Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Fluctuating pressure correlations in wall turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the present paper is to study the influence of wall-echo on pressure fluctuations $p'$, and on statistical correlations containing $p'$, {\\em viz} redistribution $\\phi_{ij}$ and pressure diffusion $d_{ij}^{(p)}$. We extend the usual analysis of turbulent correlations containing pressure fluctuations in wall-bounded \\tsc{dns} computations [Kim J.: {\\em J. Fluid Mech.} {\\bf 205} (1989) 421--451], separating $p'$ not only into rapid $p_{(\\mathrm{r})}'$ and slow $p_{(\\mathrm{s})}'$ parts [Chou P.Y.: {\\em Quart. Appl. Math.} {\\bf 3} (1945) 38--54], but further into volume (weakly inhomogeneous; $p'_{(\\mathrm{r};\\mathfrak{V})}$ and $p'_{(\\mathrm{s};\\mathfrak{V})}$) and surface (strongly inhomogeneous wall-echo; $p'_{(\\mathrm{r};w)}$ and $p'_{(\\mathrm{s};w)}$) terms. An algorithm, based on a Green's function approach, is developed to compute the above splittings for various correlations containing pressure fluctuations (redistribution, pressure diffusion, velocity/pressure-gradient), in fully develope...

Gerolymos, G A; Senechal, D; Vallet, I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Wall pressure exerted by hydrogenation of sodium aluminum hydride.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wall pressure exerted by the bulk expansion of a sodium aluminum hydride bed was measured as a function of hydrogen content. A custom apparatus was designed and loaded with sodium alanates at densities of 1.0, 1.1, and 1.16 g/cc. Four complete cycles were performed to identify variations in measured pressure. Results indicated poor correlation between exerted pressure and hydrogen capacity of the sodium alanate beds. Mechanical pressure due to the hydrogenation of sodium alanates does not influence full-scale system designs as it falls within common design factors of safety. Gas pressure gradients within the porous solid were identified and may limit reaction rates, especially for high aspect ratio beds.

Perras, Yon E.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Zimmerman, Mark D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Axial couplings of heavy hadrons from domain-wall lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We calculate matrix elements of the axial current for static-light mesons and baryons in lattice QCD with dynamical domain wall fermions. We use partially quenched heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory in a finite volume to extract the axial couplings g{sub 1}, g{sub 2}, and g{sub 3} from the data. These axial couplings allow the prediction of strong decay rates and enter chiral extrapolations of most lattice results in the b sector. Our calculations are performed with two lattice spacings and with pion masses down to 227 MeV.

W. Detmold, C.J.D. Lin, S. Meinel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Wall-pressure and PIV analysis for microbubble drag reduction investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of microbubbles injection in the boundary layer of a turbulent channel flow are investigated. Electrolysis demonstrated to be an effective method to produce microbubbles with an average diameter of 30 ??m and allowed the placement of microbubbles at desired locations within the boundary layer. Measurement of velocity fluctuations and the instantaneous wall shear stress were carried out in a channel flow facility. The wall shear stress is an important parameter that can help with the characterization of the boundary layer. This parameter can be obtained indirectly by the measurement of the flow pressure at the wall. The wall shear stress in the channel was measured by means of three different independent methods: measurement of the pressure gradient by a differential pressure transducer, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), and an optical wall shear stress sensor. The three methods showed reasonable agreement of the wall shear stress values for single-phase flow. However, differences as skin friction reductions were observed when the microbubbles were injected. Several measurements of wall-pressure were taken at various Reynolds numbers that ranged from 300 up to 6154. No significant drag reduction was observed for flows in the laminar range; however, a drag reduction of about 16% was detected for turbulent Reynolds numbers. The wall-pressure measurements were shown to be a powerful tool for the measurement of drag reduction, which could help with the design of systems capable of controlling the skin friction based on feedback given by the wall-pressure signal. The proposed measurement system designed in this work has capabilities for application in such diverse fields as multiphase flows, drag reduction, stratified flows, heat transfer among others. The synchronization between independent systems and apparatus has the potential to bring insight about the complicated phenomena involved in the nature of fluid flows.

Dominguez Ontiveros, Elvis Efren

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Accident management for indian pressurized heavy water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indian nuclear power program as of now is mainly based on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Operating Procedures for normal power operation and Emergency Operating Procedures for operational transients and accidents within design basis exist for all Indian PHWRs. In addition, on-site and off-site emergency response procedures are also available for these NPPs. The guidelines needed for severe accidents mitigation are now formally being documented for Indian PHWRs. Also, in line with International trend of having symptom based emergency handling, the work is in advanced stage for preparation of symptom-based emergency operating procedures. Following a plant upset condition; a number of alarms distributed in different information systems appear in the control room to aid operator to identify the nature of the event. After identifying the event, appropriate intervention in the form of event based emergency operating procedure is put into use by the operating staff. However, if the initiating event cannot be unambiguously identified or after the initial event some other failures take place, then the selected event based emergency operating procedure will not be optimal. In such a case, reactor safety is ensured by monitoring safety functions (depicted by selected plant parameters grouped together) throughout the event handling so that the barriers to radioactivity release namely, fuel and fuel cladding, primary heat transport system integrity and containment remain intact. Simultaneous monitoring of all these safety functions is proposed through status trees and this concept will be implemented through a computer-based system. For beyond design basis accidents, event sequences are identified which may lead to severe core damage. As part of this project, severe accident mitigation guidelines are being finalized for the selected event sequences. The paper brings out the details of work being carried out for Indian PHWRs for symptom based event handling and severe accident management. (authors)

Hajela, S.; Grover, R.; Ghadge, S.G.; Bajaj, S.S. [Directorate of Safety, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited Nabhikiya Urja Bhawan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai-400 094 (India)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

High-R Walls for New Construction Structural Performance: Wind Pressure Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report is focused primarily on laboratory testing that evaluates wind pressure performance characteristics for wall systems constructed with exterior insulating sheathing. This research and test activity will help to facilitate the ongoing use of non-structural sheathing options and provide a more in-depth understanding of how wall system layers perform in response to high wind perturbations normal to the surface.

DeRenzis, A.; Kochkin, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Two Gas Pressure Fryers Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements two gas pressure fryers under a wall-mounted canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Two Electric Pressure Fryers Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for two electric pressure fryers under a wall-mounted canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

Study of the Neutron Flux and Dpa Attenuation in the Reactor Pressure-Vessel Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of the neutron flux and dpa attenuation in the reactor pressure vessel (PV) wall presented in this work was performed with state-of-the art methods currently used to determine PV fluxes, the BUGLE-96 cross-section library, and the iron displacement cross sections derived from ENDF/B-VI data. The calculations showed that the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, extrapolation formula predicts slower--and therefore conservative--attenuation of the neutron flux (E > 1MeV) in the PV wall. More importantly, the calculations gave slower attenuation of the dpa rate in the PV wall than the attenuation predicted by the formula. The slower dpa rate attenuation was observed for all the cases considered, which included two different PWRs, and several configurations obtained by varying the PV wall thickness and thermal shield thickness. For example, for a PV wall thickness of {approximately}24 cm, the calculated ratio of the dpa rate at 1/4 and 3/4 of the PV wall thickness to the dpa value on the inner PV surface is {approximately}14% and 19% higher, respectively, than predicted by the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, formula.

Remec, I.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Wind Pressure Resistance of Walls with Exterior Rigid Foam: Structural Performance Testing and Development of Design Specifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Pressure Resistance of Wind Pressure Resistance of Walls with Exterior Rigid Foam: Structural Performance Testing and Development of Design Specifications Building America Stakeholder Meeting February 2012 2 Gaps and Barriers  Wind pressure resistance of multi- layered walls with exterior rigid foam * Performance characteristics * Capacity * Limitations * Design method * Design specification 3 Market Implications  Walls with exterior rigid foam  2012 IECC - Climate Zones 3 and higher  Wall systems:  Claddings and their attachments  Interior finishes  Air sealing, air barriers  Cavity insulation 4 Research Tasks  Laboratory Testing of Wall Assemblies under dynamic wind pressures at the NAHB Research Center  NAHB/DOE/ACC  Laboratory Testing of a One-story House in IBHS Wind Tunnel Facility

11

Heavy-wall production tubing design for special-alloy steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical wells require a comprehensive design philosophy for downhole tubulars. This paper describes novel design techniques used on four key tubing-design tasks on a 23,000-ft (7010-m), high-pressure, offshore gas well: material selection, tubing sizing, threaded-connector qualification, and field installation planning. The in-depth engineering approach combined stringent material and threaded-connector qualifications with new tubing-sizing methods and thorough installation planning. Standard tubing-sizing methods were unacceptable because of conservatism about erosional velocity and stress analysis inaccuracy. Proper stress analysis of the alloy required consideration of triaxial stress states, anisotropy of mechanical properties, and temperature weakening of yield stress.

Payne, M.L.; Hurst, D.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect

It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended service. This involved determining the room-temperature tensile and elastic-plastic fracture-toughness properties of the bobbin-tool friction-stir welds after a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging heat-treatment. These mechanical properties were used to conduct fracture-mechanics analyses to determine critical flaw sizes. Phased-array and conventional ultrasonic non-destructive examination was used to demonstrate that no flaws that match or exceed the calculated critical flaw-sizes exist in or near the friction-stir welds.

Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Very long single- and few-walled boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor/condenser method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are desired for their exceptional mechanical, electronic, thermal, structural, textural, optical, and quantum properties. A new method for producing long, small-diameter, single- and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small-diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

Michael W. Smith, Kevin Jordan, Cheol Park, Jae-Woo Kim, Peter Lillehei, Roy Crooks, Joycelyn Harrison

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Structural and vibrational properties of single walled nanotubes under hydrostatic pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[2] and a series of peaks around 1600 cm 1, the high-energy modes. Their shape in this spectral range depends demonstrate how high-pressure exper- iments help our general understanding of Raman scattering by the high the atomic displacements is along the circumference of the tube ( ) and along the tube's axis ( ). #12;only

Nabben, Reinhard

15

Materials Reliability Program: Testing and Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Plate Heat JRQ to Assess Through-Wall Attenua tion of Radiation Embrittlement (MRP-243)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The change in neutron energy spectrum through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) requires the use of an exposure parameter or metric for assessing radiation embrittlement. This report looks at experimental fracture toughness and Charpy V-notch (CVN) data generated in a special International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experiment designed to simulate an RPV wall of 190 mm thickness. These experimental data are compared with the current exposure metric of displacements per atom (dpa) coupled with ...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

16

Materials Reliability Program: Testing and Evaluation of Two Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels Irradiated to Assess Through-Wall Attenu ation of Radiation Embrittlement (MRP-203)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The change in neutron energy spectrum through the wall of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) requires the use of an exposure parameter or metric for assessing radiation embrittlement. This report looks at experimental fracture toughness and Charpy V-notch data generated in a special International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experiment designed to simulate an RPV wall of 180-mm thickness. These experimental data are compared with the current exposure metric of displacements per atom (dpa) coupled with an emb...

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

17

Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas  

SciTech Connect

It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (~ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a "gas shield" may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering metmethods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

C.A.Gentile, W.R.Blanchard, T.Kozub, C.Priniski, I.Zatz, S.Obenschain

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Optical Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated (MOTT-HUBBARD, Heavy-Fermion, Unconventional Superconductor) Materials Tuned Pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the past years, the Co-PI's have been responsible for the development and operation of optical techniques (Raman, IR, fluorescence, absorption and reflectance spectroscopy at ultrahigh pressures and high and low temperatures) which have proven to be extremely powerful for studying low-Z, molecular solids including hydrogen, ice, etc. (see results below). Meanwhile, it has become increasingly clear that optical spectroscopy has an equally extraordinary potential for studying metals and superconductors at ultrahigh pressures, thus the result will have a major impact on material research. However, because of the extreme difference in optical properties of opaque metals and transparent insulating molecular solids, successful accomplishment of the present project will require substantial effort in improving the present equipment and developing new techniques, and funds for this are requested here. Below we provide a short description of the work done and techniques developed during the last years. We also propose to explore new frontiers in compressed materials close to the insulator-metal boundaries, spin-crossover, and other quantum critical points.

Goncharov, A; Struzhkin, V V

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

Plasma Liner with an Intermediate Heavy Shell and Thermal Pressure Drive  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the challenging problems of Magnetized Target Fusion is development of the ways of transporting energy to the target situated at a large-enough distance from the energy source: the distance should be such as to prevent damage to the permanent parts of the source. Several schemes have been considered in the past, including the use of particle beams coupled with the inverse diode, mechanical projectiles in combination with magneto-compressional generators, and the plasma liner. In this paper, a possible modification of the original concept of the plasma liner (Y.C.F. Thio, C.E. Knapp, R.C. Kirkpatrick, R.E. Siemon, P.J. Turchi. J. Fusion Energy, 20, 1, 2001) is described. The modification consists in creating a thin, higher density shell made of a high-Z plasma and accelerating it onto an MTF target by a thermal pressure of a hydrogen plasma with the temperature {approx}10 eV. We discuss constraints on the parameters of this system and evaluate convergence ratio that can be expected.

Ryutov, D D; Thio, Y F

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

X-ray and pressure conditions on the first wall of a particle beam inertial confinement reactor  

SciTech Connect

Because of the presence of a chamber gas in a particle beam reactor cavity, nonneutron target debris created from thermonuclear burn will be modified or stopped before it reaches the first reactor wall. The resulting modified spectra and pulse lengths of the debris need to be calculated to determine first wall effects. Further, the cavity overpressure created by the momentum and energy exchange between the debris and gas must also be calculated to determine its effect. The purpose of this paper is to present results of the debris-background gas problem obtained with a one fluid, two temperature plasma hydrodynamic computer code model which includes multifrequency radiation transport. Spherical symmetry, ideal gas equation of state, and LTE for each radiation frequency group were assumed. The transport of debris ions was not included and all the debris energy was assumed to be in radiation. The calculated x-ray spectra and pulse lengths and the background overpressure are presented.

Magelssen, G.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms and modeling and experimental capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wall Inertial Fusion Reactors " Nuclear Eng. and Design 63,Heavy Ion Beam Fusion Reactor," Nuclear J. P E R L A D O ,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

Baker, Tod H. (O' Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Domingo, Norberto [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

28

TransWall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, imagining modern buildings without glass is difficult, and glass walls can be found almost everywhere around us. Glass has been one of the most valued materials owing to its transparency. Glass walls' transparency in modern architecture involves ...

Heejeong Heo; Seungki Kim; Hyungkun Park; Jeeyong Chung; Geehyuk Lee; Woohun Lee

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Prismatic wall heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prismatic beam concentrator mounted at the top of two adjacent walls so as to receive a rectangular incipient beam of diffused sunlight and emit a vertical concentrated sheet beam through a cavity between the walls to a mirror which reflects the beam at right angles onto a radiant iron bar at the base of one wall, as a source of supplemental household heat.

Clegg, J. E.

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

First Wall and Operational Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

32

Heavy Truck Engine Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

Nelson, Christopher

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

Sizing Relationships for Pipe Wall Preheater-710 Reactor Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Relationships presented as curves are given that permit selection of preheater pipe diameters and lengths consistent with objective pressure drops, wall temperatures, and heat addition. The data are for 710 reactor experiment coolant and operating conditions.

Moon, C.W.

