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1

Helmut Feustel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helmut Feustel Professor, Building Services EngineeringHVAC & Technical Expert on HVAC for Law-Courts in Germany, Altlandsberg (F.R.G.) HTW University of Applied Sciences, Berlin...

2

Joint article about EIA  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Published in: The Middle East Economic SurveyAuthored by: Guy Caruso, EIA Administrator; and Helmut Merklein, former Administrator

Information Center

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Helmut Claus - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EM > Helmut Claus EM > Helmut Claus Helmut Claus STA Senior Physicist Bldg. 223, A-133 Phone: 630-252-4030 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Biography Helmut Claus is a Senior Scientist STA in the Material Sciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory. He received his PhD summa cum laude from the Technische Hochschule Karlsruhe, Germany, in 1965. He is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago. His research areas include magnetic and superconducting properties of materials. Selected Publications Phase diagram of Ba1-xKxFe2As2, S. Avci, O. Chmaissem,D.-Y. Chung, S. Rosenkranz, E. A. Goremychkin, J. P. Castellan, I. S. Todorov, J. A. Schlueter, H. Claus, A. Daoud-Aladine, D. D. Khalyavin, M. G. Kanatzidis, R. Osborn, Phys. Rev. B 85, 184507 (2012) [doi]

4

About EIA - History - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Previous Administrators Richard Newell Guy Caruso Jay Hakes Calvin Kent Richard Newell 2009-2011 Guy Caruso 2002-2008 Jay Hakes 1993-2000 Calvin Kent 1990-1993 Helmut Merklein...

5

Helmut Dersch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have ported PTViewer, a Java-based spherical panorama viewer, to J2ME, Suns microedition runtime for the Java language. A prepackaged version for PalmOS 5 is distributed together with a generic jar-version suitable for any CLDC-1.1/MIDP-2.0 compliant Java runtime. 1

Smartphone; Fh Furtwangen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1985--1990  

SciTech Connect

The Earth`s capacity to support life depends on the moderating influences of gases that envelop the planet and warm its surface and protect it from harmful radiation. These gases are referred to as ``greenhouse gases.`` Their warming capacity, called ``the greenhouse effect,`` is essential to maintaining a climate hospitable to all plant, animal, and human life. In recent years, however, there has been increasing concern that human activity may be affecting the intricate balance between the Earth`s absorption of heat from the sun and its capacity to reradiate excess heat back into space. Emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities may be an important mechanism that affects global climate. Thus, research is intensifying to improve our understanding of the role human activities might play in influencing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. On the basis of scientific findings of the past few decades, the US Government and the international community at large are now taking steps toward stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. This report contributes to that process. Mandated by Congress this report provides estimates of US emissions of the principal greenhouse gases--carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorcarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds. Estimates are for the period 1985 to 1990. Preliminary estimates for 1991 have also been included, whenever data were available.

Not Available

1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.  

SciTech Connect

This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Integral Invariants for Robust Geometry Processing Helmut Pottmann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1. It leads to the main conclusion that wavelet Leaders do have significantly superior performance than

Nawratil, Georg

10

Zeitnetze. Globalisierung und postmoderne sthetik in Helmut Kraussers Roman UC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seiner Erzhlung Der Garten der Pfade, die sich verzweigenIn der Erzhlung Der Garten der Pfade, die sich verzweigenunrettbar in jenem netzfrmigen Garten der Pfade, die sich

Pause, Johannes

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

AIR FLOW DISTRIBUTION IN A HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL Helmut E. Feustel and Richard C. Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington DC, 1996 Feustel, H.E. and A. Raynor-Hooson. 1990. "Fundamentals of the Multizone Air Flow Model, Washington DC, 1992. Shapiro-Baruch, Ian. 1993. "Evaluation of Ventilation in Multifamily Dwellings," New-pane windows and sliding balcony doors. The building has a mechanical ventilation system, with kitchen

Diamond, Richard

12

COMBINATION OF MSWC AND COAL FIRED POWER PLANT Jiirgen Vehlow, Hans Hunsinger, Siegfried Kreisz, Helmut Seifert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMBINATION OF MSWC AND COAL FIRED POWER PLANT Jiirgen Vehlow, Hans Hunsinger, Siegfried Kreisz for the combination of a municipal solid waste combustion plant and a coal fired power plant in such a way that the dedusted and pre cleaned offgas of the waste combustion serves as carrier gas for the pulverized coal

Columbia University

13

Neutron Interferometry: Lessons in Experimental Quantum Mechanics Helmut Rauch and Samuel A. Werner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Of Richmond - Department of Physics Software We simulated the neutron detection efficiency physics program. Specifically, we are simulating the neutron detection efficiency of the forward TOFSimulating the Neutron Detection Efficiency of the CLAS12 Detector M. Moog and G. Gilfoyle

Lynn, Jeffrey W.

14

PHASE I FINAL REPORT SUBCONTRACT NO. 2019702 "ENERGY EFFICIENT FLUORESCENT BALLASTS"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decreased requirement on foreign oil sources. Approximatelyin purchase reductions of foreign oil alone by 1985-1990. II

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Air Flow Distribution in a Mechanically-Ventilated High-Rise Residential Building* Richard C. Diamond and Helmut E. Feustel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, Washington DC, 1992. SHAPIRO-BARUCH, IAN, "Evaluation. The individual apartments have electric-resistance heaters in each room, and double-pane windows and sliding retrofits. New double-pane, low-e windows replaced the old windows throughout the building. A computerized

Diamond, Richard

16

Overview of Lithography: Challenges and Metrologies Harry J. ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Spec for flatness = 45 nm PV at the 32 nm node. ... 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Year E xposure tool price Historical tool prices Page 35. ...

17

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil imports fall due to increased domestic ... Energy supply. Energy demand. Source: EIA ... 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 ...

18

Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 ... oil demand growth, slow supply growth and tight spare capacity 22 Richard Newell, May 5, 2011

19

Global Oil Geopolitics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude ... World Crude Oil Supply and Demand Balance 14

20

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Census Division, 2011 22 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helmut merklein 1985-1990" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Census Division, 2011 20 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000...

22

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 Value of Electric Lighting Fixture Shipments (Million) Lighting Fixture Type 1985 1990 1995 2000 2001 Residential 786.8 827.6 983.8 983.9 CommercialInstitutional (except...

23

Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 0 5 10 15 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Natural gas plant liquids Net petroleum imports Source: Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Global economic...

24

Figure 7.5 Coal Exports by Country of Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nether- Brazil United Japan Canada Italy Germany 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Million Short Tons Kingdom Total Europe 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 ...

25

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

12 Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 4 Power 5 Residential Industrial Commercial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel 6 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12...

26

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Crude Oil Domestic First Purchase Prices U.S. Average Prices, 1949-2011 Alaska North Slope, California, and Texas 1977-2011 160 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price defla- tors in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 3 Alaska North Slope. Source: Table 5.18. Real¹ Nominal² 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Dollars per Barrel Texas Texas 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 25 50 75 100 125 Nominal Dollars² per Barrel Nominal² Prices 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 100 Index: 1977=100 Real¹ Prices, Indexed 1977=100 ANS³ California Texas 1980

27

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011 4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011 Gross Withdrawals by Location Number of Producing Wells Gross Withdrawals by State and Federal Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Well Average Productivity 184 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Trillion Cubic Feet (Cumulative) 1 Through 1996, includes gross withdrawals in Federal offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico; beginning in 1997, these are included in "Federal Gulf of Mexico." 2 Gulf of Mexico. Source: Table 6.4. Onshore 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Thousands Offshore 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 Trillion Cubic Feet Louisiana¹ 1960

28

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector 2 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Total a by End-Use Sector, b 1973-2012 Residential Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Commercial Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Industrial Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Transportation Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 Electric Power Sector by Major Source, 1973-2012 160 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 Petroleum Natural Gas Retail Electricity b Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial Retail Electricity b 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 1,000 Retail Electricity

29

An Introductory wander around CSP. Sometimes mentioning extensions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Introductory wander around CSP. Sometimes mentioning extensions. A.E.Lawrence A ... 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Semaphores Monitors Events: CSP CSP CCS -calculus CPA Semaphores Monitors Events: CSP CSP CCS -calculus The crucial idea of the atomic event was from Dijkstra. CPA

Lawrence, Adrian

30

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 12.4 - National SO 2 and Heat Input Data 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2004 SO 2 (lbs) 34,523,334,000 32,184,330,000 31,466,566,000 23,671,357,600 22,404,150,534 20,518,221,256...

31

The United States of America Meets the Planet Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, U.C. Berkeley August 23, 2005, National Press Club #12;We Burn More Than Plants Produce Hydro Inputs Ethanol Energy Fuel Cell Car Hybrid Car Average Car Energy per unit area and unit time, W/m2 Bill 082305 NPC ­ p.6/13 #12;U.S. Ethanol Inflated Car Tires 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

32

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D...

33

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Petroleum Natural Gas Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D...

34

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 Electricity a Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Renewable Energy 2011 2012 2013 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M...

35

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 3 6 9 12 Natural Gas Petroleum Electricity a Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D...

