic coupling. We construct the quantum action non-perturbatively and find temperature dependent quantum corrections in the action parameters. We compare Poincar\\'{e} sections of the quantum action at finite temperature with those of the classical action.

  16. RECHARGEABLE HIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2014-01-01

    F. Eshman, High-Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleS. Sudar, High Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleHIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES Elton J. Cairns January 1981 TWO-

  17. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  18. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  19. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  20. Microlaminated high temperature intermetallic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, R.G.; Skelly, D.W.; Larsen, M. (GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)); Heathcote, J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    The thrust to weight ratio of aircraft engines is limited by the density and elevated temperature capability of high temperature turbine materials. Single crystal superalloys, which are the current state-of-the-art in high temperature turbine blade materials, have limited potential for further increases in temperature capability. High temperature intermetallics offer the advantage of higher specific strength and higher temperature capability, but lack ductility and fracture toughness below 1,000 C. By compositing these very high temperature intermetallics with ductile metals, toughening may be improved to the point where the composites have applicability in aircraft engine turbine sections. Lamination of ductile metals with continuous intermetallic layers offers one means of producing such composites. Small lamellae thicknesses may have advantages related to intrinsic defect sizes and the effectiveness of ductile reinforcements in load-controlled applications where strength is important. Intermetallic composites will require a refractory metal for toughening because of the need for metal strength at temperatures above 1,100 C. Niobium-base alloys were selected as the toughening layer in this study because of experience with oxidation-resistant niobium alloys with low densities compared to superalloys and the existence of metal-intermetallic systems in equilibrium at high temperatures. Two microlaminated composite systems, Nb[sub 3]Al-Nb and Cr[sub 2]Nb(Cr) were chosen for microstructural and mechanical property evaluation. The choice of systems was partially based upon knowledge of phase relations between the metal and the intermetallic compositions.

  1. Temperature standards, what and where: resources for effective temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, W.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Many standards have been published to describe devices, methods, and other topics. How they are developed and by whom are briefly described, and an attempt is made to extract most of those relating to temperature measurements. A directory of temperature standards and their sources is provided.

  2. The radial temperature distribution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrica,Traian

    The radial temperature distribution of a constricted oxygen arc in plasma arc cutting Sung Je Kim Gas supply, O2 RHF Starter 2 Components of cutting system Cutting torch components Plasma Arc Cutting High Temperature & Plasma Laboratory University of Minnesota #12;Rotating anode Torch body Power Supply

  3. New High-Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    -TEMPERATURE superconductors, materials that carry electricity without resistance at temperatures inexplicably far above one finds its target. Computa- tional biologists in Germany and the United States offered bold new plenty going for them. They're abundant and carbon-free, and their prices are dropping. But they're part

  4. Global Temperature November 3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of instrumental temperature measurements occurred when the 1997-98 "El Nino of the century" occurred on the back of a strong two-decade warming trend; in addition, the global temperature impact of the El Nino, which typically lags the El Nino by a few months, coincided almost precisely with calendar year 1998. As a result

  5. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  6. Pion dynamics at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toublan, D.

    1997-11-01

    The pion decay constant and mass are computed at low temperature within chiral perturbation theory to two loops. The effects of the breaking of Lorentz symmetry by the thermal equilibrium state are discussed. The validity of the Gell-Mann{endash}Oakes{endash}Renner relation at finite temperature is examined. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine Stanley L. Krugman U. S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Berkeley, Calif.. Pacific pine, conelets, freezing temperature) Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage

  8. Effects of temperature and pressure on phonons in FeSi1–xAlx

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Delaire, O.; Al-Qasir, I. I.; Ma, J.; dos Santos, A. M.; Sales, B. C.; Mauger, L.; Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L.; Xiao, Y.; Somayazulu, M.

    2013-05-31

    The effects of temperature and pressure on phonons in B20 compounds FeSi1–xAlx were measured using inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The effect of hole doping through Al substitution is compared to results of alloying with Co (electron doping) in Fe??xCoxSi. While the temperature dependence of phonons in FeSi is highly anomalous, doping with either type of carriers leads to a recovery of the normal quasiharmonic behavior. Density functional theory (DFT) computations of the electronic band structure and phonons were performed. The anomaly in the temperature dependence of the phonons in undoped FeSi was related to the narrowmore »band gap, and its sensitivity to the effect of thermal disordering by phonons. On the other hand, the pressure dependence of phonons at room temperature in undoped FeSi follows the quasiharmonic behavior and is well reproduced by the DFT calculations.« less

  9. Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

  10. Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal Electrical Power Generation Systems Using Oilfield Fluids Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature...