1965-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

Collector: storage wall systems  

SciTech Connect

Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

Boardman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Walls and Windows  

SciTech Connect

Energy travels in and out of a building through the walls and windows by means of conduction, convection, and radiation. The walls and windows, complex systems in themselves, are part of the overall building system. A wall system is composed of multiple layers that work in concert to provide shelter from the exterior weather. Wall systems vary in the degree to which they provide thermal resistance, moisture resistance, durability, and thermal storage. High tech windows are now available that can resist radiation heat transfer while still providing light and visibility. The combination of walls and windows within the building system can be adapted to meet a wide range of environmental conditions, recognizing that the best building envelope system for one climate may not be the first choice for another location.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Heavy wall production tubing design for special alloy steels  

SciTech Connect

Critical wells require a comprehensive design philosophy for downhole tubulars. This paper describes novel design techniques used on four key tasks in tubing design common to all severe service wells: Material Selection, Sizing the Tubing, Threaded Connector Qualification, Field Installation Planning. The in-depth engineering approach applies stringent material and threaded connector qualification with new tubing sizing methods and thorough installation planning. Standard tubing sizing methods are unacceptable due to conservatism with respect to erosional velocity and inaccuracy with respect to stress analysis. Proper stress analysis of alloys requires consideration of triaxial stress, anisotropy, and temperatureweakening. New design equations are given for tubing sizing applicable to critical, corrosive wells where special materials are selected for corrosion mitigation.

Payne, M.L.; Hurst, D.M.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In: Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated Heavyeds. Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated HeavyIn: Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated Heavy

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Block Heavy Hitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e study a natural generalization of the heavy hitters problem in thestreaming context. We term this generalization *block heavy hitters* and define it as follows. We are to stream over a matrix$A$, and report all *rows* ...

Andoni, Alexandr

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

39

System for pressure modulation of turbine sidewall cavities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are provided for controlling cooling air flow for pressure modulation of turbine components, such as the turbine outer sidewall cavities. The pressure at which cooling and purge air is supplied to the turbine outer side wall cavities is modulated, based on compressor discharge pressure (Pcd), thereby to generally maintain the back flow margin (BFM) so as to minimize excessive leakage and the consequent performance deterioration. In an exemplary embodiment, the air pressure within the third stage outer side wall cavity and the air pressure within the fourth stage outer side wall cavity are each controlled to a respective value that is a respective prescribed percentage of the concurrent compressor discharge pressure. The prescribed percentage may be determined from a ratio of the respective outer side wall pressure to compressor discharge pressure at Cold Day Turn Down (CDTD) required to provide a prescribed back flow margin.

Leone, Sal Albert (Scotia, NY); Book, Matthew David (Altamont, NY); Banares, Christopher R. (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method for pressure modulation of turbine sidewall cavities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for controlling cooling air flow for pressure modulation of turbine components, such as the turbine outer sidewall cavities. The pressure at which cooling and purge air is supplied to the turbine outer side wall cavities is modulated, based on compressor discharge pressure (Pcd), thereby to generally maintain the back flow margin (BFM) so as to minimize excessive leakage and the consequent performance deterioration. In an exemplary embodiment, the air pressure within the third stage outer side wall cavity and the air pressure within the fourth stage outer side wall cavity are each controlled to a respective value that is a respective prescribed percentage of the concurrent compressor discharge pressure. The prescribed percentage may be determined from a ratio of the respective outer side wall pressure to compressor discharge pressure at Cold Day Turn Down (CDTD) required to provide a prescribed back flow margin.

Leone, Sal Albert (Scotia, NY); Book, Matthew David (Altamont, NY); Banares, Christopher R. (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

Vinson, Dennis

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

BNL | Joseph S. Wall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joseph S. Wall Joseph S. Wall Emeritus Research Interests Mass mapping of unstained biological molecules with the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), particularly assemblies of complexes from subunits of known size and shape. Examples include: Alzheimer's filaments, viral capsids, annelid hemoglobins, hemocyanins, proteases, chaperonins, microtubule proteins, prions and various nucleic acid-protein complexes. Another research area is instrument development involving design and construction of an instrument for low-temperture, energy loss spectroscopy, and elemental mapping at low dose. This is being used to map phosphorus in nucleic acid-protein complexes, phosphorylated proteins and phospholipid structures. He also is director of the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope STEM

44

Tire shreds as lightweight retaining wall backfill: Active conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 4.88-m-high retaining wall test facility was constructed to test tire shreds as retaining wall backfill. The front wall of the facility could be rotated outward away from the fill and was instrumented to measure the horizontal stress. Measurement of movement within the backfill and settlement of the backfill surface during wall rotation allowed estimation of the pattern of movement within the fill. Tests were conducted with tire shreds from three suppliers. Moreover, horizontal stress at this rotation for tire shreds was about 35% less than the active stress expected for conventional granular backfill. Design parameters were developed using two procedures; the first used the coefficient of lateral earth pressure and the other was based on equivalent fluid pressure. The inclination of the sliding plane with respect to horizontal was estimated to range from 61{degree} to 70{degree} for the three types of shreds.

Tweedie, J.J. [State of Maine Dept. of Transportation, Augusta, ME (United States); Humphrey, D.N.; Sandford, T.C. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Self pressuring HTP feed systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide tanks can be pressurized with decomposed HTP (high test hydrogen peroxide) originating in the tank itself. In rocketry, this offers the advantage of eliminating bulky and heavy inert gas storage. Several prototype self-pressurizing HTP systems have recently been designed and tested. Both a differential piston tank and a small gas-driven pump have been tried to obtain the pressure boost needed for flow through a gas generator and back to the tank. Results include terrestrial maneuvering tests of a prototype microsatellite, including warm gas attitude control jets.

Whitehead, J.

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Low pressure turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

Low-pressure turbine installation is described comprising a casing, at least two groups of turbine stages mounted in said casing, each turbine stage having blades so arranged that a flow of steam passes through the respective turbine stages in contraflow manner, partition means in said casing for separating the opposed final stages of said turbine stages from each other, and steam exhausting means opened in the side walls of said casing in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis of said turbine, said steam exhausting means being connected to condensers.

Iizuka, N.; Hisano, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Otawara, Y.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

48

Wall conditions in ORMAK  

SciTech Connect

From surface effects in controlled thermonuclear fusion devices and reactors meeting; Argonne, Illnois, USA (10 Jan 1974). ORMAK is a diffuse toroidal pinch with typical plasma currents of 100 kA, electron temperatures of 800 eV, and ion temperatures of 300 eV. The walls of the plasma region are made of stainless steel coated with an intermediate layer of platinum 0.05 mu thick and an outer 1 to 2 mu layer of gold. Tests with an Ion Microprobe Mass Analyzer have shown that the platinum acts to decrease diffusion of impurities from the stalnless steel to the surface. Gold was chosen to inhibit the surface chemical adsorption of gases. Studies with a movable limiter indicate that electron energy is lost at the plasma edge mainly via line radiation and cooling on ions, while ions are lost from the plasma by charge exchange. Thus the walls are bombarded by energetic neutrals, line radiation and, in addition, bremsstrahlung x-rays. The flux of energetic neutrals is measured by a charge exchange analyzer. Wall bombardment by such neutrals should cause sputtering, and gold has been observed spectroscopically near the limiter, increasing with time during a shot, However, analysis of impurities coated on a window by the discharge indicated very little gold sputtering and re-deposition. To measure the sputterirg rate, a wall sample was coated with 105 A of radioactive gold and bombarded with neutrals from ORMAK during a day's run. No measurable sputtering was found within the counting statistics of the measurement, but surface carbon contamination of the sample prevented any final conclusions. (auth)

Colchin, R.J.; Berry, L.A.; Haste, G.R.; Kelley, G.G.; Lyon, J.F.; McNally, J.R.; Murakami, M.; Neidigh, R.V.; Simpkins, J.E.; Wing, W.R.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Bumper wall for plasma device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operation of a plasma device such as a reactor for controlled thermonuclear fusion is facilitated by an improved bumper wall enclosing the plasma to smooth the flow of energy from the plasma as the energy impinges upon the bumper wall. The bumper wall is flexible to withstand unequal and severe thermal shocks and it is readily replaced at less expense than the cost of replacing structural material in the first wall and blanket that surround it.

Coultas, Thomas A. (Hinsdale, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Transmutation rates in the annulus gas of pressure tube water reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor utilizes Pressure Tube (PT) fuel channel design and heavy water as a coolant. Fuel channel annulus gas acts as an (more)

Ahmad, Mohammad Mateen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Scaling in heavy-fermion systems  

SciTech Connect

Ambient pressure characteristics of heavy-fermion compounds, such as the ratio of the low temperature magnetic susceptibility to the electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} and a simple relationship between the T{sup 2}-coefficient of resistivity and {gamma}{sup 2}, suggest that a single-energy scale T{sub o} dictates the physics of these materials. Such is the case for Kondo-impurity systems to which heavy-fermions are related. We consider the consequences of assuming that the electronic free energy is given by a universal function of T/T{sub o} (V) where V is the molar volume. We show that volume-dependent magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and electrical resistivity of some heavy-fermion compounds scale as T/T{sub o} (V), at least over a range in pressures and temperatures. A further consequence of the principle assumption is that Gruneisen parameters defined as - {partial_derivative}{ell}nX/{partial_derivative}nV, where X is some physical property, should be identical for all properties and equal to that determined from electronic contributions to the volume- thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat. In several materials, this equality holds, at least approximately. Although evidence is found for single-energy scaling in heavy-fermion materials, we cannot conclude unambiguously that the basic assumption is correct in detail.

Thompson, J.D.; Fisk, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lawrence, J.M. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Vector-field domain walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We argue that spontaneous Lorentz violation may generally lead to metastable domain walls related to the simultaneous violation of some accompanying discrete symmetries. Remarkably, such domain-wall solutions exist for spacelike Lorentz violation and do not exist for the timelike violation. Because a preferred space direction is spontaneously induced, these domain walls have no planar symmetry and produce a peculiar static gravitational field at small distances, while their long-distance gravity appears the same as for regular scalar-field walls. Some possible applications of vector-field domain walls are briefly discussed.

Chkareuli, J. L. [E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 0177 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); I. Chavchavadze State University, 0162 Tbilisi (Georgia); Kobakhidze, Archil [E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 0177 Tbilisi (Georgia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Volkas, Raymond R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Pressure Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Specifications for carbon and alloy steel pressure tubes (ASTM)...medium-strength carbon-molybdenum alloy

55

Dynamic Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The higher pressure range will cover the important application of gas turbine engine testing. Gas turbines are used for propulsion on aircraft and ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Thick planar domain wall: its thin wall limit and dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a planar gravitating thick domain wall of the $\\lambda \\phi^4$ theory as a spacetime with finite thickness glued to two vacuum spacetimes on each side of it. Darmois junction conditions written on the boundaries of the thick wall with the embedding spacetimes reproduce the Israel junction condition across the wall in the limit of infinitesimal thickness. The thick planar domain wall located at a fixed position is then transformed to a new coordinate system in which its dynamics can be formulated. It is shown that the wall's core expands as if it were a thin wall. The thickness in the new coordinates is not constant anymore and its time dependence is given.

S. Ghassemi; S. Khakshournia; R. Mansouri

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

57

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) studies oil recovery mechanisms relevant to thermal and heavy-oil production. The scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. In August of 2000 we received funding from the U. S. DOE under Award No. DE-FC26-00BC15311 that completed December 1, 2003. The project was cost shared with industry. Heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o} API) is an underutilized energy resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods. Heating reduces oil viscosity dramatically. Hence, thermal recovery is especially important because adding heat, usually via steam injection generally improves displacement efficiency. The objectives of this work were to improve our understanding of the production mechanisms of heavy oil under both primary and enhanced modes of operation. The research described spanned a spectrum of topics related to heavy and thermal oil recovery and is categorized into: (1) multiphase flow and rock properties, (2) hot fluid injection, (3) improved primary heavy-oil recovery, (4) in-situ combustion, and (5) reservoir definition. Technology transfer efforts and industrial outreach were also important to project effort. The research tools and techniques used were quite varied. In the area of experiments, we developed a novel apparatus that improved imaging with X-ray computed tomography (CT) and high-pressure micromodels etched with realistic sandstone roughness and pore networks that improved visualization of oil-recovery mechanisms. The CT-compatible apparatus was invaluable for investigating primary heavy-oil production, multiphase flow in fractured and unfractured media, as well as imbibition. Imbibition and the flow of condensed steam are important parts of the thermal recovery process. The high-pressure micromodels were used to develop a conceptual and mechanistic picture of primary heavy-oil production by solution gas drive. They allowed for direct visualization of gas bubble formation, bubble growth, and oil displacement. Companion experiments in representative sands and sandstones were also conducted to understand the mechanisms of cold production. The evolution of in-situ gas and oil saturation was monitored with CT scanning and pressure drop data. These experiments highlighted the importance of depletion rate, overburden pressure, and oil-phase chemistry on the cold production process. From the information provided by the experiments, a conceptual and numerical model was formulated and validated for the heavy-oil solution gas drive recovery process. Also in the area of mechanisms, steamdrive for fractured, low permeability porous media was studied. Field tests have shown that heat injected in the form of steam is effective at unlocking oil from such reservoir media. The research reported here elucidated how the basic mechanisms differ from conventional steamdrive and how these differences are used to an advantage. Using simulations of single and multiple matrix blocks that account for details of heat transfer, capillarity, and fluid exchange between matrix and fracture, the importance of factors such as permeability contrast between matrix and fracture and oil composition were quantified. Experimentally, we examined the speed and extent to which steam injection alters the permeability and wettability of low permeability, siliceous rocks during thermal recovery. Rock dissolution tends to increase permeability moderately aiding in heat delivery, whereas downstream the cooled fluid deposits silica reducing permeability. Permeability reduction is not catastrophic. With respect to wettability, heat shifts rock wettability toward more water wet conditions. This effect is beneficial for the production of heavy and medium gravity oils as it improves displacement efficiency. A combination of analytical and numerical studies was used to examine the efficiency of reservoir heating using nonconventional wells such as horizontal and multi

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

Keefe, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the same time. Capable of accelerating 70 trillion protons with every pulse, and heavy ions such as gold and iron, the AGS receives protons and other ions from the AGS...

60

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1/4 scale transpiring wall reactor was designed and fabricated by Aerojet using their platelet technology. Sandia`s Engineering Evaluation Reactor serves as a test bed to supply, pressurize and heat the waste; collect, measure and analyze the effluent; and control operation of the system. This report describes the design, test capabilities, and operation of this versatile and unique test system with the transpiring wall reactor.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Engineering for Transportation and Environment Dept.; Rousar, D.C. [GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Diameter tuning of single-walled carbon nanotubes by diffusion plasma CVD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have realized a diameter tuning of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by adjusting process gas pressures with plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Detailed photoluminescence measurements reveal that the diameter distribution of SWNTs clearly ...

Toshiaki Kato; Shunsuke Kuroda; Rikizo Hatakeyama

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Oven wall panel construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

1980-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

66

PRESSURE TRANSDUCER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

Sander, H.H.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies  

SciTech Connect

The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Super Heavy Element Discovery | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Super Heavy Element Discovery SHARE Super Heavy Element Discovery The location of the Transactinides (super-heavy elements) shown on the Periodic Table. ORNL is internationally...