36

What's Driving Oil Prices? James L. Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$60 $80 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Real Price ($2005) #12;2 Hubbert's Curve (Peak Oil) PEAK OIL QUIZ Instructions: With books closed and eyes on your own paper, please mark the single best answer. 1. Peak oil production indicates: a) Half gone. b) Running out. c) Starting out. d) None

O'Donnell, Tom

37

October, 2012 CV OF MICHAEL MEGRELISHVILI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Sc., Mathematics and Mechanics Department, Tbilisi State Univer- sity. ACADEMIC POSITIONS 2003-present Associate., Georgian Ac. of Sciences, Tbilisi) TEACHING EXPERIENCE: a) Bar-Ilan University 1992­present b) Ashkelon College 1996­2008 c) Ariel College 1995­2001 d) Tbilisi Mathematical Institute 1985-1990 e) Tbilisi State

Megrelishvili, Michael

38

CV OF MICHAEL MEGRELISHVILI PRESENT POSITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mechanics Department, Tbilisi State Univer- sity. ACADEMIC POSITIONS 2003-present Associate Professor, Bar. of Sciences, Tbilisi) TEACHING EXPERIENCE: a) Bar-Ilan University 1992­present b) Ashkelon College 1996­present c) Ariel College 1995­2001 d) Tbilisi Mathematical Institute 1985-1990 e) Tbilisi State University

Megrelishvili, Michael

39

January, 2011 CV OF MICHAEL MEGRELISHVILI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Topology. 1 #12;2 CV-MEGRELISHVILI 1976-1981 M.Sc., Mathematics and Mechanics Department, Tbilisi State (Bar-Ilan University) 1985-1991 Senior Researcher (Mathem. Inst., Georgian Ac. of Sciences, Tbilisi 1995­2001 d) Tbilisi Mathematical Institute 1985-1990 e) Tbilisi State University 1983-1984 COURSES

Megrelishvili, Michael

40

Monthly energy review, December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document provides data on monthly energy use and fossil fuels. The following sections are included: Highlights: Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1985--1990; Highlights: assessment of energy use in multibuilding facilities; energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices; and international energy.

Not Available

1993-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helmut merklein 1985-1990" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25 results: 25 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Helmut E. Feustel [Clear All Filters] 1999 Sohn, Michael D., Joan M. Daisey, and Helmut E. Feustel. Characterizing indoor airflow and pollutant transport using simulation modeling for prototypical buildings. 1. Office buildings In Proceedings of the Indoor Air '99, Edinburgh, Scotland. Vol. 4. Construction Research Communications, Ltd., London, 1999. Modera, Mark P., Tengfang T. Xu, Helmut E. Feustel, Nance Matson, Charlie Huizenga, Fred S. Bauman, and Edward A. Arens. Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report., 1999. Diamond, Richard C., Helmut E. Feustel, and Nance Matson. A Guide to Energy Efficient Ventilation in Apartment Buildings, US Department of Energy

42

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Nuclear Energy . Nuclear Energy Figure 9.1 Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units, 1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, 2011 Permanent Shutdowns by Year, 1955-2011 270 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Units holding full-power operating licenses, or equivalent permission to operate, at the end of the year. Note: Data are at end of year. Sources: Tables 9.1 and 8.11a. 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -4 0 4 8 12 -4 Million Kilowatts 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 30 60 90 120 Number of Units 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 0 Number Total Units Ordered: 259 Permanent Shutdowns 28 104 Operable Units¹ U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011

43

Word Pro - S5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Development Indicators Rotary Rigs in Operation by Type, 1949-2012 Rotary Rigs in Operation by Type, Monthly Active Well Service Rig Count, Monthly Total Wells Drilled by Type, 1949-2010 . 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 Thousand Rigs 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Thousand Wells Dry Wells Crude Oil Wells Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#crude. Sources: Tables 5.1 and 5.2. Crude Oil J FMAMJ J A SOND J FMAMJ J A SOND J FMAMJ J

44

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions Total, 1980-2009 By Source, 2009 Energy Sources by Type, 1980-2009 Agricultural Sources by Major Type, 1980-2009 312 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Adipic acid production (primarily for the manufacture of nylon fibers and plastics) and nitric acid production (primarily for fertilizers). 2 Emissions from passenger cars and trucks; air, rail, and marine transportation; and farm and construction equipment. 3 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and wood for heat or electricity. Source: Table 11.4. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 Million Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0 50 100 150 200 Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide 540 143 36 18 Agricultural Energy Industrial Waste 0 200

45

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports, 1949-2011 Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports by Fuel 84 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price deflators in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Includes small amounts of coal coke. Note: Negative net imports indicate that the value of exports is greater than the value of imports. Source: Table 3.9. 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -50 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 -50 Billion Real (2005) Dollars¹ 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -50 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 -50 Billion Real (2005) Dollars¹ Coal² Natural Gas Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

46

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

World's Demand for World's Demand for Liquid Fuels A Roundtable Discussion A New Climate For Energy EIA 2009 Energy Conference April 7, 2009 Washington, DC 2 World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type 0 50 100 150 200 250 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Quadrillion Btu Liquids Natural Gas Coal Renewables Nuclear History Projections Source: EIA, IEO2008 36% 23% 6% 8% 29% 33% 24% 8% 6% 27% 3 World Liquids Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 0 50 100 150 200 250 2005 2015 2030 Quadrillion Btu Building Industrial Transportation Electric Power Source: EIA, IEO2008 4 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Light Sweet Crude Oil (2007 $/B) Reference Case High World Oil Price Low World Oil Price World Oil Prices in Three Price Cases, AEO2009 - Real Prices History Projections Source: EIA, AEO2009, NYMEX

47

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Overview Production and Trade, 1949-2011 Production and Trade, 2011 Inventories, End of Year 1981-2011 Average Prices, 1981-2011 274 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Purchased Imports Purchased Imports Domestic Purchases 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: See "Uranium Oxide" in Glossary. Source: Table 9.3. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 25 50 75 Million Pounds Uranium Oxide Export Sales Domestic Concentrate Production 4 54 17 Domestic Purchased Imports Export Sales 0 20 40 60 Million Pounds Uranium Oxide Concentrate Production 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200 Million Pounds Uranium Oxide Total 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Dollars¹ per Pound Uranium Oxide

48

Word Pro - S5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Natural Gas Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Development Figure 5.1 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Development Indicators Rotary Rigs in Operation by Type, 1949-2012 Rotary Rigs in Operation by Type, Monthly Active Well Service Rig Count, Monthly Total Wells Drilled by Type, 1949-2010 . 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 Thousand Rigs 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Thousand Wells Dry Wells Crude Oil Wells Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#crude. Sources: Tables 5.1 and 5.2.

49

Z .The Science of the Total Environment 262 2000 205 220 Drought disturbance from climate change: response of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Some brief comments will be provided concerning Mexico; however, the general assumption is that 3, solar, wind, waste, and wood. #12;6 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 3,500 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 of the electricity generated. Nuclear power provided about 64.7% of the 1994 electrical generation in Ontario25

50

Emissions of CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere due to U. S. A. fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and projection of carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere are estimated based on the Brookhaven reference energy system. Some new results are given on carbon dioxide contribution to the atmosphere from US fossil fuel consumption by different sectors including residential, commercial, industrial and transportation. The total weight of carbon as carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere and the additional CO/sub 2/ concentration over background by different subsectors in the years 1977, 1980, 1985, 1990, 2000 and 2020 are presented.

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 (Quadrillion Btu) Residential and Commercial a Sectors, Selected Products Industrial a Sector, Selected Products Transportation Sector, Selected Products 56 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Kerosene Residual Fuel Oil LPG b 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Distillate Fuel Oil Asphalt and Road Oil 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Distillate Fuel Oil d Jet Fuel e Motor Gasoline c a Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. b Liquefied petroleum gases. c Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

52

Universitatsbibliothek Heidelberg Plock 107-109 Postfach 105749  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:Lehrbuch Signatur:QS 4''MD 5342 LEONHARDT, Helmut; TILLMANN, B. (Hrsg.): Anatomie des Menschen : Lehrbuch und Atlas,Aufl.14 WALDEYER, Anton; MAYET, A.: Anatomie des Menschen,. 17., völlig überarb. Aufl., hrsg. Von J SOBOTTA, Johannes: Atlas der Anatomie des Menschen. Hrsg. von R. Putz und R. Pabst. München : Urban

Heermann, Dieter W.

53

Universitatsbibliothek Heidelberg Plock 107-109 Postfach 105749  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subtropen : Festschrift z. 60. Geb. v. Herbert Wilhelmy / hrsg. v. Helmut Blume u. Karl Heinz Schröder Waldländer / Burkhard Hofmeister. - Braunschweig : Westermann [u.a.]. - (Geographisches Seminar Zonal / hrsg Rother. - Braunschweig : Höller und Zwick. - (Geographi- sches Seminar Zonal / hrsg. von Eckart Ehlers

Heermann, Dieter W.