  11. Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules Presents concept for hermetic encapsulation of TE modules...

  12. Neutron-Proton Mass Difference in Nuclear Matter and in Finite Nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf-G. Meißner; A. M. Rakhimov; A. Wirzba; U. T. Yakhshiev

    2009-12-29

    The neutron-proton mass difference in (isospin asymmetric) nuclear matter and finite nuclei is studied in the framework of a medium-modified Skyrme model. The proposed effective Lagrangian incorporates both the medium influence of the surrounding nuclear environment on the single nucleon properties and an explicit isospin-breaking effect in the mesonic sector. Energy-dependent charged and neutral pion optical potentials in the s- and p-wave channels are included as well. The present approach predicts that the neutron-proton mass difference is mainly dictated by its strong part and that it markedly decreases in neutron matter. Furthermore, the possible interplay between the effective nucleon mass in finite nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly is discussed. In particular, we find that a correct description of the properties of mirror nuclei leads to a stringent restriction of possible modifications of the nucleon's effective mass in nuclei.

  13. A route to explain water anomalies from results on an aqueous solution of salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Corradini; M. Rovere; P. Gallo

    2010-03-26

    In this paper we investigate the possibility to detect the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water in supercooled aqueous solutions of salts. Molecular dynamics computer simulations are conducted on bulk TIP4P water and on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride in TIP4P water, with concentration c = 0.67 mol/kg. The liquid-liquid critical point is found both in the bulk and in the solution. Its position in the thermodynamic plane shifts to higher temperature and lower pressure for the solution. Comparison with available experimental data allowed us to produce the phase diagrams of both bulk water and the aqueous solution as measurable in experiments. Given the position of the liquid-liquid critical point in the solution as obtained from our simulations, the experimental determination of the hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point of water in aqueous solutions of salts appears possible.

  14. Relations between the diffusion anomaly and cooperative rearranging regions in a hydrophobically nanoconfined water monolayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco de los Santos; Giancarlo Franzese

    2012-01-30

    We simulate liquid water between hydrophobic walls separated by 0.5 nm, to study how the diffusion constant D_\\parallel parallel to the walls depends on the microscopic structure of water. At low temperature T, water diffusion can be associated with the number of defects in the hydrogen bonds network. However, the number of defects solely does not account for the peculiar diffusion of water, with maxima and minima along isotherms. Here, we calculate a relation that quantitatively reproduces the behavior of D_\\parallel, focusing on the high-T regime. We clarify how the interplay between breaking of hydrogen bonds and cooperative rearranging regions of 1-nm size gives rise to the diffusion extrema, possibly relevant for both bulk and nanoconfined water.

  15. NUCLEOSYNTHETIC TUNGSTEN ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN ACID LEACHATES OF THE MURCHISON CHONDRITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR HAFNIUM-TUNGSTEN CHRONOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer; Kleine, Thorsten; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Progressive dissolution of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite with acids of increasing strengths reveals large internal W isotope variations that reflect a heterogeneous distribution of s- and r-process W isotopes among the components of primitive chondrites. At least two distinct carriers of nucleosynthetic W isotope anomalies must be present, which were produced in different nucleosynthetic environments. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates follows a linear trend that is consistent with a mixing line between terrestrial W and a presumed s-process-enriched component. The composition of the s-enriched component agrees reasonably well with that predicted by the stellar model of s-process nucleosynthesis. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates provides a means for correcting the measured {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W of Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI) for nucleosynthetic anomalies using the isotopic variations in {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W. This new correction procedure is different from that used previously, and results in a downward shift of the initial {epsilon}{sup 182}W of CAI to -3.51 {+-} 0.10 (where {epsilon}{sup 182}W is the variation in 0.01% of the {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W ratio relative to Earth's mantle). This revision leads to Hf-W model ages of core formation in iron meteorite parent bodies that are {approx}2 Myr younger than previously calculated. The revised Hf-W model ages are consistent with CAI being the oldest solids formed in the solar system, and indicate that core formation in some planetesimals occurred within {approx}2 Myr of the beginning of the solar system.

