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1

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mozambique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mozambique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mozambique image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mozambique...

2

Energetica Santa Helena | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Santa Helena Place Nova Andradina, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil Sector Biomass Product Ethanol and Biomass eletricity generator References Energetica Santa Helena1 LinkedIn...

3

NREL: About NREL - Helena Chum - Research Fellow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helena Chum - Research Fellow Helena Chum - Research Fellow Photo of Helena Chum. Dr. Helena Chum is a Research Fellow in the National Bioenergy Center at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and a member of the NREL Research Fellows Council that reports to the Science and Technology Deputy Director. Her expertise is in renewable fuels, transportation systems, and international renewable energy activities including biomass, biofuels, and biorefineries. Dr. Chum conducts research on the sustainability of biomass and biofuels in the global context. She has developed technologies for the conversion of biomass and a variety of organic wastes into fuels, including hydrogen, chemicals, electricity, and high value materials. She directed analytical chemical research and the development of standards and reference materials

4

Saint Helena: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helena: Energy Resources Helena: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-15.95,"lon":-5.7,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Helena, Montana B Helena, Montana Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-6b_mt_helena.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-6b_usa_mt_helena.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-6b_usa_mt_helena.zip More Documents & Publications

6

Helena, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helena, Montana: Energy Resources Helena, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.6002123°, -112.0147188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.6002123,"lon":-112.0147188,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

St. Helena Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helena Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Helena Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.8305903°, -90.666133° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.8305903,"lon":-90.666133,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

MHK Projects/Helena Reach Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helena Reach Project Helena Reach Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5795,"lon":-90.5722,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Mozambique-NREL Cooperation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Topics Background analysis Country Mozambique Eastern Africa References http:www1.eere.energy.govsolarpdfsnrelinternational.pdf This article is a stub. You can help...

10

Complete genome sequence of Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T, an isolate belonging to genus Thauera, of the family Rhodocyclaceae and the class the Betaproteobacteria, has been characterized for its ability to produce abundant exopolysaccharide and degrade various aromatic compounds with nitrate as an electron acceptor. These properties, if fully understood at the genome-sequence level, can aid in environmental processing of organic matter in anaerobic cycles by short-circuiting a central anaerobic metabolite, acetate, from microbiological conversion to methane, a criti-cal greenhouse gas. Strain MZ1T is the first strain from the genus Thauera with a completely sequenced genome. The 4,496,212 bp chromosome and 78,374 bp plasmid contain 4,071 protein-coding and 71 RNA genes, and were sequenced as part of the DOE Community Se-quencing Program CSP{_}776774.

Sanseverino, John [ORNL; Chauhan, Archana [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Moser, Scott [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jegier, Patricia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Close, Dan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, Ying [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Allen, Michael S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sayler, Gary [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reevaluation of the Hadronic Contribution to $?(M_Z^2)$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reevaluate the hadronic part of the electromagnetic vacuum expectation value using the standard dispersion integral approach that utilizes the hadronic cross section measured in $\\ee$ experiments as input. Previous analyses are based upon point-by-point trapezoidal integration which does not treat experimental errors in an optimal way. We use a technique that weights the experimental inputs by their stated uncertainties, includes correlations, and incorporates some refinements. We find the five-flavor hadronic contribution to the fractional change in the electromagnetic coupling constant at $q^2=M_Z^2$, $\\Delta\\alpha(MZ)$, to be $0.02752\\pm0.00046$, which leads to a value of the electromagnetic coupling constant, $\\alpha^{-1}(M_Z^2) = 128.96\\pm0.06$. [This is an updated version of SLAC-PUB-6710 (hep-ph/9411353) which fixes a small bias in the fitting procedure (1/3 of the change) and incorporates a new and precise cross section measurement near charm threshold (2/3 of the change).

Morris L. Swartz

1995-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mozambique becomes a major coking coal exporter?  

SciTech Connect

In addition to its potential role as a major international supplier of coking coal, Mozambique will also become a major source of power generation for southern Africa. 3 figs.

Ruffini, A.

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mozambique: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique: Energy Resources Mozambique: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-18.25,"lon":35,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Mozambique-Accrediation of NIE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-Accrediation of NIE Mozambique-Accrediation of NIE (Redirected from Mozambique accrediation of NIE) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique accreditation of NIE Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner FUNAB - Environment Fund under Environment Department Sector Climate Focus Area Greenhouse Gas Topics Adaptation, Finance, Low emission development planning Country Mozambique Eastern Africa References Climate and Development Knowledge Network[1] CDKN is providing support to the Government of Mozambique (GoM) to work towards the accreditation of the Fundo do Ambiente (FUNAB) as an NIE. If successful this will enable the GoM to access additional international climate finance such as the Adaptation Fund (AF) and the emerging Green

15

Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Environment and Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Biomass, - Biofuels, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Implementation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Case studies/examples Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Mozambique UN Region Eastern Africa References Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods[1] Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Screenshot Background "This report documents how the spread of biofuels is affecting land access for poorer groups in Mozambique, and what actions are being taken,

16

Mozambique-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Mozambique-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mozambique-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Name Mozambique-African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Agency/Company /Organization Overseas Development Institute, Oxfam Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.africa-adapt.net/aa Country Mozambique UN Region Eastern Africa References ACCRA[1] Overview "ACCRA is an exciting and ambitious consortium working to improve our understanding of adaptive capacity. It is made up of Oxfam GB, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), Save the Children Alliance, Care International and World Vision International and funded by DFID. We have developed an

17

Mozambique-Accrediation of NIE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-Accrediation of NIE Mozambique-Accrediation of NIE Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique accreditation of NIE Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner FUNAB - Environment Fund under Environment Department Sector Climate Focus Area Greenhouse Gas Topics Adaptation, Finance, Low emission development planning Country Mozambique Eastern Africa References Climate and Development Knowledge Network[1] CDKN is providing support to the Government of Mozambique (GoM) to work towards the accreditation of the Fundo do Ambiente (FUNAB) as an NIE. If successful this will enable the GoM to access additional international climate finance such as the Adaptation Fund (AF) and the emerging Green

18

Mozambique-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network Mozambique-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mozambique-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Name Mozambique-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Agency/Company /Organization Climate Technology Initiative (CTI), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP) Partner International Centre for Environmental Technology Transfer Sector Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Biomass, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, -TNA

19

Description of Survey Data Regarding the Chemical Repackaging Plant Accident West Helena, Arkansas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shortly after 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 8, 1997, clouds of foul-smelling smoke began pouring from an herbicide and pesticide packaging plant in West Helena, Arkansas. An alert was sounded, employees evacuated, and the West Helena fire department was called. As three firefighters prepared to enter the plant, the chemical compounds exploded, collapsing a solid concrete block wall, and killing all three firefighters. As the odorous smoky cloud drifted away from the plant, authorities ordered residents in a 2-mile area downwind of the plant to evacuate and those in the 2- to 3-mile zone to shelter in place. This study examines and compares the responses to a mail survey of those ordered to evacuate and those told to shelter in place. Among the variables examined are compliance with official orders and perceived warnings, threat perception, time and source of first warning, response times, and behavior characteristics for both populations. The findings indicate that 90% of those that were told to evacuate did so but only 27% of those told to shelter-in-place did so, with 68% opting to evacuate instead. The implications of these findings for emergency managers is that people will likely choose to evacuate when both warnings to evacuate and warnings to shelter are issued to residents in close proximity to each other. The findings on warning times closely resemble other findings from evacuations when chemical accidents occur and route notification is used for warning residents.

Sorensen, J.H.; Vogt, B.M.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reevaluation of the Hadronic Contribution to $?(M_Z^2)$ (revised)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reevaluate the hadronic part of the electromagnetic vacuum expectation value using the standard dispersion integral approach that utilizes the hadronic cross section measured in $\\ee$ experiments as input. Previous analyses are based upon point-by-point trapezoidal integration which has the effect of weighting all inputs equally. We use a technique that weights the experimental inputs by their stated uncertainties, includes correlations, and incorporates some refinements. We find the hadronic contribution to the fractional change in the electromagnetic coupling constant at $q^2=M_Z^2$ to be $0.02666\\pm0.00075$, which leads to a value of the electromagnetic coupling constant, $\\alpha^{-1}(M_Z^2) = 129.08\\pm0.10$. This value significantly shifts the Standard Model predictions for the effective weak mixing angle measured at the $Z$ pole and moderately shifts the predicted $Z$ width.

Morris L. Swartz

1994-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helena mz mozambique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An Example of North Atlantic Deep-Ocean Swell Impacting Ascension and St. Helena Islands in the Central South Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1999, the dataloggers of the pressure transducerbased tide gauges at Ascension and St. Helena Islands were upgraded in order to enable the monitoring of wave conditions in addition to the measurement of still water levels. Within a few ...

J. M. Vassie; P. L. Woodworth; M. W. Holt

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Mozambique UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

23

Mozambique-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production Mozambique-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production (RECP) in Developing and Transition Countries Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Partner Ministry of Energy, Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment, Ministry of Industry Sector Climate, Energy, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Goods and Materials, Industry, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations

24

Southern Mozambique basin: most promising hydrocarbon province offshore eat Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent offshore acquisition of 12,800 km (8,000 mi) of seismic reflection data, with gravity and magnetic profiles encompassing the southern half of the Mozambique basin, reveals new facets of the subsurface geology. Integrated interpretation of these new geophysical data with old well information results in the development of depositional and tectonic models that positively establish the hydrocarbon potential of the basin. The recent comprehensive interpretation affords the following conclusions. (1) Significant oil shows accompany wet gas discoveries suggest that the South Mozambique basin is a mature province, as the hydrocarbon associations imply thermogenic processes. (2) Super-Karoo marine Jurassic sequences have been encountered in Nhamura-1 well onshore from the application of seismic stratigraphy and well correlation. (3) Steeply dipping reflectors truncated by the pre-Cretaceous unconformity testify to significant tectonic activity preceding the breakup of Gondwanaland. Hence, preconceived ideas about the depth of the economic basement and the absence of mature source rocks of pre-Cretaceous age should be revised. (4) Wildcats in the vicinity of ample structural closures have not been, in retrospect, optimally positioned nor drilled to sufficient depth to test the viability of prospects mapped along a major offshore extension of the East African rift system delineated by this new survey.

De Buyl, M.; Flores, G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Relating Rainfall Patterns to Agricultural Income: Implications for Rural Development in Mozambique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rural farmers in Mozambique rely on rainfed agriculture for food and income. Yet they experience high rainfall variability ranging from extreme drought to flooding rainfall from tropical cyclone systems. To explore linkages between rainfall and ...

Julie A. Silva; Corene J. Matyas

26

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kenya Lesotho Liberia Libya Madagascar Malawi Mali Mauritania Mauritius Morocco Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Reunion Rwanda Saint Helena Sao Tome and Principe ...

27

Characterisation of [11C]PR04.MZ in Papio anubis baboon: A selective high-affinity radioligand for quantitative imaging of the dopamine transporter  

SciTech Connect

N-(4-fluorobut-2-yn-1-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4{prime}-tolyl)nortropane (PR04.MZ, 1) is a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of the function of the cerebral dopamine transporter (DAT). A reliable automated process for routine production of the carbon-11 labelled analogue [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ ([{sup 11}C]-1) has been developed using GMP compliant equipment. An adult female Papioanubis baboon was studied using a test-retest protocol with [{sup 11}C]-1 in order to assess test-retest reliability, metabolism and CNS distribution profile of the tracer in non-human primates. Blood sampling was performed throughout the studies for determination of the free fraction in plasma (fP), plasma input functions and metabolic degradation of the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-1. Time-activity curves were derived for the putamen, the caudate nucleus, the ventral striatum, the midbrain and the cerebellum. Distribution volumes (VT) and non-displaceable binding potentials (BPND) for various brain regions and the blood were obtained from kinetic modelling. [{sup 11}C]-1 shows promising results as aselective marker of the presynaptic dopamine transporter. With the reliable visualisation of the extra-striatal dopaminergic neurons and no indication on labelled metabolites, the tracer provides excellent potential for translation into man.

Riss P. J.; Fowler J.; Riss, P.J.; Hooker, J.M.; Shea, C.; Xu, Y.; Carter, P.; Warner, D.; Ferrari V.; Kim, S.W.; Aigbirhio, F.I.; Fowler, J.S.; Roesch, F.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

28

Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

Moriarty, K.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PU Kenya KE Lesotho LT Liberia LI Libya LY Madagascar MA Malawi MI Mali ML Mauritania MR Mauritius MP Morocco MO Mozambique MZ Namibia WA Niger NG Nigeria NI Reunion ...

30

US Energy Information Administration - Mozambique  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

31

Saint Helena - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

32

International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method (IEA BESTEST) Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: MZ320 -- MZ360  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a set of diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models. The methodology combines empirical validation, analytical verification, and comparative analysis techniques.

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Assessing the impact of improved agricultural technologies in rural Mozambique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about green revolution, then huge investments on basicabout green revolution requires substantial investments in

Cunguara, Benedito

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mozambique - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... there have been a series of natural gas discoveries in the offshore Rovuma Basin that are large enough to ... Anadarko made several natural gas ...

35

Mozambique Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

36

Energy recovery in SUDS towards smart water grids: A case study Helena M. Ramos a,n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flooding while fully utilizing the available resources. Flood drainage systems are infrastructures, together with the ageing of the existing drainage infrastructure, to Contents lists available at Science exceeding the drainage capacity. The overflowing of roads, properties and infrastructures causes not just

Diggavi, Suhas

37

The Role of Health Care in Socialist Revolutions: Mozambique and Cuba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lhe CUban Health Area and Polyclinic: Organizational Focusfwlctianing and organizational structure of the health care

Gabriel, Phyllis S.; Stuart, Susan M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Why Analyze Mental Models of Local Climate Change? A Case from Southern Mozambique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

People construct mental models of local climate change based on their observations and experiences of past climate events and changes. These mental models offer critical insight into locally important factors that trigger responses to new climate ...

L. Jen Shaffer; Leocadia Naiene

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Vertical or integrated health programmes? The consequences for the laboratory information system in Mozambique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The laboratories are service providers for medical personnel and they function as "hubs" in the health care in the laboratories' services will affect the overall quality of health care service delivery (Mallapaty et al. 2000Vertical or integrated health programmes? The consequences for the laboratory information system

Sahay, Sundeep

40

Weyburn-Midale CO2 Storage & Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration * Industrial Site Research Coordination SITE CHARACTERIZATION ALBERTA MANITOBA MONTANA WYOMING SOUTH DAKOTA NORTH DAKOTA EDMONTON SASKATOON WINNIPEG REGINA HELENA...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helena mz mozambique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Charting the Bench and the Bedside: Biennial National Conference for Physician-Scholars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Washington, Seattle), "Community Home-Based Care and Volunteer Labor in Central Mozambique: Lives Saved

Sherman, S. Murray

42

NETL: News Release - DOE-funded R&D Seeks to Bolster Coalbed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering of Helena, MT, helps producers of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) clean up co-produced water for beneficial uses, in turn addressing critical water shortages in the...

43

Renewable Energy and Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy and Climate Change Symposium in Honor of 2009 and 2010 ACS Fellows in the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division Helena Chum, NREL Research Fellow August...