54

ehrungen und preise Preistrgerinnen & Preistrger der TU Berlin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, stifter: deutsche post dhL n ERC Advanced Grant Prof. Dr. Volker Mehrmann, institut für Mathematik 2011 n Wissenschaftsmedaille Prof. Dr. Drs. h.c. Helmut Schwarz, institut für Chemie, präsident der Chemie und Biochemie der Tschechischen Akademie der Wissen- schaften n Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

Wichmann, Felix

55

ehrungen und preise Preistrgerinnen & Preistrger der TU Berlin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, dass unser noch junger preis ,,engagiert in der Verwaltung" vom stifter- verband für die deutsche Kategorie ,,Materialien"), institut für Chemie Verleihung: 19. dezember 2011, disziplin: Biologie, Chemie.c. Helmut Schwarz, institut für Chemie, präsident der Alexander von humboldt-stiftung Verleihung: 23. Januar

Wichmann, Felix

56

EER-CONCEPTOOL: a "reasonable" environment for schema and ontology sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EER-CONCEPTOOL: a "reasonable" environment for schema and ontology sharing Helmut Meisel Ernesto components in two or more schemas or ontologies. EER-CONCEPTOOL uses Description Logics (DLs) to formalise and capture some relevant features of knowledge described using an En- hanced Entity-Relationship (EER) model

Compatangelo, Ernesto

57

ON THE NATURE OF THE PROTOTYPE LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE AG CARINAE. II. WITNESSING A MASSIVE STAR EVOLVING CLOSE TO THE EDDINGTON AND BISTABILITY LIMITS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the significantly different effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) achieved by the luminous blue variable AG Carinae during the consecutive visual minima of 1985-1990 (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 22,800 K) and 2000-2001 (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 17,000 K) place the star on different sides of the bistability limit, which occurs in line-driven stellar winds around T{sub eff} {approx} 21,000 K. Decisive evidence is provided by huge changes in the optical depth of the Lyman continuum in the inner wind as T{sub eff} changes during the S Dor cycle. These changes cause different Fe ionization structures in the inner wind. The bistability mechanism is also related to the different wind parameters during visual minima: the wind terminal velocity was 2-3 times higher and the mass-loss rate roughly two times smaller in 1985-1990 than in 2000-2003. We obtain a projected rotational velocity of 220 {+-} 50 km s{sup -1} during 1985-1990 which, combined with the high luminosity (L{sub *} = 1.5 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun}), puts AG Car extremely close to the Eddington limit modified by rotation ({Omega}{Gamma} limit): for an inclination angle of 90{sup 0}, {Gamma}{sub {Omega}} {approx}> 1.0 for M{sub sun} {approx}Car. Therefore, AG Car is close to, if not at, the {Omega}{Gamma} limit during visual minimum. Assuming M = 70 M{sub sun}, we find that {Gamma}{sub {Omega}} decreases from 0.93 to 0.72 as AG Car expands toward visual maximum, suggesting that the star is not above the Eddington limit during maximum phases.

Groh, J. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Damineli, A., E-mail: jgroh@mpifr.de [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model, Version 6. 0. User's manual. Report for November 1984-August 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is a user's manual for the Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model. It summarizes user options and software characteristics, and describes both the input data files and procedures for operating the model. It discusses proper formatting of files and creation of job-control language. The model projects for each state the emissions of sulfur oxides, sulfates, and nitrogen oxides from fossil-fuel combustion in industrial boilers. Emissions and costs of boiler generation, including emission-control costs, are projected for the years 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2010, 2020, and 2030.

Hogan, T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Word Pro - S11.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. International . International Petroleum Figure 11.1a World Crude Oil Production Overview (Million Barrels per Day) World Production, 1973-2012 World Production, Monthly Selected Producers, 1973-2012 Selected Producers, Monthly 148 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 United States 2011 2012 2013 2011 2012 2013 Non-OPEC J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 Non-OPEC World 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 3 6 9 12 OPEC J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 3 6 9 12 0 World United States Russia Persian Gulf Nations OPEC Saudi Arabia China Persian Gulf Nations Russia Iran China Saudi Arabia Iran Notes: * OPEC is the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. * The Persian Gulf Nations are Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait,

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Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Total, 1949-2012 Petroleum Products Supplied as Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1949-2012 By Product, October 2013 50 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Quadrillion Btu 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Percent d 0.074 0.002 0.708 0.244 0.001 0.258 0.022 1.462 0.061 0.033 0.302 Asphalt Aviation Distillate Jet Kerosene Liquefied Lubricants Motor Petroleum Residual Other 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Quadrillion Btu a Includes renewable diesel fuel (including biodiesel) blended into distil- late fuel oil. b Includes kerosene-type jet fuel only. c Includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helmut merklein 1985-1990" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 12. Environment Figure 12.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Total, 1973-2012 Total, a Monthly By Major Source, 1973-2012 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-August By Major Source, August 2013 158 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Natural Gas 196 162 102 Petroleum Coal Natural Gas 0 50 100 150 200 250 0 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 Coal b Petroleum b a a 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 200 400 600 800 2011 2012 2013 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 Petroleum Coal b Natural Gas 2011 2012 2013

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Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b b Primary Energy Net Imports (Quadrillion Btu) Total, 1949-2012 By Major Source, 1949-2012 Total, Monthly By Major Source, Monthly U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 9 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Natural Gas Crude Oil a Petroleum Products b Coal Crude Oil a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 -5 Petroleum Products b Coal Natural Gas J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2011 2012 2013 2011 2012 2013 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 -0.5 a Crude oil and lease condensate. Includes imports into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which began in 1977. b Petroleum products, unfinished oils, pentanes plus, and gasoline blending components. Does not include biofuels.

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Word Pro - S12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source 1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide) Total, 1973-2012 Total, a Monthly By Major Source, 1973-2012 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-August By Major Source, August 2013 158 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Natural Gas 196 162 102 Petroleum Coal Natural Gas 0 50 100 150 200 250 0 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 Coal b Petroleum b a a 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 200 400 600 800 2011 2012 2013 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 Petroleum Coal b Natural Gas 2011 2012 2013

64

Word Pro - S4.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 4.1 Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Consumption by Sector, Monthly Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#naturalgas. Sources: Tables 4.1 and 4.3. 68 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Electric Power Industrial Industrial Trans- portation Transportation 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Consumption Dry Production Net Imports Consumption Dry Production Net Imports 2011 2012 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Residential Electric Power Residential 2011 2012 2013

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Word Pro - S4.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Gas Resource Development . 4. Natural Gas Figure 4.1 Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Consumption by Sector, Monthly Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#naturalgas. Sources: Tables 4.1 and 4.3. 68 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Commercial Electric Power Industrial Industrial Trans- portation Transportation 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -5 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Consumption Dry Production Net Imports Consumption Dry Production Net Imports 2011 2012 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4

66

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels 5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels Total, 1980-2011 As Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1980-2011 By Fuel, 2011 By Petroleum Product, 2011 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases and pentanes plus are aggregated to avoid disclosure of proprie- tary information. 2 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, waxes, and miscellaneous products. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Note: See Note 2, "Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels" at end of section. Source: Table 1.15. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Quadrillion Btu Natural Gas 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 3 6 9 Percent Total Petroleum Products Coal 2.0 1.0 0.9 0.3 0.1 (s) 0.3 LPG¹ Petro- Asphalt Lubri- Petro- Special Other² 0.0 0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 Quadrillion Btu

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Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery and Blender Net Inputs and Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Inputs and Net Production (Million Barrels per Day) Net Inputs and Net Production, 1949-2012 Net Production, Selected Products, 1949-2012 Net Inputs and Net Production, Monthly Net Production, Selected Products, Monthly 38 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Other Net Inputs b Crude Oil Net Inputs a Total Net Production Total Net Inputs J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 2 4 6 8 10 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 Distillate Fuel Oil d Jet Fuel e Residual Fuel Oil Motor Gasoline c a Includes lease condensate. b Natural gas plant liquids and other liquids. c Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline.

68

Word Pro - S11.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a a World Crude Oil Production Overview (Million Barrels per Day) World Production, 1973-2012 World Production, Monthly Selected Producers, 1973-2012 Selected Producers, Monthly 148 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 United States 2011 2012 2013 2011 2012 2013 Non-OPEC J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 Non-OPEC World 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 3 6 9 12 OPEC J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 3 6 9 12 0 World United States Russia Persian Gulf Nations OPEC Saudi Arabia China Persian Gulf Nations Russia Iran China Saudi Arabia Iran Notes: * OPEC is the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. * The Persian Gulf Nations are Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Production from

69

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Stocks Petroleum Stocks Overview, 1949-2012 SPR and Non-SPR Crude Oil Stocks, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Selected Products, Monthly 46 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 BIllion Barrels Total Crude Oil Petroleum Products Petroleum Products 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 250 500 750 Million Barrels SPR Non-SPR 2011 2012 2013 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Billion Barrels J F MA M J J A S O ND J F MA M J J A S OND J F MA M J J A S OND 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Million Barrels a Includes kerosene-type jet fuel only. b Includes propylene. Notes: * SPR=Strategic Petroleum Reserve. * Stocks are at end of

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Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Overview Petroleum Overview (Million Barrels per Day) Overview, 1949-2012 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Plant Liquids Field Production, 1949-2012 Overview, January-October Total Field Production, a Monthly 36 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids Total Field Production a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 Products Supplied Net Imports 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Crude Oil b J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 2011 2012 2013 9.9 6.5 18.8 8.8 7.6 18.5 7.8 8.6 18.9 0 5 10 15 20 25 2011 2012 2013 Net Imports Products Supplied Total Field Production a a Crude oil, including lease condensate, and natural gas plant liquids field

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Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a a Primary Energy Imports and Exports (Quadrillion Btu) Imports by Source, 1949-2012 Exports by Source, 1949-2012 Imports by Source, Monthly Exports by Major Source, Monthly a Coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. b Includes coal coke. Sources: Tables 1.4a and 1.4b. 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Natural Gas Petroleum Other a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Petroleum Electricity Coal b Natural Gas J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Petroleum J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 Natural Gas Coal b Petroleum Natural Gas

