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Sample records for helena sudan swaziland

  1. Helena Chum - Research Fellow | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helena Chum - Research Fellow Photo of Helena Chum Research Fellows Dr. Helena Chum is a Research Fellow in the National Bioenergy Center at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and a member of the NREL Research Fellows Council that reports to the Science and Technology Deputy Director. Her expertise is in renewable fuels, transportation systems, and international renewable energy activities including agriculture, forestry, bioenergy, bioproducts, biofuels,

  2. Energetica Santa Helena | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Santa Helena Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energetica Santa Helena Place: Nova Andradina, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil Sector: Biomass Product: Ethanol and Biomass eletricity...

  3. Saint Helena: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Saint Helena Population 4,255 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code SH 3-letter ISO code SHN Numeric ISO...

  4. Helena, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Helena is a city in Lewis and Clark County, Montana. It falls under Montana's At-large congressional...

  5. EA-2022: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 2: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana EA-2022: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana Summary The Bureau of Reclamation (Montana Area Office), with DOE's Western Area Power Administration (Upper Great Plains Region) as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to develop a 9.4 megawatt hydroelectric project at the existing Helena Valley Pumping Plant site at Canyon Ferry Dam on the Missouri

  6. EA-2022: Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plant site at Canyon Ferry Dam on the Missouri River near Helena, Montana. The new hydropower generator would interconnect to Western's transmission system at an existing...

  7. Sudan-IAEA Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agency Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http:www-tc.iaea.orgtcwebt Program Start 2007 Country Sudan Northern Africa References IAEA project database1...

  8. Sudan-National Adaptation Programme of Action | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background analysis Website http:unfccc.intresourcedoc Country Sudan Northern Africa References Sudan-NAPA1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  9. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan ...

  10. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services LLC Loan Application | Department of Energy DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application December 28, 2009 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application

  11. Geothermal Technologies Office: Download GETEM, August 2012 Beta

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovak Republic Slovenia South Africa South Korea Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand...

  12. Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

  13. Swaziland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and process applications for licenses, and modifyvary licenses.Approve tariffs, prices, charges and terms and conditions of operating a license.Monitor the performance and...

  14. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  15. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. MHK Projects/Helena Reach Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    34.5795, -90.5722 Project Phase Phase 1 Project Installed Capacity (MW) 0 PermitLicense Buildout (MW) 152 Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) 40 kW Number of Devices Deployed 0...

  17. Sudan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    600 MW of coal-fired capacity is awaiting contract signatures, for construction near the Red Sea. Finally, work is underway to raise the 280 MW Roseires Dam, with completion of the...

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  19. Sudan-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  20. NREL: Biomass Research - Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas.Foust@nrel.gov Bratis, Adam Management, Biomass Laboratory Program Manager Adam.Bratis@nrel.gov Chum, Helena Management, Biomass Fellow Helena.Chum@nrel.gov Pienkos,...

  1. Property:Country | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + HOMER + Armenia + HOMER + Bhutan + HOMER + Yugoslavia + HOMER + Mexico + HOMER + Egypt + HOMER + Saint Helena + HOMER + Syria + HOMER + Israel + HOMER + Uganda + HOMER +...

  2. Intergral Drive Systems AG IDS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Swaziland Zip: CH-8005 Sector: Wind energy Product: Zurich based producer of power electronics systems for wind turbines, PV plants, and propulsion systems. Coordinates:...

  3. Scientist Named an American Chemical Society Fellow - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientist Named an American Chemical Society Fellow September 1, 2010 Helena Chum Dr. Helena Chum was named a 2010 Fellow by the American Chemical Society. Dr. Helena Chum, research fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was recently named a 2010 Fellow by the American Chemical Society (ACS). Dr. Chum's work includes the development of technologies for the conversion of biomass and organic wastes into liquid and gaseous fuels, chemicals and

  4. EA-2022: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Draft Environmental Assessment EA-2022: Draft Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana The Bureau of Reclamation, with Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, issued a draft EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to develop a 9.4 megawatt hydroelectric project at the existing Helena Valley Pumping Plant site at Canyon Ferry Dam on the Missouri River near Helena, Montana. The new hydropower generator would

  5. Pender County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Pender County, North Carolina Atkinson, North Carolina Burgaw, North Carolina St. Helena, North Carolina Surf City, North...