44

6th annual MIDYEAR UPDATE -ECONOMIC OUTLOOK "MONTANA'S CONSTRUCTION-LESS RECOVERY"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00 ­ 1:30 p.m. Best Western Helena Great Northern Hotel Co-sponsored by Helena Area Chamber of Commerce of Commerce and CVB & Montana-Dakota Utilities Wednesday, August 10 7:00 ­ 8:30 a. m. Holiday Inn Bozeman Co

Crone, Elizabeth

45

LAC Regional Platform Workshop Insurance & Visas | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya Kirguizistn Kosovo Kuwait Lesotho Liberia * Lybia Lebanon Madagascar Malaysia Malawi Mali Morocco Mauritania Moldavia Mongolia Mozambique Namibia Nepal Nicaragua...

46

On the energy sources of Mozambican households and the demand-supply curves for domestic electricity in the northern electrical grid in Mozambique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of electrical infrastructure to supply rural households is considered economically unfeasible because of the high cost of capital investment required to expand the (more)

Arthur, Maria de Fatima Serra Ribeiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Newsletter Signup Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

48

Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Board Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana State Land Board Place Helena, Montana Website http:dnrc.mt.govLandBoardS References Webpage1 This article is a stub. You...

49

Dislocations, Strains, Deformation I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... This presentation will give an overview of the HB2a diffractometer focusing on recent parametric ... Science 327, 1488 (2010) .... M. Anderson2; Helena Van Swygenhoven1; 1Paul Scherrer Institute; 2The Ohio State University

50

Reduced incidence of admissions for myocardial infarction associated with public smoking ban: before and after study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

90% of the population of Helena live in the 59601 zip code.10% remaining live in the 59602 zip code, which includes aold who resided in the 59602 zip code and were admitted to

Sargent, R P; Shepard, R M; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Waste Management Sector Network (WMSN) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique Nepal Nigeria Panama Philippines Rwanda Senegal South Africa Tanzania Thailand Togolese Republic Trinidad and Tobago Uganda Ukraine Vietnam Zambia Climate...

52

Joint Programme on Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique, Nicaragua, Peru, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, South Africa, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe Western...

53

Bismuth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   World mine and refinery production of bismuth by country...Bulgaria, the German Democratic Republic, Greece, Mozambique,

54

RECLAMATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t a N o r t h N o r t h D a k o t a D a k o t a Boise Austin Topeka Pierre Helena Phoenix Lincoln Olympia Santa Fe Cheyenne Sacramento Des Moines Carson City Salt Lake City AE Comm...

55

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290301  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management & Research290 Waste Manage Res 2002: 20: 290­301 Printed in UK ­ all rights reserved Copyright © ISWA 2002 Waste Management & Research ISSN 0734­242X Introduction Chromated copper of sorting technologies for CCA treated wood waste Monika Blassino Helena Solo-Gabriele University of Miami

Florida, University of

56

LOG-IN Africa local governance and ICTs research network for Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LOG-IN Africa is an emergent pan-African network of researchers and research institutions from nine countries (Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa, and Uganda). It will assess the current state and outcomes of ...

Gianluca Misuraca

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

After the flood : crisis, voice and innovation in Maputo's solid waste management sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores responses to the problem of solid waste management (SWM) in two neighborhoods of Maputo, Mozambique in the wake of catastrophic flooding in 2000. In these neighborhoods, small-scale service providers ...

Kruks-Wisner, Gabrielle (Gabrielle K.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aug. 24, 2012 Aug. 24, 2012 Failure the only option at the Mechanics Lab BREAK TIME - Helena Jin and Kevin Nelson (both 8526) inspect the test setup for upcoming experiments to determine the breaking strength of weapon case lugs. (Photo by Dino Vournas) View large image. by Patti Koning For most people, breaking something is unplanned and unwelcome. But for Bonnie Antoun (8256) and the rest of the Micromechanics & Materials Mechanics Experimental Facilities staff, also known as the Mechanics Lab, it's all in a day's work. Bonnie and the rest of the staff - Wei-Yang Lu, Bo Song, Helena Jin, Kevin Connelly, Andy Kung, and Kevin Nelson (8256) - will stretch, squeeze, torque, heat, cool, and pound any material to failure. Material systems of interest include metals, ceramics, structural foams, polymers,

59

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE0000190 OE0000190 NorthWestern Energy OE PMC EDT Division 2010 Mario Sciulli 5 years (1/1/2010 - 12/31/2014) Helena & Philipsburg, Montana, USA Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Deploy, test, and evaluate a variety of Smart Grid technologies on several distribution feeders serving the city of Helena and the rural area in the vicinity of the town of Philipsburg. 04 19 2010 Mario Sciulli Digitally signed by Mario Sciulli DN: cn=Mario Sciulli, o=NETL/PMC, ou=Energy Delivery Technologies Division, email=mario.sciulli@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.04.19 16:12:15 -04'00' 07 13 2010 Fred E. Pozzuto Digitally signed by Fred E. Pozzuto DN: cn=Fred E. Pozzuto, o=USDOE, ou=NETL-Office of Project Facilitation and Compliance, email=fred.pozzuto@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I am approving this document

60

Montana Watershed Coordination Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Watershed Coordination Council Watershed Coordination Council Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Watershed Coordination Council Name Montana Watershed Coordination Council Place Helena, Montana Zip 59604-6873 Website http://mtwatersheds.org/index. References MWCC Website[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Montana Watershed Coordination Council is an organization based in Helena, Montana. MWCC has been cultivating broad-based support for community driven approaches to managing complex land and water issues for over eighteen years as the statewide organization representing each of more than 60 watershed groups. The MWCC mission is to enhance, conserve, and protect natural resources and sustain the high quality of life in Montana for present and future

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helena mz mozambique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 8060 of 28,560 results. 51 - 8060 of 28,560 results. Download Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. http://energy.gov/eere/downloads/reference-buildings-climate-zone-and-representative-city-6b-helena-montana Download Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP

62

NREL: Awards and Honors - Scientific and Technical Society Honors and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific and Technical Society Honors and Awards Scientific and Technical Society Honors and Awards American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Fellow - Stanley Bull 2003 Fellow - Dr. Art Nozik 2000 Fellow - Dr. Michael Seibert 1995 Fellow - Helena Chum 1991 Fellow - Robert Thresher American Chemical Society - Fuels & Energy Division 2010 Glenn Award for Best Paper - Casey McAlpin, Teresa Alleman, and Robert McCormick 2006 Special Festschrift Journal of Physical Chemistry B Publication - Arthur J. Nozik 2000 Glenn Award - Maria Ghirardi and Dr. Michael Seibert American Chemical Society - Northeastern Section 2011 Gustavus John Esselen Award - Dr. Arthur J. Nozik 2005 Fellow - Helena Chum American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2011 Finegan Standards Leadership Medal - Richard DeBlasio

63

Fossil fuel-fired peak heating for geothermal greenhouses  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the capital and operating costs for fossil fuel-fired peak heating systems in geothermally (direct use) heated greenhouses. Issues covered include equipment capital costs, fuel requirements, maintenance and operating costs, system control and integration into conventional hot water greenhouse heating systems. Annual costs per square foot of greenhouse floor area are developed for three climates: Helena, MT; Klamath Falls, OR and San Bernardino, CA, for both boiler and individual unit heater peaking systems. In most applications, peaking systems sized for 60% of the peak load are able to satisfy over 95% of the annual heating requirements and cost less than $0.15 per square foot per year to operate. The propane-fired boiler system has the least cost of operation in all but Helena, MT climate.

Rafferty, K.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Carbon Capture and Storage in Southern Africa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern Africa Southern Africa Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Capture and Storage in Southern Africa: An assessment of the rationale, possibilities and capacity needs to enable CO2 capture and storage in Botswana, Mozambique and Namibia Agency/Company /Organization Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Topics Background analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type Publications Website http://www.ecn.nl/docs/library Country Mozambique, Namibia, Botswana Eastern Africa, Southern Africa, Southern Africa References CCS in Southern Africa[1] Abstract "In April 2010, a series of workshops on CO2 capture and storage were held in Botswana, Mozambique and Namibia, attended by a total of about 100 participants. The objectives of the workshops were to provide a thorough

65

Advanced Instrumentation for In Situ Field Monitoring of Soil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation for In Situ Field Monitoring of Soil Carbon Sequestration S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) M.Z. Martin (martinm1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7828)...

66

New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-2% of the oil mass, however the calcium ion peak at m/z 40and elemental carbon (EC) peaks. The HDDV oil mass spectraoil mass spectra were characterized by an intense Ca + ion peak and

Spencer, Matthew Todd

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Advanced silicon photonic modulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various electrical and optical schemes used in Mach-Zehnder (MZ) silicon plasma dispersion effect modulators are explored. A rib waveguide reverse biased silicon diode modulator is designed, tested and found to operate at ...

Sorace, Cheryl M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Physikalisches Institut Measurement of e -p # e -X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Q 2 # M 2 Z . This dependence is exploited to deter­ mine the mass of the Z boson, MZ.2.1 Uranium calorimeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.2.2 Central tracking

69

Plasma Dynamo Experiments Cary Forest PPPL Colloquium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamo Experiments Cary Forest PPPL Colloquium 5 th June 2013 Wednesday, June 5, 13 So many dynamos (s men dnuh-mz), 1. a phrase which reads the same backwards and...

70

Summary: Tenth DAE symposium on high energy physics - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the mass of Higgs boson is more than 500 GeV/c 2, one expects the electroweak sector to become strong in the TEV region. If mx < mz, H --~ bb would be the...

71

Why Sequence a Thauera species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, or using simple organic compounds for growth. The sequencing of Thauera sp. MZ1T will be an important contribution to the DOE systems...

72

Black Carbons Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean: biomass burning or fossil fuels? Geophys. Res. Lett.112. Jacobson, M.Z. Control of fossil-fuel particulate blackcombustion of biomass and fossil fuel in the absence of

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.Z. (2002). Control of fossil-fuel particulate black carboncarbon aerosols from fossil fuel combustion. J. Geophys.Climate response of fossil fuel and biofuel soot, accounting

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Using vector divisions in solving the linear complementarity problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear complementarity problem LCP(M,q) is to find a vector z in IR^n satisfying z^T(Mz+q)=0, Mz+q>=0,z>=0, where M=(m"i"j)@?IR^n^x^n and q@?IR^n are given. In this paper, we use the fact that solving LCP(M,q) is equivalent to solving the nonlinear ... Keywords: Global convergence, Linear complementarity problem, Newton's method, Secant method, Vector division

Youssef Elfoutayeni; Mohamed Khaladi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Modeling the Variability of the Greater Agulhas Current System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An eddy-permitting, regional ocean model has been used to examine the variability in the source regions of the Agulhas Current on a range of time scales. These source regions are the East Madagascar Current, the flow through the Mozambique ...

J. C. Hermes; C. J. C. Reason; J. R. E. Lutjeharms

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Meager genetic variability of the human malaria agent Plasmodium vivax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collected from Azerbaijan, Thailand, Turkey, Venezuela, and Ethiopia. Three blood samples were ob- tained; AZE, Azerbaijan; THA, Thailand; TUR, Turkey; VEN, Venezuela; PNG, Papua New Guinea; MOZ, Mozambique variability, P. simium, which comes from South America, is more closely related to P. vivax from Azerbaijan

77

INSIGHT: LOCAL INSIGHT: LOCAL he Square Kilometre Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Australia. The Karoo, an area in SA that was once the floor of an inland sea, is one of the best places of the entire SKA project using the Meer- KAT telescope under construction in the Karoo and a similar, twin% in the Karoo and 40% spread across eight partner countries in Africa (Botswana, Namibia, Mozambique, Madagascar

Glass, Ian S.

78

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

120 60 0 60 120 180 30 3090150 90 150  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baffin Bay Caribbean Sea Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Alaska Labrador Sea Chukchi Sea Banda Sea Arafura Sea Timor Sea Luzon Strait Gulf of Bothnia Persian Gulf Gulf of Oman Sea of Azov Gulf of Tonkin Gulf Gulf of Carpentaria Bay of Biscay Sea Laccadive Mozambique Channel Gulf of Aden Gulf of St. Lawrence

80

Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems Ethan Warner 1 , Yimin Zhang 1 , Helena Chum 2 , Robin Newmark 1 Biofuels represent an opportunity for improved sustainability of transportation fuels, promotion of rural development, and reduction of GHG emissions. But the potential for unintended consequences, such as competition for land and water, necessitates biofuel expansion that considers the complexities of resource requirements within specific contexts (e.g., technology, feedstock, supply chain, local resource availability). Through technological learning, sugarcane and corn ethanol industries have achieved steady improvements in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helena mz mozambique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Self-Calibrating Remote Control Chemical Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

The Susie Mine, part of the Upper Tenmile Mining Area, is located in Rimini, MT about 15 miles southwest of Helena, MT. The Upper Tenmile Creek Mining Area is an EPA Superfund site with 70 abandoned hard rock mines and several residential yards prioritized for clean up. Water from the Susie mine flows into Tenmile Creek from which the city of Helena draws part of its water supply. MSE Technology Applications in Butte, Montana was contracted by the EPA to build a treatment system for the Susie mine effluent and demonstrate a system capable of treating mine waste water in remote locations. The Idaho National Lab was contracted to design, build and demonstrate a low maintenance self-calibrating monitoring system that would monitor multiple sample points, allow remote two-way communications with the control software and allow access to the collected data through a web site. The Automated Chemical Analysis Monitoring (ACAM) system was installed in December 2006. This thesis documents the overall design of the hardware, control software and website, the data collected while MSE-TAs system was operational, the data collected after MSE-TAs system was shut down and suggested improvements to the existing system.

Jessica Croft

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Implementation of supersymmetric processes in the HERWIG event generator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. [4, 5, 6], the mass and decay spectra are fed in from a data file. In particular, we have provided a separate code (ISAWIG) for the conversion of data from ISAJET [9]. This way, the masses of the sparticles and their R-parity conserving decay rates... ), and the following coefficients C?? : CLL = Lq sin 2?W Ni4Nj4 ?Ni3Nj3 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z + LqiLqj u?M2qL ; (3.30) 15 CLR = Lq sin 2?W Ni3Nj3 ?Ni4Nj4 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z ? LqiLqjt?M2qL ; (3.31) CRL = Rq sin 2?W Ni4Nj4 ?Ni3Nj3 s?M2Z + iMZ?Z ? RqiRqjt?M2qR ; (3...

Moretti, Stefano; Odagiri, Kosuke; Richardson, P; Seymour, Michael H; Webber, Bryan R

83

Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resilience (PPCR) Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bangladesh, Bolivia, Cambodia, Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Tajikistan, Tonga, Yemen, Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea

84

Jet production at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results from jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering to investigate parton dynamics at low x are reviewed. The results on jet production in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction used to test perturbative QCD are discussed and the values of alphas(Mz) extracted from a QCD analysis of the data are presented

C. Glasman

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

"I shall love you up to the death" (Marie-Antoinette to Axel von Fersen)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HY M& NP OQ RU K AL BO CP DG ER FS HU IX KY MZ N& QT L AM BZ CD EG FI HK LN OR PS QU TY X& M AN BO CP-256. [3] David Kahn, The Code-Breakers, Scribner 1996. [4] Evelyne Lever, Marie-Antoinette Correspondance

International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

86

CD146 expression is associated with a poor prognosis in human breast tumors and with enhanced motility in breast cancer cell lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Asterand, Detroit, MI, USA). ZR-75-30, T47D, BrCA-MZ-02, MDA-MB-453, MDA-MB- 231, MDA-MB-436 and BT549 cells were cultured in RPMI (Cambrex, Verviers, Belgium) supplemented with 10% heat- inactivated FCS (Invitrogen, Paisley, UK). MCF-7 cells were cultured...