  16. Long-Term Instrumental and Reconstructed Temperature Records Contradict Anthropogenic Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lüdecke, Horst-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Monthly instrumental temperature records from 5 stations in the northern hemisphere are analyzed, each of which is local and over 200 years in length, as well as two reconstructed long-range yearly records - from a stalagmite and from tree rings that are about 2000 years long. In the instrumental records, the steepest 100-year temperature fall happened in the 19th century and the steepest rise in the 20th century, both events being of about the same magnitude. Evaluation by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) yields Hurst exponents that are in good agreement with the literature. DFA, Monte Carlo simulations, and synthetic records reveal that both 100-year events were caused by external trends. In contrast to this, the reconstructed records show stronger 100-year rises and falls as quite common during the last 2000 years. These results contradict the hypothesis of an unusual (anthropogenic) global warming during the 20th century. As a hypothesis, the sun's magnetic field, which is correlated with sunspot ...

  17. Investigation of temperature in the stratosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kays, Marvin Dale

    1968-01-01

    for the $0-mb level. However, there is no significant difference in the general circulation between the 10- and 50-mb levels. During the summer, high pr ssure is centered over the Eorth Pole with winds blowing from east io west (an east wind. ) as shown... in Fig. 1. Speeds of 5 to 10 mps are common with the average maximum reaching about 20 mps during July. The circumpolar high pressure cell dominates the entire Northern Hemisphere during the summer. There is a change from east to west winds about...

  18. An Integrated Scheme for Anomaly Identification and Automatic Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Robert M. Edwards and Asok Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    An Integrated Scheme for Anomaly Identification and Automatic Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin.edu INTRODUCTION Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are complex systems with many variables that require adjustment to the NPP. METHODOLOGY This proposed integrated scheme consists of three inter-related subsystems: Nuclear

  19. F A S T -T R A C K P A P E R The seismic anomaly beneath Iceland extends down to the mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Richard M.

    F A S T - T R A C K P A P E R The seismic anomaly beneath Iceland extends down to the mantle, NJ 08544±5807, USA 4 Meteorological Of®ce of Iceland, Bustadavegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland 5 National Energy Authority, Grensasvegi 9, Reykjavik, Iceland Accepted 2000 June 15. Received 2000 June 8

  20. Room temperature water Leidenfrost droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Celestini; Thomas Frisch; Yves Pomeau

    2013-08-05

    We experimentally investigate the Leidenfrost effect at pressures ranging from 1 to 0.05 atmospheric pressure. As a direct consequence of the Clausius-Clapeyron phase diagram of water, the droplet temperature can be at ambient temperature in a non-sophisticated lab environment. Furthermore, the lifetime of the Leidenfrost droplet is significantly increased in this low pressure environment. The temperature and pressure dependance of the evaporation rate are successfully tested against a recently proposed model. These results may pave a way to reach efficient Leidenfrost micro-fluidic and milli-fluidic applications.

  1. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  2. Validation of Noah-simulated Soil Temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Youlong; Ek, Michael; Sheffield, Justin; Livneh, Ben; Huang, Maoyi; Wei, Helin; Song, Feng; Luo, Lifeng; Meng, Jesse; Wood, Eric

    2013-02-25

    Soil temperature can exhibit considerable memory from weather and climate signals and is among the most important initial conditions in numerical weather and climate models. Consequently, a more accurate long-term land surface soil temperature dataset is needed to improve weather and climate simulation and prediction, and is also important for the simulation of agricultural crop yield and ecological processes. The North-American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS) Phase 2 (NLDAS-2) has generated 31-years (1979-2009) of simulated hourly soil temperature data with a spatial resolution of 1/8o. This dataset has not been comprehensively evaluated to date. Thus, the ultimate purpose of the present work is to assess Noah-simulated soil temperature for different soil depths and timescales. We used long-term (1979-2001) observed monthly mean soil temperatures from 137 cooperative stations over the United States to evaluate simulated soil temperature for three soil layers (0-10 cm, 10-40 cm, 40-100 cm) for annual and monthly timescales. We used short-term (1997-1999) observed soil temperature from 72 Oklahoma Mesonet stations to validate simulated soil temperatures for three soil layers and for daily and hourly timescales. The results showed that the Noah land surface model (Noah LSM) generally matches observed soil temperature well for different soil layers and timescales. At greater depths, the simulation skill (anomaly correlation) decreased for all time scales. The monthly mean diurnal cycle difference between simulated and observed soil temperature revealed large midnight biases in the cold season due to small downward longwave radiation and issues related to model parameters.