72

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency 1 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency Total and U.S. Department of Defense, Fiscal Years U.S. Department of Defense and Non-Defense Agencies, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 1975-2011 Non-Defense Agencies, Fiscal Year 2011 24 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 General Services Administration. 2 Health and Human Services. 3 National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 4 See Table 1.11 for list of agencies. Note: The U.S. Government's fiscal year was October 1 through September 30, except in 1975 and 1976 when it was July 1 through June 30. Source: Table 1.11. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 Trillion Btu Non-Defense Non-Defense Defense 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 Trillion Btu Defense

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Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Products Supplied by Type Petroleum Products Supplied by Type (Million Barrels per Day) Total Petroleum and Motor Gasoline, 1949-2012 Selected Products,1949-2012 Selected Products, Monthly Total Petroleum, January-October 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 6 12 18 24 18.885 18.524 18.821 2011 2012 2013 0 6 12 18 24 Total Petroleum Motor Gasoline a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 3 6 9 12 Motor Gasoline a Distillate Fuel Oil b Jet Fuel c Propane d Motor Gasoline a J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 3 6 9 12 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil b Jet Fuel c Residual Fuel Oil a Beginning in 1993, includes fuel ethanol blended into motor gasoline. b Beginning in 2009, includes renewable diesel fuel (including biodiesel)

74

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Strategic Petroleum Reserve, 1977-2011 End-of-Year Stocks in SPR Crude Oil Imports for SPR¹ SPR as Share of Domestic Stocks SPR Stocks as Days of Petroleum Net Imports² 158 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Imported by SPR and imported by others for SPR. 2 Derived by dividing end-of-year SPR stocks by annual average daily net imports of all petroleum. Note: SPR=Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Source: Table 5.17. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 200 400 600 800 Million Barrels 8 59 24 16 93 60 85 72 43 18 27 19 20 10 0 4 5 4 0 1 0 8 7 5 9 41 23 34 19 3 3 7 20 0 0 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 25 50 75 100 Million Barrels 1 8 11 17 43 68 88 96 115 94 91 85 81 82 86 83 77 73 75 67 62 59 57 52 50 57 57 56

75

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Merchandise Trade Value (Billion Dollars a ) Imports and Exports, 1974-2012 Imports and Exports, Monthly Trade Balance, 1974-2012 Trade Balance, Monthly a Prices are not adjusted for inflation. S ee "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.5. 12 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Energy Exports 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 50 100 150 200 250 2011 2012 2013 Total Imports Total Exports Energy Imports Total Imports Total Exports Energy Imports Energy Exports 2011 2012 2013 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O ND -100 -75 -50 -25 0 -100 0 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995

76

Standards Actions - January 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Initiated Projects Initiated The following DOE Technical Standards projects were recently initiated. If you have any questions or are interested in participating in the development of these stan- dards, please contact the per- sons listed below. • Establishing and Maintaining a Facility Representative Pro- gram at DOE Facilities , Project Number MGMT-0003 (revision of DOE-STD-1063-97); David Compton, S-3.1, 202-586-1034, Fax 202-586-3472, David .Compton@hq.doe.gov. • Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Process, Project Number SAFT- 0074 (Revision of DOE-STD- 3015-97); Helmut Filacchione, DP-21, 301-903-7519, Fax 301- 903-8628, Helmut.Filacchione @hq.doe.gov. DOE Technical Standards Project Canceled The following DOE Technical Standards project was recently can- celed. If you have any questions about this action, please contact

77

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transport Sector Transport Sector David Sandalow EIA Annual Energy Conference April 27, 2011 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total motor vehicle production (millions) Chinese auto production is skyrocketing Source: Ward's Automotive, International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers (OICA), Chinese and Japanese Auto Manufacturers Associations 2 United States China Japan Almost all Chinese production sold to rapidly growing domestic market Millions passenger vehicles and trucks 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 China 75m China became a net importer in 1990s; now imports ~50% of oil 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million barrels per day net imports Production Consumption Chinese oil demand growth (mainly for transport) leads world

78

Word Pro - S9.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Cost of Fossil-Fuel Receipts at Electric Generating Plants 3 Cost of Fossil-Fuel Receipts at Electric Generating Plants (Dollars a per Million Btu, Including Taxes) Costs, 1973-2012 Costs, Monthly By Fuel Type 128 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 Residual Fuel Oil J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 5 10 15 20 25 Natural Gas Coal Coal Residual Fuel Oil Natural Gas 2011 2012 2013 a Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#prices. Source: Table 9.9. 23.24 18.60

79

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

th U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum th U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum Welcoming Remarks David Danielson Assistant Secretary Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Dr. David Danielson, Assistant Secretary The 4th U.S. - China Energy Efficiency Forum 3 - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1971 1974 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 U.S. and China : World's Largest Energy Consumers and Emitters Total CO2 from Energy Consumption (Gt) Source: World Bank Indicators. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion (2012 Edition), IEA, Paris. U.S. 5.4 China 7.3 Global Energy Consumption - 100 200 300 400 500 600 Quadrillion Btu Rest of the World 38% 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 50 100 150 200

80

C:\ANNUAL\Vol2chps.v8\ANNUAL2.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 1. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 1930-2000 Figure 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Dry Production Consumption Net Imports Sources: 1930-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Report, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposi- tion"; Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; Form EIA-627, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report"; and Form FPC-14, "Annual Report for Importers and Exporters of Natural Gas."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helmut merklein 1985-1990" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for IEA Bilateral Meetings March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, IEA Bilateral Meetings, March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

82

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Source, a 1949-2012 By Source, a Monthly Total, January-August By Source, a August 2013 a Small quantities of net imports of coal coke and electricity are not shown. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.3. 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 15 30 45 Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M

83

Shalf_NUG2006_QuadCore.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Memory Subsystem Performance and Memory Subsystem Performance and QuadCore Predictions John Shalf SDSA Team Leader jshalf@lbl.gov NERSC User Group Meeting September 17, 2007 NERSC User Group Meeting, September 17, 2007 1 Memory Performance is Key µProc 60%/yr. DRAM 7%/yr. 1 10 100 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 DRAM CPU Processor-Memory Performance Gap: (grows 50% / year) Performance "Moore's Law" 1000 Ever-growing processor-memory performance gap * Total chip performance following Moore's Law * Increasing concern that memory bandwidth may cap overall performance NERSC User Group Meeting, September 17, 2007 2 Concerns about Multicore * Memory Bandwidth Starvation - "Multicore puts us on the wrong side of the memory wall. Will CMP ultimately be asphyxiated by the memory wall?" Thomas Sterling - While true, multicore has not introduced a new

84

Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 4 6 8 10 0 50 100 150 200 250 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1980 1985 1990 1995 1975 2000 Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use is classified as industrial use. In 1995 and earlier years, agricultural use was classified as commercial use. Sources: 1930-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1996: Form EIA- 176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report." 23. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1930-1996 Figure

85

Crude Oil and Gasoline Price Monitoring  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What drives crude oil prices? What drives crude oil prices? November 13, 2013 | Washington, DC An analysis of 7 factors that influence oil markets, with chart data updated monthly and quarterly Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events November 13, 2013 2 price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) Low spare capacity Iraq invades Kuwait Saudis abandon swing producer role Iran-Iraq War Iranian revolution Arab Oil Embargo Asian financial crisis U.S. spare capacity exhausted Global financial collapse 9-11 attacks OPEC cuts targets 1.7 mmbpd OPEC cuts targets 4.2 mmbpd Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Thomson Reuters 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil

86

Slide 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook March 20, 2013 | Washington, DC By Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Topics addressed * Current role of biofuels * Biofuels outlook 2 Howard Gruenspecht, Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook March 20, 2013 Liquid biofuels currently provide about 1 percent of total U.S. energy 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History 2011 36% 20% 26% 8% 8% 1% Shares of total U.S. energy Nuclear Oil and other liquids Liquid biofuels Natural gas

87

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 xvii Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 0 30 60 90 120 Quadrillion Btu Figure 1. Energy Overview The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. The Nation imported more energy to fill the gap. In 2002, net imported energy accounted for 26 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 per Chained (1996) Dollar Thousand Btu Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product Over the second half of the 20th century, the rate at which energy was consumed per dollar of the economy's output of goods and services fell dramatically. By the end of the century, the rate was half of the mid-century

88

Analytical questions for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For Consumer Energy Alliance February 21, 2013 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski February 21, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

89

President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Workshop on Manufacturing R&D for the Hydrogen Economy Washington, DC July 13, 2005 JoAnn Milliken DOE Hydrogen Program Planning U.S. Energy Dependence is Driven By Transportation * The U.S. imports 55% of its oil; expected to grow to 68% by 2025 under the status quo. * Transportation accounts for 2/3 of the 20 million barrels of oil our nation uses each day. * Gasoline hybrid electric vehicles will help in the near -mid term; a replacement for petroleum is needed for the long-term. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 Million barrels per day Marine Rail Actual Projection Cars Air Light Trucks Heavy Vehicles U.S. Production Off-Road Projection Hydrogen Provides a Solution Producing hydrogen from domestic resources, including renewable, nuclear, and coal

90

FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FutureGen FutureGen Technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage and Hydrogen and Electricity Production Office of Fossil Energy U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC June 2, 2003 Lowell Miller, Director, Office of Coal & Power Systems 24-Jun-03 Slide 2 Office of Fossil Energy Presentation Agenda * FE Hydrogen Program * FutureGen * Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) 24-Jun-03 Slide 3 Office of Fossil Energy Key Drivers * Decreasing domestic supply will lead to increased imports from less stable regions * Conventional petroleum is finite; production will peak and irreversibly decline due to continually increasing demand * Improving environmental quality - Meeting air emission regulations - Greenhouse gas emissions 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