Zabouo, Gwladys; Imbert, Anne-Marie; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Finetti, Pascal; Moreau, Thomas; Esterni, Benjamin; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, Francois; Chabannon, Christian

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

87

arXiv:hep-ph/0103095v19Mar2001 Low-Energy Supersymmetry and its Phenomenology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage, the word "minimal" in MSSM refers to the minimal particle spectrum and the associated R- tions to the MSSM Higgs sector is the modifi- cation of the upper bound of the light CP-even Higgs mass precise result. First, the increase of the light CP-even Higgs mass bound beyond mZ can be significant

California at Santa Cruz, University of

88

B American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011 DOI: 10.1007/s13361-011-0168-y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with collision-induced dissociation MS/MS. Anal. Sci. 25, 985­ 988 (2009) 15. Williams, J.P., Grabenauer, MHz). Periodically, ion packets are released in short (150 s-wide) pulses into a ~3 m long stacked ring) m/z measurement. Roughly 102 ­103 mass spectra are collected per IMS experiment, allowing drift time

Clemmer, David E.

89

Cation Effects on the Layer Structure of Biogenic Mn-Oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). Wet sample slurries were placed in an aluminum sample cell with Lexan windows-bs (Samuel Webb, SSRL). Two Mn-oxide references, triclinic birnessite (TcBir) and -MnO2 were synthesized and Environmental and Quality (ISEQ) Graduate Fellowship. M.Z. also thanks Dr. Samuel Webb at SSRL for his help

Sparks, Donald L.

90

Dartmouth Trace Element Analysis Core: Lab methods All prices are based on analysis of up to 10 elements of interest to the investigator. More analytes can  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas) mode for maximum sensitivity. Pb data is the sum of Pb206,207 and 208. Selenium is analysed in reaction mode with H2 as the reactive gas at a flow rate sufficient to minimize Ar dimer background @ m/z78) bottles or metal free centrifuge tubes (e.g VWR 89049 series). A minimum of 10mls of sample should

Lotko, William

91

593.ps.gz - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

form of an semide nite program. ... in the area of statistics, and in engineering elds such as structural design [6, 8] and control theory .... SDP problem, and even if they are, strong duality does not necessarily have to hold. ..... We now describe a scaling procedure which allows us to view the MZ ...... puting, 2:257{267, 1981.

92

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 1730 of 28,905 results. 21 - 1730 of 28,905 results. Download EA-1602: Final Environmental Assessment Alternative Intake Project Transmission Line and Interconnection http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1602-final-environmental-assessment Download Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. http://energy.gov/eere/downloads/reference-buildings-building-type-warehouse Download Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view

93

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 11480 of 28,560 results. 71 - 11480 of 28,560 results. Download CX-006151: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery State Energy Program - Renewable Energy Incentives - Ivins Residence Open Loop Heat Pump System CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/13/2011 Location(s): Lewes, Delaware Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006151-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Helena, Montana Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003034-categorical-exclusion-determination

94

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 24,683 square feet and 1 floor. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 19.2 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 7.63 thousand Btu/SF.

95

Microsoft Word - blue letterhead.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BRIAN SCHWEITZER JOHN BOHLINGER BRIAN SCHWEITZER JOHN BOHLINGER GOVERNOR LT. GOVERNOR STATE CAPITOL * P.O. BOX 200801 * HELENA, MONTANA 59620-0801 TELEPHONE: 406-444-3111 * FAX: 406-444-5529 * WEBSITE: WWW.MT.GOV OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR STATE OF MONTANA February 26, 2009 The Honorable Steven Chu Secretary U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: State Energy Program Assurances Dear Secretary Chu: As a condition of receiving our State's share of the $3.1 billion funding for the State Energy Program (SEP) under the American Recovery and Renewal Act of 2009 (H.R. 1)(ARRA), I provide the following assurances. I wrote to our public utility commission and asked that

96

Chateau Tebeau LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chateau Tebeau LLC Chateau Tebeau LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Chateau Tebeau LLC Facility Chateau Tebeau LLC Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SUREnergy Location Helena OH Coordinates 41.32860734°, -83.27046633° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.32860734,"lon":-83.27046633,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

97

Montana Environmental Quality Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quality Council Quality Council Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana Environmental Quality Council Address Legislative Environmental Policy Office PO Box 201704 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-1704 Phone number 406-444-3742 Website http://leg.mt.gov/css/Services Coordinates 46.53°, -112.16° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.53,"lon":-112.16,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish, Wildlife & Parks Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-0701 Phone number 406-444-2535 Website http://fwp.mt.gov/doingBusines Coordinates 46.586864°, -112.01525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.586864,"lon":-112.01525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

Broadwater Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Broadwater Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Broadwater Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwater Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Broadwater Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Helena, Montana Coordinates 46.6002123°, -112.0147188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

100

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 16430 of 26,764 results. 21 - 16430 of 26,764 results. Download Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. http://energy.gov/eere/downloads/reference-buildings-building-type-warehouse Download Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helena mz mozambique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Electricity Delivery and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 2010 July 13, 2010 CX-003028: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act - Fault Current Limiting Superconducting Transformer CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B4.11 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2010 CX-003034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Helena, Montana Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 1, 2010 CX-002833: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B4.4, A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B5.1 Date: 07/01/2010 Location(s): Salem, Oregon

102

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Montana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 26, 2010 July 26, 2010 CX-003263: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana-Tribe-Blackfeet Tribe CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 13, 2010 CX-003037: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mercury Removal from Clean Coal Processing Air Stream CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Butte, Montana Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2010 CX-003034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Helena, Montana Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 12, 2010 CX-002969: Categorical Exclusion Determination

103

Montana Department of Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Department of Transportation Name Montana Department of Transportation Address 2701 Prospect Avenue P.O. Box 201001 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620 Website http://www.mdt.mt.gov/ Coordinates 46.589151°, -111.992175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.589151,"lon":-111.992175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

104

High Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name High Country Rose Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility High Country Rose Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Helena, Montana Coordinates 46.6002123°, -112.0147188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

105

Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Helena, Montana Coordinates 46.6002123°, -112.0147188° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

106

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

107

Montana Department of Environmental Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Department of Environmental Quality Name Montana Department of Environmental Quality Address 1520 E. 6th Ave, PO Box 200901 Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-0901 Phone number 406-444-2544 Website http://www.deq.mt.gov/default. Coordinates 46.58741°, -112.013743° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.58741,"lon":-112.013743,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation Title IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Edenhofer, Ottmar, Ramon Pichs-Madruga, Youba Sokona, Kristin Seyboth, Dan Arvizu, Thomas Bruckner, John Christensen, Helena Chum, Jean-Michel Devernay, Andre Faaij, Manfred Fischedick, Barry Goldstein, Gerrit Hansen, John Huckerby, Arnulf Jäger-Waldau, Susanne Kadner, Daniel M. Kammen, Volker Krey, Arun Kumar, Anthony Lewis, Oswaldo Lucon, Patrick Matschoss, Lourdes Maurice, Catherine Mitchell, William Moomaw, José Moreira, Alain Nadai, Lars J. Nilsson, John Nyboer, Atiq Rahman, Jayant A. Sathaye, Janet Sawin, Roberto Schaeffer, Tormod Schei, Steffen Schlömer, Ralph Sims, Christoph von Stechow, Aviel Verbruggen, Kevin Urama, Ryan H. Wiser, Francis Yamba, and Timm Zwickel

109

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 15340 of 28,905 results. 31 - 15340 of 28,905 results. Download Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). http://energy.gov/eere/downloads/archive-reference-buildings-climate-zone-6a-minneapolis-minnesota Download Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana

110

2009 Renewable Energy Data Book, August 2010 (Book)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Data Book Renewable Energy Data Book AUGUST 2010 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Acknowledgments This report was produced by Rachel Gelman, edited by Michelle Kubik, and designed by Stacy Buchanan of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). We greatly appreciate the input of Mike Cliggett and Carla Frisch of the U.S. Department of Energy; as well as Lynn Billman, Helena Chum, Dale Gardner, Maureen Hand, Roland Hulstrom, and Jordan Macknick of NREL. Front page background photo: Courtesy of NASA Front page inset photos (left to right): One through six, and eight - iStock; seven - PIX 17854 Pages 2, 6, 42, 56, 66, 74, 80, 86, 90, 98, 110, 118: iStock Page 16: PIX 14369 Page 94: PIX 17854 © 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Key Findings * Although renewable energy (excluding hydropower) is a relatively small portion of total energy

111

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena,

112

Montana State Historic Preservation Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana State Historic Preservation Office Montana State Historic Preservation Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana State Historic Preservation Office Name Montana State Historic Preservation Office Address 1410 Eighth Avenue Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620 Phone number 406-444-7715 Website http://mhs.mt.gov/shpo/ Coordinates 46.588015°, -112.015825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.588015,"lon":-112.015825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

113

Microsoft Word - Security_Group_Minutes_022106_Final _2_.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/2006 1 3/2006 1 U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) Security Topic Group Conference Call February 21, 2006 Group Chair: Alex Thrower, DOE/OCRWM Participants: Larry Stern, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance; Aubrey Godwin, Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency; Bill Reese, Idaho State Police; Steve Schnoebelen and James McNeill, California Highway Patrol; Bob Fronczak, Association of American Railroads; Lisa Janairo, Don Flater, and Tim Runyon, Council of State Governments (CSG)-Midwest; Jim Baranski and Ed Wilds, CSG- Northeast; Harry Hopes, CSX; Scott Field, Western Interstate Energy Board; Christian Einberg, DOE/OCRWM; Conrad Smith, CSG - Eastern Regional Office; Bob Halstead, Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects; and Helena Zyblikewycz, AFL-CIO.

114

Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation Conservation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Department of Natural Resources& Conservation Name Montana Department of Natural Resources& Conservation Address 1625 11th Ave Place Helena, Montana Zip 59620-1601 Phone number 406-444-2074 Website http://dnrc.mt.gov Coordinates 46.589523°, -112.011519° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.589523,"lon":-112.011519,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

National Action Programmes on Desertification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmes on Desertification Programmes on Desertification Jump to: navigation, search Name National Action Programmes on Desertification Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unccd.int/actionpro Country Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

116

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Name Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials Website http://www.forestcarbonpartner Country Argentina, Bolivia, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Laos, Liberia, Madagascar, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of the Congo, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vanuatu, Vietnam

117

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. A unique identification is, however, heavily

118

Apparatus and method of determining molecular weight of large molecules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer determines the mass of multiply charged high molecular weight molecules. This spectrometer utilizes an ion detector which is capable of simultaneously measuring the charge z and transit time of a single ion as it passes through the detector. From this transit time, the velocity of the single ion may then be derived, thus providing the mass-to-charge ratio m/z for a single ion which has been accelerated through a known potential. Given z and m/z, the mass m of the single ion can then be calculated. Electrospray ions with masses in excess of 1 MDa and charge numbers greater than 425 e.sup.- are readily detected. The on-axis single ion detection configuration enables a duty cycle of nearly 100% and extends the practical application of electrospray mass spectrometry to the analysis of very large molecules with relatively inexpensive instrumentation.

Fuerstenau, Stephen (Montrose, CA); Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Madden, Norman (Livermore, CA); Searles, William (Fremont, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Leseabschrift Studiengangsordnung (Satzung) fr Studierende des Bachelorstudienganges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Allgemeine Chemie und im zweiten Semester die Module 1. Organische Chemie 2. Physik II § 5 Besondere 4 V + 1 S 6 A K, M MZ3000 Mikrobiologie 2V + 2P 6 A K, M, T LS1100-MLS Allgemeine Chemie 3V + 1? + 4P 10 A K, M, T LS1600-MLS Organische Chemie 3V + 1? + 4P 10 A K, M, T LS2301 Biophysikalische Chemie

120

Proc. Pac. Symp. Biocomp. (PSB), 2004. GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF CROSS-LINKABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISCRIMINATION S. POTLURI1 , A.A. KHAN1 , A. KUZMINYKH2 , J.M. BUJNICKI3 , A.M. FRIEDMAN4 , C. BAILEY-KELLOGG1. 1 #12;2. Cross-link p q r 3. Proteolytically digest1. Model / predict (a) (b) 4. Interpret mass spectrum q rp => model (a) m/z Figure 1: Cross-linking mass spectrometry protocol. (1) Computationally

Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helena mz mozambique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nuclear Spins in a Nanoscale Device for Quantum Information Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coherent oscillations between any two levels from four nuclear spin states of I=3/2 have been demonstrated in a nanometre-scale NMR semiconductor device, where nuclear spins are all-electrically controlled. Using this device, we discuss quantum logic operations on two fictitious qubits of the I=3/2 system, and propose a quantum state tomography scheme based on the measurement of longitudinal magnetization, $M_z$.

S. K. Ozdemir; A. Miranowicz; T. Ota; G. Yusa; N. Imoto; Y. Hirayama

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 69316944, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/6931/2011/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(isoprene: NOx 1:3) in the absence of seed aerosol in a 5 m3 Teflon chamber surrounded by a bank of UV power of around 1600 at m/z 69.07 (protonated isoprene). Its response was calibrated with respect. The photooxidation time was 2 h, after which the SOA loading was 40 µg m-3. At that time, isoprene completely decayed

Nizkorodov, Sergey

123

Low-energy U(1) x USp(2M) gauge theory from simple high-energy gauge group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an explicit example of the embedding of a near BPS low-energy (U(1) x USp(2M))/Z_2 gauge theory into a high-energy theory with a simple gauge group and adjoint matter content. This system possesses degenerate monopoles arising from the high-energy symmetry breaking as well as non-Abelian vortices due to the symmetry breaking at low energies. These solitons of different codimensions are related by the exact homotopy sequences.

Sven Bjarke Gudnason; Kenichi Konishi

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

Bayesian Study and Naturalness in MSSM Forecast for the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a forecast of the CMSSM for the LHC based in an improved Bayesian analysis taking into account the present theoretical and experimental wisdom about the model. In this way we obtain a map of the preferred regions of the CMSSM parameter space and show that fine-tuning penalization arises from the Bayesian analysis itself when the experimental value of Mz is considered. The results are remarkable stable when using different priors

Maria Eugenia Cabrera

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

125

Quantitative Analysis of Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine ("Tetramine") Spiked into Beverages by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Validation by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, commonly known as tetramine, is a highly neurotoxic rodenticide (human oral LD{sub 50} = 0.1 mg/kg) used in hundreds of deliberate food poisoning events in China. Here we describe a method for quantitation of tetramine spiked into beverages, including milk, juice, tea, cola, and water and cleaned up by C8 solid phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was based upon fragmentation of m/z 347 to m/z 268. The method was validated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in SIM mode for ions m/z 212, 240, and 360. The limit of quantitation was 0.10 {micro}g/mL by LC/MS/MS versus 0.15 {micro}g/mL for GC/MS. Fortifications of the beverages at 2.5 {micro}g/mL and 0.25 {micro}g/mL were recovered ranging from 73-128% by liquid-liquid extraction for GC/MS analysis, 13-96% by SPE and 10-101% by liquid-liquid extraction for LC/MS/MS analysis.

Owens, J; Hok, S; Alcaraz, A; Koester, C

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

126

Metallicity Calibrations and the Mass-Metallicity Relation for Star-Forming Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We investigate the effect of metallicity calibrations, AGN classification, and aperture covering fraction on the local mass-metallicity (MZ) relation using 27,730 star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 4. We analyse the SDSS MZ relation with 10 metallicity calibrations, including theoretical and empirical methods. We show that the choice of metallicity calibration has a significant effect on the shape and y-intercept(12+log(O/H)) of the MZ relation. The absolute metallicity scale (y-int) varies up to 0.7 dex, depending on the calibration used, and the change in shape is substantial. These results indicate that it is critical to use the same metallicity calibration when comparing different luminosity-metallicity or mass-metallicity relations. We present new metallicity conversions that allow metallicities that have been derived using different strong-line calibrations to be converted to the same base calibration. These conversions facilitate comparisons between d...