69

Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport for Heavy Ion Fusion* Edward Lee** LawrenceHm Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Abstract Solenoid transport ofseveral stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this

Lee, Edward

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Identifying heavy Higgs bosons  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques for identifying heavy Higgs bosons produced at SSC energies are discussed. In the first, the Higgs boson decays into ZZ, with one Z decaying into an e-pair or ..mu..-pair and the other into a neutrino pair. In the second, the production of the Higgs boson by WW fusion is tagged by detecting the quarks that produced the bremsstrahlung virtual W's. The associated Higgs decay is identified by one leptonic and one hadronic decay. Both methods appear capable of finding a heavy Higgs boson provided the SSC design parameters are achieved. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Cahn, R.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Heavy ion fusion--Using heavy ions to make electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Proc. of the Inertial Fusion Science and ApplicationsP. Abbott, P. F. Peterson, Fusion Science and Technology 44March 1520, 2004 Heavy Ion Fusion Using Heavy Ions to Make

Celata, C.M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the behaviour of oil and gas prices and the fruits of future exploration. The rate of technological progress. How optimistic are you that the North Sea remains a viable source of oil and gas? A) Our new researchNorth Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen

Levi, Ran

73

Heavy Vehicle Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

DEVELOPMENTS IN HEAVY QUARKONIUM SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ 1­ DEVELOPMENTS IN HEAVY QUARKONIUM SPECTROSCOPY Written May 2012 by S. Eidelman (Budker Inst. Navas (Univ. Granada), and C. Patrignani (Univ. Genova, INFN). A golden age for heavy quarkonium physics at HERA and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC opened a window on the deconfinement

75

SALTSTONE OSMOTIC PRESSURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency <1 and as a result actual osmotic pressures are less than theoretical pressures. Observations from laboratory tests of simulated saltstone indicate that it may exhibit the behavior of a semi-permeable membrane. After several weeks of back pressure saturation in a flexible wall permeameter (FWP) the membrane containing a simulated saltstone sample appeared to have bubbles underneath it. Upon removal from the FWP the specimen was examined and it was determined that the bubbles were due to liquid that had accumulated between the membrane and the sample. One possible explanation for the accumulation of solution between the membrane and sample is the development of osmotic pressure within the sample. Osmotic pressure will affect fluid flow and contaminant transport and may result in the changes to the internal structure of the semi-permeable material. B?nard et al. 2008 reported swelling of wet cured Portland cement mortars containing salts of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}x12H{sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater will flow into the semi-permeable material resulting in hydrologic containment within the membrane. Additionally, hyperfiltration can occur within semi-permeable materials when water moves through a membrane into the more concentrated solution and dissolved constituents are retained in the lower concentration solution. Groundwater flow and transport equations that incorporate chemical gradients (osmosis) have been developed. These equations are referred to as coupled flow equations. Currently groundwater modeling to assess the performance of saltstone waste forms is conducted using the PORFLOW groundwater flow and transport model. PORFLOW does not include coupled flow from chemico-osmotic gradients and therefore numerical simulation of the effect of coupled flow on contaminant transport in and around saltstone cannot be assessed. Most natural semi-permeable membranes are non-ideal membranes and do not restrict all movement of solutes and as a result theoretical osmotic potential is not realized. Osmotic efficiency is a parameter in the coupled flow equation that accounts for the

Nichols, R.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

76

SALTSTONE OSMOTIC PRESSURE  

SciTech Connect

Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency <1 and as a result actual osmotic pressures are less than theoretical pressures. Observations from laboratory tests of simulated saltstone indicate that it may exhibit the behavior of a semi-permeable membrane. After several weeks of back pressure saturation in a flexible wall permeameter (FWP) the membrane containing a simulated saltstone sample appeared to have bubbles underneath it. Upon removal from the FWP the specimen was examined and it was determined that the bubbles were due to liquid that had accumulated between the membrane and the sample. One possible explanation for the accumulation of solution between the membrane and sample is the development of osmotic pressure within the sample. Osmotic pressure will affect fluid flow and contaminant transport and may result in the changes to the internal structure of the semi-permeable material. B?nard et al. 2008 reported swelling of wet cured Portland cement mortars containing salts of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}x12H{sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater will flow into the semi-permeable material resulting in hydrologic containment within the membrane. Additionally, hyperfiltration can occur within semi-permeable materials when water moves through a membrane into the more concentrated solution and dissolved constituents are retained in the lower concentration solution. Groundwater flow and transport equations that incorporate chemical gradients (osmosis) have been developed. These equations are referred to as coupled flow equations. Currently groundwater modeling to assess the performance of saltstone waste forms is conducted using the PORFLOW groundwater flow and transport model. PORFLOW does not include coupled flow from chemico-osmotic gradients and therefore numerical simulation of the effect of coupled flow on contaminant transport in and around saltstone cannot be assessed. Most natural semi-permeable membranes are non-ideal membranes and do not restrict all movement of solutes and as a result theoretical osmotic potential is not realized. Osmotic efficiency is a parameter in the coupled flow equation that accounts for the

Nichols, R.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

EERE Roofus' Solar and Efficient Home: Walls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Walls Insulation Windows Activities Printable Version Walls Illustration of Roofus, a golden retriever, sitting in front of a wall. On cold nights, you use a blanket to keep you...

78

Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Security_Walls_VPP_Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Force Recognized for Outstanding Safety CARLSBAD, N.M., May 10, 2013 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded Security Walls, LLC, the Waste Isolation Pilot...

80

Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the ambient pressure superconductor CePt3Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the evolution of superconductivity (sc) and antiferromagnetism (afm) in the heavy fermion compound CePt3Si with hydrostatic pressure. We present a pressure-temperature phase diagram established by electrical transport measurements. Pressure shifts the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, to lower temperatures. Antiferromagnetism is suppressed at a critical pressure Pc ? 0.5 GPa. Key words: CePt3Si, superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, hydrostatic pressure Superconductivity (sc) is one of the most striking effects in solid state physics. In a conventional superconductor Cooper pairing is mediated by phonons. In general, magnetism destroys superconductivity. In heavy fermion systems, however, sc exists in close proximity to magnetism, promoting the suspicion that the sc is mediated by magnetic excitations. Since the discovery of sc in the heavy fermion compound CeCu2Si2 at atmospheric pressure [1], only a few Ce-based systems were found which also exhibit sc at atmospheric pressure, like CeMIn5 (M=Co, Ir) [4]. Most superconducting pure Ce-based systems show sc only under applied pressure sufficient to suppress long range magnetic order, like CeIn3 [2] or CeRh2Si2 [3]. CeIn3 displays a typical temperature-pressure phase diagram for these compounds; antiferromagnetism (afm) is suppressed to zero temperature with pressure and sc develops right in the vicinity where afm disappears [2]. Very recently another material, namely CePt3Si, was found showing magnetic order and sc at atmospheric pressure [5]. In contrast to the systems mentioned before, the crystal

M. Nicklas A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Influence of radiation damage on ruby as a pressure gauge  

SciTech Connect

This study tackles the question if ruby crystals, irradiated with energetic heavy ions, can still be used as reliable pressure sensors. The problem is linked to novel irradiation experiments, exposing pressurized samples to swift heavy-ion beams. In order to test and quantify a possible influence of radiation damage on the laser-induced fluorescence lines of ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}), small crystals were exposed to different heavy ions (Xe, Au, and U) with kinetic energies of several giga-electron volt at ambient as well as high-pressure conditions. With increasing fluence (ions/cm{sup 2}), the R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines shift both to lower wavelengths which leads to an underestimation of the pressure. An empirical correction term {epsilon} is proposed to include the irradiation damage effect into the commonly employed ruby calibration scale.

Schuster, B. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Weikusat, C.; Miletich, R. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 234-236, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Fujara, F. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle. managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle 07/07 Brookhaven National Laboratory Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multipurpose research institution located on a 5,300-acre site on Long Island, New York. Six Nobel Prize-winning discoveries have been made at Brookhaven Lab. The Laboratory operates large-scale scientific facilities and performs research in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, applied science, and

83

Characterizing Heavy Ion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Heavy Ion Reactions in the 1980's Is there Treasure at the end of the Rainbow? & What happens and how do different modes compete? John Schiffer One of the three research areas for ATLAS, as stated in a 1984 document to Congress: Are there some new marvelous symmetries, hidden in resonances in heavier nuclei, beyond 12 C+ 12 C and its immediate vicinity? (s.c. linac work, pre-ATLAS) Other attempts to chase the rainbow 180 o elastic scattering of 12 C on 40 Ca shows structure Fusion of 16 O on 40 Ca does not. In the end, it seemed that these structures were sometimes present in alpha-particle nuclei, but almost never in others. Some optimists, continued the pursuit. We also looked at the total fusion cross section in systems that showed resonances in scattering.

84

Computing Heavy Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable calculations of the structure of heavy elements are crucial to address fundamental science questions such as the origin of the elements in the universe. Applications relevant for energy production, medicine, or national security also rely on theoretical predictions of basic properties of atomic nuclei. Heavy elements are best described within the nuclear density functional theory (DFT) and its various extensions. While relatively mature, DFT has never been implemented in its full power, as it relies on a very large number (~ 10^9-10^12) of expensive calculations (~ day). The advent of leadership-class computers, as well as dedicated large-scale collaborative efforts such as the SciDAC 2 UNEDF project, have dramatically changed the field. This article gives an overview of the various computational challenges related to the nuclear DFT, as well as some of the recent achievements.

Schunck, N; Kortelainen, M; McDonnell, J; Mor, J; Nazarewicz, W; Pei, J; Sarich, J; Sheikh, J; Staszczak, A; Stoitsov, M; Wild, S M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Computing Heavy Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable calculations of the structure of heavy elements are crucial to address fundamental science questions such as the origin of the elements in the universe. Applications relevant for energy production, medicine, or national security also rely on theoretical predictions of basic properties of atomic nuclei. Heavy elements are best described within the nuclear density functional theory (DFT) and its various extensions. While relatively mature, DFT has never been implemented in its full power, as it relies on a very large number (~ 10^9-10^12) of expensive calculations (~ day). The advent of leadership-class computers, as well as dedicated large-scale collaborative efforts such as the SciDAC 2 UNEDF project, have dramatically changed the field. This article gives an overview of the various computational challenges related to the nuclear DFT, as well as some of the recent achievements.

N. Schunck; A. Baran; M. Kortelainen; J. McDonnell; J. Mor; W. Nazarewicz; J. Pei; J. Sarich; J. Sheikh; A. Staszczak; M. Stoitsov; S. M. Wild

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

Ray Johnson

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Heavy Ions - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ions Heavy Ions Heavy ions used at the BASE Facility are accelerated in the form of "cocktails," named because of the fact that several heavy ions with the same mass-to-charge ratio are sent into the Cyclotron, which accelerates the ions while acting as a precision mass separator. The Control Room Operator then uses Cyclotron frequency to select only the desired ion, a process that takes about 2 minutes. We provide four standard cocktails: 4.5, 10, 16, and 30 MeV/nucleon. Depending on the cocktail, LETs from 1 to 100 MeV/(mg/cm^2) and flux levels of up to 1E7 ions/cm2-sec are available. Parts are tested in our vacuum chamber, and can be remotely positioned horizontally, vertically, or rotationally (y and z axes) with the motion table. An alignment laser is available to ensure the part is in the center of the beam. Mounting hardware is readily available. 12xBNC (F-F), 2x25-pin D (F-M or M-F), 4x40-pin flat ribbon (M-M), 4x50-pin flat ribbon (M-M), 12xSMA (F-F), and 2xEthernet vacuum feedthroughs are mounted upon request. (The 4x40-pin and 4x50-pin flat ribbon connectors are wired straight across, so you will need a F-F adapter to correct the pin numbers to normal.) Holes are provided through the cave shielding blocks for connecting additional test equipment, with a distance of approximately 10 feet from vacuum feedthrough to the top of the shielding block.

88

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

90

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

91

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

92

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

93

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

94

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from January 1 through March 31, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history matching techniques. During this period, previous analysis of experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation was verified by comparison among analytic, dual-porosity simulation, and fine-grid simulation. We continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured porous media at high pressure and high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. A new experiment was conducted on diatomite core. Significantly, we show that elevated temperature induces fines release in sandstone cores and this behavior may be linked to wettability. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from October 1 through December 31, 2002 , for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition was analyzed to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation. It is shown that the usual assumption of constant, time-independent shape factors is incorrect. In other work, we continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured media at high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased the apparent wettability and affected water relative permeability of cores used in previous experiments. A phenomenological and mechanistic cause for this behavior is sought. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Compositional changes in heavy oil steamflood simulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The numerical simulation of heavy oil steamfloods has generally been conducted assuming that the oil is non-volatile. Reservoir simulation has traditionally ignored compositional effect s due to heat and steam and assumed that the hydrocarbon phase is non-volatile. This is equivalent to assuming that the equilibrium ratios, K-values, are zero. In order to properly model the mechanism of steamflooding, however, compositional effects need to be taken into account. In this study, laboratory data including distillation, vapor pressure, steam distillation and viscosity measurements, along with a commercial PVT simulator are used to tune equation-of-state (EOS) and viscosity parameters to properly model the PVT properties of the oil. The Peng-Robinson equation-of-state (PR-EOS) was used for all phase behavior calculations. Viscosity as a function of temperature and composition was modeled with the Pedersen correlation for heavy oils. Once a tuned equation-of-state, compositional fluid description was developed for the heavy oil, one-dimensional numerical simulations of the steamflooding process were performed. These simulations demonstrated the utility of the equation-of-state approach. In addition, it was concluded that compositional effects are essential for the proper modeling of low residual oil saturations seen in the field and the formation of an in-situ solvent bank at the steam-oil interface.

Lolley, Christopher Scott

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from July 1 through September, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, work focused on completing project tasks in the area of multiphase flow and rock properties. The area of interest is the production mechanisms of oil from porous media at high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on oil recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. Work continued to delineate how the wettability of reservoir rock shifts from mixed and intermediate wet conditions to more water-wet conditions as temperature increases. One mechanism for the shift toward water-wet conditions is the release of fines coated with oil-wet material from pore walls. New experiments and theory illustrate the role of temperature on fines release.

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Lubricants under high local pressure: Liquids act like solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is confined between two walls at large normal pressures. The atomic scale motion that occurs when the two, atomic- scale details of the plastic flow mechanism are investigated by means of molecular dynamics- city v over a broad velocity range. Under non-extreme condi- tions (intermediate pressures

Müser, Martin H.

99

A Study on Experiment and Numerical Analysis for Disclosing Shell Wall Thinning of a Feedwater Heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedwater heaters of many nuclear power plants have recently experienced severe wall thinning damage, which will increase as operating time progresses. Several nuclear power plants in Korea have experienced wall thinning damage in the area around the impingement baffle - installed downstream of the high pressure turbine extraction steam line - inside number 5A and 5B feedwater heaters. At that point, the extracted steam from the high pressure turbine is two phase fluid at high temperature, high pressure, and high speed. Since it flows in reverse direction after impinging the impingement baffle, the shell wall of the number 5 high pressure feedwater heater may be affected by flow-accelerated corrosion. This paper describes the comparisons between the numerical analysis results using the FLUENT code and the down scale experimental data in an effort to determine root causes of the shell wall thinning of the high pressure feedwater heaters. The numerical analysis and experimental data were also confirmed by actual wall thickness measured by an ultrasonic test. (authors)

Kyeong Mo, Hwang; Tae Eun, Jin [Korea Power Engineering Company, 360-9, Mabuk-dong, Kusong-Eup, Yongin-Shi (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo [Daeji Metal Co., LTD., 994-57, Dongchun-Dong, Yeunsu-Gu, Incheon Shi (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hoon, Kim [Kyunghee University, 1, Seocheon-Ri, Gihung-Eup, Yongin-Shi (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Domain walls riding the wave.  