91

Slide 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workshop Workshop Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences January 24, 2013 | Washington, DC By Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Biofuels in the United States: Context and Outlook Topics addressed * Current role of biofuels * Biofuels outlook - EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case * Biofuels and fuel market segmentation * Biofuels in the context of multiple policy issues 2 Howard Gruenspecht January 24, 2013 Liquid biofuels currently provide about 1 percent of total U.S. energy 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History 2011 36% 20% 26% 8% 8%

92

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference March 13, 2013 | Amsterdam, Netherlands by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , FLAME March 13, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

93

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society April 08, 2013 | Baltimore, MD By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, Baltimore CFA Society April 08, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

94

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Forum Renewable Energy Forum Beijing, China May 27, 2010 David Sandalow Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs U.S. Department of Energy 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Quadrillion Btu China China and the United States together consume around 40% of the world's energy... 37% Rest of the world United States 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption (million MtCO 2 ) ...and together account for more than 40% of global GHG emissions. 42% China Rest of the world United States 2003 projection 2006 projection 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Quadrillion Btu 2010 projection Actual energy consumption China's energy demand

95

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment By Fuel and Equipment Type, 2010 Total Units by Equipment Type, 1985-2010² Coal Units by Equipment Type, Petroleum and Natural Gas Units 1985-2010² by Equipment Type, 1985-2010² 318 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Coal Units Petroleum and Natural Gas Units Particulate Collectors Thousand Megawatts 329 165 185 26 75 1 Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 100 200 300 400 Thousand Megawatts Flue Gas Desulfurization¹ Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas Desulfurization¹ Particulate Collectors Desulfurization¹ Desulfurization¹ Cooling Towers

96

Nicholas J. Wright! Advanced Technologies Group Lead NERSC Initiative:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Wright! J. Wright! Advanced Technologies Group Lead NERSC Initiative: Preparing Applications for Exascale --- 1 --- NERSC U ser G roup M ee0ng February 1 2. 2 013 * Technology disruption is underway at the processor and memory level. Computing challenges include: - Energy efficiency - Concurrency - Data movement - Programmability - Resilience * We can only meet these challenges through both hardware and software innovation - Rewrite application codes - Try to influence computer industry 2 Computer Industry Roadmaps These will impact all scales of computing 10 100 1,000 10,000 100,000 1,000,000 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Year of Introduction The Expectation Gap Performance "Expectation Gap" Challenges to Exascale Performance Growth 1. S ystem p ower i s t he

97

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Dry Production Consumption Net Imports Figure 23. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 1930-2000 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2000 Sources: 1930-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Report, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; Form EIA-627, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report"; and Form FPC-14, "Annual

98

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy and energy and climate challenge: A Tale of Two Countries Tsinghua University 15 July, 2009 (1) There is growing competition and anxiety over access to energy resources. (2) Our long-term economic prosperity is tied to the sustainable use of energy. (3) There are risks of adverse climate change for both countries. Energy Challenge 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 5 25 20 15 10 0 Production Consumption Million barrels per day US became a net oil importer in the 1940s 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 7 4 5 8 3 6 1 0 2 China became a net oil importer in the 1990s Both countries are now importing roughly half of their oil 4 Temperature Record 1850 - 2006 IPCC 4 th climate assessment (2007) Source: Stroeve et al. 2007 and update d by Dirk Notz Hamburg The Polar Ice Cap is melting much faster than

99

Gammasphere Past, Present and Future: M.P. Carpenter Argonne National Laboratory ICW2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 3 Super Conducting Linac Development at Argonne Super Conducting Linac Development at Argonne 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 EN/FN Tandem Rm. Temp. Helix Superconducting Helix SC Booster Linac ATLAS Project Positive Ion Injector / ECR / Uranium-Upgrade ATLAS Energy Upgrade ANL RIA-SRF Development ANL SC Linac Operation The HELIX Age The HELIX Age * 1969 H. Klein et al (Frankfurt University) propose a heavy-ion linac using normal-conducting helical accelerating structures (HELAC) * HELAC loses out against C. Schmelzer's (Heidelberg University) UNILAC as the choice for the GSI heavy-ion facility * Subsequently several laboratories start pursueing superconducting helical structures (Karlsruhe, Orsay, Argonne CHM) * Good fields are achieved but

100

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Expenditures³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. 3 Based on nominal dollars. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, kerosene, lubricants, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, special naphthas, waxes, and miscellaneous petroleum products. Source: Table 3.5. 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 300 600 900 1,200 1,500 Billion Dollars¹ Electricity Gas 709 366 160 50 6

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101

Commercial nuclear and uranium market forecasts for the United States and the world outside communist areas. Analysis report AR/ES/80-02  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power forecasts prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the United States Department of Energy are presented. The domestic forecasts from the EIA Annual Report to Congress for 1978 (published in July 1979) are detailed for the two time frames considered in the EIA analytical hierarchy: the midterm, encompassing the 1985, 1990, and 1995 milestones and the long term, beyond 1995 to the year 2020. EIA nuclear forecasts for the balance of nations in the World Outside Communist Areas (WOCA) are also presented through the year 2000. In turn, an assessment is made of the uranium consumption requirements implied by both the domestic and WOCA nuclear power forecasts. A discussion is included of appropriate fuel cycle assumptions, sensitivities, and price projections.

Clark, R.G.; Reynolds, A.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model, Version 6. 0. Model-Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) Model was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency for use by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) in preparing future assessments of industrial-boiler emissions. The ICE Model user's manual includes a summary of user options and software characteristics, a description of the input data files, and a description of the procedures for operation of the ICE Model. Proper formatting of files and creation of job-control language are discussed. The ICE Model projects for each State the sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and nitrogen oxides emissions from fossil fuel combustion in industrial boilers. Projections of emissions and costs of boiler generation, including emission-control costs, are projected for the years 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2010, 2020, and 2030.

Elliott, D.J.; Hogan, T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methane Emissions Methane Emissions Total, 1980-2009 By Source, 2009 Energy Sources by Type 1980-2009 Agricultural Sources by Major Type, 1980-2009 310 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Chemical production, and iron and steel production. 2 Natural gas production, processing, and distribution. 3 Petroleum production, refining, and distribution. 4 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and wood for heat or electricity. 5 Emissions from passenger cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles, and other transport. 6 Methane emitted as a product of digestion in animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, and swine. Source: Table 11.3. Sources Sources Management Processes¹ 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 0 10 20 30 40 Million Metric Tons of Methane 12.1 8.6 8.3 0.2 Energy Agricultural

104

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cost and Economic Impacts of Cost and Economic Impacts of Pending EPA Regulations Bruce Braine Vice President, Strategic Policy Analysis EIA Energy Conference April 2011 2 AEP's Generation Fleet ~39,000 MW Capacity ~80% of coal is in AEP-East Coal/Lignite 66% Gas/Oil 22% Nuclear 6% Pumped Storage/ Hydro/Wind 6% 5.2 million customers in 11 states Industry-leading size and scale of assets: Asset Size Industry Rank Domestic Generation ~39,000 MW # 2 Transmission ~39,000 miles # 1 Distribution ~214,000 miles # 1 AEP - Background 3 AEP Already Has Substantially Reduced SO 2 & NOx Emissions * Since 1980 AEP"s TOTAL generating fleet has reduced: *SO 2 emissions by over 77% *NOx emissions by ~80% 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 SO2

105

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 2 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 Total U.S. Government Energy Consumption By Major Energy Source By Selected Petroleum Product 26 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Jet Fuel 1 Distillate fuel oil and residual fuel oil. 2 Includes ethanol blended into motor gasoline. Note: U.S. Government's fiscal year was October 1 through September 30, except in 1975 and 1976 when it was July 1 through June 30. Source: Table 1.12. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 Quadrillion Btu 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Quadrillion Btu 1.57 1.38 1.40 1.36 1.38 1.37 1.42 1.45 1.43 1.48 1.45 1.41 1.47 1.36 1.46 1.44 1.46 1.29 1.25 1.18 1.13 1.11 1.09 1.04 1.01 0.99 1.00 1.04 1.14 1.19 1.16 1.07 1.09 1.12 1.09

106

Workshop Advisory Committee Gabe Aeppli (LCN London)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Advisory Committee Gabe Aeppli (LCN London) Massimo Altarelli (Euro-XFEL ) Andrea Cavalleri (Oxford/DESY) Lin Chen (Argonne/Northwestern) George Crabtree (Argonne) Helmut Dosch (DESY) Janos Hajdu (Uppsala) Sol Gruner (Cornell) Jerry Hastings (SLAC) Rus Hemley (Carnegie Institute) Eric Isaacs (Argonne) Ben Larson (Oak Ridge) Richard Lee (Livermore) Ingolf Lindau (SLAC) Denny Mills (Argonne) Keith Moffat (Univ. Chicago) David Moncton (MIT) Harald Reichert (ESRF) Jo Stöhr (SLAC) Lou Terminello (PNNL) Linda Young (Argonne) Soichi Wakatsuki (KEK) Workshop Coordinator Anne Owens Workshop Chairs Uwe Bergmann, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Gopal Shenoy, Argonne National Laboratory Edgar Weckert, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DES