Kewley, Lisa J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 0 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Primary Schools, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 59.6 0.5 3.1 1.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations.The benchmark building had 73,932 square feet and 1 floor. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 15.80 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 18.77 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

128

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Outpatient Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 99.7 8.8 1.4 17.7 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 40,932 square feet and 3 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 13.02 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 46.01 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

129

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Secondary Schools, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 96.7 2.2 2.8 5.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations.The benchmark building had 210,810 square feet and 2 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 15.20 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 11.83 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

130

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Supermarkets, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 145.6 0.3 0.6 20.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations.The benchmark building had 44,985 square feet and 1 floor. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 19.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 20.7 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

131

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 31.7 1.7 0.6 1.3 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 498,407 square feet and 12 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 10.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 15.94 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

132

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Hotels, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 60.9 13.2 76.3 8.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations.The benchmark building had 122,075 square feet and 6 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 11.28 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 24.77 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

133

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Hospitals, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 89.1 25.2 3.9 13.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 241,263 square feet and 5 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 16.36 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 15.15 thousand Btu/SF. Ventilation includes energy used by fans and heat rejection systems.

134

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Small Hotels, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 36.6 2.7 12.0 3.9 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations.The benchmark building had 43,186 square feet and 4 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 13.79 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 21.98 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

135

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 38.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 53,608 square feet and 3 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 10.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 18.85 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

136

DOE Commercial Reference Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Version 1.4_7.0 New Construction, ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 Site Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] August 2012 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks Weighted Average Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 47 48 45 44 39 41 41 46 40 41 47 42 52 46 53 67 45 Medium Office 51 51 51 48 41 47 43 51 46 45 52 47 57 51 59 76 50 Small Office 52 51 53 47 41 46 41 51 47 47 54 49 59 54 61 83 51 Warehouse 29 23 24 27 19 24 23 32 29 28 38 34 46 41 53 78 30 Stand-alone Retail 60 63 62 63 46 58 53 74 64 68 84 72 96 87 107 150 72 Strip Mall 57 61 60 65 48 61 57 78 68 74 89 76 103 94 115 164 71 Primary School 57 57 57 55 46 54 52 62 56 55 66 59 75 67 80 103 60 Secondary School 60 61 59 60 44 56 51 71 59 63 78 66 91 79 99 135 67 Supermarket

137

Department of Energy Commercial Building Benchmarks (New Construction): Energy Use Intensities, May 5, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarks Benchmarks New Construction Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] May 5, 2009 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks 2003 CBECS Avg. Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 39 42 40 39 32 40 34 43 39 37 43 38 47 44 49 62 99 Medium Office 38 44 42 44 35 41 40 51 43 46 53 47 59 54 62 82 94 Small Office 46 48 49 46 36 44 38 53 47 47 61 52 70 62 77 110 80 Warehouse 15 15 15 16 14 16 14 18 17 16 21 20 26 23 27 43 48 Stand-alone Retail 48 46 46 41 34 41 35 45 42 40 48 45 54 51 61 88 70 Strip Mall 46 44 44 44 35 43 38 48 45 42 51 47 60 55 66 99 110 Primary School 65 71 69 69 57 65 71 78 68 65 85 74 99 88 107 147 68 Secondary School 69 74 74 73 50 68 67 87 72 72 99 81 117 101 128 181 80 Supermarket 161 171 161 175 155 162 171 191 174 186 206 188 224 209 240

138

Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks New Construction Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] May 5, 2009 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks 2003 CBECS Avg. Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 39 42 40 39 32 40 34 43 39 37 43 38 47 44 49 62 99 Medium Office 38 44 42 44 35 41 40 51 43 46 53 47 59 54 62 82 94 Small Office 46 48 49 46 36 44 38 53 47 47 61 52 70 62 77 110 80 Warehouse 15 15 15 16 14 16 14 18 17 16 21 20 26 23 27 43 48 Stand-alone Retail 48 46 46 41 34 41 35 45 42 40 48 45 54 51 61 88 70 Strip Mall 46 44 44 44 35 43 38 48 45 42 51 47 60 55 66 99 110 Primary School 65 71 69 69 57 65 71 78 68 65 85 74 99 88 107 147 68

139

Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MT MT Montana Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All $13,971,000 MT Montana State Energy Office $9,593,500 MT Anaconda-Deer Lodge City $50,000 MT Billings City $1,003,000 MT Bozeman City $175,500 MT Butte-Silver Bow City $138,700 MT Great Falls City $570,100 MT Havre City $50,000 MT Helena City $138,600 MT Kalispell City $96,700 MT Miles City City $50,000 MT Missoula City $680,400 MT Cascade County $94,400 MT Flathead County $274,200 MT Gallatin County $198,700 MT Lake County $119,500 MT Lewis and Clark County $120,400 MT Lincoln County $80,000 MT Missoula County $151,000 MT Park County $67,100 MT Ravalli County $167,400 MT Yellowstone County $151,800 In addition, today's announcement includes funding for the following Tribal

140

African Climate Change Resilience Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resilience Alliance Resilience Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Logo: African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Name African Climate Change Resilience Alliance Agency/Company /Organization Overseas Development Institute, Oxfam Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.africa-adapt.net/aa Country Ethiopia, Mozambique, Uganda UN Region Eastern Africa References ACCRA[1] Overview "ACCRA is an exciting and ambitious consortium working to improve our understanding of adaptive capacity. It is made up of Oxfam GB, the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), Save the Children Alliance, Care International and World Vision International and funded by DFID. We have developed an innovative adaptive capacity framework which we are currently consulting

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141

REDD+ In Dryland Forests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dryland Forests Dryland Forests Jump to: navigation, search Name REDD+ In Dryland Forests: Issues and Prospects for Pro-poor REDD in the Miombo Woodlands of Southern Africa Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Namibia, Zambia, Mozambique UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

142

Africa - CCS capacity building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - CCS capacity building Africa - CCS capacity building Jump to: navigation, search Name Africa - CCS capacity building Agency/Company /Organization Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Partner EECG Consultants, the University of Maputo, the Desert Research Foundation Namibia and the South Africa New Energy Research Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.ccs-africa.org/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2011 Country Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

143

SAFARI 2000 Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set Released Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "SAFARI 2000 MISR Level 2 Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000". This data set is a product of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative containing 240 HDF-EOS formatted MISR Level 2 Top-of-Atmosphere/Cloud and Aerosol/Surface Products focused in a southern African study area which includes: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The MISR Level 2 Products are geophysical measurements derived from the Level 1B2 data which consists of parameters that have been geometrically corrected and projected to a standard map grid. The products are in swaths, each derived from a single MISR orbit, where the imagery is 360 km wide and

144

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Saint Vincent and the Grenadines UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan

145

Procana | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Procana Procana Jump to: navigation, search Name Procana Place London, United Kingdom Sector Bioenergy Product London-based subsidiary of BioEnergy Africa/Sable Mining formed to develop a USD 510 ethanol project in Mozambique. References Procana[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Procana is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Procana" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Procana&oldid=349973" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

146

Uganda-REEEP Energy Activities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REEEP Energy Activities REEEP Energy Activities Agency/Company /Organization Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.reeep.org//655/proj Country Uganda Eastern Africa References REEEP project database [1] REEEP Projects in Uganda Breaking the risk barrier for institutional investment in clean energy in emerging markets Development of Marketplace Competition for Affordable Non-Fossil Lighting in Sub-Saharan Africa Establishment of PFAN network & activities in Mozambique & Uganda Financing Cogeneration and Small Hydro Projects in the Sugar and Tea Industry in East and Southern A Microfinancing the uptake of modern cookstoves in Uganda Promotion of Solar Water Heating in Uganda

147

Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Papau New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Papau New Guinea UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa

148

TO: FILE DATE------  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DATE------ DATE------ la Fp7 ---------__ OWNER(.=) m-----z- Past: -----_------------------ Current: ------------i----------- Owner c:nntacted q ye' s y "0; !' L-----J if yea, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION -------_------___ 0 Research & Development cl Facility Type 0 Production scale testins 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process E Theoretical Studies Sample SI Analysis [7 Manufacturing i University $ Resear.& Organization Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other -~------------------- 0 Production G Di spo5alfStorage TYPE OF CONTRACT ~------~--~~---- 0 Prime 0 Suhccntractnr 0 Purchase Order q Other information (i.e., crJst + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, etc) ------- ---------------------------- ~Canfrakt/Purchase Order # ----------------___---------

149

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL: BNL: Lucian Wielopolski Sudeep Mitra Oded Doron BNL: Lucian Wielopolski Sudeep Mitra Oded Doron New Analytical Modalities for Soil Carbon Analysis: Overview of the Inelastic Neutron Scattering System New Analytical Modalities for Soil Carbon Analysis: Overview of the Inelastic Neutron Scattering System Fifth Annual Conference on Carbon Capture & Sequestration May, 2006 Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Inelastic Neutron Scattering Inelastic Inelastic Neutron Neutron Scattering Scattering New Modalities for Carbon Analysis New Modalities for Carbon Analysis New Modalities for Carbon Analysis Volume, Scan, Non-Destructive 10 5 ~ 30 Gamma Rays Nuclear Reactions Nuclear INS Samples Destructive 10 1 --- m/z Py- Molecular Beam Molecular Py-MBMS Surface, Destructive

150

ION DYNAMICS IN LINEAR RF TRAPS J. Pedregosa Gutierrez, C. Champenois, M. Marciante, M. Houssin and M. Knoop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of stability criteria Adiabatic approximation / Pseudopotential V*RF for several k values (a difference of 50m 2 1/3 n=1 N /2 1 sin 3 2-1 N 1/3 q2 /40 2 mz 2 1/3 N V1 V2 V3 V4 V=1eV #1.1 +VRF -VRF UDC +VRF UDC -VRF 3.1V #1.2 +VRF -VRF UDC UDC 3.1V #2 / #4 +VRF -VRF UDC - 5.5kV / 37V #3 +VRF -VRF

Hensinger, Winfried

151

Development of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-ion mobility-orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a tool for proteomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) are widely used for large-scale protein identification in order to reduce the adverse effects of analyte ion suppression, increase the dynamic range, and as a deconvolution technique for complex datasets typical of cellular protein complements. In this work, matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization is coupled with ion mobility (IM) separation for the analysis of biological molecules. The utility of liquid-phase separations coupled to MS lies in the orthogonality of the two separation dimensions for all analytes. The data presented in this work illustrates that IM-MS relies on the correlation between separation dimensions for different classes (either structural or chemical) of analyte ions to obtain a useful separation. For example, for a series of peptide ions of increasing mass-to-charge (m/z) a plot drift time in the IM drift cell vs. m/z increases in a near-linear fashion, but DNA or lipids having similar m/z values will have very different IM drift time-m/z relationships, thus drift time vs. m/z can be used as a qualitative tool for compound class identification. In addition, IM-MS is applied to the analysis of large peptide datasets in order to determine the peak capacity of the method for bottom-up experiments in proteomics, and it is found that IM separation increases the peak capacity of an MS-only experiment by a factor of 5-10. The population density of the appearance area for peptides is further characterized in terms of the gas-phase structural propensities for tryptic peptide ions. It is found that a small percentage (~3%) of peptide sequences form extended (i.e., helical or ?-sheet type) structures in the gas-phase, thus influencing the overall appearance area for peptide ions. Furthermore, the ability of IM-MS to screen for the presence of phosphopeptides is characterized, and it is found that post translationally modified peptides populate the bottom one-half to one-third of the total appearance area for peptide ions. In general, the data presented in this work indicates that IM-MS offers dynamic range and deconvolution capabilities comparable to liquid-phase separation techniques coupled to MS on a time scale (ms) that is fully compatible to current MS, including TOF-MS, technology.

Ruotolo, Brandon Thomas

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Units: Cool Modules for HOT Languages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A module system ought to enable assembly-line programming using separate compilation and an expressive linking language. Separate compilation allows programmers to develop parts of a program independently. A linking language gives programmers precise control over the assembly of parts into a whole. This paper presents models of program units, MzScheme's module language for assembly-line programming. Units support separate compilation, independent module reuse, cyclic dependencies, hierarchical structuring, and dynamic linking. The models explain how to integrate units with untyped and typed languages such as Scheme and ML.

Matthew Flatt; Matthias Felleisen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Sensor systems for the Altair Lunar Lander:  

SciTech Connect

The Altair Lunar Lander will enable astronauts to learn to live and work on the moon for extended periods of time, providing the experience needed to expand human exploration farther into the solar system. My overriding recommendation: Use independent and complementary [sometimes referred to as 'orthogonal'] techniques to disambiguate confounding/interfering signals. E.g.: a mass spectrometer ['MS'], which currently serves as a Majority Constituent Analyzer ['MCA'] can be very valuable in detecting the presence of a gaseous specie, so long as it falls on a mass-to-charge ratio ['m/z'] that is not already occupied by a majority constituent of cabin air. Consider the toxic gas, CO. Both N{sub 2} and CO have parent peaks of m/z = 28, and CO{sub 2} has a fragment peak at m/z = 28 [and at 16 and 12], so the N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} m/z=28 signals could mask low, but potentially-dangerous levels of CO. However there are numerous surface-sensitive CO detectors, as well as tunable-diode-laser-based CO sensors that could provide independent monitoring of CO. Also, by appending a gas chromatograph ['GC'] as the front-end sample processer, prior to the inlet of the MS, one can rely upon the GC to separate CO from N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, providing the crew with another CO monitor. If the Altair Lunar Lander is able to include a Raman-based MCA for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2}, then each type of MCA would have cross-references, providing more confidence in the ongoing performance of each technique, and decreasing the risk that one instrument might fail to perform properly, without being noticed. See, also Dr. Pete Snyder's work, which states 'An orthogonal technologies sensor system appears to be attractive for a high confidence detection of presence and temporal characterization of bioaerosols.' Another recommendation: Use data fusion for event detection to decrease uncertainty: tie together the outputs from multiple sensing modalities - eNose, solid-state sensors, GC-IMS, GC-MS - via nonlinear algorithms, such as an 'artificial neural net.' MA Ryan at the JPL and Henry Abarbanel at UCSD are possible candidates to implement such an approach.

Mariella, R

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

The measurement of $\\alpha_s$ from event shapes with the DELPHI detector at the highest LEP energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hadronic event shape distributions are determined from data in e+e- collisions between 183 and 207 GeV. From these the strong coupling alpha_s is extracted in O(alpha_s^2), NLLA and matched O(alpha_s^2)+NLLA theory. Hadronisation corrections evaluated with fragmentation model generators as well as an analytical power ansatz are applied. Comparing these measurements to those obtained at and around M_Z allows a combined measurement of alpha_s from all DELPHI data and a test of the energy dependence of the strong coupling.

Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; sman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Brat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besanon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brckman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernndez, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Fth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; Garca, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gmez-Ceballos, G; Gonalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; Lpez, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Marchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martnez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjrnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mnig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Mller, U; Mnich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; sterberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rdky, J; Rivero, M; Rodrguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tom, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Control of New Kinetic Barriers & Design of Nanorods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accomplishments of this project include three elements. The first element directly relates to the focus of this project. Specifically, we have determined the three-dimensional Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers, with and without surfactants, and two manuscripts in preparation; references refer to the list of journal publications. Further, we have discovered a characteristic length scale - the dimension of atomic islands bounded by multiple-layer surface steps. This discovery has made it possible to understand scientifically why nanorods synthesis is possible at all, will enable science-based design of nanorods, and may impact energy technology through nanomaterials design and synthesis. The second element relates to an exploration - synthesis of nanowires. This exploration is made possible through additional support of a Small Grant Exploratory Research from NSF. Through a combination of atomistic simulations, theories, and experiments, the PI and colleagues have made two contributions to the field. Specifically, they have revealed the physical reason why periodic twins develop during growth of SiC nanowires. Further, they have discovered that SiC nanowire films have an order-of-magnitude higher friction that their macroscopic counterpart, something that has never been reported before. The third elements relates to knowledge dissemination. The PI has co-edited (with Helena van Swygenhoven of PSI) an issue of MRS Bulletin, with the theme of Atomistic Simulations of Mechanics of Nanostructures, co-authored a review article in JOM, and authored a review paper in connection with a Banff workshop series co-sponsored by Canada, US, and Mexico.

Hanchen Huang

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

Health Services and Outcomes Research Reduction in the Incidence of Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated With a Citywide Smoking Ordinance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BackgroundSecondhand smoke exposure increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). One study (Helena, Mont) examined the issue and found a decrease in AMI associated with a smoke-free ordinance. We sought to determine the impact of a smoke-free ordinance on AMI admission rates in another geographically isolated community (Pueblo, Colo). Methods and ResultsWe assessed AMI hospitalizations in Pueblo during a 3-year period, 1.5 years before and 1.5 years after implementation of a smoke-free ordinance. We compared the AMI hospitalization rates among individuals residing within city limits, the area where the ordinance applied, versus those outside city limits. We also compared AMI rates during this time period with another geographically isolated but proximal community, El Paso County, Colo, that did not have an ordinance. A total of 855 patients were hospitalized with a diagnosis of primary AMI in Pueblo between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2004. A reduction in AMI hospitalizations was observed in the period after the ordinance among Pueblo city limit residents (relative risk [RR]?0.73, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.63 to 0.85). No significant changes in AMI rates were observed among residents outside city limits (RR?0.85, 95 % CI 0.63 to 1.16) or in El Paso County during the same period (RR?0.97, 95 % CI 0.89 to 1.06). The reduction in AMI rate within Pueblo differed significantly from changes in the external control group (El Paso County) even after adjustment for seasonal trends (P?0.001).

Carl Bartecchi; Md Robert; N. Alsever; Md Christine Nevin-woods; Mph William; M. Thomas; Raymond O. Estacio; Md Becki; Bucher Bartelson; Phd Mori; J. Krantz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

ARM - Datastreams - aosacsm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsaosacsm Datastreamsaosacsm Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1046180 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AOSACSM AOS: aerosol chemical speciation monitor Active Dates 2010.11.20 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Aerosols Originating Instrument Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Inorganic chemical composition Mass concentration of ammonium, ambient aerosol in air. ug/m^3 ammonium ( time ) Mass to charge ratios of ion fragments m/z amus ( amus ) Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time

158

INTERO)CPICE CORRC-NOKNCL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

s.u-or:.L~ s.u-or:.L~ p40.0-0(-b INTERO)CPICE CORRC-NOKNCL 7117-01.85.sej.08 TO: File cc: A. Wallo DATE: 27 March 1985 B. Fritz C. Young F. Hoch SUmJECT: SPENCER CHEMICAL CO., JAYHAWK WORKS A@-+ FRoMz S.E. Jones The Spencer Chemical Co. Jayhawks Works, and Joplin, Missouri, located between Pittsburg, Kansas was licensed b!!.the NRC undersource Material License C-4352 and Special NuclearMaterial Licenses SNM-154 to operate a uranium oxide pilot plant, and SNM-329 to process enriched uranium (for other licensees:). Headquarters for the Spencer Chemical Company appear to have been located at the Dwight Building, Kansas Cit,y. IMissouri. and the Research Center, 9009 West 67th Street, Merriam, Kansas. Licensing activities for the Jayhawks facilities was managed at these two locations.

159

A disc in the heart of the Ant nebula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of a silicate disc at the centre of the planetary nebula Mz3 (the Ant). The nebula was observed with MIDI on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). The visibilities obtained at different orientations clearly indicate the presence of a dusty, nearly edge-on disc in the heart of the nebula. An amorphous silicate absorption feature is clearly seen in our mid-IR spectrum and visibility curves. We used radiative transfer Monte Carlo simulations to constrain the geometrical and physical parameters of the disc. We derive an inner radius of 9 AU (~6mas assuming D=1.4kpc). This disc is perpendicular to, but a factor of 10^{3} smaller than the optical bipolar outflow.

Lykou, Foteini; Lagadec, Eric; Zijlstra, Albert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A disc in the heart of the Ant nebula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of a silicate disc at the centre of the planetary nebula Mz3 (the Ant). The nebula was observed with MIDI on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). The visibilities obtained at different orientations clearly indicate the presence of a dusty, nearly edge-on disc in the heart of the nebula. An amorphous silicate absorption feature is clearly seen in our mid-IR spectrum and visibility curves. We used radiative transfer Monte Carlo simulations to constrain the geometrical and physical parameters of the disc. We derive an inner radius of 9 AU (~6mas assuming D=1.4kpc). This disc is perpendicular to, but a factor of 10^{3} smaller than the optical bipolar outflow.

Foteini Lykou; Olivier Chesneau; Eric Lagadec; Albert Zijlstra

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Neutrino dark matter candidate in fourth generation scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We overview the constraints on the 4th-generation neutrino dark matter candidate and investigate a possible way to make it a viable dark matter candidate. Given the LEP constraints tell us that the 4th-generation neutrino has to be rather heavy (> M_Z/2), in sharp contrast to the other three neutrinos, the underlying nature of the 4th-generation neutrino is expected to be different. We suggest that an additional gauge symmetry B-4L_4 distinguishes it from the Standard Model's three lighter neutrinos and this also facilitates promotion of the 4th-generation predominantly right-handed neutrino to a good cold dark matter candidate. It provides distinguishable predictions for the dark matter direct detection and the Large Hadron Collider experiments.

Hye-Sung Lee; Zuowei Liu; Amarjit Soni

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Pauli matrices and 2D electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper it will be argued that transport in a 2D electron gas can be implemented as 'local hidden instrument based' variables. With this concept of instrumentalism it is possible to explain the quantum correlation, the particle-wave duality and Wheeler's 'backward causation of a particle'. In the case of quantum correlation the spin measuring variant of the Einstein Podolsky and Rosen paradox is studied. In the case of particle-wave duality the system studied is single photon Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometry with a phase shift size $\\delta$. The idea that the instruments more or less neutrally may show us the way to the particle will be replaced by the concept of laboratory equipment contributing in an unexpected way to the measurement.

J. F. Geurdes

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

An SU(5)$\\otimes$Z_{13} Grand Unification Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an SU(5) grand unified model with an invisible axion and the unification of the three coupling constants which is in agreement with the values, at $M_Z$, of $\\alpha$, $\\alpha_s$, and $\\sin^2\\theta_W$. A discrete, anomalous, $Z_{13}$ symmetry implies that the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is an automatic symmetry of the classical Lagrangian protecting, at the same time, the invisible axion against possible semi-classical gravity effects. Although the unification scale is of the order of the Peccei-Quinn scale the proton is stabilized by the fact that in this model the standard model fields form the SU(5) multiplets completed by new exotic fields and, also, because it is protected by the $Z_{13}$ symmetry.

Alex G. Dias; Edison T. Franco; Vicente Pleitez

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

for the Support of High Performance Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture for the Support of High Performance Computing was sponsored by the National Science Foundation to identify critical research topics in computer architecture as they relate to high performance computing. Following a wide-ranging discus-sion of the computational characteristics and requirements of the grand challenge applications, the workshop identified four major computer architecture grand challenges as crucial to advancing the state of the art of high performance computation in the coming decade. These are: (1) idealized parallel computer models; (2) usable peta-ops (1015 ops) performance; (3) computers in an era of HDTV, gigabyte networks, and visualization; and (4) infrastruc-ture for prototyping architectures. This report overviews some of the demands of the grand challenge applications and presents the above four grand challenges for computer architecture. Q MZ AM-demic Press, Inc. A. Origin of the Workshop

Howard Jay Siegel; Seth Abraham; William L. Bain; Kenneth E. Batcher; Thomas L. Casavant; Doug Degroot; Jack B. Dennis; David C. Douglas; Tse-yun Feng; James R. Goodman; Alan Huang; Harry F. Jordan; J. Robertjump; Yalen. Patt; I Alan; Jay Smith; James E. Smith; Lawrence Snyder; I~harold S. Stone; Russ Tuck; Benjamin W. Wah

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

CRC handbook of mass spectra of environmental contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook presents a collection of the electron impact mass spectra of 394 commonly encountered environmental pollutants. Each pollutant is examined on a separate page and is presented as a bar graph always starting at M/z = 40. All spectra are determined by analyses of data in EPA data bases. The major fragment ions are correlated with their respective structure. The mass and intensity of the four most intense ions in a spectrum are given. Each spectrum is marked to indicate the origin of the selected fragment ions. The approved name of the Chemical Abstract Service, the common name of the compound, the article number (if any) given in the Merck Index, the CAS Registry Number, the Molecular formula, and the nominal molecular weight of the compound are given for all spectra. All spectra are indexed by common chemical name, CAS Registry Number, exact molecular weight, and intense peaks.

Hites, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Relating hygroscopicity and composition of organic aerosol particulate matter  

SciTech Connect

A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) was used to measure the water uptake (hygroscopicity) of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed during the chemical and photochemical oxidation of several organic precursors in a smog chamber. Electron ionization mass spectra of the non-refractory submicron aerosol were simultaneously determined with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), and correlations between the two different signals were investigated. SOA hygroscopicity was found to strongly correlate with the relative abundance of the ion signal m/z 44 expressed as a fraction of total organic signal (f44). m/z 44 is due mostly to the ion fragment CO+2 for all types of SOA systems studied, and has been previously shown to strongly correlate with organic O/C for ambient and chamber OA. The analysis was also performed on ambient OA from two field experiments at the remote site Jungfraujoch, and the megacity Mexico City, where similar results were found. A simple empirical linear relation between the hygroscopicity of OA at subsaturated RH, as given by the hygroscopic growth factor (GF) or *org parameter, and f44 was determined and is given by *org=2.2f44?0.13. This approximation can be further verified and refined as the database for AMS and HTDMA measurements is constantly being expanded around the world. The use of this approximation could introduce an important simplification in the parameterization of hygroscopicity of OA in atmospheric models, since 20 f44 is correlated with the photochemical age of an air mass.

Duplissy, J.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Dommen, J.; Alfarra, M. R.; Metzger, A.; Barmpadimos, I.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Tritscher, Torsten; Gysel, Martin; Aiken, Allison; Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Collins, Donald R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Baltensperger, Urs

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fixing the EW scale in supersymmetric models after the Higgs discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TeV-scale supersymmetry was originally introduced to solve the hierarchy problem and therefore fix the electroweak (EW) scale in the presence of quantum corrections. Numerical methods testing the SUSY models often report a good likelihood L (or chi^2=-2ln L) to fit the data {\\it including} the EW scale itself (m_Z^0) with a {\\it simultaneously} large fine-tuning i.e. a large variation of this scale under a small variation of the SUSY parameters. We argue that this is inconsistent and we identify the origin of this problem. Our claim is that the likelihood (or chi^2) to fit the data that is usually reported in such models does not account for the chi^2 cost of fixing the EW scale. When this constraint is implemented, the likelihood (or chi^2) receives a significant correction (delta_chi^2) that worsens the current data fits of SUSY models. We estimate this correction for the models: constrained MSSM (CMSSM), models with non-universal gaugino masses (NUGM) or higgs soft masses (NUHM1, NUHM2), the NMSSM and the general NMSSM (GNMSSM). For a higgs mass m_h\\approx 126 GeV, one finds that in these models (delta_chi^2)/ndf> 1.5 (approx 1 for GNMSSM), which violates the usual condition of a good fit (total chi^2/ndf approx 1) already before fitting observables other than the EW scale itself (ndf=number of degrees of freedom). This has (negative) implications for SUSY models and it is suggested that future data fits properly account for this effect, if one remains true to the original goal of SUSY. Since the expression of delta_chi^2 that emerges from our calculation depends on a familiar measure of fine-tuning, one concludes that EW fine-tuning is an intrinsic part of the likelihood to fit the data that includes the EW scale (m_Z^0).

D. M. Ghilencea

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

169

Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Yemen UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

170

Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Samoa UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

171

Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Nepal UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

172

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bangladesh UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

174

Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

175

Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Jamaica UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

176

Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Haiti UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

177

Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Saint Lucia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

178

Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Grenada UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

179

Lessons and Guidance on Securing financing for RE/EE projects in Southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lessons and Guidance on Securing financing for RE/EE projects in Southern Lessons and Guidance on Securing financing for RE/EE projects in Southern Africa through Gold Standard Carbon Revenues Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Lessons and Guidance on Securing financing for RE/EE projects in Southern Africa through Gold Standard Carbon Revenues Agency/Company /Organization: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Implementation, Finance Website: toolkits.reeep.org/index.php?work=detail&asset=projectOutput&id=135 Country: Tanzania, Mozambique Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa Coordinates: -25.9577855°, 32.5623996° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-25.9577855,"lon":32.5623996,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Dominica UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

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181

Genomic Analysis of Highly Virulent Isolate of African Swine Fever Virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

African swine fever (ASF) is widespread in Africa but has occasionally been introduced into other continents. In June 2007, ASF was isolated in the Caucasus Region of the Republic of Georgia and subsequently in neighboring countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and 9 states of the Russian Federation). Previous data for sequencing of 3 genes indicated that the Georgia 2007/1 isolate is closely related to isolates of genotype II, which has been identified in Mozambique, Madagascar, and Zambia. We report the complete genomic coding sequence of the Georgia 2007/1 isolate and comparison with other isolates. A genome sequence of 189,344 bp encoding 166 open reading frames (ORFs) was obtained. Phylogeny based on concatenated sequences of 125 conserved ORFs showed that this isolate clustered most closely with the Mkuzi 1979 isolate. Some ORFs clustered differently, suggesting that recombination may have occurred. Results provide a baseline for monitoring genomic changes in this virus. African swine fever (ASF) is a hemorrhagic fever in domestic pigs that causes serious economic losses and high mortality rates. ASF is currently endemic to many countries in sub-Saharan Africa and the island of Sardinia in Europe and was endemic to Spain and Portugal from 1960 until the mid 1990s. It is still endemic to Madagascar since its introduction in 1998. Sporadic ASF outbreaks have occurred in Brazil, the Caribbean region, the Indian Ocean island

David A. G. Chapman; Alistair C. Darby; Melissa Da Silva; Chris Upton; Alan D. Radford; Linda K. Dixon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hydrocarbon implications of Karoo Supergroup turbidites and tectonics in northern Zimbabwe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field research in the relatively unstudied Lower Zambezi trough of northernmost Zimbabwe and adjacent Zambia and Mozambique has revealed a sedimentary tectonic history unlike other Karoo basin (Late Carboniferous to Early Jurassic) of the region. This presents a much better setting for petroleum deposits than has been found in those other areas. Aerial photo interpretation and reconnaissance geophysical data show strike-slip folds and faults at the surface and subbasins up to 10 km deep. This contrast with other Karoo basins, which are of a half-graben genesis, is further evident in the sedimentary sequences of the Lower Zambezi basin complex. Lacustrine turbidites occur in the Lower Karoo Kondo Pools Formation. Upper fan facies of a restricted active margin subaqueous fan system are found in limited outcrops in an accommodation zone uplift between the two subbasins. The overlying units are classical Karoo alluvial layers, but intercalated with a higher frequency of unconformities. Syndepositional and postdepositional deformation includes thrust faulting and detachment. Hydrocarbon potential is enhanced by three virtues that are lacking in other parts of southern Africa. Distal facies to those seen in exposures of the Kondo Pools Formation subaqueous fans should be rich in sapropelic mudstone, the source rock so elusive elsewhere. Second, basin depth is sufficient for thermal maturity. Finally, the tectonic regime was conducive to the formation of convex as well as unconformity traps. Mobil Oil is in the midst of an exploration program that may capitalize on these factors.