  6. Shelby County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alabama Calera, Alabama Chelsea, Alabama Columbiana, Alabama Harpersville, Alabama Helena, Alabama Hoover, Alabama Indian Springs Village, Alabama Lake Purdy, Alabama Leeds,...

  7. Montana Environmental Quality Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Council Jump to: navigation, search Name: Montana Environmental Quality Council Address: Legislative Environmental Policy Office PO Box 201704 Place: Helena, Montana Zip:...

  8. Montana Watershed Coordination Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coordination Council Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Watershed Coordination Council Name: Montana Watershed Coordination Council Place: Helena, Montana Zip: 59604-6873...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/19-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Kalispell, Missoula, Helena, Bozeman, Havre, Glasgow, Lewistown and Billings. Once an application is filed, its status may be tracked using the Montana Pending Water...

  10. X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    read28466 Rayos X para Arqumedes, Helena Cebrian, El Pais http:www.elpais.esarticulosociedadRayosXArquimedeselpporsoc20060730elpepisoc8Tes LOCALNATIONAL PRESS:...

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REFUGE AUGUSTA STUTTGART HELENA WHITE RIVER NATIONAL0 WILDLIFE REFUGE GREERS FERRY RESERVOIR N Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * Watershed Comprises -...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2009 (final).ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REFUGE AUGUSTA STUTTGART HELENA WHITE RIVER NATIONAL0 WILDLIFE REFUGE GREERS FERRY RESERVOIR N Little Rock District, Southwestern Division *Watershed Comprises -...

  13. Montana Department of Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transportation Name: Montana Department of Transportation Address: 2701 Prospect Avenue P.O. Box 201001 Place: Helena, Montana Zip: 59620 Website: www.mdt.mt.gov Coordinates:...

  14. Montana Department of Environmental Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Quality is an organization based in Helena, Montana. References "Webpage" Air Quality Permitting Contact Contacts.png Dave Klemp (406) 404.0286 http:...

  15. 2008 Feature Stories | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and hydrogen research. Helena Chum, David Ginley, Garry Rumbles, Bob Thresher and John Turner join the top rank of internationally recognized NREL scientists and engineers...

  16. Climate Zone Subtype A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francois County, Missouri St. Helena Parish, Louisiana St. James Parish, Louisiana St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana St. Johns County, Florida St. Joseph County, Indiana...

  17. Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Project, Florida October 13, 2015 EA-2022: Draft Environmental Assessment Sleeping Giant Hydropower Project; Helena, Montana October 9, 2015 EIS-0463: Revision to EPA...

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doppler radar will be deployed on Helena Island during the same time frame as the LASIC deployment to Ascension Island. The cloud radar will augment the LASIC AMF1 suite on...

  19. BPA-2013-00494-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 8, 2013 In reply refer to: DK-7 Kory Hofland Montana Department of Revenue PO Box 7149 Helena, MT 59604 FOIA BPA-2013-00494-F Dear Mr. Hofland: Thank you for your request...

  20. BPA-2011-00937-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    g7F50F PUBLIC AFFAIRS April 11, 2011 In reply refer to: DK Kory Hofland, Unit Manager Montana Department of Revenue PO Box 7149 Helena, MT 59604 RE: FOIA BPA-2011-00937-F Dear...

  1. BPA-2012-00507-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2012 In reply refer to: DK - 7 Montana Department of Revenue Attn: Kory Hofland PO Box 7149 Helena, MT 59604 FOIA BPA-2012-00507-F Dear Ms. Hofland: Thank you for your request...

  2. Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Board Jump to: navigation, search Name: Montana State Land Board Place: Helena, Montana Website: dnrc.mt.govLandBoardStaff.as References: Webpage1 This article is a stub....

  3. BPA-2010-00769 FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , 2010 In reply refer to: DK-7 Ms Grace Gilmore Utility Appraiser - Large Customer Team Montana Department of Revenue PO Box 5805 Helena, Montana 59604-5805 RE: FOIA...