SciTech Connect

Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is the preferred method, as it combines manipulation and readout of the domain-wall state. The electrons that take part in the process of readout and manipulation of the domain-wall structure in the nanowire do so through the so-called spin transfer torque: When spin-polarized electrons in the ferromagnet nanowire pass through the domain wall they experience a nonuniform magnetization, and they try to align their spins with the local magnetic moments. The force that the electrons experience has a reaction force counterpart that 'pushes' the local magnetic moments, resulting in movement of the domain wall in the direction of the electron flow through the spin-transfer torque. The forces between the electrons and the local magnetic moments in the ferromagnet also create additional electrical resistance for the electrons passing through the domain wall. By measuring resistance across a segment of the nanowire, one determines if a domain wall is present; i.e., one can read the stored information. The interaction of the spin-polarized electrons with the domain wall in the ferromagnetic nanowire is not very efficient. Even for materials achieving high polarization of the free electrons, it is very difficult to move the magnetic domain wall. Several factors contribute to this problem, with imperfections of the ferromagnetic nanowire that cause domain-wall pinning being the dominant one. Permalloy nanowires, one of the best candidates for domain-wall-based memory and logic devices, require current densities of the order of 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2} in order to move a domain wall from a pinning well. Considering that this current has to pass through a relatively long wire, it is not very difficult to imagine that most of the energy will go to Joule heating. The efficiency of the process - the ratio of the energy converted to domain-wall motion to the total energy consumed - is comparable to that of an incandescent light bulb converting electricity to light. A step towards more efficient domain-wall-based memory devices is the advance of using alternating currents or curren

Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CFD Simulation of Airflow in Ventilated Wall System Report #9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to examine air movements in vinyl and brick ventilation cavities in detail, using a state of the art CFD commercial modeling tool. The CFD activity was planned to proceed the other activities in order to develop insight on the important magnitudes of scales occurring during ventilation air flow. This information generated by the CFD model was to be used to modify (if necessary) and to validate the air flow dynamics already imbedded in the hygrothermal model for the computer-based air flow simulation procedures. A comprehensive program of advanced, state-of-the-art hygrothermal modeling was then envisaged mainly to extend the knowledge to other wall systems and at least six representative climatic areas. These data were then to be used to provide the basis for the development of design guidelines. CFD results provided timely and much needed answers to many of the concerns and questions related to ventilation flows due to thermal buoyancy and wind-driven flow scenarios. The relative strength between these two mechanisms. Simple correlations were developed and are presented in the report providing the overall pressure drop, and flow through various cavities under different exterior solar and temperature scenarios. Brick Rainscreen Wall: It was initially expected that a 50 mm cavity would offer reduced pressure drops and increased air flow compared to a 19 mm cavity. However, these models showed that the size of the ventilation slots through the wall are the limiting factor rather than the cavity depth. Of course, once the slots are enlarged beyond a certain point, this could change. The effects of natural convection within the air cavities, driven by the temperature difference across the cavity, were shown to be less important than the external wind speed (for a wind direction normal to the wall surface), when wind action is present. Vinyl Rainscreen Wall: The CFD model of the vinyl rainscreen wall was simpler than that for the brick wall. Constant wall temperatures were used rather than conjugate heat transfer. Although this is appropriate for a thin surface with little heat capacity, it does mean that an empirical correlation between solar radiation (and perhaps wind speed) and vinyl temperature is required to use these results appropriately. The results developed from this CFD model were correlated to weather parameters and construction details so that they can be incorporated into ORNL s advanced hygrothermal models MOISTURE- EXPERT.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Karagiozis, Achilles N [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

Sharp, W M; Niller, D A C; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

103

Glazing and the Trombe wall  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Single, double and triple glazing are examined for use in passive solar Trombe walls and south facing windows. Net gains and losses are calculated employing regional weather data and annual contribution to heating load reduction is evaluated. The study concentrates on the reflectivity of each glass pane, including the dependence of reflectivity on the angle of incidence of the radiation, and resulting heat gains and losses. This facet of passive design heretofore has been inadequately treated as is shown to be significant. The marginal value of each additional pane is investigated with regard to heat gain, energy savings and total costs. Additionally, attention is given to the effects of Trombe wall energy storage.

Pouder, R W; Leigh, R W

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Technology Analysis - Heavy Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the GPRA benefits estimates for EERE's Vehicle Technologies Program's heavy vehicle technology research activities. Argonne researchers develop the benefits analysis using four...

105

DEDICATED HEAVY ION MEDICAL ACCELERATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , ,8iological and Medical Research with Acceleratedet al. , "Biological and Medical Research with J\\cceleratedic Heavy Ions in Medical and Scientific Research, Edmonton,

Gough, R.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Heavy Ion Fusion development plan  

SciTech Connect

Some general cnsiderations in the fusion development program are given. The various factors are considered that must be determined before heavy ion fusion can be assessed. (MOW)

Maschke, A.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear Science--A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart 2003 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Science--A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart ©2003 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) 7-1 Chapter 7 Nuclear Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used, protons, alphas, or "heavy ions"), creates these reactions when they strike a target nucleus. Nuclear

108

Very high energy heavy-ion accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A review is given of various programs for building heavy ion accelerators. Topics discussed are (1) options of reaching very high energies with heavy ions; (2) present performance of the superHILAC and the Bevalac; (3) heavy ion sources; (4) applications of heavy ion accelerators outside of basic research; and (5) reliability and operating costs of heavy ion sources. (PMA)

Grunder, H.A.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Support pedestals for interconnecting a cover and nozzle band wall in a gas turbine nozzle segment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner band portions. Each band portion includes a nozzle wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through the apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. Structural pedestals interconnect the cover and nozzle wall and pass through holes in the impingement plate to reduce localized stress otherwise resulting from a difference in pressure within the chamber of the nozzle segment and the hot gas path and the fixed turbine casing surrounding the nozzle stage. The pedestals may be cast or welded to the cover and nozzle wall.

Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method and apparatus for detecting irregularities on or in the wall of a vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting irregularities on or in the wall of a vessel by detecting localized spatial temperature differentials on the wall surface, comprising scanning the vessel surface with a thermal imaging camera and recording the position of the or each region for which the thermal image from the camera is indicative of such a temperature differential across the region. The spatial temperature differential may be formed by bacterial growth on the vessel surface; alternatively, it may be the result of defects in the vessel wall such as thin regions or pin holes or cracks. The detection of leaks through the vessel wall may be enhanced by applying a pressure differential or a temperature differential across the vessel wall; the testing for leaks may be performed with the vessel full or empty, and from the inside or the outside.

Bowling, Michael Keith (Blackborough Cullompton, GB)

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

Grigorian, Leonid (Raymond, OH); Hornyak, Louis (Evergreen, CO); Dillon, Anne C (Boulder, CO); Heben, Michael J (Denver, CO)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Steel-framed buildings: Impacts of wall detail configurations on the whole wall thermal performance  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this paper is the influence of architectural wall details on the whole wall thermal performance. Whole wall thermal performance analysis was performed for six light gage steel-framed wall systems (some with wood components). For each wall system, all wall details were simulated using calibrated 3-D finite difference computer modeling. The thermal performance of the six steel-framed wall systems included various system details and the whole wall system thermal performance for a typical single-story ranch house. Currently, predicted heat losses through building walls are typically based on measurements of the wall system clear wall area using test methods such as ASTM C 236 or are calculated by one of the procedures recommended in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals that often is carried out for the clear wall area exclusively. In this paper, clear wall area is defined as the part of the wall system that is free of thermal anomalies due to building envelope details or thermally unaffected by intersections with other surfaces of the building envelope. Clear wall experiments or calculations normally do not include the effects of building envelope details such as corners, window and door openings, and structural intersections with roofs, floors, ceilings, and other walls. In steel-framed wall systems, these details typically consist of much more structural components than the clear wall. For this situation, the thermal properties measured or calculated for the clear wall area do not adequately represent the total wall system thermal performance. Factors that would impact the ability of today`s standard practice to accurately predict the total wall system thermal performance are the accuracy of the calculation methods, the area of the total wall that is clear wall, and the quantity and thermal performance of the various wall system details.

Kosny, J.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Heavy Machine Shop | Central Fabrication Services | Brookhaven...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Machine Shop Heavy Machine Shop The Heavy Machine Shop facility is located in building 479, and may be accessed by the main door on the north face or front of the building....

114

Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization Studies at DIII-D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effort to understand the physics of the resistive wall mode (RWM) and develop methods to control this magnetohydrodynamic mode to allow achievement of higher pressure in advanced tokamak plasmas has been an example of successful multi-institutional collaboration at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego, California. DIII-D research in this area has produced several advances and breakthroughs following a coordinated research plan involving a sequence of measurements, development of new analysis tools, and the installation of new diagnostic and feedback stabilization hardware: Suppression of the RWM by active magnetic feedback has been demonstrated using the DIII-D six-element error field correction coil, rotational stabilization of the RWM has been demonstrated and sustained for all values of the plasma pressure from the no-wall to the ideal-wall stability limits, improved RWM feedback stabilization has been shown using a new set of 12 internal control coils, and newly developed models of feedback have shown good agreement with the measurements. By so doing, the DIII-D work on RWM stabilization has become a cornerstone of the long-term advanced tokamak program and is having impact on the world fusion program. Presently both ITER and FIRE are including plans for RWM stabilization in their programs.

Garofalo, A.M. [Columbia University (United States)

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Heavy crude oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The oil crisis of the past decade has focused most of the attention and effort of researchers on crude oil resources, which are accepted as unrecoverable using known technology. World reserves are estimated to be 600-1000 billion metric tons, and with present technology 160 billion tons of this total can be recovered. This book is devoted to the discussion of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques, their mechanism and applicability to heavy oil reservoirs. The book also discusses some field results. The use of numerical simulators has become important, in addition to laboratory research, in analysing the applicability of oil recovery processes, and for this reason the last section of the book is devoted to simulators used in EOR research.

Okandan, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

SYNCHROTRONS FOR HEAVY IONS - BEVALAC EXPERIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Ions ir. Medical and Scientific Research", Edmonton,Heavy Ions in Medical and Scientific Research" Edmonton,vigorous medical and nuclear science research groups. The

Grunder, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Glimpse of heavy electrons reveals "hidden order"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glimpse of heavy electrons reveals "hidden order" Glimpse of heavy electrons reveals "hidden order" The remarkable breakthrough helps validate theory behind the observed increase...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Water Wall Turbine Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.wwturbine.com Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

122

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injection ISX G Natural Gas Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet details work by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Through the wall solar cooker  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a solar appliance for extending from the interior of a kitchen through an exterior wall of the building and beyond a predetermined distance in a cantilever manner to receive and concentrate in the appliance outside of the building, solar radiation rays for cooking purposes comprising: a housing, the housing being mounted to extend from a kitchen through an external wall of a building and beyond in a cantilever manner and forming a closed oven, the oven comprising a bottom, glass top, a pair of sides and a first end positioned with access from within the kitchen and comprising an oven door, a first reflective panel member mounted above, juxtapositioned to one edge of the glass top for positioning against the outer surface of the external wall and extending laterally therefrom for receiving and directing solar rays impinging thereon through the glass top and into the oven, and a second double-sided reflective panel mounted above and juxtapositioned to the glass top and extending substantially perpendicular to the first reflective panel for receiving solar rays impinging on either side thereof, and directing the solar rays into the oven.

Kerr, B.P.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

Lagasse, Paul R. (Santa Fe, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

Lagasse, P.R.

1985-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Heavy ion fusion--Using heavy ions to make electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a practical fusion power reactor. HIF is the only fusionenter the reactor chamber, and focus Heavy Ion Fusion ontoengineering test reactor. The promise of fusion as a power

Celata, C.M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Heavy Ion Colliders at Heavy Ion Colliders Theory Drivers & View from LHC Urs Achim Wiedemann CERN PH-TH NSAC Implementation Subcommittee Hearings 7 September 2012 Heavy Ion Physics - Main Tools of Theorists Understanding properties of hot and dense matter from the elementary interactions in QCD High Energy Physics String Theory Computational Physics Fluid Dynamics Dissipative fluid dynamic description * Based on: E-p conservation: 2 nd law of thermodynamics: * Sensitive to properties of matter that are calculated from first principles in quantum field theory - EOS: and sound velocity - transport coefficients: shear , bulk viscosity, conductivities ...

130

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Lattice QCD and Hydro/Cascade Model of Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report here on a recent lattice study of the QCD transition region at finite temperature and zero chemical potential using domain wall fermions (DWF). We also present a parameterization of the QCD equation of state obtained from lattice QCD that is suitable for use in hydrodynamics studies of heavy ion collisions. Finally, we show preliminary results from a multi-stage hydrodynamics/hadron cascade model of a heavy ion collision, in an attempt to understand how well the experimental data (e.g. particle spectra, elliptic flow, and HBT radii) can constrain the inputs (e.g. initial temperature, freezeout temperature, shear viscosity, equation of state) of the theoretical model.

Michael Cheng

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

132

Lattice QCD and Hydro/Cascade Model of Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report here on a recent lattice study of the QCD transition region at finite temperature and zero chemical potential using domain wall fermions (DWF). We also present a parameterization of the QCD equation of state obtained from lattice QCD that is suitable for use in hydrodynamics studies of heavy ion collisions. Finally, we show preliminary results from a multi-stage hydrodynamics/hadron cascade model of a heavy ion collision, in an attempt to understand how well the experimental data (e.g. particle spectra, elliptic flow, and HBT radii) can constrain the inputs (e.g. initial temperature, freezeout temperature, shear viscosity, equation of state) of the theoretical model.

Cheng, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The physics of heavy flavors  

SciTech Connect

We review the physics of heavy quark flavors, including weak decays, onium, tau leptons, mixing, the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, and CP violation in B decay. 36 refs., 12 figs.

Gilman, F.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

indicate that collisions of small particles with large gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider may be serving up miniscule servings of hot quark-gluon plasma. RHIC...

135

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider website has moved to www.bnl.govrhicdefault.asp Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics. Last...

136

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most fundamental forces and properties of matter and the early universe. RHIC accelerates beams of particles (e.g., the nuclei of heavy atoms such as gold) to nearly the speed of light, and smashes them together to recreate a state of matter thought to have existed immediately after the Big Bang some 13.8 billion years ago. STAR and PHENIX, two large detectors located around the 2.4-mile-circumference accelerator, take "snapshots" of these collisions to reveal a glimpse of the basic constituents of visible matter, quarks and gluons. Understanding matter at

137

Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessil and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication (with a through-wall dimension of approx.6 mm (approx.0.24 in.)) was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications (i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m/sup 2/ (72 ft/sup 2/) of cladding surface).

Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

Sexton, W.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

Kishiyama, K. I.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Experimental assessment of air permeability in a concrete shear wall subjected to simulated seismic loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A safety concern for the proposed Special Nuclear Materials Laboratory (SNML) facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was air leakage from the facility if it were to experience a design basis earthquake event. To address this concern, a study was initiated to estimate air leakage, driven by wind-generated pressure gradients, from a seismically damaged concrete structure. This report describes a prototype experiment developed and performed to measure the air permeability in a reinforced concrete shear wall, both before and after simulated seismic loading. A shear wall test structure was fabricated with standard 4000-psi concrete mix. Static load-cycle testing was used to simulate earthquake loading. Permeability measurements were made by pressurizing one side of the shear wall above atmospheric conditions and recording the transient pressure decay. As long as the structure exhibited linear load displacement response, no variation in the air permeability was detected. However, experimental results indicate that the air permeability in the shear wall increased by a factor of 40 after the wall had been damaged (cracked). 17 figs., 8 tabs.

Girrens, S.P.; Farrar, C.R.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Heat-sound insulating wall  

SciTech Connect

The wall comprises a closed acoustic box-structure which is defined by a slightly ribbed sheet and a flat sheet. The boxstructure has lateral ribs which extend beyond the sheet. A panel of high-density mineral wool which is of small thickness is enclosed inside the box-structure. A heat insulator covers the box-structure and the ribs of the box-structure and is protected by an outer trough which has ribs or corrugations perpendicular to the ribs of the box-structure.

Ovaert, F.; Reneault, P.

1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

142

HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment including the dome was removed, a concrete cover was to be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

143

Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to deliver these oils at low energy consumption. However, the possible accumulation of oil on the pipe walls alternative for the transportation of heavy crude oils. The lubricating effect of the aqueous film leads to reduced equivalent viscosities and, hence, low energy consumption. One of the possible problems associated

Loh, Watson

144

Gas-lubricated seal for sealing between a piston and a cylinder wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A piston-cylinder seal uses gas for a lubricant and has a runner supported on a gapless structure and placed in the space between the piston and the cylinder wall. The runner is deformed elastically under the influence of the operating pressures to follow and compensate for variations in the piston-cylinder fit and maintain a seal. 4 figs.

Hoult, D.P.

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

pressure_measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... piston gauges, ball gages, pressure transducers, pressure gauges, non-mercurial barometers, and manometers in both gas and oil media using ...

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Gas pressure reduction circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes passive pressure reduction devices for use with sensitive instruments. Two gas circuits are developed which not only provide a pressure reduction under flow demand

D. W. Guillaume; D. DeVries

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

Edincliler, Ayse [Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Earthquake Engineering, Cengelkoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug [Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

Rueben L. Gutierrez

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Radiological Issues for the Thin Liquid Walls of ARIES-IFE Study  

SciTech Connect

Heavy ion beam driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants employ liquid wall materials to protect the structure against the energetic x-rays, ions, and debris emitted from the target following each shot. The objective of this assessment is to identify the radiological issues of the candidate liquid wall materials (Pb, LiPb, Sn, and Flibe) using the ARIES-IFE radiation chamber environment. The issues to be addressed include the radioactivity level and liquid waste minimization for waste management. Specifically, the liquids are evaluated with regard to the Class C limitation for waste disposal, a top-level requirement for all ARIES power plant designs. Two extreme cases were analyzed; the worst case is separation of the liquid wall material (highest radiation exposure) and the breeder (lowest radiation exposure), and the best case is the mixing of the two liquid streams. Both tangential and porous wall injection schemes were examined. Pb and LiPb are more radioactive than Sn and Flibe. For the liquid breeder system, the porous wall injection scheme with mixed liquid flows results in the lowest waste disposal rating and smallest waste stream achieved in our study.

El-Guebaly, L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Wilson, P. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Henderson, D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Waganer, L. [Boeing Company (United States); Raffray, R. [University of California-San Diego (United States)

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Textural break foundation wall construction modules  

SciTech Connect

Below-grade, textural-break foundation wall structures are provided for inhibiting diffusion and advection of liquids and gases into and out from a surrounding hydrogeologic environment. The foundation wall structure includes a foundation wall having an interior and exterior surface and a porous medium disposed around a portion of the exterior surface. The structure further includes a modular barrier disposed around a portion of the porous medium. The modular barrier is substantially removable from the hydrogeologic environment.

Phillips, Steven J. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

First wall for polarized fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

Greenside, Henry S. (Cranbury, NJ); Budny, Robert V. (Princeton, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Buttonwood, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

First wall for polarized fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

Seismic Response of Reinforced Concrete Walls Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... data verification and development of improved models; and (2) investigation of global wall bucking in the 2010 Chile earthquake designed using ...

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Engineering secondary cell wall deposition in plants  

loop, biofuels, cell wall, lignin, sacchari?cation, synthetic biology. Summary ... target speci?c cell types such as ?bre and pith cells. It is well

158

RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory search U.S. Department of Energy logo Home RHIC Science News Images Videos For Scientists Björn Schenke 490th Brookhaven Lecture, 12/18 Join Björn Schenke of Brookhaven Lab's Physics Department for the 490th Brookhaven Lecture, titled 'The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions,' on Wednesday, Dec. 18, at 4 p.m. in Berkner Hall. droplets Tiny Drops of Hot Quark Soup-How Small Can They Be? New analyses indicate that collisions of small particles with large gold nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider may be serving up miniscule servings of hot quark-gluon plasma. RHIC Physics RHIC is the first machine in the world capable of colliding ions as heavy as gold. The Spin Puzzle RHIC is the world's only machine capable of colliding beams of polarized

159

CMVRTC: Heavy Truck Duty Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heavy truck duty cycle (HTDC) project heavy truck duty cycle (HTDC) project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project was initiated in 2004 and is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies Program. ORNL designed the research program to generate real-world-based duty cycle data from trucks operating in long-haul operations and was designed to be conducted in three phases: identification of parameters to be collected, instrumentation and pilot testing, identification of a real-world fleet, design of the data collection suite and fleet instrumentation, and data collection, analysis, and development of a duty cycle generation tool (DCGT). ANL logo dana logo michelin logo Schrader logo This type of data will be useful for supporting energy efficiency

160

Jet quenching and heavy quarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jet quenching and more generally physics at high transverse momentum P_T scales is a cornerstone of the heavy-ion physics program at the LHC. In this work, the current understanding of jet quenching in terms of a QCD shower evolution being modified by the surrounding medium is reviewed along with the evidence for this picture from light parton high P_T observables. Conceptually, the same QCD shower description should also be relevant for heavy quarks, but with several important modifications introduced by the quark masses. Thus especially in the limit of small jet energy over quark mass E_jet/m_q, the relevant physics may be rather different from light quark jets, and several attempts to explain the observed phenomenology of heavy quarks at high P_T are discussed here.

Thorsten Renk

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Aspect ratio effect on heat transfer in rotating two-pass rectangular channels with smooth walls and ribbed walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study experimentally investigates the effects of rotation, the buoyancy force, and the channel aspect ratio on heat transfer in two-pass rotating rectangular channels. The experiments are conducted with two surface conditions: smooth walls and 45?? angled ribbed walls. The channel aspect ratios include 4:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4. Four Reynolds numbers are studied: 5000, 10000, 25000 and 40000. The rotation speed is fixed at 550 rpm for all tests, and for each channel, two channel orientations are studied: 90?? and 45?? or 135??, with respect to the plane of rotation. Rib turbulators are placed on the leading and trailing walls of the channels at an angle of 45?? to the flow direction. The ribs have a 1.59 by 1.59 mm square cross section, and the rib pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) is 10 for all tests. The effects of the local buoyancy parameter and channel aspect ratio on the regional Nusselt number ratio are presented. Pressure drop data are also measured for both smooth and ribbed channels in rotating and non-rotating conditions. The results show that increasing the local buoyancy parameter increases the Nusselt number ratio on the trailing surface and decreases the Nusselt number ratio on the leading surface in the first pass for all channels. However, the trend of the Nusselt number ratio in the second pass is more complicated due to the strong effect of the 180?? turn. Results are also presented for this critical turn region of the two-pass channels. In addition to these regions, the channel averaged heat transfer, friction factor, and thermal performance are determined for each channel. With the channels having comparable Nusselt number ratios, the 1:4 channel has the superior thermal performance because it incurs the least pressure penalty. In this study, the author is able to systematically analyze, correlate, and conclude the thermal performance comparison with the combination of rotation effects on five different aspect ratio channels with both smooth walls and rib turbulated walls.

Fu, Wen-Lung

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Accelerators for heavy ion fusion  

SciTech Connect

Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

Bangerter, R.O.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Threaded connector evaluation for heavy-wall production tubing in a deep well  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to qualify a connector for a deep, critical service gas well, a connector evaluation program was executed which included both destructive laboratory testing and computer analysis. The advantage of using both tests and analysis to evaluate connector performance is emphasized. Both tests and analysis have strengths and limitations that must be understood and properly manipulated to construct an optimum evaluation program.

Payne, M.L.; Galate, J.W.; Hurst, D.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

Baker, P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

BronWall: a software system for volumetric quantification of the bronchial wall remodeling in MDCT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops an original volumetric quantification approach of the bronchial wall remodeling, based on MDCT acquisitions prior/post-medication delivery. The methodology is implemented as a software system -BronWall- integrating 3D segmentation, ... Keywords: 3D image processing, 3D segmentation, bronchial reactivity, software system, volumetric quantification, wall remodeling

A. Saragaglia; C. Fetita; F. Preteux

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

PressurePressure Indiana Coal Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TimeTime PressurePressure · Indiana Coal Characteristics · Indiana Coals for Coke · CoalTransportation in Indiana · Coal Slurry Ponds Evaluation · Site Selection for Coal Gasification · Coal-To-Liquids Study, CTL · Indiana Coal Forecasting · Under-Ground Coal Gasification · Benefits of Oxyfuel Combustion · Economic

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

167

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injected, Ultra Low-NOx Natural Gas Engine: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Duggal, V. K.; Lyford-Pike, E. J.; Wright, J. F.; Dunn, M.; Goudie, D.; Munshi, S.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Heavy-ion Collisions: Direct and indirect probes of the density and temperature dependence of Esym  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy-ion collisions provide a versatile terrestrial probe of the nuclear equation of state through the formation of nuclear matter at a wide variety of temperatures, densities, and pressures. Direct and indirect approaches for constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using heavy-ion collisions have been developed. The direct approach relies on scaling methods which attempt to connect isotopic fragment distributions to the symmetry energy. Using the indirect approach constraints on the equation of state are extracted from comparison of experimental results and theoretical transport calculations which utilize effective nucleon-nucleon interactions. Besides exploring the density dependence of the equation of state, heavy-ion collisions are simultaneously probing different temperature gradients of nuclear matter allowing for the temperature dependence of the symmetry energy to be examined. The current progress and open questions related to constraining the density and temperature dependence of the symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions are discussed in the review.

Z. Kohley; S. J. Yennello

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

169

New Corrosion Resistance Bar in Sandwich Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandwich masonry wall is an energy-saving composite wall with good mechanical properties and durability. But the adhesion strength to its tie bar affects its permanence. In order to simple the traditional production processes, a new method was proposed. ... Keywords: energy-saving, durability, steel bar, insulation

Li Yancang; Ge Xiaohua; Wang Fengxin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fire performance of single leaf masonry walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A finite element model called MasSET has been developed which is capable of predicting the structural behaviour of single leaf masonry walls subject to elevated temperatures. The analysis models a slice through the wall as a column strip in plane stress, ... Keywords: boundary conditions, eccentricity, finite element model, masonry in fire, slenderness ratio

A. Nadjai; M. O'Gara; F. Ali

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

High-pressure microhydraulic actuator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

Mosier, Bruce P. (San Francisco, CA); Crocker, Robert W. (Fremont, CA); Patel, Kamlesh D. (Dublin, CA)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2A GeV 3 Hadron Production from AGS to RHIC 3.1 SystematicsHadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions Hans Georg RitterAC02- 05CH11231. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

Ritter, Hans Georg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide is a catalog of medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles with alternative fuel and advanced powertrain options. This edition covers model year 2003 engines and vehicles.

Not Available

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Structure of a Winter Storm Producing Heavy Precipitation over Nova Scotia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 22 February 1986 Nova Scotia experienced heavy precipitation in the form of snow, freezing precipitation, and rain from a storm having a central pressure no lower than 99.3 kPa. Using observations obtained during the Canadian Atlantic Storms ...

R. E. Stewart; C. A. Lin; S. R. Macpherson

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Proton Distribution in Heavy Nuclei  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

It is reasoned that, from considerations connected with beta-decay stability and Coulomb repulsion forces, a neutron excess is developed on the surface of heavy nuclei. Several consequences of this qualitative analysis in nucleon interactions are briefly noted. (K.S.)

Johnson, M. H; Teller, E.

1953-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

176

Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Wall System Innovation Vladimir Kochkin Joseph Wiehagen April 2013 Wall Innovation Metrics  High R (thermal and air barrier)  High Performance  Durable, structural  Build-able  Low transition risk to builders  50% Building America Goal  ≈ R25+ (CZ 4 and higher) 2 Background  Technologies for high-R walls have been proposed and used for over 25 years  But real market penetration is very low  Often the last EE measure implemented by builders (e.g. E*) 3 Background  High-R wall solutions have not achieved a broad level of standardization and commonality  A large set of methods and materials entered the market  Multiple and conflicting details  Wall characteristics are more critical = RISK 4 New Home Starts -

177

2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

Daniel J. Cosgrove

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Ultrasonic Digital Communication System for a Steel Wall Multipath Channel: Methods and Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As of the development of this thesis, no commercially available products have been identified for the digital communication of instrumented data across a thick ({approx} 6 n.) steel wall using ultrasound. The specific goal of the current research is to investigate the application of methods for digital communication of instrumented data (i.e., temperature, voltage, etc.) across the wall of a steel pressure vessel. The acoustic transmission of data using ultrasonic transducers prevents the need to breach the wall of such a pressure vessel which could ultimately affect its safety or lifespan, or void the homogeneity of an experiment under test. Actual digital communication paradigms are introduced and implemented for the successful dissemination of data across such a wall utilizing solely an acoustic ultrasonic link. The first, dubbed the ''single-hop'' configuration, can communicate bursts of digital data one-way across the wall using the Differential Binary Phase-Shift Keying (DBPSK) modulation technique as fast as 500 bps. The second, dubbed the ''double-hop'' configuration, transmits a carrier into the vessel, modulates it, and retransmits it externally. Using a pulsed carrier with Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM), this technique can communicate digital data as fast as 500 bps. Using a CW carrier, Least Mean-Squared (LMS) adaptive interference suppression, and DBPSK, this method can communicate data as fast as 5 kbps. A third technique, dubbed the ''reflected-power'' configuration, communicates digital data by modulating a pulsed carrier by varying the acoustic impedance at the internal transducer-wall interface. The paradigms of the latter two configurations are believed to be unique. All modulation methods are based on the premise that the wall cannot be breached in any way and can therefore be viably implemented with power delivered wirelessly through the acoustic channel using ultrasound. Methods, results, and considerations for future research are discussed herein.

TL Murphy

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Light-Heavy Price Difference Varies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Light-Heavy Price Difference Varies ; Function of Crude Market Factors ; Function of Conversion Capacity ; Function of Product Market Factors

180

Summary of the Heavy Flavours Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a summary of the contributions presented in the Heavy Flavours Working Group of the DIS2006 Workshop.