  3. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  4. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  5. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1998-03-24

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub (x)},Eu{sub (y)}, wherein: 0.1 wt %{<=}x{<=}20 wt % and 0.1 wt %{<=}y{<=}20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  6. Apparatus and method for high temperature viscosity and temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Krishnan (Mississippi State, MS); Shah, Vimal (Houston, TX); Costley, R. Daniel (Mississippi State, MS); Singh, Jagdish P. (Mississippi State, MS)

    2001-01-01

    A probe for measuring the viscosity and/or temperature of high temperature liquids, such as molten metals, glass and similar materials comprises a rod which is an acoustical waveguide through which a transducer emits an ultrasonic signal through one end of the probe, and which is reflected from (a) a notch or slit or an interface between two materials of the probe and (b) from the other end of the probe which is in contact with the hot liquid or hot melt, and is detected by the same transducer at the signal emission end. To avoid the harmful effects of introducing a thermally conductive heat sink into the melt, the probe is made of relatively thermally insulative (non-heat-conductive) refractory material. The time between signal emission and reflection, and the amplitude of reflections, are compared against calibration curves to obtain temperature and viscosity values.

  7. LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON HIGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS Harald W. Weber-induced Defects in HTS Practical Materials HTS4Fusion Conductor Workshop, KIT, 27 May 2011 #12;LOW TEMPERATURE;LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Options / Materials "Demo" design (magnetic field, temperature, fluence

  8. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

  9. Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jungst, Rudolph George (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James Rudolph (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel Richard (Austin, TX)

    2000-01-01

    A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

  10. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01

    The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

  11. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

    2005-11-08

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  13. LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON FUSION MAGNET COMPONENTS ­ 1: SUPERCONDUCTORS Harald W, Austria Introduction: The ITER-Magnets, Neutron Spectra Low Temperature Superconductors Stabilizer HTS Conclusions WAMSDO Workshop, Geneva 14 November 2011 #12;LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Overview: ITER 300

  14. Tuning dehydrogenation temperature of carbonammonia borane nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    the hydrogen storage properties. For example, the dehydrogenation temperature of ammonia borane (ABTuning dehydrogenation temperature of carbon­ammonia borane nanocomposites Saghar Sepehri, Betzaida temperature and kinetics of coherent carbon­ammonia borane nanocomposites prepared by sol­gel synthesis

  15. RFID tag antenna based temperature sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Rahul

    Temperature monitoring is important in a number of fields, particularly cold supply chain applications. Most commercial wireless temperature sensors consist of transceivers, memory and batteries to maintain a temperature ...

  16. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  17. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  18. Long-Term Instrumental and Reconstructed Temperature Records Contradict Anthropogenic Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horst-Joachim Lüdecke

    2011-10-09

    Monthly instrumental temperature records from 5 stations in the northern hemisphere are analyzed, each of which is local and over 200 years in length, as well as two reconstructed long-range yearly records - from a stalagmite and from tree rings that are about 2000 years long. In the instrumental records, the steepest 100-year temperature fall happened in the 19th century and the steepest rise in the 20th century, both events being of about the same magnitude. Evaluation by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) yields Hurst exponents that are in good agreement with the literature. DFA, Monte Carlo simulations, and synthetic records reveal that both 100-year events were caused by external trends. In contrast to this, the reconstructed records show stronger 100-year rises and falls as quite common during the last 2000 years. These results contradict the hypothesis of an unusual (anthropogenic) global warming during the 20th century. As a hypothesis, the sun's magnetic field, which is correlated with sunspot numbers, is put forward as an explanation. The long-term low-frequency fluctuations in sunspot numbers are not detectable by the DFA in the monthly instrumental records, resulting in the common low Hurst exponents. The same does not hold true for the 2000-year-long reconstructed records, which explains both their higher Hurst exponents and the higher probabilities of strong 100-year temperature fluctuations. A long-term synthetic record that embodies the reconstructed sunspot number fluctuations includes the different Hurst exponents of both the instrumental and the reconstructed records and, therefore, corroborates the conjecture.