  4. Characters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characters Characters Meet the characters of the game! Meet the characters of the game! Dr Raoul Fernandez's profile Helena Edison's profile Jerome Zabel's profile Nancy Sanders' profile Roc Bridges' profile

  5. EA-2022: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-2022: Finding of No Significant Impact Western Area Power Administration adopted and approved a final EA, prepared by the Bureau of Reclamation with Western as a cooperating agency, that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to develop a 9.4 megawatt hydroelectric project at the existing Helena Valley Pumping Plant site at Canyon Ferry Dam on the Missouri River near Helena, Montana. Western issued a finding of no significant impact for the

  6. EA-2022: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2022: Final Environmental Assessment EA-2022: Final Environmental Assessment The Bureau of Reclamation, with Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, issued a final EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to develop a 9.4 megawatt hydroelectric project at the existing Helena Valley Pumping Plant site at Canyon Ferry Dam on the Missouri River near Helena, Montana. The new hydropower generator would interconnect to Western's transmission system at an

  7. LBNL-Cookstoves Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (LBNL) Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass, - Biomass Combustion Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Website http:cookstoves.lbl.gov Country Sudan, Ethiopia,...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Cruz_Import Export_NMMSS 2013 Presentation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to restricted destinations - a specific license may be required: Afghanistan Andorra Angola Burma Djibouti India Israel Libya Pakistan South Sudan 12 Nameaddress of...

  9. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008418 Section J, Appendix D

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sudan Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Turkmenistan Ukraine Uzbekistan 2. Due to the dynamic nature of world events, other countries may, at any time, become sensitive. Therefore,...

  10. Governance for Sustainable Development in the Arab Region | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Type Guidemanual Website http:www.escwa.un.orginform Country Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  11. Best Practices and Tools for Large-scale Deployment of Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.escwa.un.orginformationpublicationsedituploadsdpd-09-TP3.pdf Country: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  12. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background Membership "ESCWA comprises 14 Arab countries in Western Asia: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  13. Shipping and Receiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shipping should be used at all other times. Shipping materials to Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, and Syria is prohibited; contact Berkeley Lab Procurement for more...

  14. Shipping and Receiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    necessary; regular shipping should be used at all other times. Shipping materials to Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, and Syria is prohibited; contact Berkeley Lab...

  15. How to Request & Access Beam Time | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    who were born in, are citizens of, or have affiliations with organizations from Cuba, Iran, Sudan or Syria, we must collect additional information and obtain ADVANCE...

  16. User 'To Do' List as Soon as Beam Time is Assigned | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is required for users who were born in, are citizens of, or have had afffiliations with Cuba, Iran, Sudan or Syria. Review Safety of Scheduled Experiments Identify potential...

  17. User 'To Do' List after Beam Time is Assigned | Linac Coherent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is required for users who were born in, are citizens of, or have had afffiliations with Cuba, Iran, Sudan or Syria. Review Safety of Scheduled Experiments & Complete Training...

  18. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  19. CX-003034: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Northwest Smart Grid DemonstrationCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B4.4, B5.1Date: 07/13/2010Location(s): Helena, MontanaOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. Get Access to Work Onsite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    your registration. NOTE: Users who are citizens of, or were born in, T4 countries (Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria) need DOE permission to work at the ALS, a process which can...

  1. Documents for Foreign Nationals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beamtime, etc. NOTE: Researchers who are citizens of, or were born in, T4 countries (Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria) need DOE permission, which can take 4-6 months to obtain, and...

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012_summer_fuels.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer Transportation Fuels O tl k Outlook April 10, 2012 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * Recovery in Libyan production but lower crude oil exports from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over from South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and uncertainty over the level and security of supply from Iran and other countries in the Middle East and North Africa region. * Decline in consumption in

  3. Fossil fuel-fired peak heating for geothermal greenhouses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafferty, K.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines the capital and operating costs for fossil fuel-fired peak heating systems in geothermally (direct use) heated greenhouses. Issues covered include equipment capital costs, fuel requirements, maintenance and operating costs, system control and integration into conventional hot water greenhouse heating systems. Annual costs per square foot of greenhouse floor area are developed for three climates: Helena, MT; Klamath Falls, OR and San Bernardino, CA, for both boiler and individual unit heater peaking systems. In most applications, peaking systems sized for 60% of the peak load are able to satisfy over 95% of the annual heating requirements and cost less than $0.15 per square foot per year to operate. The propane-fired boiler system has the least cost of operation in all but Helena, MT climate.