U. Karshon; I. Schienbein; P. Thompson

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Oklahoma Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Oklahoma Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

182

Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive product catalog of medium and heavy-duty engines and vehicles with alternative fuel and advanced powertrain options.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Mississippi Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

184

Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines Sindo N´u~nez-Queija based on joint ITC´u~nez-Queija CWI & TU/e #12;Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines Part I ­ Introduction and Methodology Tales to tell: · traffic measurements and statistical analysis · traffic modeling · heavy

Núñez-Queija, Rudesindo

185

Finding Interesting Correlations with Conditional Heavy Hitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finding Interesting Correlations with Conditional Heavy Hitters Katsiaryna Mirylenka, Themis Srivastava AT&T Labs, Florham Park, NJ, USA {graham, divesh}@research.att.com Abstract-- The notion of heavy of Conditional Heavy Hitters to identify such items, with applications in network monitoring, and Markov chain

Palpanas, Themis

186

HEAVY BARYONS: A COMBINED LARGE Nc AND HEAVY QUARK EXPANSION FOR ELECTROWEAK CURRENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combined large Nc and heavy quark limit for baryons containing a single heavy quark is discussed. The combined large Nc and heavy quark expansion of the heavy quark bilinear operators is obtained. In the combined expansion the corrections proportional to mN/mQ are summed to all orders. In particular, the combined expansion can be used to determine semileptonic form factors of heavy baryons in the combined limit. 1

Boris A. Gelman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Weak Decay Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide upper and lower bounds on the semileptonic weak decay form factors for $B \\to D^(*)$ and $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c$ decays by utilizing inclusive heavy quark effective theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to second order in $\\Lambda_{QCD}/m_Q$ and first order in $\\alpha_s$. The $O(\\alpha_s^2 \\beta_0)$ corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented.

Chiang, C W

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Weak Decay Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide upper and lower bounds on the semileptonic weak decay form factors for $B \\to D^(*)$ and $\\Lambda_b \\to \\Lambda_c$ decays by utilizing inclusive heavy quark effective theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to second order in $\\Lambda_{QCD}/m_Q$ and first order in $\\alpha_s$. The $O(\\alpha_s^2 \\beta_0)$ corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Baryonic Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper and lower bounds are established on the Lambda_b -> Lambda_c semileptonic decay form factors by utilizing inclusive heavy-quark-effective-theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to leading order in Lambda_QCD/m_Q and alpha_s. The O(alpha_s^2 beta_0) corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented. Several form factor models used in the literature are compared with our bounds.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Bounds on Heavy-to-Heavy Baryonic Form Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper and lower bounds are established on the Lambda_b -> Lambda_c semileptonic decay form factors by utilizing inclusive heavy-quark-effective-theory sum rules. These bounds are calculated to leading order in Lambda_QCD/m_Q and alpha_s. The O(alpha_s^2 beta_0) corrections to the bounds at zero recoil are also presented. Several form factor models used in the literature are compared with our bounds.

Chiang, C W

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

PRESSURE WELDING--BIBLIOGRAPHY  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 117 references from the years 1944 to 1961 on pressure welding is presented. (N.W.R.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Dynamics of Wave Breaking at a Coastal Sea Wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural designs barely consider the dynamic scenario of a well-developed impinging wave hitting the structure. The usual area of focus is on static and stability factors (e.g. drag, inertia, resistive forces related to weight, buoyancy, sliding etc). Even the "Factor of Safety" which is regularly used in designs to account for unknown and/or unforeseen situations which might occur implies a degree of uncertainty about the dynamic scenario of breaking waves in the coastal environment. In the present study the hydrodynamics of a coastal structure-turbulent bore interaction was studied by examination (two-dimensional) of the singular case of a plunging breaking wave forming a well developed turbulent bore which impacted on a model sea wall structure. The turbulent bore impact event was found to display similar characteristics to the impact event of other wave shapes, in particular that of a plunging breaker. Examination of the impact event confirmed the conversion of nearly all horizontal velocity to vertical velocity during the "flip through" event. In accordance with theoretical expectations the location of maximum pressure was found to occur just below the still water level (SWL). Resulting pressure data in the present study consisted of two blunt spikes as opposed to the "church-roof" (high spike) shape seen in other results. The shape of the pressure data was attributed to the following: firstly, to the initial impact of the protruding jet of the breaking wave which causes the first maxima, secondly, to the sensor encountering the bulk of the entrapped air hence causing the drop in pressure between the blunt spikes and lastly, to the inherent hydrostatic pressure combined with the compression of the entrapped air bubbles, by the subsequent forward motion of the water within the wave, which causes the second maxima. The point of maximum pressure was found to always be within the second maxima. Observation of the turbulent bore-structure interaction showed that the consequential maximum pressure was a direct result of the compression of entrapped air by the weight of the water in the wave as it continued forward onto the structure combined with the inherent hydrostatic pressure of the wave. The project was conducted in an attempt to contribute to the vast knowledge of coastal structure-wave interactions and to add to the understanding of the physics and characteristics of breaking waves. Whilst numerous studies and experiments have been carried out on the phenomenon of breaking waves by previous researchers the current project highlights the advent of new equipment and technological advances in existing methods.

Antoine, Arthur L.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

Heusch, C.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

PRESSURIZER ANALYSIS AND THE PRE DIGITAL PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is given which was programmed for the Philco 2000 (TRANSAC) Computer in order to provide a means for making pressurizer design and performance calculations. The analysis and digital program provide the exibility for studying the effects of various assumptions such as the type of steam compression process (i.e., isentropic or saturation), spray efficiency, wall condensation, and mixing of the pressurizer water and of the insurge. Also included in the program are data on pressure controlled steam and water relief,valves (total of four), pressure controlled heaters (total of five), pressure controlled spray valve, and various input formats allowing the use of either total surge, surge rate or bulk average temperature for the surge, spray fraction or spray rate for the spray and either temperatures or enthalpies for the surge and spray energies. The program uses steam and water properties in the form of empirical equations where the empirical constants in these equations may be changed depending upon the range of interest of the problem. (auth)

Findlay, J.A.

1961-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Electrochemical assessment and service-life prediction of mechanically stabilized earth walls backfilled with crushed concrete and recycled asphalt pavement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) wall is a vertical grade separation that uses earth reinforcement extending laterally from the wall to take advantage of earth pressure to reduce the required design strength of the wall. MSE wall systems are often prefabricated to reduce construction time, thus improving constructability when compared with conventionally cast-in-place reinforced wall systems. However, there is a lack of knowledge for predicting the service-life of MSE retaining wall systems when recycled backfill materials such as Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) and Crushed Concrete (CC) are used instead of Conventional Fill Material (CFM). The specific knowledge missing is how these recycled materials, when used as backfill in MSE wall systems, affects the corrosion rate of the reinforcing strips. This work addresses this knowledge gap by providing recommendations for MSE wall systems backfilled with CC or RAP, and provides a guide to predict the service-life based on corrosion rate test data obtained from embedding steel and galvanized-steel earth reinforcing strips embedded in MSE wall systems backfilled with CC, RAP, and CFM. Experimental data from samples emulating MSE wall systems with steel and galvanized-steel reinforcing strips embedded in CC and RAP were compared to samples with strips embedded in CFM. The results of the testing provide data and methodologies that may, depending on the environmental exposure conditions, justify the use of RAP and CC for the construction of MSE walls. If these backfill materials are obtained from the construction site, this could provide a significant cost savings during construction.

Esfeller, Michael Watts, Jr.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

Sidney Diamond; D. Ray Johnson

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Design and fabrication of a MEMS-array pressure sensor system for passive underwater navigation inspired by the lateral line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An object within a fluid flow generates local pressure variations that are unique and characteristic to the object's shape and size. For example, a three-dimensional object or a wall-like obstacle obstructs flow and creates ...

Hou, Stephen Ming-Chang, 1981-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Process for recovering evolved hydrogen enriched with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a separation means and method for enriching a hydrogen atmosphere with at least one heavy hydrogen isotope by using a solid titaniun alloy hydride. To this end, the titanium alloy hydride containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of vanadium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, iron, cobalt and nickel is contacted with a circulating gaseous flow of hydrogen containing at least one heavy hydrogen isotope at a temperature in the range of -20.degree. to +40.degree. C and at a pressure above the dissociation pressure of the hydrided alloy selectively to concentrate at least one of the isotopes of hydrogen in the hydrided metal alloy. The contacting is continued until equilibrium is reached, and then the gaseous flow is isolated while the temperature and pressure of the enriched hydride remain undisturbed selectively to isolate the hydride. Thereafter, the enriched hydrogen is selectively recovered in accordance with the separation factor (S.F.) of the alloy hydride employed.

Tanaka, John (Storrs, CT); Reilly, Jr., James J. (Bellport, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

HEAVY WATER MODERATED POWER REACTORS PROGRESS REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1961  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of September l961, construction of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor was about 90% complete. Thirty-two compacted tubes of crushed, fused uranium oxide in Zircaloy sheaths were fabricated for irradiation tests and destructive evaluation. lrradiation tests of the tubes were started in the Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor and at Savannah River. The fabrication process for the tubes included steps designed to exclude hydrogenous material from the oxide cores, thereby eliminating the probable cause of sheath failures in previous irradiations. Additional experimental data on heat transfer burnout of tubes in subcooled water at pressures of about 100 to 1000 psi showed that the burnout heat flux is not affected significantiy by pressure in this range. The data were correlated in terms of water velocity and subcooling. (auth)

Hood, R.R. comp.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bio-Synthetic Wall Systems Visualization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bio-Synthetic Wall Systems Visualization Speaker(s): Maria-Paz Gutierrez Date: December 16, 2008 - 10:00am Location: 90-3075 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Michael Donn...

202

SO(10) domain-wall brane models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct domain-wall brane models based on the grand-unification group SO(10), generalising the SU(5) model of Davies, George and Volkas. Motivated by the Dvali-Shifman proposal for the dynamical localisation of gauge bosons, the SO(10) symmetry is spontaneously broken inside the wall. We present two scenarios: in the first, the unbroken subgroup inside the wall is SU(5) x U(1)X, and in the second it is the left-right symmetry group SU(3) x SU(2)L x SU(2)R x U(1)B-L. In both cases we demonstrate that the phenomenologically-correct fermion zero modes can be localised to the wall, and we briefly discuss how the symmetry-breaking dynamics may be extended to induce breaking to the standard model group with subsequent electroweak breaking. Dynamically localised gravity is realised through the type 2 Randall-Sundrum mechanism.

Jayne E. Thompson; Raymond R. Volkas

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electric and Magnetic Walls on Dielectric Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sufficient conditions of the existence of electric or magnetic walls on dielectric interfaces are given for a multizone uniform dielectric waveguiding system. If one of two adjacent dielectric zones supports a TEM field distribution while the other supports a TM (TE) field distribution, then the common dielectric interface behaves as an electric (magnetic) wall, that is, the electric (magnetic) field line is perpendicular to the interface while the magnetic (electric) field line is parallel to the interface.

Changbiao Wang

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

Doru M. Stefanescu

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Shear wall experiments and design in Japan  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the available experimental data bases and design codes/standards for reinforced concrete (RC) shear wall structures in Japan. Information related to the seismic design of RC reactor buildings and containment structures was emphasized in the survey. The seismic requirements for concrete structures, particularly those related to shear strength design, are outlined. Detailed descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Building Technologies Office: Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project on Facebook...

208

Pressure Drops Due to Silica Scaling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experience with reinjection returns in many geothermal fields has prompted a move towards injecting waste fluids at some distance from the production field. This means that often, reinjection pipelines cover very long distances. If the waste water in the pipelines is supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica, then the deposition of silica in these pipelines is almost certain. Although the deposit may be of negligible thickness, the inner surface characteristics of the pipe will be different to those of clean mild steel. During a silica scaling experiment. geothermal brine was passed through a series of pipes of different sizes and over a period of three weeks, silica scale formed on the inner surface. The pressure drop along a distance of approximately 5m was measured by a water manometer in all test pipe sections. Significant pressure drop was observed during this time and can be correlated with the increase in the friction factor of the pipe walls due to silica scaling.

Brown, K.L.; Freeston, D.H.; Dimas, Z.O.; Slatter, A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Kinetic damping of resistive wall modes in ITER  

SciTech Connect

Full drift kinetic modelling including finite orbit width effects has been used to assess the passive stabilisation of the resistive wall mode (RWM) that can be expected in the ITER advanced scenario. At realistic plasma rotation frequency, the thermal ions have a stabilising effect on the RWM, but the stability limit remains below the target plasma pressure to achieve Q = 5. However, the inclusion of damping arising from the fusion-born alpha particles, the NBI ions, and ICRH fast ions extends the RWM stability limit above the target {beta} for the advanced scenario. The fast ion damping arises primarily from finite orbit width effects and is not due to resonance between the particle frequencies and the instability.

Chapman, I. T.; Liu, Y. Q. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Asunta, O. [Department of Applied Physics, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Aalto University, P.O. Box 14100 FI-00076 AALTO (Finland); Graves, J. P. [CRPP, Association EURATOM/Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Johnson, T. [EURATOM-VR Association, EES, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Jucker, M. [GFDL/Princeton University, AOS Program, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

On relative permeability of rough-walled fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a conceptual and numerical model of multiphase flow in fractures. The void space of real rough-walled rock fractures is conceptualized as a two-dimensional heterogeneous porous medium, characterized by aperture as a function of position in the fracture plane. Portions of a fracture are occupied by wetting and non-wetting phase, respectively, according to local capillary pressure and accessibility criteria. Phase occupancy and permeability are derived by assuming a parallel-plate approximation for suitably small subregions in the fracture plane. Wetting and non-wetting phase relative permeabilities are calculated by numerically simulating single phase flows separately in the wetted and non-wetted pore spaces. Illustrative examples indicate that relative permeabilities depend sensitively on the nature and range of spatial correlation between apertures. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Deformation and tribology of multi-walled hollow nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-walled hollow nanoparticles made from tungsten disulphide (WS$_2$) show exceptional tribological performance as additives to liquid lubricants due to effective transfer of low shear strength material onto the sliding surfaces. Using a scaling approach based on continuum elasticity theory for shells and pairwise summation of van der Waals interactions, we show that van der Waals interactions cause strong adhesion to the substrate which favors release of delaminated layers onto the surfaces. For large and thin nanoparticles, van der Waals adhesion can cause considerable deformation and subsequent delamination. For the thick WS$_2$ nanoparticles, deformation due to van der Waals interactions remains small and the main mechanism for delamination is pressure which in fact leads to collapse beyond a critical value. We also discuss the effect of shear flow on deformation and rolling on the substrate.

U. S. Schwarz; S. Komura; S. A. Safran

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Comparison of Pressure Vessel Design and Inspection Requirements as Defined by ASME Code and Germany's TRD Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code with the German TRD Code for pressure vessel engineering, fabrication, inspection, and other pressure vessel processes. The report compares calculations of minimum required wall thickness for pressure vessels such as boiler tubes, pipes, headers, and drums. It also compares material allowable stress values and reviews the major materials permitted by both codes for use in pressure vessel engineering and manufacturing. The repor...