  19. Comprehensive Report For Proposed Elevated Temperature Elastic Perfectly Plastic (EPP) Code Cases Representative Example Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg L. Hollinger

    2014-06-01

    Background: The current rules in the nuclear section of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code , Section III, Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200F (650C)1. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (E-PP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures. The proposed rules for strain limits and creep-fatigue evaluation were initially documented in the technical literature 2, 3, and have been recently revised to incorporate comments and simplify their application. The revised code cases have been developed. Task Objectives: The goal of the Sample Problem task is to exercise these code cases through example problems to demonstrate their feasibility and, also, to identify potential corrections and improvements should problems be encountered. This will provide input to the development of technical background documents for consideration by the applicable B&PV committees considering these code cases for approval. This task has been performed by Hollinger and Pease of Becht Engineering Co., Inc., Nuclear Services Division and a report detailing the results of the E-PP analyses conducted on example problems per the procedures of the E-PP strain limits and creep-fatigue draft code cases is enclosed as Enclosure 1. Conclusions: The feasibility of the application of the E-PP code cases has been demonstrated through example problems that consist of realistic geometry (a nozzle attached to a semi-hemispheric shell with a circumferential weld) and load (pressure; pipe reaction load applied at the end of the nozzle, including axial and shear forces, bending and torsional moments; through-wall transient temperature gradient) and design and operating conditions (Levels A, B and C).

  20. The seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, Bridget Frances

    1994-01-01

    differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter. 40 years of monthly mean surface data and 25 years of monthly mean 700mb and 500mb data is averaged over the seasons. The spatial correlation of four northern hemisphere midlatitude test sites...

  1. A possible solution to the Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Pioneer Anomaly problems via a VSL approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roee Amit

    2008-02-15

    I apply the equations of motion derived in the accompanying manuscript for the classical approximation of the vsl-path integral to the Newtonian gravitational field in simple geometries. The vsl classical-action, a complex quantity in this case, yields modified Euler-Lagrange equations. This, in turn, leads to the emergence of two equations of motions that must be satisfied concomitantly in order to minimize the complex action. The solutions obtained to the doublet equation of motion include the MOND force law, a dark-energy-like omni-present repulsive gravitational force, a pioneer-like anomaly at the solar system level, and additional predictions, which can be verified with either careful observations or via additional probes to the outer solar system. The exercise carried out in this paper exemplifies the explanatory potential of the vsl-approach, pointing to a potentially new physics paradigm. Finally, the vsl-approach is not only predictive, but highly falsifiable, an important ingredient of any physics theory.

  2. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-07-02

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores.

  3. Isotope Anomalies in the Fe-group Elements in Meteorites and Connection to Nucleosynthesis in AGB Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasserburg, Gerald J; Busso, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of neutron captures in AGB stars on \\oq Fe-group\\cqb elements, with an emphasis on Cr, Fe, and Ni. These elements show anomalies in $^{54}$Cr, $^{58}$Fe, and $^{64}$Ni in solar-system materials, which are commonly attributed to SNe. However, as large fractions of the interstellar medium (ISM) were reprocessed in AGB stars, these elements were reprocessed, too. We calculate the effects of such reprocessing on Cr, Fe, and Ni through 1.5\\msb and 3\\msb AGB models, adopting solar and 1/3 solar metallicities. All cases produce excesses of $^{54}$Cr, $^{58}$Fe, and $^{64}$Ni, while the other isotopes are little altered; hence, the observations may be explained by AGB processing. The results are robust and not dependent on the detailed initial isotopic composition. Consequences for other \\oq Fe group\\cqb elements are then explored. They include $^{50}$Ti excesses, and some production of $^{46,47,49}$Ti. In many circumstellar condensates, Ti quantitatively reflects these effects of AGB neutron cap...

  4. Hydrogen bond relaxation dynamics and the associated vibronic and volumetric anomalies of H2O upon frozen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi Zhang; Xiaojian Fu; Yu Wen; Jer-lai Kuo; Zexiang Shen; Ji Zhou; Chang Q. Sun

    2011-10-02

    A combination of the extended Ice Rule of Pauling, Raman spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics calculations has enabled us to clarify the bonding origin of the anomalous volume expansion, Raman phonon relaxation, and the stiffness and fragility of H2O upon frozen. We found that the initially shorter-and-stronger intramolecular "H+/p-O2-" bond follows the regular rule of cooling-contraction while the initially longer-and-weaker intermolecular "O2- : H+/p" nonbond turns to be even longer yet stiffer in the "O2- : H+/p-O2-" hydrogen-bond of H2O upon frozen, as a consequence of the polarization and Coulomb repulsion between the unevenly-bounded bonding and nonbonding electron pairs. The elongation of the nonbond and the polarization of the nonbonding lone pair are responsible, respectively, for the volume expansion and the stiffness and the fragility of ice. Findings should form important impact to the understanding of the physical anomalies of H2O under other stimuli such as pressure and confinement.