  4. U.S. and Brazil Bilateral Collaboration on Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Helena Chum, NREL, presentation at the December 5, 2012, Biomass Program-hosted International webinar on the U.S.-Brazil bilateral collaboration on biofuels. PDF icon chum_2012_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary of the meeting between the the United States of America and the Federative Republic of Brazil On the Strategic Energy Dialogue The Hydrogen Laboratory and The Brazilian Reference Center for Hydrogen Energy Growing the Future Bioeconomy

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds govCampaignsLASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds Campaign Links Science Plan Related Campaigns LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds - Supplemental Measurements 2016.06.01, Zuidema, AMF LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds - Cloud Radar at St. Helena 2016.06.01, Zuidema, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with

  6. Brazil Bilateral: Petrobras-NREL CRADA Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review 2.4.2.303 Brazil Bilateral: Petrobras-NREL CRADA March 25, 2015 BETO Area: Thermochemical Conversion NREL AOP: Industry and Refinery Integration Helena L. Chum, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Andrea Pinho, Petrobras / CENPES This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information In collaboration with Barry Freel, Ensyn Corp. 2 Goal Statements * Demonstrate technical and economic

  7. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP ACT FOR THE SLEEPING GIANT HYDROPOWER PROJECT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP ACT FOR THE SLEEPING GIANT HYDROPOWER PROJECT LEWIS AND CLARK COUNTY, MONTANA DOE/EA - 2022 AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration ACTION: Adoption and Approval of Environmental Assessment and Issuance of Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The Helena Valley Jrrigation District (District) J1as reque ted approval from the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) to develop the 9.4 megawatt (MW) Sleeping Giant Hydroelectric Project (Project) at

  8. U.S. and Brazil Bilateral Collaboration on Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Brazil Bilateral Collaboration on Biofuels U.S. and Brazil Bilateral Collaboration on Biofuels Helena Chum, NREL, presentation at the December 5, 2012, Biomass Program-hosted International webinar on the U.S.-Brazil bilateral collaboration on biofuels. PDF icon chum_2012_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary of the meeting between the the United States of America and the Federative Republic of Brazil On the Strategic Energy Dialogue The Hydrogen Laboratory and The Brazilian

  9. Energy resources in southern Africa: a select bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavan, A.

    1981-01-01

    The aims, progress, and possibilities involved in Southern Africa's energy development are the subject of this 473-item bibliography. The primary items of information described in this document are relatively recent (1975-81), originate from both indigenous and international sources, and are mostly in English, although a few are in French and Portuguese. The presented information focuses on the African continent, the Southern African region, and the nations of Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The energy source topics include alcohol, coal, gas, oil, solar, uranium, water, wind, and wood; as well as a general energy-development category.

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Hotels, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 60.9 13.2 76.3 8.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Small Hotels, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 36.6 2.7 12.0 3.9 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 38.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones.

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 31.7 1.7 0.6 1.3 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones.

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Supermarkets, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 145.6 0.3 0.6 20.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Hospitals, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 89.1 25.2 3.9 13.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Outpatient Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 99.7 8.8 1.4 17.7 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and are designed to provide a consistent

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Primary Schools, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 59.6 0.5 3.1 1.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Secondary Schools, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 96.7 2.2 2.8 5.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They

  20. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.Ch.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984, an increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North Africa ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was up 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries.

  1. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984. An increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North America ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries. 9 figures, 27 tables.

  2. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008418 Section J, Appendix D

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION J APPENDIX D SENSITIVE FOREIGN NATIONS CONTROL 1. Pursuant to the Contract Section I Clause 952.204-71 entitled "Sensitive Foreign Nations Controls," "sensitive foreign nations" is one of the countries listed below: Algeria Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus China (People's Republic of China) Cuba Georgia Hong Kong India Iran Iraq Israel Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Libya Moldova North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of) Pakistan Russia Sudan Syria Taiwan Tajikistan

  3. Microsoft Word - SEC J_Appendix D - Sensitive Foreign Nations Control

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX D SENSITIVE FOREIGN NATIONS CONTROL 1. Pursuant to the Contract Section I Clause entitled "Sensitive Foreign Nations Controls," "sensitive foreign nations" is one of the countries listed below: Algeria Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus China (People's Republic of China) Cuba Georgia Hong Kong India Iran Iraq Israel Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Libya Moldova North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of) Pakistan Russia Sudan Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Turkmenistan