Tromp, P.L. (Univ. of Zimbabwe, Harare (Zimbabwe))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Tajikistan UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

184

Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bolivia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

185

Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Niger UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

186

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Hospitals, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 34.6 40.7 88.9 85.4 1.8 1.8 20.0 21.0 Houston 2A 42.1 48.0 89.5 86.9 2.2 2.1 19.6 20.8 Phoenix 2B 42.2 48.6 82.1 80.2 2.0 1.9 20.7 21.9 Atlanta 3A 45.8 53.9 83.7 82.1 2.5 2.5 19.0 20.6 Los Angeles 3B 45.4 46.9 75.4 71.0 2.5 2.4 18.5 18.8 Las Vegas 3B 40.9 48.0 69.5 69.0 2.2 2.2 18.5 21.2 San Francisco 3C 49.2 52.8 66.5 64.1 2.8 2.7 17.1 18.0 Baltimore 4A 49.0 60.3 79.8 79.7 2.8 2.7 18.2 19.8 Albuquerque 4B 36.2 42.6 56.1 55.4 2.8 2.7 18.7 20.1 Seattle 4C 50.5 61.2 65.4 64.6 3.0 2.9 17.5 18.6 Chicago 5A 52.5 55.9 67.3 64.0 3.1 3.0 17.8 18.0 Boulder 5B 39.1 41.1 52.6 50.1 3.0 3.0 18.1 18.2 Minneapolis 6A 55.7 60.5 59.7 56.9 3.3 3.2 17.3 17.5 Helena 6B 45.5 49.4 48.4 46.0 3.3 3.2 17.3 17.4 Duluth 7 59.8 64.0 50.6 47.2 3.6 3.5 16.9 16.5 Fairbanks 8 86.9 91.1

187

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Large Hotels, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 1.4 0.1 155.0 142.0 30.1 29.4 8.9 11.2 Houston 2A 7.1 1.9 119.9 117.9 38.1 37.1 8.8 10.8 Phoenix 2B 4.5 1.1 113.2 111.5 33.5 32.7 9.1 11.4 Atlanta 3A 13.1 3.8 91.3 88.5 45.7 44.6 8.8 10.5 Los Angeles 3B 3.1 0.7 77.5 74.9 44.3 43.1 8.9 10.4 Las Vegas 3B 7.4 2.2 78.9 83.0 39.0 38.0 9.0 11.2 San Francisco 3C 8.0 2.6 48.8 49.6 50.8 49.5 8.7 10.0 Baltimore 4A 20.8 6.9 82.8 74.4 51.8 50.5 8.8 10.1 Albuquerque 4B 13.7 5.4 51.3 54.8 50.6 49.4 9.1 10.9 Seattle 4C 18.2 6.4 46.7 40.4 54.9 53.5 8.9 9.9 Chicago 5A 29.1 9.7 71.1 63.4 57.1 55.6 8.8 9.6 Boulder 5B 20.5 8.0 47.6 44.8 56.8 55.4 9.0 10.1 Minneapolis 6A 37.2 12.6 67.5 59.8 61.6 60.1 8.8 9.6 Helena 6B 30.3 11.5 43.4 37.9 62.5 60.9 9.0 9.8 Duluth 7 45.5 15.9 51.3 40.6 69.2 67.4 8.9 9.3 Fairbanks 8 74.5 24.3

188

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Outpatient Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 65.4 60.3 69.6 61.9 0.7 0.7 24.6 23.9 Houston 2A 73.2 76.2 54.0 52.9 0.8 0.8 22.1 24.0 Phoenix 2B 79.1 79.8 54.7 52.9 0.7 0.7 23.8 25.3 Atlanta 3A 83.1 91.1 41.8 42.1 0.9 0.9 22.1 24.6 Los Angeles 3B 87.8 86.3 37.4 35.6 0.9 0.9 22.5 23.1 Las Vegas 3B 76.6 80.5 44.1 44.0 0.8 0.8 23.2 25.5 San Francisco 3C 85.0 93.4 25.0 24.7 1.0 1.0 20.3 22.2 Baltimore 4A 85.9 97.6 34.8 35.3 1.0 1.0 21.0 23.5 Albuquerque 4B 76.5 83.6 30.4 30.9 1.0 1.0 24.1 26.4 Seattle 4C 91.7 103.1 22.8 22.6 1.1 1.0 20.9 22.9 Chicago 5A 92.4 96.0 28.1 26.4 1.1 1.1 21.2 22.1 Boulder 5B 79.9 82.9 24.7 23.3 1.1 1.1 23.4 24.4 Minneapolis 6A 97.1 102.0 24.9 23.5 1.2 1.1 21.1 22.1 Helena 6B 88.6 93.2 19.9 18.8 1.2 1.2 22.3 23.3 Duluth 7 100.6 104.6 17.0 15.5 1.3 1.3 20.8 21.2 Fairbanks

189

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.5 0.7 23.0 25.2 14.3 16.1 Houston 2A 11.6 12.4 16.2 18.9 14.6 16.9 Phoenix 2B 8.3 10.2 17.2 21.3 14.2 17.5 Atlanta 3A 24.9 26.2 9.2 11.2 15.1 17.4 Los Angeles 3B 6.9 7.7 3.3 3.9 13.4 14.1 Las Vegas 3B 15.4 17.9 11.6 14.8 12.7 16.9 San Francisco 3C 22.4 22.5 0.7 1.0 10.6 12.1 Baltimore 4A 43.0 46.9 6.2 7.9 13.3 16.2 Albuquerque 4B 30.2 33.8 5.3 6.8 13.7 16.5 Seattle 4C 38.4 42.0 0.9 1.3 11.1 13.7 Chicago 5A 59.5 62.9 4.4 5.3 15.3 18.7 Boulder 5B 43.3 47.2 3.2 4.2 15.2 18.7 Minneapolis 6A 75.5 82.2 3.7 4.3 19.5 21.1 Helena 6B 60.3 66.1 1.9 2.3 20.8 22.2 Duluth 7 92.8 103.7 1.2 1.4 21.1 21.9 Fairbanks 8 156.4 173.4 0.5 0.5 27.1 30.0 Note(s): Source(s): Heating Cooling Ventilation Climate Zone Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate

190

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

191

Environmental assessment of spatial plan policies through land use scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method based on scenario analysis to compare the environmental effects of different spatial plan policies in a range of possible futures. The study aimed at contributing to overcome two limitations encountered in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for spatial planning: poor exploration of how the future might unfold, and poor consideration of alternative plan policies. Scenarios were developed through what-if functions and spatial modeling in a Geographical Information System (GIS), and consisted in maps that represent future land uses under different assumptions on key driving forces. The use of land use scenarios provided a representation of how the different policies will look like on the ground. This allowed gaining a better understanding of the policies' implications on the environment, which could be measured through a set of indicators. The research undertook a case-study approach by developing and assessing land use scenarios for the future growth of Caia, a strategically-located and fast-developing town in rural Mozambique. The effects of alternative spatial plan policies were assessed against a set of environmental performance indicators, including deforestation, loss of agricultural land, encroachment of flood-prone areas and wetlands and access to water sources. In this way, critical environmental effects related to the implementation of each policy were identified and discussed, suggesting possible strategies to address them. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method contributes to two critical issues in SEA: exploration of the future and consideration of alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future scenarios are used to test the environmental performance of different spatial plan policies in uncertainty conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatially-explicit land use scenarios provide a representation of how different policies will look like on the ground.

Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

193

Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives  

SciTech Connect

Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather than ozonolysis, is the main formaldehyde source in those filters. Emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not found to be large enough to substantially increase indoor concentrations in typical building scenarios. Nevertheless, ozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as a source of low levels of indoor irritants.

Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jrmie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIghTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

365 lbs 365 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 4510 lbs Distribution F/R: 57/43 % GVWR: 5520 lbs GAWR F/R: 2865/2865 lbs Payload: 1010 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 107.0 inches Track F/R: 62/61.2 inches Length: 187.2 inches Width: 72.6 inches Height: 66.4 inches Ground Clearance: 7.1 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Goodyear Tire Model: Eagle RS-A Tire Size: P215/55R18 Tire Pressure F/R: 30/30 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENgINE Model: 3MZ-FE Output: 208 hp @ 5600 rpm Configuration: DOHC V6 Displacement: 3.3 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.2 Gallons Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2010 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEhICLE FEATuRES Base Vehicle: 2006 Lexus RX 400h VIN: JTJHW31U160002575 Seatbelt Positions: Five

195

Strategies for Energy Efficient Resource Management of Hybrid Programming Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many scientific applications are programmed using hybrid programming models that use both message-passing and shared-memory, due to the increasing prevalence of large-scale systems with multicore, multisocket nodes. Previous work has shown that energy efficiency can be improved using software-controlled execution schemes that consider both the programming model and the power-aware execution capabilities of the system. However, such approaches have focused on identifying optimal resource utilization for one programming model, either shared-memory or message-passing, in isolation. The potential solution space, thus the challenge, increases substantially when optimizing hybrid models since the possible resource configurations increase exponentially. Nonetheless, with the accelerating adoption of hybrid programming models, we increasingly need improved energy efficiency in hybrid parallel applications on large-scale systems. In this work, we present new software-controlled execution schemes that consider the effects of dynamic concurrency throttling (DCT) and dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) in the context of hybrid programming models. Specifically, we present predictive models and novel algorithms based on statistical analysis that anticipate application power and time requirements under different concurrency and frequency configurations. We apply our models and methods to the NPB MZ benchmarks and selected applications from the ASC Sequoia codes. Overall, we achieve substantial energy savings (8.74% on average and up to 13.8%) with some performance gain (up to 7.5%) or negligible performance loss.

Li, Dong [ORNL; Supinski, Bronis de [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Schulz, Martin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Cameron, Kirk W. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIghTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

245 lbs 245 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 4118 lbs GVWR: 5675 lbs GAWR F/R: 2865/3130 lbs Distribution F/R: 59/41 % Payload: 1557 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 106.7 in Track F/R: 61.9/61.1 in Length: 185.3 in Width: 71.5 in Height: 68.6 in Ground Clearance: 5.9 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Goodyear Tire Model: Integrity Tire Size: P225/65R17 Tire Pressure F/R: 32/32 Spare Installed: Yes ENgINE Model: 3MZ-FE Output: 208 hp @ 5600 rpm Configuration: V6 Displacement: 3.3 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.2 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2010 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEhICLE FEATuRES Base Vehicle: 2006 Highlander VIN: JTEDW21A860005681 Seatbelt Positions: Seven Standard Features: Air Conditioning

197

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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198

An Alternative Form of Laser Beam Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Careful characterization of laser beams used in materials processing such as welding and drilling is necessary to obtain robust, reproducible processes and products. Recently, equipment and techniques have become available which make it possible to rapidly and conveniently characterize the size, shape, mode structure, beam quality (Mz), and intensity of a laser beam (incident power/unit area) as a function of distance along the beam path. This facilitates obtaining a desired focused spot size and also locating its position. However, for a given position along the beam axis, these devices typically measure where the beam intensity level has been reduced to I/ez of maximum intensity at that position to determine the beam size. While giving an intuitive indication of the beam shape since the maximum intensity of the beam varies greatly, the contour so determined is not an iso-contour of any parameter related to the beam intensity or power. In this work we shall discuss an alternative beam shape formulation where the same measured information is plotted as contour intervals of intensity.

KNOROVSKY,GERALD A.; MACCALLUM,DANNY O.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Model Independent Upper Bound on the Lightest Higgs Boson Mass in Supersymmetric Standard Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main features of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is the existence of an absolute tree-level upper bound $m_h$ on the mass of the $CP=+1$ lightest Higgs boson, equal to $m_Z$, that could affect detectability at future colliders. The above bound is spoiled by {\\bf radiative corrections} and by an {\\bf enlarged Higgs sector}, as {\\em e.g.} a gauge singlet. Radiative corrections in the MSSM can push the upper bound up to $115\\ GeV$ for $m_t \\simlt 150\\ GeV$. The presence of an enlarged Higgs sector changes the previous upper bound to one depending on the electroweak scale, $\\tan \\beta$ and the gauge and Yukawa couplings of the theory. When radiative corrections are included, the allowed region in the $(m_h,m_t)$ plane depends on the scale $\\Lambda$ below which the theory remains perturbative. In particular, for models with arbitrary Higgs sectors and couplings saturating the scale $\\Lambda=10^{16}\\ GeV$ we find $m_h \\simlt 155\\ GeV$ and $m_t \\simlt 190\\ GeV$.

Mariano Quiros

1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

Retention indices, relative response factors, and mass spectra of trifluoroethyl and heptafluorobutyl esters of carboxylic acids determined by capillary GC/MS  

SciTech Connect

The GC/MS characteristics of carboxylic acid esters prepared from fluorine-containing alcohols were compared to those of methyl esters. The GC retention of 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl (TFE) esters was less than, and 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-1-butyl (HFB) esters approximately equivalent to that of methyl esters. The peak shape of both TFE and HFB esters was slightly superior to that of methyl esters. Mass spectra of TFE and HFB aliphatic esters show significantly more intense molecular and key fragment ions than those of methyl esters. Also, owing to their significantly higher molecular weights, TFE or HFB ester molecular ions and most fragment ions of interest occur at significantly higher m/z values than most potential interfering ions. The GC retention indices, relative GC/MS total ion current response factors, and 70 eV electron impact mass spectra of about 70 TFE and 70 HFB carboxylic acid esters are reported. Results from analysis of a TFE/HFB esterified petroleum carboxylic acid concentrate are discussed in detail. 26 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Yu, S.K.-T.; Vrana, R.P.; Green, J.B.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Molecular uranates - laser synthesis of uranium oxide anions in the gas phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser ablation of solid UO{sub 3} or (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7} yielded in the gas phase molecular uranium oxide anions with compositions ranging from [UO{sub n}]{sup -} (n = 2-4) to [U{sub 14}O{sub n}]{sup -} (n = 32-35), as detected by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The cluster series [U{sub x}O{sub 3x}]{sup -} for x {le} 6 and various [U{sub x}O{sub 3x-y}]{sup -}, in which y increased with increasing x, could be identified. A few anions with H atoms were also present, and their abundance increased when hydrated UO{sub 3} was used in place of anhydrous UO{sub 3}. Collision-induced dissociation experiments with some of the lower m/z cluster anions supported extended structures in which neutral UO{sub 3} constitutes the building block. Cationic uranium oxide clusters [U{sub x}O{sub n}]{sup +} (x = 2-9; n = 3-24) could also be produced and are briefly discussed. Common trends in the O/U ratios for both negative and positive clusters could be unveiled.

Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Gibson, John K

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning Aerosol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Natural and prescribed biomass fires are a major source of atmospheric aerosols that can persist in the atmosphere for long periods of time. Biomass burning aerosols (BBA) can be associated with long range transport of water soluble N?, S?, P?, and metal?containing species. In this study, BBA samples were collected using a particle?into?liquid sampler (PILS) from laboratory burns of vegetation collected on military bases in the southeastern and southwestern United States. The samples were then analyzed using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/HR?MS) that enabled accurate mass measurements for hundreds of species with m/z values between 70 and 1000 and assignment of probable elemental formulae. Mg, Al, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Ba?containing organometallic species were identified. The results suggest that the biomass may have accumulated metal?containing species that were reemitted during biomass burning. Further research into the sources, persistence, and dispersion of metal?containing aerosols as well as their environmental effects is needed.

Chang-Graham, Alexandra L.; Profeta, Luisa Tm; Johnson, Timothy J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical characterizations of atmospheric aerosols is a serious analytical challenge because of the complexity of particulate matter analyte composed of a large number of compounds with a wide range of molecular structures, physico-chemical properties, and reactivity. In this study chemical composition of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) samples is characterized by high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurement combined with Kendrick analysis allowed us to assign elemental composition for hundreds of compounds in the range of m/z values of 50-1000. ESI/MS spectra of different BBOA samples contain a variety of distinct, sample specific, characteristic peaks that can be used as unique markers for different types of biofuels. Our results indicate that a significant number of high-MW organic compounds in BBOA samples are highly oxidized polar species that can be efficiently detected using ESI/MS but are difficult to observe using the conventional GCMS analysis of aerosol samples. The average O:C ratios obtained for each of the BBOA samples studied in this work are in a strikingly good agreement with the previously reported values obtained using STXM/NEXAFS. The degree of unsaturation of detected organic compounds shows a clear decrease with increase in the molecular weight of the anyalyte molecules. The decrease is particularly pronounced for the samples containing a large number of CH2-based homologous series.

Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

HIGGS BOSON SEARCH AT PHOTON COLLIDER FOR MH = 140 ? 190 GEV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Higgs boson within the mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV can be discovered at a photon collider in the reaction ?? ? WW (with real or virtual W). Quite moderate resolution in the effective mass of the WW system is required. Preliminary remarks. A discovery of the Higgs boson is one of the main goals for the next generation of colliders. If the Higgs boson mass MH is larger than 2MZ, Higgs boson can be discovered at LHC, photon colliders [1] or e + e ? linear colliders [2] via the sizable decay mode H ? ZZ. For all types of collisions a background to this decay mode is rather small. If MH Higgs boson can be discovered at photon colliders or e + e ? linear colliders via the dominant decay mode H ? b b and at LHC via the decay mode H ? ??. The mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV is the most difficult one for the Higgs boson discovery. In this mass range the decay mode H ? W + W ? with real or virtual Ws (W ? ? qq, e?,...) is dominant, branching ratios of other decay modes decrease rapidly and their using for the Higgs boson discovery is very difficult. The use of the H ? W + W ? decay at e + e ?

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

HIGGS BOSON SEARCH AT PHOTON COLLIDER FOR MH = 140 ? 190 GEV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Higgs boson within the mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV can be discovered at a photon collider in the reaction ?? ? WW (with real or virtual W) with the luminosity integral about 1 fb ?1. The reasonable resolution in the effective mass of the WW system is required. Preliminary remarks. A discovery of the Higgs boson is one of the main goals for the next generation of colliders. If the Higgs boson mass MH is larger than 2MZ, it can be discovered at LHC, photon colliders [1] or e + e ? linear colliders [2] via the sizable decay mode H ? ZZ. For all types of collisions a background to this decay mode is rather small. If MH Higgs boson can be discovered at e + e ? linear colliders or photon colliders via the dominant decay mode H ? b b and at LHC via the decay mode H ? ??. The mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV is the most difficult one for the Higgs boson discovery. In this mass range the decay mode H ? W + W ? with real or virtual Ws

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Production and Utilization of CO3- Produced by a Corona Discharge in Air for Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization is a multistep ionization process used in mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The formation of product ions depends upon interactions with the analyte and the reactant ion species formed in the ionization source. The predominant reactant ion observed in a point-to-plane corona discharge in air occurs at m/z 60. There have been multiple references in the literature to the identity of this ion with some disagreement. It was postulated to be either CO3- or N2O2-. The identity of this ion is important as it is a key to the ionization of analytes. It was determined here to be CO3- through the use of 18O labeled oxygen. Further confirmation was provided through MS/MS studies. The ionization of nitroglycerine (NG) with CO3- produced the adduct NGCO3-. This was compared to ionization with NO3- and Cl- reactant ions that also formed adducts with NG. The fragmentation patterns of these three adducts provides insight into the charge distribution and indicates that CO3- has a relatively high electron affinity similar to that of nitrate.

Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Small Hotels, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.2 0.0 25.7 21.2 5.6 5.4 6.7 2.6 Houston 2A 2.8 0.7 17.7 16.1 6.7 6.5 5.6 2.0 Phoenix 2B 2.0 0.2 18.7 17.0 6.0 5.9 6.2 2.3 Atlanta 3A 5.4 1.9 12.0 11.1 7.8 7.6 5.4 1.6 Los Angeles 3B 1.7 0.0 9.5 9.7 7.6 7.4 5.2 1.4 Las Vegas 3B 3.4 0.6 13.6 13.5 6.8 6.6 5.7 1.9 San Francisco 3C 4.4 0.3 5.8 6.1 8.5 8.3 4.5 0.9 Baltimore 4A 9.2 3.7 9.6 8.8 8.6 8.4 4.9 1.3 Albuquerque 4B 5.9 1.8 8.8 8.8 8.4 8.2 5.5 1.4 Seattle 4C 7.6 2.0 4.9 5.0 9.1 8.8 4.6 0.8 Chicago 5A 13.5 5.2 7.8 6.9 9.4 9.1 4.9 1.1 Boulder 5B 9.1 3.2 6.8 6.4 9.3 9.1 5.3 1.1 Minneapolis 6A 18.3 8.8 7.4 6.5 10.0 9.7 4.8 1.1 Helena 6B 14.2 5.8 5.1 5.0 10.1 9.9 5.0 1.0 Duluth 7 22.8 11.6 4.9 4.2 11.1 10.8 4.6 0.9 Fairbanks 8 41.6 26.7 3.9 3.1 12.3 12.0 4.6 1.1 Note(s): Source(s): DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

208

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 0 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 1.0 0.0 22.0 19.2 0.4 0.4 1.9 13.0 Houston 2A 4.6 1.8 15.5 14.7 0.5 0.5 1.5 12.8 Phoenix 2B 4.0 0.7 17.5 19.4 0.4 0.4 1.9 15.0 Atlanta 3A 7.8 4.3 10.1 10.4 0.6 0.5 1.4 13.9 Los Angeles 3B 4.1 0.3 8.0 3.5 0.5 0.5 1.4 10.9 Las Vegas 3B 5.6 1.4 13.2 14.6 0.5 0.5 1.8 14.5 San Francisco 3C 5.8 1.7 2.9 1.2 0.6 0.6 1.1 8.9 Baltimore 4A 12.1 9.6 8.0 7.8 0.6 0.6 1.3 12.8 Albuquerque 4B 8.0 4.6 6.7 6.9 0.6 0.6 1.6 14.4 Seattle 4C 11.8 7.3 2.5 1.3 0.6 0.6 1.2 11.1 Chicago 5A 17.8 14.2 5.5 4.5 0.7 0.6 1.4 11.4 Boulder 5B 11.6 8.3 4.4 3.9 0.7 0.6 1.5 12.6 Minneapolis 6A 23.6 22.4 4.8 3.8 0.7 0.7 1.4 11.0 Helena 6B 18.1 15.0 2.9 2.3 0.7 0.7 1.4 12.9 Duluth 7 28.9 29.4 2.4 1.7 0.8 0.7 1.4 10.3 Fairbanks 8 52.8 56.4 1.6 1.2 0.8 0.8 1.7 13.2 Note(s): Source(s): DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

209

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Supermarkets, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 2.2 2.2 11.8 12.4 0.4 0.4 11.1 11.1 Houston 2A 21.6 21.5 9.7 10.7 0.4 0.4 18.0 18.5 Phoenix 2B 21.4 21.2 11.2 13.2 0.4 0.4 13.6 15.6 Atlanta 3A 41.3 41.1 5.4 6.1 0.5 0.5 21.1 21.7 Los Angeles 3B 22.5 22.3 1.1 1.1 0.5 0.5 12.7 12.3 Las Vegas 3B 32.9 32.6 8.3 10.2 0.4 0.4 18.8 20.1 San Francisco 3C 50.0 48.4 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.5 13.2 13.1 Baltimore 4A 64.7 67.0 3.8 4.5 0.5 0.5 22.3 23.7 Albuquerque 4B 50.7 51.1 3.2 4.1 0.5 0.5 23.7 25.2 Seattle 4C 66.3 68.5 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 18.8 20.0 Chicago 5A 81.6 84.5 2.4 2.7 0.5 0.5 27.3 28.6 Boulder 5B 65.3 67.2 1.9 2.3 0.5 0.5 28.3 30.0 Minneapolis 6A 99.9 104.0 2.0 2.3 0.6 0.6 29.9 31.6 Helena 6B 87.3 95.4 1.1 1.3 0.6 0.6 32.1 34.1 Duluth 7 123.5 129.6 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.6 32.1 34.6 Fairbanks 8 188.2 200.6 0.2 0.2 0.7 0.6 40.4

210

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.3 0.8 21.9 24.5 0.3 0.2 3.1 3.5 Houston 2A 4.2 4.4 17.7 20.9 0.3 0.3 2.8 3.3 Phoenix 2B 3.0 3.3 16.2 18.3 0.3 0.3 3.2 3.7 Atlanta 3A 6.9 8.5 14.1 17.5 0.4 0.4 2.6 3.2 Los Angeles 3B 2.8 2.9 11.9 13.0 0.4 0.4 2.5 2.7 Las Vegas 3B 4.6 4.7 10.8 13.0 0.3 0.3 2.7 3.3 San Francisco 3C 5.0 6.4 5.6 6.6 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 Baltimore 4A 9.8 14.4 12.0 15.5 0.4 0.4 2.4 3.1 Albuquerque 4B 6.6 8.3 6.5 7.6 0.4 0.4 2.3 2.7 Seattle 4C 10.1 15.0 4.5 5.3 0.5 0.4 1.7 2.1 Chicago 5A 14.8 15.1 7.4 7.7 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.1 Boulder 5B 9.5 9.5 4.9 5.0 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.0 Minneapolis 6A 19.6 21.3 6.7 7.0 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.1 Helena 6B 14.2 15.7 3.7 3.8 0.5 0.5 1.8 1.9 Duluth 7 24.3 26.6 3.8 3.6 0.6 0.6 1.8 1.8 Fairbanks 8 45.9 47.9 2.7 2.2 0.7 0.6 2.0 1.7 Note(s): Source(s): DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

211

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Secondary Schools, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 1.0 10.2 73.6 17.5 1.2 1.4 6.0 9.1 Houston 2A 9.5 7.0 49.7 20.7 1.5 1.3 5.2 10.9 Phoenix 2B 6.6 20.9 53.9 10.0 1.3 1.7 5.7 8.8 Atlanta 3A 18.7 5.8 31.4 5.2 1.7 1.6 5.0 7.3 Los Angeles 3B 5.7 11.5 25.2 14.4 1.7 1.5 5.0 10.3 Las Vegas 3B 10.5 15.8 34.7 1.7 1.5 1.8 5.3 7.5 San Francisco 3C 16.1 36.2 11.4 7.3 1.9 1.9 4.8 8.4 Baltimore 4A 31.0 22.9 23.8 7.0 2.0 1.9 4.9 8.7 Albuquerque 4B 20.5 35.2 15.1 1.5 1.9 2.0 5.1 7.3 Seattle 4C 30.1 45.1 7.1 4.8 2.0 2.1 4.6 7.2 Chicago 5A 42.3 32.2 17.9 3.7 2.1 2.1 5.0 7.0 Boulder 5B 29.6 61.0 10.1 3.7 2.1 2.3 5.0 7.2 Minneapolis 6A 56.4 48.1 14.7 2.1 2.3 2.3 5.1 7.1 Helena 6B 44.9 74.7 6.6 1.3 2.3 2.5 5.1 7.2 Duluth 7 68.1 130.1 6.6 0.6 2.6 2.8 5.2 8.5 Fairbanks 8 120.1 0.0 3.8 0.0 2.8 0.0 6.0 0.0 Note(s): Source(s): DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

212

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Primary Schools, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.7 0.7 20.6 22.4 1.4 1.4 3.1 3.4 Houston 2A 6.4 8.3 13.3 17.2 1.7 1.7 2.4 2.9 Phoenix 2B 4.1 6.1 14.2 19.6 1.6 1.5 2.9 3.6 Atlanta 3A 12.5 16.8 7.6 10.6 2.0 2.0 2.1 2.7 Los Angeles 3B 4.4 4.4 6.1 6.6 1.9 1.9 2.2 2.4 Las Vegas 3B 6.6 10.2 10.1 14.5 1.8 1.7 2.6 3.4 San Francisco 3C 10.9 12.6 2.3 3.0 2.2 2.1 1.9 2.2 Baltimore 4A 18.6 29.8 5.4 7.8 2.2 2.2 1.8 2.5 Albuquerque 4B 13.3 19.5 4.7 6.8 2.2 2.1 2.3 3.1 Seattle 4C 17.0 25.8 1.4 2.0 2.3 2.3 1.5 2.0 Chicago 5A 27.0 33.3 3.9 4.5 2.4 2.4 1.9 2.1 Boulder 5B 18.2 24.1 2.7 3.4 2.4 2.3 1.8 2.2 Minneapolis 6A 34.8 43.2 2.9 3.5 2.6 2.5 1.7 2.0 Helena 6B 28.0 33.5 1.6 1.9 2.6 2.5 1.7 1.9 Duluth 7 42.3 51.8 1.2 1.3 2.9 2.8 1.5 1.9 Fairbanks 8 84.2 99.3 0.7 0.8 3.2 3.1 2.0 2.2 Note(s): Source(s): DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

213

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Authors: Danielle Lehle and Michael D. Vanden Berg, Utah Geological Survey. Venue: Economic Geology of the Rocky Mountain Region session, May 11, 2009, Geological Society of America-Rocky Mountain Section annual meeting, Orem, Utah, May 11-13, 2009. http://www.geosociety.org/sectdiv/rockymtn/09mtg/index.htm [external site] Abstract: The upper Green River formation’s oil shale deposits located within the Uinta Basin of Utah and the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado contain remarkably similar stratigraphic sequences despite being separated by the Douglas Creek arch. Individual horizons, as well as individual beds, can be traced for hundreds of miles within and between the two basins. However, changes in the topography-controlled runoff patterns between the basins, as well as changes in localized climate conditions throughout upper Green River time, created significant differences between basin-specific deposits. These variations affected the richness and thickness of each oil shale zone, resulting in basin-specific preferred extraction techniques (i.e., in-situ in Colorado and mining/retort in Utah). Colorado’s oil-shale resource was mapped and quantified by the USGS in the late 1970s, whereas this study is the first attempt at quantifying Utah’s overall resource by specific oil shale horizon. This presentation focuses on the Mahogany zone (MZ) and the stratigraphically lower R-6 zone; subsequent work will define other important horizons.