1994-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

213

Oblique inlet pressure loss for swirling flow entering a catalyst substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This experimental study investigates the oblique inlet pressure loss for the entry of an annular swirling flow into an automotive catalyst substrate. The results are applicable to a wide range of compact heat exchangers. For zero swirl, the total pressure loss agrees with established expressions for pressure loss in developing laminar flow in parallel channels with finite wall thickness. For positive swirl, the additional pressure loss due to oblique flow entry is correlated to the tangential velocity upstream of the catalyst, measured using laser-Doppler anemometry. The obtained oblique inlet pressure loss correlation can improve the accuracy of numerical calculations of the flow distribution in catalysts. (author)

Persoons, T.; Vanierschot, M.; Van den Bulck, E. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Celestijnenlaan 300A, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Process for converting heavy oil deposited on coal to distillable oil in a low severity process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing oil from coal fines that have been agglomerated or blended with heavy oil comprises the steps of heating the coal fines to temperatures over 350.degree. C. up to 450.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere, such as steam or nitrogen, to convert some of the heavy oil to lighter, and distilling and collecting the lighter oils. The pressure at which the process is carried out can be from atmospheric to 100 atmospheres. A hydrogen donor can be added to the oil prior to deposition on the coal surface to increase the yield of distillable oil.

Ignasiak, Teresa (417 Heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Strausz, Otto (13119 Grand View Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (417 heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Janiak, Jerzy (17820 - 76 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (3046 - 11465 - 41 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Szymocha, Kazimierz (3125 - 109 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

Isaksson, J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

CC Pressure Test  

SciTech Connect

The inner vessel heads including bypass and beam tubes had just been welded into place and dye penetrant checked. The vacuum heads were not on at this time but the vacuum shell was on covering the piping penetrating into the inner vessel. Signal boxes with all feed through boards, the instrumentation box, and high voltage boxes were all installed with their pump outs capped. All 1/4-inch instrumentation lines were terminated at their respective shutoff valves. All vacuum piping used for pumping down the inner vessel was isolated using o-ring sealed blind flanges. PV215A (VAT Series 12), the 4-inch VRC gate valve isolating the cyropump, and the rupture disk had to be removed and replaced with blind flanges before pressurizing due to their pressure limitations. Stresses in plates used as blind flanges were checked using Code calcualtions. Before the CC test, vacuum style blanks and clamps were hydrostatically pressure tested to 150% of the maximum test pressure, 60 psig. The Code inspector and Research Division Safety had all given their approval to the test pressure and procedure prior to filling the vessel with argon. The test was a major success. Based on the lack of any distinguishable pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages, the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 3 hrs.). A major leak in the instrumentation tubing was discovered at half of the maximum test pressure and was quickly isolated by crimping and capping with a compression fitting. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The 44 psig relief valve located just outside the cleanroom had to be capped until the pressure in the vessel indicated 38 psi. This was to allow higher supply pressures and hence, higher flows through the pressurizing line. Also, in order to get pressure readings at the cryostat without exposing any personnel to the potentially dangerous stored energy near the maximum test pressure, a camera was installed at the top of the vessel to view the indicator mounted there. The monitor was viewed at the ante room adjacent to the cleanroom. The holding pressure of 32 psig (4/5 of the maximum test pressure) was only maintained for about 20 minutes instead of the half hour recommendation in the procedure. We felt that this was sufficient time to Snoop test and perform the pressure drop test. After the test was completed, the inspector for CBI Na-Con and the Research Divison Safety Officer signed all of required documentation.

Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

1990-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hydrostatic Pressure Retainment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is a great deal of attention being concentrated on reducing the weight of pressure vessels and fuel/oxidizer tanks (tankage) by 10% to 20%. Most (more)

Setlock, Robert J., Jr.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heavy-Ion Physics with CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a brief overview of the CMS experiment capabilities to study the hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The CERN Large Hadron Collider will provide collisions of Pb nuclei at 5.5 TeV per nucleon. The CMS heavy ion group has developed a plethora of physics analyses addressing many important aspects of heavy-ion physics in preparation for a competitive and successful program.

Aneta Iordanova

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Heavy ions and string theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review a selection of recent developments in the application of ideas of string theory to heavy ion physics. Our topics divide naturally into equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena. On the non-equilibrium side, we discuss generalizations of Bjorken flow, numerical simulations of black hole formation in asymptotically anti-de Sitter geometries, equilibration in the dual field theory, and hard probes. On the equilibrium side, we summarize improved holographic QCD, extraction of transport coefficients, inclusion of chemical potentials, and approaches to the phase diagram. We close with some possible directions for future research.

Oliver DeWolfe; Steven S. Gubser; Christopher Rosen; Derek Teaney

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

Jian-Wei Qiu

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Recent Heavy Flavor Results at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the recent experimental results of heavy favor physics from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) at Long Island, New York, USA.We will discuss the directly reconstructed open charm mesons as well as electrons from heavy favor hadron decays. The charm and bottom quark production cross-sections have also been measured. We will also discuss JPsi and Upsilon states in p+p and heavy ion collisions. The studies described here were carried out and reported by the STAR and PHENIX collaborations at RHIC.

Wenqin Xu

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

223

Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons  

SciTech Connect

The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Guo, Feng-Kun; /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.; Hanhart, Christoph; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

224

Heavy Duty Truck Engine Advancement Adoption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

petroleum consumption. According to the DOE Energy Information Administration's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009, U.S. heavy truck fuel consumption will increase 23 percent between...

225

Heavy ion physics at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Ion Physics at the LHC ? R. VogtLaboratory, Berkeley, CA USA Physics Department, Universityfor addressing unique physics issues in a completely new

Vogt, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS F. NAJMABADI* University the trade- offs, to develop operational windows for chamber con- cepts, and to identify high the injection process; (d) for relatively low yield targets ( 250 MJ), an operational window with no buffer gas

California at San Diego, University of

227

Wall R-values that tell it like it is  

SciTech Connect

The R-value of a whole wall can be considerable lower than the R-value of the insulation that fills it. At DOE`s Buildings Technology Center, scientists have developed a system for measuring whole wall R-value and have already tested several wall systems. Topics covered include the following: how wall r-value is usually calculated; measuring whole-wall r-values; evaluating wall performance; a wall rating label; beyond r-value; r-value terminology. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kosny, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Miniaturized pressurization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to pressurization systems and liquid rocket propulsion systems, and particularly to those used to attitude control or maneuvering of small space vehicles or airborne vehicles where the requirement for thrust is intermittent rather than continuous, and must be available rapidly upon demand. This invention also relates to increasing performance of such propulsion systems, by way of eliminating inert mass from the propulsion system. The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

Whitehead, J.C.; Swink, D.G.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Heavy Squarks at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHC, with its seven-fold increase in energy over the Tevatron, is capable of probing regions of SUSY parameter space exhibiting qualitatively new collider phenomenology. Here we investigate one such region in which first generation squarks are very heavy compared to the other superpartners. We find that the production of these squarks, which is dominantly associative, only becomes rate-limited at mSquark > 4(5) TeV for L~10(100) fb-1. However, discovery of this scenario is complicated because heavy squarks decay primarily into a jet and boosted gluino, yielding a dijet-like topology with missing energy (MET) pointing along the direction of the second hardest jet. The result is that many signal events are removed by standard jet/MET anti-alignment cuts designed to guard against jet mismeasurement errors. We suggest replacing these anti-alignment cuts with a measurement of jet substructure that can significantly extend the reach of this channel while still removing much of the background. We study a selection of benchmark points in detail, demonstrating that mSquark= 4(5) TeV first generation squarks can be discovered at the LHC with L~10(100)fb-1.

JiJi Fan; David Krohn; Pablo Mosteiro; Arun M. Thalapillil; Lian-Tao Wang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

living walls | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14 14 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142229614 Varnish cache server living walls Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind

232

Living Walls | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Living Walls Living Walls Home > Groups > Buildings Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid). Architects

233

Domain wall conduction in multiaxial ferroelectrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conductance of domain wall structures consisting of either stripes or cylindrical domains in multiaxial ferroelectric-semiconductors is analyzed. The effects of the flexoelectric coupling, domain size, wall tilt, and curvature on charge accumulation are analyzed using the Landau-Ginsburg Devonshire theory for polarization vector combined with the Poisson equation for charge distributions. The proximity and size effect of the electron and donor accumulation/depletion by thin stripe domains and cylindrical nanodomains are revealed. In contrast to thick domain stripes and wider cylindrical domains, in which the carrier accumulation (and so the static conductivity) sharply increases at the domain walls only, small nanodomains of radii less than 5-10 correlation lengths appeared conducting across the entire cross-section. Implications of such conductive nanosized channels may be promising for nanoelectronics.

Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Svechnikov, S. V. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Maksymovych, Petro [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Domain-wall branes in Lifshitz theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze whether or not Lifshitz field theories in 4 + 1 dimensions may provide ultraviolet-complete domain-wall brane models. We first show that Lifshitz scalar field theory can admit topologically stable domain wall solutions. A Lifshitz fermion field is then added to the toy model, and we demonstrate that 3+1- dimensional Kaluza-Klein zero mode solutions do not exist when the four spatial dimensions are treated isotropically. To recover 3 + 1-dimensional chiral fermions dynamically localized to the domain wall, we must postulate the breaking of full 4-dimensional rotational symmetry down to the subgroup of rotations which mix the usual 3-dimensional spatial directions and fix the extra-dimensional axis in addition to the anisotropy between space and time.

Jayne E. Thompson; Raymond R. Volkas

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

235

Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

236

Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

237

INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

Michael Arney, Ph.D.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

Michael A. Romano

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Method of producing heavy oils  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of producing viscous oils from a subterranean reservoir containing unconsolidated or friable sand, the reservoir being penetrated by at least one well in fluid communication therewith comprising: (a) first, stimulating the reservoir by injecting steam through the well at a pressure sufficient to fracture the reservoir adjacent the well; (b) next, shutting in the well for a period of time; (c) then, completing the well adjacent the reservoir with a gravel pack; (d) then, producing oil from the reservoir through the well; and (e) periodically, subsequently stimulating the reservoir by injecting steam through the well and into the reservoir at a pressure below the pressure which would fracture the reservoir adjacent the well.

Ferguson, N.B.

1987-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

Wood Pulp Digetster Wall Corrosion Investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The modeling of the flow in a wood pulp digester is but one component of the investigation of the corrosion of digesters. This report describes the development of a Near-Wall-Model (NWM) that is intended to couple with a CFD model that determines the flow, heat, and chemical species transport and reaction within the bulk flow of a digester. Lubrication theory approximations were chosen from which to develop a model that could determine the flow conditions within a thin layer near the vessel wall using information from the interior conditions provided by a CFD calculation of the complete digester. The other conditions will be determined by coupled solutions of the wood chip, heat, and chemical species transport and chemical reactions. The NWM was to couple with a digester performance code in an iterative fashion to provide more detailed information about the conditions within the NW region. Process Simulations, Ltd (PSL) is developing the digester performance code. This more detailed (and perhaps more accurate) information from the NWM was to provide an estimate of the conditions that could aggravate the corrosion at the wall. It is intended that this combined tool (NWM-PSL) could be used to understand conditions at/near the wall in order to develop methods to reduce the corrosion. However, development and testing of the NWM flow model took longer than anticipated and the other developments (energy and species transport, chemical reactions and linking with the PSL code) were not completed. The development and testing of the NWM are described in this report. In addition, the investigation of the potential effects of a clear layer (layer reduced in concentration of wood chips) near the wall is reported in Appendix D. The existence of a clear layer was found to enhance the flow near the wall.

Giles, GE

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Standing gravitational waves from domain walls  

SciTech Connect

We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of 'stiff' matter, i.e., matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era, the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact nonlinear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

Gogberashvili, Merab [Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, 6 Tamarashvili Street, Tbilisi 0177 (Georgia); Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi 0128 (Georgia); California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Myrzakul, Shynaray [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Gumilev Eurasian National University, Astana, 010008 (Kazakhstan); California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Singleton, Douglas [California State University, Fresno, Physics Department, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States); Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow 117198 (Russian Federation)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

When wall insulation doesn`t save  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent study in Florida concluded that while wall insulation clearly saves heating energy, it is less effective at saving cooling energy. The study focused on concrete block houses on slab foundations, and determined that whether insulation saves cooling energy depends significantly on the interior thermostat setpoint, the lower the thermostat below outside temperature, the more likely wall installation was to save energy. This article describes the design of the study and compares it to other studies. Results in their entirety are described. 1 fig.

Johnson, D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Enhancement of wall jet transport properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

Claunch, Scott D. (Broomfield, CO); Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sovent Based Enhanced Oil Recovery for In-Situ Upgrading of Heavy Oil Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the depletion of conventional crude oil reserves in the world, heavy oil and bitumen resources have great potential to meet the future demand for petroleum products. However, oil recovery from heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs is much more difficult than that from conventional oil reservoirs. This is mainly because heavy oil or bitumen is partially or completely immobile under reservoir conditions due to its extremely high viscosity, which creates special production challenges. In order to overcome these challenges significant efforts were devoted by Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University and The Center for Energy Economics (CEE) at the University of Texas. A simplified model was developed to assess the density of the upgraded crude depending on the ratio of solvent mass to crude oil mass, temperature, pressure and the properties of the crude oil. The simplified model incorporated the interaction dynamics into a homogeneous, porous heavy oil reservoir to simulate the dispersion and concentration of injected CO{sub 2}. The model also incorporated the characteristic of a highly varying CO{sub 2} density near the critical point. Since the major challenge in heavy oil recovery is its high viscosity, most researchers have focused their investigations on this parameter in the laboratory as well as in the field resulting in disparaging results. This was attributed to oil being a complex poly-disperse blend of light and heavy paraffins, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes, which have diverse behaviors at reservoir temperature and pressures. The situation is exacerbated by a dearth of experimental data on gas diffusion coefficients in heavy oils due to the tedious nature of diffusivity measurements. Ultimately, the viscosity and thus oil recovery is regulated by pressure and its effect on the diffusion coefficient and oil swelling factors. The generation of a new phase within the crude and the differences in mobility between the new crude matrix and the precipitate readily enables removal of asphaltenes. Thus, an upgraded crude low in heavy metal, sulfur and nitrogen is more conducive for further purification.

Norman Munroe

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

Lassila, David H. (Aptos, CA); Bonner, Brian P. (Livermore, CA)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

246

Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Heavy metals hazardous components of Eaf dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is a waste generated in the EAF during the steel production process. Among different wastes, EAF dust represents one of the most hazardous, since it contains heavy metals such as Zn, Fe, Cr, Cd and Pb. The goal of the ... Keywords: electric arc furnace (EAF), furnace additives, hazard components, heavy metals, scrap composition, x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

Cristiana-Zizi Rizescu; Zorica Bacinschi; Elena Valentina Stoian; Aurora Poinescu; Dan Nicolae Ungureanu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Heavy metals in suspended powders from steelmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivations for controlling heavy metal concentrations in gas streams are diverse. Some of them are dangerous to health or to the environment (e.g. Hg, Cd, As, Pb, Cr), some may cause corrosion (e.g. Zn, Pb), some are harmful in other ways (e.g. Arsenic ... Keywords: anthropogenic sources, emissions, heavy metals, human health, pollution of ecosystem, toxic

Cristiana-Zizi Rizescu; Elena-Valentina Stoian; Aurora-Anca Poinescu; Sofia Teodorescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

UNITAR boosts cogeneration for heavy crude production  

SciTech Connect

The UNITAR/UNDP Information Center for Heavy Crude and Tar Sands publicized the favorable effect of cogeneration on the economics of generating steam for in situ recovery of heavy oil. Although cogeneration of electricity with the production of steam for heavy crude production is a rapidly growing activity in California, it is still unknown in other countries where heavy crude is produced. The study concentrated on two specific cases: a heavy crude cogeneration plant in Kern County in California and a heavy crude production plant at Wolf Lake in Alberta, Canada. A comparison of the two cases showed that due to the specific conditions in California, cogeneration can reduce, in this specific case, the cost of production of heavy crude by $4.80 per barrel whereas in the case of Wolf Lake, cogeneration would not be economic (electricity prices in relation to natural gas prices are much lower in Canada). One of the purposes of the UNITAR study was to direct attention in other countries producing heavy crude to the advantages of cogeneration.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Heavy Vehicle Technologies Program Retrospective and Outlook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OHVT Mission is to conduct, in collaboration with our heavy vehicle industry partners and their suppliers, a customer-focused national program to research and develop technologies that will enable trucks and other heavy vehicles to be more energy efficient and able to use alternative fuels while simultaneously reducing emissions.