  4. Global warming and the regions in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvi, S.H.; Elagib, N.

    1996-12-31

    The announcement of NASA scientist James Hansen made at a United States Senate`s hearing in June 1988 about the onset of global warming ignited a whirlwind of public concern in United States and elsewhere in the world. Although the temperature had shown only a slight shift, its warming has the potential of causing environmental catastrophe. According to atmosphere scientists, the effect of higher temperatures will change rainfall patterns--some areas getting drier, some much wetter. The phenomenon of warming in the Arabian Gulf region was first reported by Alvi for Bahrain and then for Oman. In the recent investigations, the authors have found a similar warming in other regions of the Arabian Gulf and in several regions of Sudan in Africa. The paper will investigate the observed data on temperature and rainfall of Seeb in Oman, Bahrain, International Airport in Kuwait as index stations for the Arabian Gulf and Port Sudan, Khartoum and Malakal in the African Continent of Sudan. Based on various statistical methods, the study will highlight a drying of the regions from the striking increase in temperature and decline of rainfall amount. Places of such environmental behavior are regarded as desertifying regions. Following Hulme and Kelly, desertification is taken to mean land degradation in dryland regions, or the permanent decline in the potential of the land to support biological activity, and hence human welfare. The paper will also, therefore, include the aspect of desertification for the regions under consideration.

  5. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  6. Get Access to Work Onsite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Get Access to Work Onsite Print The following process MUST be completed online by new and returning users at least TWO WEEKS prior to arrival at the ALS. Not a U.S. citizen? Please look at Documents for Foreign Nationals well ahead of your visit. Bring all relevant documents to the ALS in order to complete your registration. NOTE: Users who are citizens of, or were born in, T4 countries (Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria) need DOE permission to work at the ALS, a process which can take 4-6 months to

  7. Get Access to Work Onsite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Get Access to Work Onsite Print The following process MUST be completed online by new and returning users at least TWO WEEKS prior to arrival at the ALS. Not a U.S. citizen? Please look at Documents for Foreign Nationals well ahead of your visit. Bring all relevant documents to the ALS in order to complete your registration. NOTE: Users who are citizens of, or were born in, T4 countries (Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria) need DOE permission to work at the ALS, a process which can take 4-6 months to

  8. Understanding Resource Nationalism in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Llewelyn; Kreyling, Sean J.

    2010-07-26

    Resource nationalism in oil-importing states appears on the rise. Oil price volatility underpinned by demand growth has led China, India and others to increase state support for national-flag firms in order to increase the state’s energy self-sufficiency. Both Chinese and Indian National Oil Companies (NOCs) have made energy investments worldwide, including in Sudan and Iran. Long-standing oil importers such as the United States and Japan have reenergized policies designed to increase domestic production of crude and crude substitutes, or have subsidized national-flag firms, in the name of energy independence.

  9. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  10. Tectonic origin of Crowley's Ridge, northeastern Arkansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanArsdale, R.B. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Geology Dept.); Williams, R.A.; Shedlock, K.M.; King, K.W.; Odum, J.K. (Geological survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center); Schweig, E.S. III; Kanter, L.R. (Memphis State Univ., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Crowley's Ridge is a 320 km long topographic ridge that extends from Thebes, Illinois to Helena, Arkansas. The ridge has been interpreted as an erosional remnant formed during Quaternary incision of the ancestral Mississippi and Ohio rivers; however, the Reelfoot Rift COCORP line identified a down-to-the-west fault bounding the western margin of Crowley's Ridge south of Jonesboro, Arkansas. Subsequent Mini-Sosie seismic reflection profiles confirmed the COCORP data and identified additional faults beneath other margins of the ridge. In each case the faults lie beneath the base of the ridge scarp. The Mini-Sosie data did not resolve the uppermost 150 m and so it was not possible to determine if the faults displace the near-surface Claiborne Group (middle Eocene). A shotgun source seismic reflection survey was subsequently conducted to image the uppermost 250 m across the faulted margins. The shotgun survey across the western margin of the ridge south of Jonesboro reveals displaced reflectors as shallow as 30 m depth. Claiborne Group strata are displaced approximately 6 m and it appears that some of the topographic relief of Crowley's Ridge at this location is due to post middle Eocene fault displacement. Based on the reflection data, the authors suggest that Crowley's Ridge is tectonic in origin.