107

Word Pro - S9.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Prices Petroleum Prices Crude Oil Prices, 1949-2012 Composite Refiner Acquisition Cost, Monthly Refiner Prices to End Users: Selected Products, August 2013 118 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 a Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#prices. Sources: Tables 9.1, 9.5, and 9.7. 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Dollars per Barrel Composite Refiner Acquisition Cost Domestic First Purchase Price Dollars a per Barrel Dollars a per Barrel J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 2011 2012 2013 (Consumer Grade) 3.314 3.169 3.097 3.002 2.500 1.074 No. 2 No. 2 Finished Motor Kerosene-Type Residual Fuel

108

Word Pro - S9.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Energy 9. Energy Prices Figure 9.1 Petroleum Prices Crude Oil Prices, 1949-2012 Composite Refiner Acquisition Cost, Monthly Refiner Prices to End Users: Selected Products, August 2013 118 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 a Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#prices. Sources: Tables 9.1, 9.5, and 9.7. 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Dollars per Barrel Composite Refiner Acquisition Cost Domestic First Purchase Price Dollars a per Barrel Dollars a per Barrel J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 2011 2012 2013 (Consumer Grade) 3.314 3.169 3.097 3.002 2.500 1.074 No. 2 No. 2 Finished Motor

109

Song-to-NETL-V1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion and Utilization of Conversion and Utilization of CO 2 from Fossil Fuel Combustion Chunshan Song Department of Energy & Geo-Environmental Engineering, and Clean Fuels & Catalysis Program, The Energy Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA E-mail: csong@psu.edu; http://www.ems.psu.edu/~song/ACEL.html DOE NETL Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science May 22-24, 2001, Pittsburgh, PA, USA PENNSTATE World CO 2 Emissions from the Consumption of Fossil Fuels during 1980-1997 (in Million Metric Tons of Carbon) Sources: DOE, EIA, 1998, 1999 World Regions 1980 1985 1990 1995 1997.0 North America 1484.2 1439.0 1561.4 1643.9 1725.8 Central and South America 173.0 167.8 187.4 226.1 242.5 Western Europe 1022.1 979.3 1011.2 957.8 990.2 Eastern Europe & F ormer U.S.S.R.

110

Microsoft PowerPoint - Final translated version of Tsinghua Speech  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

对能源和气候的挑战 对能源和气候的挑战 两个国家的故事 清华大学 2009年7月15号 (1)关于获得能源资源的竞争和焦虑越来越多。 (2) 我们的长期经济繁荣与能源的可持续利用息息 相关。 (3) 不利的气候变化为两个国家带来风险。 能源挑战 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 5 25 20 15 10 0 Production Consumption 万桶/天 美国在1940 年代成为净 石油进口国 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 7 4 5 8 3 6 1 0 2 中国在1990 年代成为净 石油进口国 两国现在有大约一半的石油通过进口 4 温室气体浓度 1850 - 2006 政府间气候变化专门 委员会(IPCC)第四 次气候评估( 2007 )

111

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments, Trade, and Prices 8 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments, Trade, and Prices Number of U.S. Companies Reporting Shipments, 1982-2010 Total Shipments, 1982-2010 Trade, Modules Only, 1996-2010 Prices, 1989-2010 296 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: Shipments are for domestic and export shipments, and may include imports that subsequently were shipped to domestic or foreign customers. Source: Table 10.8. 19 18 23 15 17 17 14 17 19 23 21 19 22 24 25 21 21 19 21 19 19 20 19 29 41 46 66 101 112 1982 1987 1992 1997 2002 2007 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Number Cells and Modules Imports 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 Thousand Peak Kilowatts Modules Only Modules 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004

112

EIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World and U.S. World and U.S. Energy Data and Projections Presentation for Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee November 3, 2003 Howard Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Outline * World energy data and projections to 2025 * EIA/IEA nuclear outlook * Energy security and greenhouse gas implications * U.S. energy data and projections to 2025 * Scenarios for U.S. nuclear energy * Key Uncertainties 2.9% 2.3% 2.3% 4.0% 5.1% 3.7% US Western Europe Other Industrial EE/FSU Developing Asia Other Developing 0.0% 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 6.0% Average Annual Increase in GDP by Region, 2000-2025 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 History Projections EE/FSU Developing Industrialized Energy Intensity by Region, 1970-2025 207 243 285 311 349 368 404 433 481

113

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Direct Appropriations on Federal Buildings Energy Conservation Retrofits and Capital Equipment ($2010 Million) FY 1985 FY 1986 FY 1987 FY 1988 FY 1989 FY 1990 Source(s): DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table 11-B, p. 31; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2007, Table 9-B, p. 26 for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000-2006; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sep. 2004, Table 4-B, p. 38 for 1986-1989, 1991-1994, 1996-1999; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 349,350 102,135 FY 1996 238,232 FY 2002 147,895 83,340 FY 1995 438,943 FY 2001 162,488 FY 2007 321,686 108,705 FY 1994 318,739 FY 2000 150,900 FY 2006 301,222 98,708 FY 1993 170,826 FY 1999 261,784 FY 2005 201,156 342,653 FY 1992 209,973

114

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Total Use of Water by Buildings (Million Gallons per Day) (1) Year 1985 1990 1995 2000 (2) 2005 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes water from the public supply and self-supplied sources (e.g., wells) for residential and commercial sectors. 2) USGS did not estimate water use in the commercial and residential sectors for 2000. Estimates are based on available data and 1995 splits between domestic and commercial use. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial sector use for 2005. Estimated based on available data and commercial percentage in 1995. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1990, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1081, 1993; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1995, U.S. Geological

115

Welcome!  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Privileged and Confidential Privileged and Confidential Welcome! Bev Alexander Vice President, Customer Care November 1, 2006 1 Privileged and Confidential California leads the US, Europe leads the world Per Capita Electricity Consumption - 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 KWh US CA Western Europe Source: California Energy Commission Per Capita Electricity Use 2 Privileged and Confidential GWH Impacts from Programs Begun Prior to 2001 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 1 9 7 5 1 9 7 6 1 9 7 7 1 9 7 8 1 9 7 9 1 9 8 0 1 9 8 1 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 3 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 5 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 7 1 9 8 8 1 9 8 9 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 9 9 9 2 0 0 0 Utility Programs Building Standards Appliance Standards Source: California Energy Commission Sources of savings 3 Privileged and Confidential 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000

116

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Figure 7.1 Electricity Overview (Billion Kilowatthours) Overview, 2012 Net Generation by Sector, 1989-2012 Net Generation by Sector, Monthly Trade, 1949-2012 92 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Electric Power Total c Imports Exports 3,899 11 145 59 12 3,687 136 Electric Commercial Industrial Imports Exports Retail Direct 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 End Use Net Generation Trade Sales a Use b Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 Total c Electric Power J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 400 500 Industrial 2013 2011 Industrial 2012 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 a Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utili- ties and other energy service providers.

117

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Electricity Overview (Billion Kilowatthours) Overview, 2012 Net Generation by Sector, 1989-2012 Net Generation by Sector, Monthly Trade, 1949-2012 92 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Electric Power Total c Imports Exports 3,899 11 145 59 12 3,687 136 Electric Commercial Industrial Imports Exports Retail Direct 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 End Use Net Generation Trade Sales a Use b Power 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 Total c Electric Power J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 100 200 300 400 500 Industrial 2013 2011 Industrial 2012 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 a Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utili- ties and other energy service providers. b See "Direct Use" in Glossary.

118

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Energy Consumption 2. Energy Consumption by Sector Figure 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Quadrillion Btu) Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, 1949-2012 Total Consumption by End-Use Sector, Monthly By Sector, August 2013 22 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Transportation Residential 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 10 20 30 40 Industrial Transportation Residential Commercial J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 1 2 3 4 Industrial Commercial 2011 2012 2013 1.664 1.511 2.610 2.385 3.644 0.231 0.188 1.728 2.379 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation 0 1 2 3 4 Primary Consumption Total Consumption Electric Power Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#consumption. Source: Table 2.1. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013

119

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0 1 2 3 4 5 PV a a a a thermal a electric Power

120

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatthours) Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, 1949-2012 Total (All Sectors), Major Sources, Monthly Electric Power Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Commercial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 Industrial Sector, Major Sources, 2012 94 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Gases b Gas Gas electric Power c Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy a Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Coal Nuclear Electric Power 2013 2011 2012 Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Coal 1,503 1,138 769 463 20 Coal Natural Nuclear Renewable Petro- 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 50 100 150 200 Petroleum Energy a Gas Electric Power leum 5.9 2.5 0.8 0.1 Natural Waste Coal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helmut merklein 1985-1990" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Renewable . Renewable Energy Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949-2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949-2012 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Total Hydroelectric Power b Other c Renewable Energy a See Table 10.1 for definition. b Conventional hydroelectric power. c Geothermal, solar/PV, and wind. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#renewable. Sources: Tables 1.3 and 10.1-10.2c. Power fuels a Fossil Fuels Biomass a Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 2.7 1.9 1.9 1.4 0.5 0.2 0.2 Hydro- Wood Bio- Wind Waste Solar/ Geo- 0 1 2 3 0.7 0.1 2.2 1.2 4.7 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric 0

122

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 1. Conceptual design, Sections 1 through 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume presents in detail the market analysis, parametric analysis, and the selection process for the preferred system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume III. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall, long term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumpton, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains appendices to the conceptual design and systems analysis studies gien in Volume II, Books 1 and 2. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, 13 December 1976-12 March 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the second three months of this feasibility study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating Mammoth Lakes Village, California using geothermal energy, the following work was accomplished. A saturation survey of the number and types of space and water heaters currently in use in the Village was completed. Electric energy and ambient temperature metering equipment was installed. Peak heating demand for Mammoth Lakes was estimated for the years 1985, 1990 and 2000. Buildings were selected which are considered typical of Mammoth Lakes in terms of their heating systems to be used in estimating the cost of installing hydronic heating systems in Mammoth. Block diagrams and an order of magnitude cost comparison were prepared for high-temperature and low-temperature geothermal district heating systems. Models depicting a geothermal district heating system and a geothermal-electric power plant were designed, built and delivered to ERDA in Washington. Local input to the feasibility study was obtained from representatives of the State of California Departments of Transportation and Fish and Game, US Forest Service, and Mono County Planning Department.

Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Study of hydrogen-powered versus battery-powered automobiles  

SciTech Connect

A study has been conducted of two future candidate automobile propulsion systems that do not rely upon petroleum or natural gas as an energy source. Potential vehicle characteristics for each system have been identified. The first vehicle system employs a gaseous, hydrogen-fueled, internal combustion engine and either a liquid or metal hydride energy storage system. The second vehicle system employs an electronically controlled, electric motor powertrain and a battery energy storage system. Major tasks included in this study were the technical and economic assessments of the state of the art and future alternatives in hydrogen production and delivery, the hydrogen vehicle assessment, the battery-electric vehicle assessment, and the comparison of the principal vehicle alternative in 1985, 1990, and 2000. The comparison includes weight, size, cost, energy, and design range relationships and the implications on expenditure of all major energy sources. The study is summarized, results are presented, and conclusions are drawn. Comments are made on the future roles of hydrogen and electricity in automobile propulsion.

Donnelly, J.J. Jr.; Escher, W.J.D.; Greayer, W.C.; Nichols, R.J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Word Pro - S1.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cost of Fuels to End Users in Real (1982-1984) Dollars Costs, 1960-2012 Costs, August 2013 Residential Electricity, a Monthly Motor Gasoline, a Monthly Residential Natural Gas, a Monthly 14 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 Residential Heating Oil b 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Dollars per Million Btu Residential Electricity a Motor Gasoline a Residential Natural Gas a J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 2 4 6 8 Dollars per Kilowatthour 2011 2012 2013 Electricity a 15.68 12.59 6.89 Residential Motor Residential 0 3 6 9 12 15 18 Dollars per Million Btu Gasoline a Natural Gas a J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 Dollars per Gallon 2011 2012 2013 J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 2 4 6 8 10 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 2011 2012 2013 a Includes taxes. b Excludes taxes.

128

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2012 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-August By Major Source, August 2013 . 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 2011 2012 2013 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy Coal Renewable Energy Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 Nuclear Electric Power Petroleum Coal 26.971 26.079 25.936 2011 2012 2013 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1.575 0.917 0.747 0.363 0.024 Coal Petroleum 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Renewable

129

doepresentation.dvi  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Shocks and U.S. External Adjustment Martin Bodenstein, Christopher Erceg, Luca Guerrieri Division of International Finance, Federal Reserve Board April 2008 Net Exports of Petroleum and Products and Goods Trade Balance (percent share of GDP, 1970q1-2007q4) 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 Persian Gulf War Iran-Iraq War Iranian Revolution Arab- Israeli War Effects of An Oil Demand Shock that Drives the Price of Oil Up by 20% (Linear Estimator) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Real Oil Price Percent Quarters 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Overall Trade Balance (GDP share) Percentage Point Quarters Effects of An Oil Demand Shock that Drives the Price of Oil Up by 20% (Linear Estimator) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 Non-oil Trade Balance (GDP share) Quarters Percentage Point 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 -0.8 -0.7 -0.6 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 Oil Trade Balance (GDP share)

130

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Coal . Coal Figure 6.1 Coal (Million Short Tons) Overview, 1949-2012 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2012 Overview, Monthly Electric Power Sector Consumption, Monthly 82 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 2011 20 12 2013 Electric Power Consumption J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Net Exports 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 a Includes combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants and a small number of electricity-only-plants. b For 1978 forward, small amounts of transportation sector use are included in "Industrial." Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#coal. Sources: Tables 6.1-6.2. Production

131

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Electricity End Use (Billion Kilowatthours) Electricity End Use Overview, 1989-2012 Retail Sales a by Sector, August 2013 Retail Sales a by Sector, 1949-2012 Retail Sales a by Sector, Monthly Retail Sales a Total, January-August 108 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 137.8 127.2 84.8 0.6 Residential Industrial 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Direct Use b Total Retail Sales a Transportation d Commercial c Transportation d Commercial c Commercial c Residential 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 Industrial a Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by utilities and other energy service providers. b See "Direct Use" in Glossary. c Commercial sector, including public street and highway lighting, inte

132

Photon Science : SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Science Photon Science Directorate | Science Highlights | Publications | SLAC Faculty Affairs | Org Chart Photon Science Faculty Arthur I. Bienenstock * Britt Hedman Anders Nilsson Gordon E. Brown, Jr. Keith O. Hodgson Jens Nørskov Axel T. Brunger Norbert Holtkamp R. Paul Phizackerley * Herman Winick * Philip Bucksbaum Zhirong Huang Piero A. Pianetta Bob Byer Harold Y. Hwang Srinivas Raghu Bruce Clemens Kent Irwin David A. Reis Yi Cui Chi-Chang Kao Zhi-Xun Shen Thomas Devereaux Ingolf Lindau * Edward I. Solomon Sebastian Doniach Aaron Lindenberg Joachim Stöhr Kelly Gaffney Wendy Mao Soichi Wakatsuki John Galayda Todd J. Martinez William Weis (Chair) Jerry Hastings Nicholas Melosh Helmut Wiedemann * *Emeritus Visiting/Consulting Faculty Faculty Affairs Office Particle Physics and Astrophysics Faculty

133

finalreport_stockcharaterizationLBNL41365.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

365 365 Efficient Thermal Energy Distribution in Commercial Buildings Final Report to California Institute for Energy Efficiency Mark Modera, Tengfang Xu, Helmut Feustel, and Nance Matson Indoor Environment Program Energy and Environment Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California Charlie Huizenga, Fred Bauman, and Edward Arens Center for Environmental Design Research University of California Berkeley, California Tom Borgers California State University, Humboldt Arcata, California May 1994 (Revised in August 1999) Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees,

134

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Scientific Technical / Admin. Postdoctoral and Visitors Uli Dahmen, Head Jane Cavlina / Administrator Abhay Gautam Christian Kisielowski John Turner Helmut Poppa Andrew Minor ChengYu Song Frances Allen Andreas Schmid Marissa Libbee Tamara Radetic Peter Ercius Karen Bustillo Haimei Zheng Jim Ciston Alpha N'Diaye Colin Ophus Gong Chen Burak Ozdol Velimir Radmilovic Sara Kiani Hua Guo Christian Liebscher Josh Kacher Chris Nelson Xiuguang Jin Qian Yu Mary Scott Search the LBNL directory services page for other LBNL staff. Scientific Staff Uli Dahmen udahmen@lbl.gov (510) 486-4627 Ulrich Dahmen is Director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy. His current research interests include embedded nanostructures and interfaces in materials. Embedded nanostructures. Size- and shape-dependence of structural phase

135

prstab.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M. M. Gabriela Catanesi, 12 Swapan Chattopadhyay, 11 Weiren Chou, 2 David B. Cline, 15 Linda R. Coney, 14 Janet M. Conrad, 14 John N. Corlett, 16 Lucien Cremaldi, 13 Mary Anne Cummings, 17 Christine Darve, 2 Fritz DeJongh, 2 Alexandr Drozhdin, 2 Paul Drumm, 18 V. Daniel Elvira, 2 Deborah Errede, 19 Adrian Fabich, 3 William M. Fawley, 16 Richard C. Fernow, 8 Massimo Ferrario, 12 David A. Finley, 2 Nathaniel J. Fisch, 20 Yasuo Fukui, 15 Miguel A. Furman, 16 Tony A. Gabriel, 21 Raphael Galea, 14 Juan C. Gallardo, 8 Roland Garoby, 3 Alper A. Garren, 15 Stephen H. Geer, 2 Simone Gilardoni, 3 Andreas J. Van Ginneken, 2 Ilya F. Ginzburg, 22 Romulus Godang, 13 Maury Goodman, 23 Michael R. Gosz, 1 Michael A. Green, 16 Peter Gruber, 3 John F. Gunion, 24 Ramesh Gupta, 8 John R Haines, 21 Klaus Hanke, 3 Gail G. Hanson, 25 Tao Han, 4 Michael Haney, 19 Don Hartill, 26 Robert E. Hartline, 27 Helmut D. Haseroth, 3 Ahmed Hassanein,