214

MSSM Forecast for the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a forecast of the MSSM with universal soft terms (CMSSM) for the LHC, based on an improved Bayesian analysis. We do not incorporate ad hoc measures of the fine-tuning to penalize unnatural possibilities: such penalization arises from the Bayesian analysis itself when the experimental value of $M_Z$ is considered. This allows to scan the whole parameter space, allowing arbitrarily large soft terms. Still the low-energy region is statistically favoured (even before including dark matter or g-2 constraints). Contrary to other studies, the results are almost unaffected by changing the upper limits taken for the soft terms. The results are also remarkable stable when using flat or logarithmic priors, a fact that arises from the larger statistical weight of the low-energy region in both cases. Then we incorporate all the important experimental constrains to the analysis, obtaining a map of the probability density of the MSSM parameter space, i.e. the forecast of the MSSM. Since not all the experimental information is equally robust, we perform separate analyses depending on the group of observables used. When only the most robust ones are used, the favoured region of the parameter space contains a significant portion outside the LHC reach. This effect gets reinforced if the Higgs mass is not close to its present experimental limit and persits when dark matter constraints are included. Only when the g-2 constraint (based on $e^+e^-$ data) is considered, the preferred region (for $\\mu>0$) is well inside the LHC scope. We also perform a Bayesian comparison of the positive- and negative-$\\mu$ possibilities.

Maria Eugenia Cabrera; Alberto Casas; Roberto Ruiz de Austri

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Enzymatic Digestion in Aqueous-Organic Solvents: A Mass Spectrometry-Based Approach in Monitoring Protein Conformation Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The three dimensional structure of a protein is important for its function. When misfolded, a protein may be rendered inactive or adapt a conformation that could be toxic. Studying protein folding requires an understanding of protein conformation. Traditionally, protein conformation has been studied using x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). X-ray crystallography is limited in the analysis of crystallized proteins and is computationally intensive. NMR deals with proteins in solution but reports only an average of conformation and the technique severely suffers from spectral overlapping due to the thousands of resonances of the protein. More recently, mass spectrometry has been employed not only to elucidate primary structures but also gather information on the three-dimensional conformation of proteins. In this study, a mass spectrometric-based approach is used to study the changes in conformation of cytochrome c and the green fluorescent protein when subjected to aqueous-organic solvent systems. The technique involved trypsin digestion and generation of peptide mass maps. For cytochrome c, the experiments were done with ethanol, methanol and acetonitrile to gain insights on naturation and denaturation. An apparent solvent effect to the rate of digestion and propensity for missed cleavages attributed to weakening of hydrophobic interactions and strengthening of intramolecular hydrogen bonding was observed. For the green fluorescent protein, sulfolane, a known supercharging agent, was used to gain insights on the effect of supercharging to protein conformation. Addition of 2.0% sulfolane shifted the charge state envelope of the protein towards lower m/z while adding lower amounts of sulfolane enhanced lower charge states while broadening the charge state envelope. The time course study showed different patterns of digestion dependent on solvent conditions implying changes in conformation. Furthermore, absorbance and fluorescence measurements suggested that addition of sulfolane protects the fluorophore from quenching. The activity of trypsin is not affected by addition of low amounts of sulfolane.

Tuvilla, Mavreen Rose

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters {beta}(t) as a function of flight time of products at m/z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their {beta}(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. The observation of H{sub 2} and H atoms, {approx}1% in branching, indicates that products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Except atomic H and H{sub 2}, the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, {beta}{>=}-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

Lee, Shih-Huang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Zambia : long-term generation expansion study - executive summary.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. The analysis involved the hydro operations studies of the Zambezi river basin and the systems planning studies for the least-cost generation expansion planning. Two well-known and widely accepted computer models were used in the analysis: PC-VALORAGUA model for the hydro operations and optimization studies and the WASP-III Plus model for the optimization of long-term system development. The WASP-III Plus model is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory's Energy and Power Evaluation Model (ENPEP). The analysis was conducted in close collaboration with the Zambia Electricity Supply Corporation (ZESCO). On the initiative from The World Bank, the sponsor of the study, ZESCO formed a team of experts that participated in the analysis and were trained in the use of computer models. Both models were transferred to ZESCO free of charge and installed on several computers in the ZESCO corporate offices in Lusaka. In September-October 1995, two members of the ZESCO National Team participated in a 4-week training course at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, U.S.A., focusing on the long-term system expansion planning using the WASP and VALORAGUA models. The hydropower operations studies were performed for the whole Zambezi river basin, including the full installation of the Kariba power station, and the Cahora Bassa hydro power station in Mozambique. The analysis also included possible future projects such as Itezhi-Tezhi, Kafue Gorge Lower, and Batoka Gorge power stations. As hydropower operations studies served to determine the operational characteristics of the existing and future hydro power plants, it was necessary to simulate the whole Zambezi river basin in order to take into account all interactions and mutual influences between the hydro power plants. In addition, it allowed for the optimization of reservoir management and optimization of hydro cascades, resulting in the better utilization of available hydro potential. Numerous analyses were performed for different stages of system development. These include system configurations that correspond to years 1997, 2001, 2015 and 2020. Additional simulations were performed in order to determine the operational parameters of the three existing hydro power stations Victoria Falls, Kariba, and Kafue Gorge Upper, that correspond to the situation before and after their rehabilitation. The rehabilitation works for these three major power stations, that would bring their operational parameters and availability back to the design level, are planned to be carried out in the period until 2000. The main results of the hydro operations studies are presented in Table ES-1. These results correspond to VALORAGUA simulations of system configurations in the years 2001 and 2015. The minimum, average, and maximum electricity generation is based on the simulation of monthly water inflows that correspond to the chronological series of unregulated water inflows at each hydro profile in the period from April 1961 to March 1990. The recommended hydrology dataset provided in the Hydrology Report of the SADC Energy Project AAA 3.8 was used for this study.

Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Buehring, W.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

218

Insights Into the P-To-Q Conversion in the Catalytic Cycle of Methane Monooxygenase From a Synthetic Model System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the catalytic cycle of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), it has been proposed that cleavage of the O-O bond in the ({mu}-peroxo)diiron(III) intermediate P gives rise to the diiron(IV) intermediate Q with an Fe{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2} diamond core, which oxidizes methane to methanol. As a model for this conversion, ({mu}-oxo) diiron(III) complex 1 ([Fe{sup III}{sub 2}({mu}-O)({mu}-O{sub 2}H{sub 3})(L){sub 2}]{sup 3+}, L = tris(3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxypyridyl-2-methyl)amine) has been treated consecutively with one eq of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and one eq of HClO{sub 4} to form 3 ([Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}(L){sub 2}]{sup 4+}). In the course of this reaction a new species, 2, can be observed before the protonation step; 2 gives rise to a cationic peak cluster by ESI-MS at m/z 1,399, corresponding to the [Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}L{sub 2}H](OTf){sub 2}{sup +} ion in which 1 oxygen atom derives from 1 and the other two originate from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Moessbauer studies of 2 reveal the presence of two distinct, exchange coupled iron(IV) centers, and EXAFS fits indicate a short Fe-O bond at 1.66 {angstrom} and an Fe-Fe distance of 3.32 {angstrom}. Taken together, the spectroscopic data point to an HO-Fe{sup IV}-O-Fe{sup IV} = O core for 2. Protonation of 2 results in the loss of H{sub 2}O and the formation of 3. Isotope labeling experiments show that the [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] core of 3 can incorporate both oxygen atoms from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The reactions described here serve as the only biomimetic precedent for the conversion of intermediates P to Q in the sMMO reaction cycle and shed light on how a peroxodiiron(III) unit can transform into an [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] core.

Xue, G.; Fiedler, A.T.; Martinho, M.; Munck, E.; Que, L.; Jr.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

Coverage Dependent Charge Reduction of Cationic Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ionic charge state of monodisperse cationic gold clusters on surfaces may be controlled by selecting the coverage of mass-selected ions soft landed onto a substrate. Polydisperse diphosphine-capped gold clusters were synthesized in solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. The polydisperse gold clusters were introduced into the gas phase by electrospray ionization and mass selection was employed to select a multiply charged cationic cluster species (Au11L53+, m/z = 1409, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to the surfaces of four different self-assembled monolayers on gold (SAMs) at coverages of 1011 and 1012 clusters/mm2. Employing the spatial profiling capabilities of in-situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is shown that, in addition to the chemical functionality of the monolayer (as demonstrated previously: ACS Nano, 2012, 6, 573) the coverage of cationic gold clusters on the surface may be used to control the distribution of ionic charge states of the soft-landed multiply charged clusters. In the case of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol SAM (FSAM) almost complete retention of charge by the deposited Au11L53+ clusters was observed at a lower coverage of 1011 clusters/mm2. In contrast, at a higher coverage of 1012 clusters/mm2, pronounced reduction of charge to Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ was observed on the FSAM. When soft landed onto 16- and 11-mercaptohexadecanoic acid surfaces on gold (16,11-COOH-SAMs), the mass-selected Au11L53+ clusters exhibited partial reduction of charge to Au11L52+ at lower coverage and additional reduction of charge to both Au11L52+ and Au11L5+ at higher coverage. The reduction of charge was found to be more pronounced on the surface of the shorter (thinner) C11 than the longer (thicker) C16-COOH-SAM. On the surface of the 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) monolayer, the most abundant charge state was found to be Au11L52+ at lower coverage and Au11L5+ at higher coverage, respectively. A coverage-dependent electron tunneling mechanism is proposed to account for the observed reduction of charge of mass-selected multiply charged gold clusters soft landed on SAMs. The results demonstrate that one of the critical parameters that influence the chemical and physical properties of supported metal clusters, ionic charge state, may be controlled by selecting the coverage of charged species soft landed onto surfaces.

Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

Molecular Assemblies, Genes and Genomics Integrated Efficiently (MAGGIE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final report on MAGGIE. We set ambitious goals to model the functions of individual organisms and their community from molecular to systems scale. These scientific goals are driving the development of sophisticated algorithms to analyze large amounts of experimental measurements made using high throughput technologies to explain and predict how the environment influences biological function at multiple scales and how the microbial systems in turn modify the environment. By experimentally evaluating predictions made using these models we will test the degree to which our quantitative multiscale understanding wilt help to rationally steer individual microbes and their communities towards specific tasks. Towards this end we have made substantial progress towards understanding evolution of gene families, transcriptional structures, detailed structures of keystone molecular assemblies (proteins and complexes), protein interactions, biological networks, microbial interactions, and community structure. Using comparative analysis we have tracked the evolutionary history of gene functions to understand how novel functions evolve. One level up, we have used proteomics data, high-resolution genome tiling microarrays, and 5' RNA sequencing to revise genome annotations, discover new genes including ncRNAs, and map dynamically changing operon structures of five model organisms: For Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, Pyrococcus furiosis, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Methanococcus maripaludis and Haiobacterium salinarum NROL We have developed machine learning algorithms to accurately identify protein interactions at a near-zero false positive rate from noisy data generated using tagfess complex purification, TAP purification, and analysis of membrane complexes. Combining other genome-scale datasets produced by ENIGMA (in particular, microarray data) and available from literature we have been able to achieve a true positive rate as high as 65% at almost zero false positives when applied to the manually curated training set. Applying this method to the data representing around a quarter of the fraction space for water soluble proteins in D. vulgaris, we obtained 854 reliable pair wise interactions. Further, we have developed algorithms to analyze and assign significance to protein interaction data from bait pull-down experiments and integrate these data with other systems biology data through associative biclustering in a parallel computing environment. We will 'fill-in' missing information in these interaction data using a 'Transitive Closure' algorithm and subsequently use 'Between Commonality Decomposition' algorithm to discover complexes within these large graphs of protein interactions. To characterize the metabolic activities of proteins and their complexes we are developing algorithms to deconvolute pure mass spectra, estimate chemical formula for m/z values, and fit isotopic fine structure to metabolomics data. We have discovered that in comparison to isotopic pattern fitting methods restricting the chemical formula by these two dimensions actually facilitates unique solutions for chemical formula generators. To understand how microbial functions are regulated we have developed complementary algorithms for reconstructing gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Whereas the network inference algorithms cMonkey and Inferelator developed enable de novo reconstruction of predictive models for GRNs from diverse systems biology data, the RegPrecise and RegPredict framework developed uses evolutionary comparisons of genomes from closely related organisms to reconstruct conserved regulons. We have integrated the two complementary algorithms to rapidly generate comprehensive models for gene regulation of understudied organisms. Our preliminary analyses of these reconstructed GRNs have revealed novel regulatory mechanisms and cis-regulatory motifs, as well asothers that are conserved across species. Finally, we are supporting scientific efforts in ENIGMA with data management solutions and by integrating all of the algorithms, software and data into

Nitin S. Baliga

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "helena mz mozambique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Molecular Assemblies, Genes and Genomics Integrated Efficiently (MAGGIE)  

SciTech Connect

Final report on MAGGIE. We set ambitious goals to model the functions of individual organisms and their community from molecular to systems scale. These scientific goals are driving the development of sophisticated algorithms to analyze large amounts of experimental measurements made using high throughput technologies to explain and predict how the environment influences biological function at multiple scales and how the microbial systems in turn modify the environment. By experimentally evaluating predictions made using these models we will test the degree to which our quantitative multiscale understanding wilt help to rationally steer individual microbes and their communities towards specific tasks. Towards this end we have made substantial progress towards understanding evolution of gene families, transcriptional structures, detailed structures of keystone molecular assemblies (proteins and complexes), protein interactions, biological networks, microbial interactions, and community structure. Using comparative analysis we have tracked the evolutionary history of gene functions to understand how novel functions evolve. One level up, we have used proteomics data, high-resolution genome tiling microarrays, and 5' RNA sequencing to revise genome annotations, discover new genes including ncRNAs, and map dynamically changing operon structures of five model organisms: For Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, Pyrococcus furiosis, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Methanococcus maripaludis and Haiobacterium salinarum NROL We have developed machine learning algorithms to accurately identify protein interactions at a near-zero false positive rate from noisy data generated using tagfess complex purification, TAP purification, and analysis of membrane complexes. Combining other genome-scale datasets produced by ENIGMA (in particular, microarray data) and available from literature we have been able to achieve a true positive rate as high as 65% at almost zero false positives when applied to the manually curated training set. Applying this method to the data representing around a quarter of the fraction space for water soluble proteins in D. vulgaris, we obtained 854 reliable pair wise interactions. Further, we have developed algorithms to analyze and assign significance to protein interaction data from bait pull-down experiments and integrate these data with other systems biology data through associative biclustering in a parallel computing environment. We will 'fill-in' missing information in these interaction data using a 'Transitive Closure' algorithm and subsequently use 'Between Commonality Decomposition' algorithm to discover complexes within these large graphs of protein interactions. To characterize the metabolic activities of proteins and their complexes we are developing algorithms to deconvolute pure mass spectra, estimate chemical formula for m/z values, and fit isotopic fine structure to metabolomics data. We have discovered that in comparison to isotopic pattern fitting methods restricting the chemical formula by these two dimensions actually facilitates unique solutions for chemical formula generators. To understand how microbial functions are regulated we have developed complementary algorithms for reconstructing gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Whereas the network inference algorithms cMonkey and Inferelator developed enable de novo reconstruction of predictive models for GRNs from diverse systems biology data, the RegPrecise and RegPredict framework developed uses evolutionary comparisons of genomes from closely related organisms to reconstruct conserved regulons. We have integrated the two complementary algorithms to rapidly generate comprehensive models for gene regulation of understudied organisms. Our preliminary analyses of these reconstructed GRNs have revealed novel regulatory mechanisms and cis-regulatory motifs, as well asothers that are conserved across species. Finally, we are supporting scientific efforts in ENIGMA with data management solutions and by integrating all of the algorithms, software and data into

Nitin S. Baliga

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z