  11. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Daniels, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  12. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,839,817 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1985, a decrease of 3% from the 1,896,446 km/sup 2/ held at the end of 1984. This decrease mainly is due to significant relinquishments made in Algeria, Egypt, and Tunisia. Morocco, however, had an increase of 18,087 km/sup 2/. Oil discoveries were reported in Algeria (possibly 5), Libya (at least 2), and Egypt (16). Only 1 gas find was made (in Morocco). According to sparse information, development drilling may have decreased markedly during 1985. Oil and condensate production increased by 3.1% to approximately 3,054,000 b/d compared to about 2,963,400 b/d in 1984. No statistics are currently available on gas production in North Africa. 8 figures, 27 tables.

  13. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    Licensed oil acreage in the 6 North Africa countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan and Tunisia) totaled 1,500,000 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1986, down 290,000 km/sup 2/ from 1985. About 50% of the relinquishments were in Libya. Most oil and gas discoveries were made in Egypt (16 oil and 2 gas). Several oil finds were reported in onshore Libya, and 1 was reported in Algeria in the southeastern Sahara. According to available statistics, development drilling decreased from 1985 levels, except in Tunisia. A 6.3% decline in oil production took place in 1986, falling below the 3 million bbl level (2,912,000 b/d). Only sparse data are released on the gas output in North Africa. 6 figures, 27 tables.

  14. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  15. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  16. Landau damping effects on dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty negative-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barman, Arnab; Misra, A. P. E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com

    2014-07-15

    The nonlinear theory of dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) with Landau damping is studied in an unmagnetized dusty negative-ion plasma in the extreme conditions when the free electrons are absent. The cold massive charged dusts are described by fluid equations, whereas the two-species of ions (positive and negative) are described by the kinetic Vlasov equations. A Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with Landau damping, governing the dynamics of weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive DAWs, is derived following Ott and Sudan [Phys. Fluids 12, 2388 (1969)]. It is shown that for some typical laboratory and space plasmas, the Landau damping (and the nonlinear) effects are more pronounced than the finite Debye length (dispersive) effects for which the KdV soliton theory is not applicable to DAWs in dusty pair-ion plasmas. The properties of the linear phase velocity, solitary wave amplitudes (in presence and absence of the Landau damping) as well as the Landau damping rate are studied with the effects of the positive ion to dust density ratio (?{sub pd}) as well as the ratios of positive to negative ion temperatures (?) and masses (m)

  17. Nonlinear stability of field-reversed configurations with self-generated toroidal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omelchenko, Y. A.; Schaffer, M. J.; Parks, P. B.

    2001-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a high-beta compact toroidal plasma confinement scheme in which the external poloidal field is reversed on the geometric axis by azimuthal (toroidal) plasma current. A quasineutral, hybrid, particle-in-cell (PIC) approach [Y. A. Omelchenko and R. N. Sudan, Phys. Plasmas 2, 2773 (1995)] is applied to study long-term nonlinear stability of computational FRC equilibria to a number of toroidal modes, including the most disruptive tilt mode. In particular, a self-generated toroidal magnetic field is found to be an important factor in mitigating the instability and preventing the confinement disruption. This is shown to be a unique FRC property resulting from the Hall effect in the regions of vanishing poloidal magnetic field. The instability-driven toroidal field stabilizes kink formation by increasing the magnetic field energy without destabilizing curvature-driven plasma motion. Finally, the tilt instability saturates due to nonlinear, finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and plasma relaxation to a quasisteady kinetic state. During this transition the FRC is shown to dissipate a substantial amount of initially trapped flux and plasma energy. These effects are demonstrated for kinetic and fluid-like, spherical and prolate FRCs.

  18. Kinetic simulations of the formation and stability of the field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omelchenko, Yu. A.