  5. Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Addthis Project Level Easy Energy Savings 12-30 annually for each 10F...

  6. Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have...

  7. Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  8. Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated with a CHP System at a Distributed Data Center - Presentation by Exergy Partners Corp., June 2011 Advanced Low Temperature...

  9. Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

  10. Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

  11. HYDROGEN SULFIDE -HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN SULFIDE - HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A Foundation. ii #12;HYDROGEN SULFIDE-HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 139

  12. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

  13. Thermodynamic Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Including the Use of Low Heat Rejection Concepts Thermodynamic Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Including the Use...

  14. Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group, May 25, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA.

  15. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  16. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  17. Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D...

  18. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  19. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  20. Temperature controlled high voltage regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiaro, Jr., Peter J. (Clinton, TN); Schulze, Gerald K. (Knoxville, TN)

    2004-04-20

    A temperature controlled high voltage regulator for automatically adjusting the high voltage applied to a radiation detector is described. The regulator is a solid state device that is independent of the attached radiation detector, enabling the regulator to be used by various models of radiation detectors, such as gas flow proportional radiation detectors.

  1. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  2. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  3. temperature heat pumps applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application of industrial heat pumps June 21 th 2012 J-L Peureux, E. Sapora, D. Bobelin EDF R&D #12;Achema 2012 Frankfurt There are thermal requirements in the industrial plant Treq Heat exchanger = Cons ~ 0 CO2 ~ -100% Treq

  4. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  5. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  6. Phonon anomalies in Pb1-xLax,,Zr0.9Ti0.1...O3 ceramics E. Buixaderas,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KuÂ?el, Petr

    Phonon anomalies in Pb1-xLax,,Zr0.9Ti0.1...O3 ceramics E. Buixaderas,1,a I. Gregora,1 S. Kamba,1 P modified lead zirconate titanate ceramics Pb1-xLax ZryTi1-y O3 PLZT X/Y /1-Y, where X=100x, Y =100y have The local symmetry, however, seems to be monoclinic.7 Raman scattering of PZT 90/10 ceramics8 and single

  7. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  8. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

  14. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for remotely monitoring temperature. Both method and apparatus employ a temperature probe material having an excitation-dependent emission line whose fluorescence intensity varies directly with temperature whenever excited by light having a first wavelength and whose fluorescence intensity varies inversely with temperature whenever excited by light having a second wavelength. Temperature is measured by alternatively illiminating the temperature probe material with light having the first wavelength and light having the second wavelength, monitoring the intensity of the successive emissions of the excitation-dependent emission line, and relating the intensity ratio of successive emissions to temperature. 3 figs.

  15. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S. Michael (Livermore, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for remotely monitoring temperature. Both method and apparatus employ a temperature probe material having an excitation-dependent emission line whose fluorescence intensity varies directly with temperature whenever excited by light having a first wavelength and whose fluorescence intensity varies inversely with temperature whenever excited by light having a second wavelength. Temperature is measured by alternatively illuminating the temperature probe material with light having the first wavelength and light having the second wavelength, monitoring the intensity of the successive emissions of the excitation-dependent emission line, and relating the intensity ratio of successive emissions to temperature.

  16. Fuel processor temperature monitoring and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In one embodiment, the method of the invention monitors one or more of the following conditions: a relatively low temperature value of the gas stream; a relatively high temperature value of the gas stream; and a rate-of-change of monitored temperature. In a preferred embodiment, the rate of temperature change is monitored to prevent the occurrence of an unacceptably high or low temperature condition. Here, at least two temperatures of the recirculating gas stream are monitored over a period of time. The rate-of-change of temperature versus time is determined. Then the monitored rate-of-change of temperature is compared to a preselected rate-of-change of value. The monitoring of rate-of-change of temperature provides proactive means for preventing occurrence of an unacceptably high temperature in the catalytic reactor.

  17. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  18. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  19. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  20. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.