136

prstab.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 V. Daniel Elvira, 2 Deborah Errede, 19 Adrian Fabich, 3 William M. Fawley, 16 Richard C. Fernow, 8 Massimo Ferrario, 12 David A. Finley, 2 Nathaniel J. Fisch, 20 Yasuo Fukui, 15 Miguel A. Furman, 16 Tony A. Gabriel, 21 Raphael Galea, 14 Juan C. Gallardo, 8 Roland Garoby, 3 Alper A. Garren, 15 Stephen H. Geer, 2 Simone Gilardoni, 3 Andreas J. Van Ginneken, 2 Ilya F. Ginzburg, 22 Romulus Godang, 13 Maury Goodman, 23 Michael R. Gosz, 1 Michael A. Green, 16 Peter Gruber, 3 John F. Gunion, 24 Ramesh Gupta, 8 John R Haines, 21 Klaus Hanke, 3 Gail G. Hanson, 25 Tao Han, 4 Michael Haney, 19 Don Hartill, 26 Robert E. Hartline, 27 Helmut D. Haseroth, 3 Ahmed Hassanein, 23 Kara Hoffman, 28 Norbert Holtkamp, 21 E. Barbara Holzer, 3 Colin Johnson, 3 Rolland P. Johnson, 27 Carol Johnstone, 2 Klaus Jungmann, 29 Stephen A. Kahn, 8 Daniel M. Kaplan, 1 Eberhard K. Keil, 2 Eun-San Kim, 30 Kwang-Je Kim, 28 Bruce J. King, 31 Harold

137

prstab.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Swapan Swapan Chattopadhyay, 11 Weiren Chou, 2 David B. Cline, 15 Linda R. Coney, 14 Janet M. Conrad, 14 John N. Corlett, 16 Lucien Cremaldi, 13 Mary Anne Cummings, 17 Christine Darve, 2 Fritz DeJongh, 2 Alexandr Drozhdin, 2 Paul Drumm, 6 V. Daniel Elvira, 2 Deborah Errede, 18 Adrian Fabich, 3 William M. Fawley, 16 Richard C. Fernow, 8 Massimo Ferrario, 12 David A. Finley, 2 Nathaniel J. Fisch, 19 Yasuo Fukui, 15 Miguel A. Furman, 16 Tony A. Gabriel, 20 Raphael Galea, 14 Juan C. Gallardo, 8 Roland Garoby, 3 Alper A. Garren, 15 Stephen H. Geer, 2 Simone Gilardoni, 3 Andreas J. Van Ginneken, 2 Ilya F. Ginzburg, 21 Romulus Godang, 13 Maury Goodman, 22 Michael R. Gosz, 1 Michael A. Green, 16 Peter Gruber, 3 John F. Gunion, 23 Ramesh Gupta, 8 John R Haines, 20 Klaus Hanke, 3 Gail G. Hanson, 24 Tao Han, 4 Michael Haney, 18 Don Hartill, 25 Robert E. Hartline, 26 Helmut D. Haseroth, 3 Ahmed Hassanein, 22 Kara Hoffman, 27

138

Acknowledgments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work has been developed during my three-year scholarship from the PhD program Logics in Computer Science (GKLI) at the University of Munich, funded by the German Research Society (DFG). Special thanks are due to Helmut Schwichtenberg who has launched this PhD program. Above all, I thank my supervisor Franois Bry, the head of the research unit Programming and Modeling Languages (PMS) at the Institute for Informatics at the University of Munich. Without his confidence in my skills and perseverance on the one hand side and his numerous valuable ideas on the other hand side, surely, this work wouldnt have been realized. Nachum Dershowitz, many thanks to you for examining this thesis and for supporting me during my work. Your interest in calendars, and in particular, your book on calendric calculations has inspired me for this work. I have to thank the team from PMS for a pleasant working atmosphere. Many colleagues from the research unit PMS, from the PhD program GKLI as well as from the REWERSE

Stephanie Spranger; Stephanie Spranger; Stephanie Spranger; Erstgutachter Prof; Dr. Franois Bry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Advanced Photon Source (APS) Colloquium Series Video Collection from 2007  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's most brilliant x-ray beams for research, enabling scientists to pursue new knowledge across many scientific disciplines. The monthly APS Colloquium series brings these distinguished scientists to lecture on topics of general interest. Some of these presentations are available as integrated video and slides. The 2007 multimedia presentations available on this website are: 1) Shedding Synchrotron Light on a Puzzle of Glasses, Aleksandr Chumakov; 2) The Phase Problem: Related Computational Challenges, Veit Elser, Cornell University; 3) The Quantum Information Revolution: 101 Uses for Schodinger's Cat, Paul G. Kwait, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; 4) High-Resolution Spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Claude R Canizares, MIT; 5) Photonic Crystals from Order to Disorder, Steven G. Johnson, Assist. Professor, Applied Mathematics, MIT; 6) Light's Darkness, Miles Padgett, University of Glasgow; 7) X-rays at Solid-Liquid Surfaces, Helmut Dosch, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research; 8) Synchrotron Probes of Emergent Electronic States of Matter in Solids, J. W. Allen, University of Michigan; 9) The Whys and How of Ultrafast X-ray Science, Jerome Hastings, SLAC.

140

An Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration Potential in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the study, Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration in Pennsylvania, performed by Synergic Resources Corporation for the Pennsylvania Governor's Energy Council. The study could well be the most comprehensive statewide evaluation of industrial cogeneration yet conducted. Although a multitude of estimates of cogeneration potential have surfaced in recent years, this study examined cogeneration opportunities in much greater detail for the following factors: 1. Sales of cogenerated electricity to all major utilities were valued using the estimated PURPA rates based on the Public Utility Commission rules. The demonstrated effects of the wide variation of expected PURPA utility purchase rates on industry-specific economical cogeneration potential further underscores the significance of these rates; 2. Industrial energy consumption (including the use of feedstocks and internally generated fuels) reflected the most accurate data available at both the state and national levels; 3. Pennsylvania-specific forecasts of industrial growth for each major manufacturing industry were incorporated; 4. Forecasts of fuel and electricity price changes were also state-specific rather than national or regional; 5. Discounted cash flow economic analyses were performed for cases in which existing combustion systems both did and did not require replacement as well as for expansions of existing industrial plants and new plants for the years 1985, 1990, and 2000; 6. Emerging technologies such as atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal-gasification combined cycles, fuel cells and bottoming cycles were analyzed in addition to the economic assessment of conventional cogeneration systems; Industry-specific rates of market penetration were developed and applied to determine likely levels of market penetration; 7. Sensitivity of cogeneration feasibility with respect to alternative; 8. Ownership and financing arrangements (such as utility and third party ownership) as well as changes in forecasts of PURPA and retail electricity rates, fuel prices, industrial growth rates, and cogeneration technology capital costs and operating characteristics were examined; 9. To more accurately assess the potential for additional cogeneration development, a detailed survey was conducted identifying all existing cogenerators in Pennsylvania; 10. Case study economic analyses were performed for 30 companies to further illustrate cogeneration feasibility; and 11. Barriers to and opportunities for greater industrial cogeneration were identified and a booklet to market cogeneration to industry was developed.

Hinkle, B. K.; Qasim, S.; Ludwig, E. V., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helmut merklein 1985-1990" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SRNL - News Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earns Doctoral Student Invitation to International Nobel Laureates Meeting Earns Doctoral Student Invitation to International Nobel Laureates Meeting ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) Steven Jung presents a certificate of appreciation to Helmut Sies of the University of Düsseldorf, one of the two scientific chairs of the Lindau Meeting, for his contributions to the 57th Meeting. AIKEN, S.C. (August 27, 2007) - A doctoral student who conducted research at the Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory was among the 49 young rising stars in American research selected to join their peers from around the globe this summer for discussions with Nobel laureates as part of the 57th annual Meeting of Nobel Laureates and Students in Lindau, Germany. SRNL nominated Steven B. Jung, a doctoral candidate from the University of Missouri-Rolla, for his work on an SRNL research project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science to design and optimize new materials to remove certain radioactive elements from high-level radioactive waste. Jung, who is working toward a PhD in materials science and engineering, has also developed innovative new methods for testing how well different glass formulas can tolerate impurities, as part of an SRNL program to develop strategies for converting excess plutonium to a glass form. Utilizing his background in ceramic engineering, Jung is pursuing a variety of research interests from the use of glass for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste to glass and ceramic materials for medical applications, such as bone scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

142

International monetary relations between the United States, France, and West Germany in the 1970s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States acted unilaterally to terminate the Bretton Woods monetary system in August 1971, and international exchange rate management went from a regime of fixed to floating parities, much to the displeasure of the membership of the European Community. The Nixon, Ford, and Carter administrations adopted policies that heavily benefited U.S. reform objectives and domestic economic goals, which frequently clashed with allied concerns, and damaged American monetary relations with France and West Germany. Yet, the inability of France and the Federal Republic of Germany to form cohesive economic and monetary policies throughout international negotiations or within the European Community (EC), allowed American desires to dictate the path and pace of European integration. France and Germany attempted, with limited success, to influence U.S. monetary policy through bilateral diplomacy during years of exchange rate fluctuations, dollar devaluations, oil shocks, and payments deficits. Finally, President Valery Giscard d'Estaing and Chancellor Helmut Schmidt created the European Monetary System (EMS) in 1979, reversing the trend of half-hearted attempts at European integration so relevant the decade before. The EMS detached the EC's currencies from the dollar's control, was compatible with the reformed international monetary system, advanced a more independent European monetary identity, and formed the base for future monetary integration. As a result, the EMS, as the birthplace of the Euro, the single European currency launched in 2002, may soon rival the dollar's position as the primary reserve currency. American monetary policies designed to improve the health of the dollar during the 1970s were a catalyst for European integration. However, as the European Union deepens its economic integration and the Euro grows in strength, it seems that U.S. policies created a regime and a currency that will challenge its dominant position in international monetary affairs.

Rae, Michelle Frasher

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z