    2000-05-01

    The Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) is a high-beta compact toroidal plasma confined primarily by poloidal fields. In the FRC the external field is reversed on axis by the diamagnetic current carried by thermal plasma particles. A three-dimensional, hybrid, particle-in-cell (zero-inertia fluid electrons, and kinetic ions), code FLAME, previously used to study ion rings [Yu. A. Omelchenko and R. N. Sudan, J. Comp. Phys. 133, 146 (1997)], is applied to investigate FRC formation and tilt instability. Axisymmetric FRC equilibria are obtained by simulating the standard experimental reversed theta-pinch technique. These are used to study the nonlinear tilt mode in the ''kinetic'' and ''fluid-like'' cases characterized by ''small'' ({approx}3) and ''large'' ({approx}12) ratios of the characteristic radial plasma size to the mean ion gyro-radius, respectively. The formation simulations have revealed the presence of a substantial toroidal (azimuthal) magnetic field inside the separatrix, generated due to the stretching of the poloidal field by a sheared toroidal electron flow. This is shown to be an important tilt-stabilizing effect in both cases. On the other hand, the tilt mode stabilization by finite Larmor radius effects has been found relatively insignificant for the chosen equilibria. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. A giant dune-dammed lake on the North Platte River, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinehart, J.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Conservation and Survey Div.); Loope, D.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The recent work in the Nebraska Sand Hills, just north of the North Platte Valley, has revealed the presence of numerous dune dams--sites where eolian sand has filled Pleistocene paleovalleys and caused the formation of lake basins containing abundant small, interdunal lakes. Although the Platte River is considered the southern margin of the Sand Hills, there is a 1,200 sq km triangular area of large dunes in Lincoln County just south of the South Platte. The authors hypothesize that large dunes migrated southward to fill the North Platte Valley during glacial maximum when both the North and South Platte were dry. As Rocky Mountain snowmelt and Great Plains precipitation increased during deglaciation, a single 65 km-long, 15 km-wide, 50 m-deep lake formed behind the massive dune dam. The tentative chronology suggests that the lake was in existence for at least several thousand years. They have not yet found compelling evidence of catastrophic flooding downstream of the former lake. Evidence of two large Quaternary lakes on the White Nile between Khartoum and Malakal (Sudan) was discovered in the 1960's. Shoreline deposits indicate the lakes were 400--600 km long and up to 50 km wide. Although the lakes have been attributed to repeated blockage of the White Nile by clay-rich Blue Nile deposits, the distribution and age of dune sand near the confluence of these rivers suggest that, as in the Nebraska example, the course of the White Nile was blocked by dunes when the region was desiccated in the Late Pleistocene. Lakes behind permeable dams rise to a level where input equals output. Earthen dams are vulnerable to overtopping and piping. The relatively high permeability of dune sand prevents or delays overtopping, and piping is prevented by the extremely high low hydraulic gradients that typify extant sand dams.

  20. Use of supercritical fluid solution expansion processes for drug delivery, particle synthesis, and thin film deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hybertson, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    Properties of the gases and aerosols resulting from the expansion of supercritical fluid solutions were studied. Film deposition, particle formation, and drug delivery processes using supercritical fluids were developed. Thin films of palladium, copper, aluminum, silver, and silicon dioxide were deposited by a method called supercritical fluid transport-chemical deposition (SFT-CD). In each case, a precursor compound was dissolved in a supercritical fluid and the solution was allowed to expand through a restrictor nozzle into a reaction chamber at subcritical pressure, resulting in the formation of aerosol particles of the precursor. A chemical reaction was induced to occur at the surface of a substrate, resulting in deposition of a thin film. Micron-sized particles of aluminum fluoride and copper oxide were synthesized by a method called supercritical fluid transport-chemical formation of particles (SFT-CFP). The process was similar to that in SFT-CD, but the chemical reactions were induced to occur in the gas phase instead of at a substrate surface, resulting in the formation of fine particles. A new method of pulmonary drug delivery called supercritical fluid drug delivery (SFDD) was conceived and demonstrated. In SFDD a drug compound is dissolved in a supercritical fluid, and the solution is allowed to expand through a restrictor nozzle. The resultant aerosol is directly inhaled by a human or animal subject and the fine drug particles are deposited in the lungs. Menthol, vanillin, camphor, cholesterol, Sudan III, and Oil Blue N were used as model drug compounds for SFDD. Delivery of [alpha]-tocopherol to rat lung tissue was demonstrated, with observed increases of 80-290% above background levels.

  1. Three Blind Men and the Elephant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J S

    2007-02-13

    Just like the blind men in the popular story of perceiving the elephant, the three major constituencies participating in the energy debate have greatly different perceptions of the problem. The constituency that is worried about climate change believes the energy problem is caused by profligate use of fossil fuel that has dramatically changed our atmosphere. The energy security group sees dangerous reliance on foreign sources of oil increasingly held by countries hostile to the US. The economic vitality group sees high energy prices and their effect on the economy and our life-style. Just like the blind men, each of the three constituencies perceives a different problem. And just as with the blind men, while each perspective is right as a piece of the elephant, it takes all the perspectives together to actually solve the problem. Environmentalists focus on solutions responding to the scientific consensus that greenhouse gases are creating rapid climate change. The tipping point has come: it is now a consensus position among scientists the global warming is being affected by anthropogenic activity to 90% certainty according to the last IPCC report. Although they still struggle with the prediction of how much global temperatures will rise if we do nothing--is it 5 deg or 10 under BAU? This group believes that we cannot afford to take a chance because we get only one chance. We can not afford to do this kind of experiment with the Earth. Any choice which decreases our CO{sub 2} footprint is favored, even if it means a decrease in standard of living. The energy security constituency sees the geo-politics of oil becoming increasingly dire. They look at oil money being used to fund anti-American activities of groups such as the Wahabis in Saudi Arabia, Hezbollah in Lebanon and the infamous Al Qaeda. They quip that the Iraq war is the first war where we are paying for both sides. They note Iran and the Shia throughout the Middle East seeing the possibility of controlling 2/3 of the world's oil. They see oil and gas being used by Russia to exert political power using the gas tap and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela clearly anti-American and now a virtual dictator who controls 15% of our oil imports. Conflicts in Nigeria over oil wealth and corruption affected our oil supply. Countries such as China are at best unwilling to join political action against countries such as Sudan that supply them oil, and at worst, selling them arms in order to cement their relationships with respect to importing oil. This security constituency favors ending our vulnerability by ending our ''addiction to foreign oil''. This group thinks that there is no domestic source of energy that is bad. They will be happy to see our corn turned into ethanol; our coal turned into liquid fuel for transportation. No matter that the price of tortillas doubles in Mexico, we expand corn farming at the expense of the environment, our tanks and pipes in gas stations corrode and leak, or we make liquid fuel from coal, thus increasing the carbon footprint by 30% per unit of energy. The economic vitality group sees increasing international demand for oil occurring simultaneously with a peaking supply of light sweet crude. They see an oil market where higher prices drive more production of oil which is heavier and more sour (supply follows demand). However, fast growth in world-wide demand increases even faster and prices will go up. For example, China adds 10,000 cars per month, and there is an uncanny correlation between the price of oil and the amount of oil imported by China. The security contingent also worries about reliability of supply as affected by pipeline leaks in Alaska or hurricanes or potential terrorism. This constituency thinks the problem is one of capacity and favors solutions that will increase oil production, reservoirs, pipelines and refineries. They believe that the energy system will be determined by the market and want solutions that favor investment in capacity. What the environmentalists don't seem to get is climate change by itself will fail to gather b

  2. Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

    2011-09-30

    In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of waste heat and better documentation of potential of carbon credits, would also improve the economic outlook. Analysis of baseline operational conditions indicated that a reduction in methane emissions and other greenhouse gas savings resulted from implementation of the project. The project results indicate that using anaerobic digestion to produce bio-methane from agricultural biomass is a promising source of electricity, but that significant challenges need to be addressed before dairy-based biomass energy production can be fully integrated into an alternative energy economy. The biomass energy facility was found to be operating undercapacity. Economic analysis indicated a positive economic sustainability, even at the reduced power production levels demonstrated during the baseline period. However, increasing methane generation capacity (via the importation of biomass codigestate) will be critical for increasing electricity output and improving the long-term economic sustainability of the operation. Dairy-based biomass energy plants are operating under strict environmental regulations applicable to both power-production and confined animal facilities and novel approached are being applied to maintain minimal environmental impacts. The use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for nitrous oxide control and a biological hydrogen sulfide control system were tested at this facility. Results from this study suggest that biomass energy systems can be compliant with reasonable scientifically based air and water pollution control regulations. The most significant challenge for the development of biomass energy as a viable component of power production on a regional scale is likely to be the availability of energy-rich organic feedstocks. Additionally, there needs to be further development of regional expertise in digester and power plant operations. At the Fiscalini facility, power production was limited by the availability of biomass for methane generation, not the designed system capacity. During the baseline study period, feedstocks included manure, sudan grass silage, and refused-feed. The ability of the dairy to produce silage in excess of on-site feed requirements limited power production. The availability of biomass energy crops and alternative feedstocks, such as agricultural and food wastes, will be a major determinant to the economic and environmental sustainability of biomass based electricity production.