James J. Eberhardt

1999-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Wednesday, 27 September 2006 00:00 Heavy-fermion systems are...

253

Pressure capacity of MSS SP-75 fittings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to provide guidance for evaluation of as-received fittings. That guidance is given in the form of equations to estimate the burst strength of fittings. In addition, because pipelines are designed on the basis of the yield stress or pressure, concepts are presented that allow the estimation of the yield pressure of fittings. The fitting types that are considered herein are elbows, tees, caps, and reducers that are covered in Manufacturers Standardization Society Standard Practice 75 (MSS SP-75), Specification for High Test Wrought Butt Welding Fittings, 1993 Edition. The estimation of the burst pressure of fittings is relatively straightforward as a number of burst tests have been conducted on fittings. These experimental results have been used to develop the burst test relationships that are presented. The determination of the yield pressure for a fitting is difficult as yield pressure has not been defined. Typically, yield stress is defined by a given total strain level or an offset strain in a tensile test. In these specimens, the stress through the wall thickness is uniform, which makes the yield criterion easy to apply. When yielding is uniform through the thickness, it is commonly called local membrane yielding. In a fitting, the stress state in the fitting involves uniform stress through the wall thickness or membrane stress and also bending stresses. As a fitting is pressurized, the local stress state is the sum of a membrane stress and a local bending stress. The definition of yield pressure could be defined by the sum of the membrane stress and local bending stress reaching a given strain level. This would result in extremely thick fittings as bending stresses usually exceed the membrane stresses by several orders of magnitude. It is highly likely that because of this complication in defining a yield pressure for a fitting that fittings are required to match the burst strength of the attached pipe.

Rodabaugh, E.C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Heavy photon search experiment at JLAB  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab will search for new heavy vector boson(s), aka "heavy photons", in the mass range of 20 MeV/c{sup 2} to 1000 MeV/c{sup 2} using the scattering of high energy, high intensity electron beams off a high Z target. The proposed measurements will cover the region of parameter space favored by the muon g-2 anomaly, and will explore a significant region of parameter space, not only at large couplings ({alpha}'/{alpha} > 10{sup -7}), but also in the regions of small couplings, down to {alpha}'/{alpha}~10{sup -10}. The excellent vertexing capability of the Si-tracker uniquely enables HPS to cover the small coupling region. Also, HPS will search for heavy photons in an alternative to the e{sup +} e{sup -} decay mode, in the heavy photon's decay to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}.

Stepanyan, Stepan [JLAB

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Research and Development Opportunities for Heavy Trucks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1] 1] Introduction Heavy-duty long-haul trucks are critical to the movement of the Nation's freight. These vehicles, which currently consume about 10 percent of the Nation's oil, are characterized by high fuel consumption, fast market turnover, and rapid uptake of new technologies. Improving the fuel economy of Class 8 trucks will dramatically impact both fuel and cost savings. This paper describes the importance of heavy trucks to the Nation's economy, and its potential for fuel efficiency gains. Why Focus on Heavy Trucks? Large and Immediate Impact Investments in improving the fuel economy of heavy Class 8 trucks will result in large reduction in petroleum consumption within a short timeframe. While heavy-duty vehicles make up only 4% of the

256

Neutral-fueling pressure measurements and modeling near the plasma edge in TMX-U  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large variations in pressure from external gas-fueling sources and from plasma-induced wall reflux along the TMX-U plasma have been observed. These pressure variations can produce locally high neutral density in the plasma, which strongly affects the plasma parameters. These local pressure measurements include data from a newly installed neutral-pressure diagnostic system of fast magnetron gauges. The plasma-induced warm-wall reflux has been observed to be primarily HD and H/sub 2/ as opposed to D/sub 2/. This observation supports the model that all of the neutral D/sub 2/ gas enters the plasma region, strikes the plasma first, and is dissociated. The part of the D/sub 2/ gas, which is not absorbed as ions, strikes a wall, where it is converted to HD. Electron induced wall desorption measured by a mass spectrograph and actual analysis of the Ti indicates predominately H/sub 2/ instead of D/sub 2/ wall loading in TMX-U.

Pickles, W.L.

1984-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

257

Helicity probabilities for heavy quark fragmentation into heavy-light excited mesons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief review on how heavy quark symmetry constraints the helicity fragmentation probabilities for a heavy quark hadronizes into heavy-light hadrons, we present a heavy quark fragmentation model to extract the value for the Falk-Peskin probability $w_{3/2}$ describing the fragmentation of a heavy quark into a heavy-light meson whose light degrees of freedom have angular momentum ${3 \\over 2}$. We point out that this probability depends on the longitudinal momentum fraction $z$ of the meson and on its transverse momentum $p_\\bot$ relative to the jet axis. In this model, the light degrees of freedom prefer to have their angular momentum aligned transverse to, rather than along, the jet axis. Implications for the production of excited heavy mesons, like $D^{**}$ and $B^{**}$, are briefly discussed.

Tzu Chiang Yuan

1995-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Spectroscopy of Very Heavy Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in spectroscopic techniques have meant that heavy nuclei in the upper right-hand corner of the nuclear chart have become amenable to detailed study. This detailed spectroscopic data can provide a stringent test for current nuclear structure theories. Experiments to investigate the structure of nuclei in the region of {sup 254}No can yield information concerning moments of inertia, stability against fission with rotation, single-particle properties, excitation energies of two quasi-particle states, and so on. A brief overview of the techniques used and recent results from studies in the region of {sup 254}No are presented, along with a summary of future developments which will allow further advances to be made.

Greenlees, P. T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Ketelhut, S.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Ackermann, D.; Hessberger, F.-P. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Butler, P. A.; Gray-Jones, C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)] (and others)

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

SUPRI heavy oil research program  

SciTech Connect

The 14th Annual Report of the SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Program includes discussion of the following topics: (1) A Study of End Effects in Displacement Experiments; (2) Cat Scan Status Report; (3) Modifying In-situ Combustion with Metallic Additives; (4) Kinetics of Combustion; (5) Study of Residual Oil Saturation for Steam Injection and Fuel Concentration for In-Situ Combustion; (6) Analysis of Transient Foam Flow in 1-D Porous Media with Computed Tomography; (7) Steam-Foam Studies in the Presence of Residual Oil; (8) Microvisualization of Foam Flow in a Porous Medium; (9) Three- Dimensional Laboratory Steam Injection Model; (10) Saturation Evaluation Following Water Flooding; (11) Numerical Simulation of Well-to-Well Tracer Flow Test with Nonunity Mobility Ratio.

Aziz, K.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Castanier, L.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

Szilard, L.

1958-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Multi-wall carbon nanotubes in microwaves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electromagnetic (EM) response of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) prepared by chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) method has been analyzed in the microwave frequency range. EM absorption properties of MWCNT depend on their medium diameter related ... Keywords: carbon nanotube, coating, electromagnetic absorption, microwave

S. Moseenkov; V. Kuznetsov; A. Usoltseva; I. Mazov; A. Ischenko; T. Buryakov; O. Anikeeva; A. Romanenko; P. Kuzhir; D. Bychenok; K. Batrakov; S. Maksimenko

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Thermodynamic Measurements under a Wall Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A storm intercept crew from the University of Oklahoma made a sounding near and underneath the wall cloud of the right-moving member of a splitting thunderstorm in north Texas on 27 May 1985. A comparison between the sounding and an environmental ...

Howard B. Bluestein; Eugene W. McCaul Jr.; Gregory P. Byrd; Robert L. Walko

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

265

Critical CRBR core pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

Ju, F.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Giraffe blood pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thing that happens to you when you raise or lower your head. The arteries serving your heart (carotids) constrict when you lower your head, and that lowers the blood pressure...

267

Capacitance pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Materials Reliability Program: Input for Pressurized Thermal Shock Rulemaking (MRP-248)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) rule addresses the risk of a nuclear power plant reactor vessel failing due to propagation of a crack through the vessel wall. If a plant has an emergency cool-down event that superimposes a large thermal transient stress on a large pressure stress in the presence of a pre-existing flaw, it is possible that a crack could initiate and propagate through the vessel wall. The resistance of a vessel to crack initiation and propagation declines as the vessel ages. As a resul...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

Pressure multiplying dispenser  

SciTech Connect

A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA); Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Heavy-fermion systems are characterized by electrons with extremely large effective masses. The corresponding...

271

Deformation Prediction of a Heavy Hydro Turbine Blade During ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Deformation Prediction of a Heavy Hydro Turbine Blade During ... Abstract Scope, Heavy hydro turbine castings are made of martensitic...

272

Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Ion Beam Driven Fusion Reactor Study, KfK-3480,a possible heavy ion fusion reactor design [1]. The final

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Experimental Research on Recovery of Heavy Metals from EAF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To recycle these heavy metals, it is quite important to know the reactivity and metallurgical behavior of these heavy metals contained in EAF stainless steel dust.

274

Assessment of heavy metal contamination of roadside soils in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2008 ... heavy metals was found using factor analysis. Keywords Heavy metals Roadside soils . Transportation period Contamination index .

275

ECN Pressure Test  

SciTech Connect

This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

1991-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

On Two-Phase Relative Permeability and Capillary Pressure of Rough-Walled Rock Fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range of conditions multiphase flows in porous media can befor describing multiphase flow in porous media. Given themultiphase flow is in petroleum reservoirs, many of which are situated in fractured-porous

Pruess ed, K.; Tsang, Y.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Seismic Earth Pressures on Retaining Structures and Basement Walls in Cohesionless Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geoenvironmental Engineering, ASCE 127(5): 424-435. Gazetas,Geotechnical Engineering, ASCE 108: 679-695. Stadler A. T.Engineering Division, ASCE, (105) GT9: 1049-1066. Okabe S. "

Geraili Mikola, Roozbeh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Engineering the fusion reactor first wall  

SciTech Connect

Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and magnetohydrodynamics. While work to date has been quite valuable, no blanket concept has been built and operated in anything approaching a realistic fusion reactor environment. Rather, work has been limited to isolated experiments on first wall components and paper studies. The need now is to complete necessary R&D on first wall components, assemble components into a practical design, and test the first wall in a realistic fusion environment. Besides supporting work, major prototype experiments could be performed in non-nuclear experiments, as part of the ITER project and as part of the Component Test Facility. The latter is under active consideration and is a proposed machine which would use a driven plasma to expose an entire first wall to a fusion environment. Key US contributors to first wall research have been UCLA, UCSD, U of Wisconsin, LANL, ORNL, PNNL, Argonne and Idaho National Lab. Current efforts have been coordinated by UCLA. It is recognized that when this work progresses to a larger scale, leadership from a national laboratory will be required. LANL is well-prepared to provide such leadership.

Wurden, Glen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Willms [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intense heavy ions beams inside a heavy fusion reactor chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beams inside a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber * Agustin F.of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on the maximum

Lifschitz, Agustin F.; Maynard, Gilles; Vay, Jean-Luc; Lenglet, Andrian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intense heavy ions beams inside a heavy fusion reactor chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beams inside a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber * Agustin F.efficiency of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on

Lifschitz, Agustin F.; Maynard, Gilles; Vay, Jean-Luc; Lenglet, Andrian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. In the twelve to eighteen-month project period, three wells were equipped with ERT arrays. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) background measurements were taken in the three ERT equipped wells. Pumping equipment was installed on the two fracture stimulated wells and pumping tests were conducted following the hydraulic fracture treatments. All wells were treated monthly with microbes, by adding a commercially available microbial mixture to wellbore fluids. ERT surveys were taken on a monthly basis, following microbial treatments. Worked performed to date demonstrates that resistivity changes are occurring in the subsurface, with resistivity increasing slightly. Pumping results for the hydraulically fractured wells were disappointing, with only a show of oil recovered and an increase in well shut-in pressure.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

New Way To Realize Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ever since then, civilization has used the toxic liquid metal to measure pressure. ... The pressure and temperature of a gas are directly related to its ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

285

DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN STUDIES OF SM-2 PRESSURIZER  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons to SM-1 plant performance indicated that the computer model previously used to determine pressurizer performance and select the proper size was significantly in error in treating loss of load transients because it failed to account for the condensation which automatically takes place on the vessel wall and liquid interface. This also made the model incapable of evaluating methods of augmenting this condensation. The most apPropriste condensation rates that could be arrived at from the literature were selected, and the analog computer model revised and greatly augmented to incorporate this phenomenon. Using this model, a generalized curve was derived for sizing a pressurizer for the SM-2 or sininlar PWR plants. The new model was also used to evaluate some new design concepts, one of which appears very worthwhile for large pressurizers, or whatever size is particularly critical. If automatic pressure-repulated sprays or standpipe are provided, the total space required between minimum and maximum pressures due to positive and negative load transients can be further reduced by making the target steady-state pressure a function of steam generator load, with the no-load level approximately 100 psi higher than the full-load pressure. (auth)

Bradley, P.L.

1960-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

286

Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 Angstroms. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 < T < 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of "caged" or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

S. O. Diallo; M. Jazdzewska; J. C. Palmer; E. Mamontov; K. E. Gubbins; M. Sliwinska-Bartkowiak

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 A. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 T 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of caged or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL; Jazdzewska, Monika [Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland; Palmer, Jeremy [North Carolina State University; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Gubbins, Dr. K. E. [North Carolina State University; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, M [Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Passive blast pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

289

Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reading the Cosmic Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall NERSC Key to Planck's Revision of Universal Recipe March 21, 2013 Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, + 1 510 486 7421 map800-600.jpg This map shows the oldest light in our universe, as detected with the greatest precision yet by the Planck mission. The ancient light, called the cosmic microwave background, was imprinted on the sky when the universe was 370,000 years old. (Image credit: ESA and the Planck Collaboration) Thanks to a supersensitive space telescope and some sophisticated supercomputing, scientists from the international Planck collaboration have made the closest reading yet of the most ancient story in our universe: the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Today, the team released preliminary results based on the Planck

290

Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3936801°, -79.7861577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3936801,"lon":-79.7861577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

291

Solar Decathlon 2013: Raising More Than Just Walls | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raising More Than Just Walls Solar Decathlon 2013: Raising More Than Just Walls September 10, 2013 - 1:36pm Addthis Key to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte's...

292

After Exodus : re-occupation of the metropolitan wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The title "Exodus alludes to a restricted exclave encircled by a forbidding wall -- effect, a prison on the scale of a metropolis, and one in which people sought refuge voluntarily. Over the past forty years, similar walls ...

Allison, Jordan Lloyd Norman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

TBU-0061- In the Matter of Misti Wall  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Misti Wall (the complainant or Wall), appeals the dismissal of her complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. As...

294

Recording of Heart Wall Motion with Ultrasound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultrasonic echo?ranging apparatus using a pulse transmitter and high gain broadband receiver connected to a bariumtitanatetransducer has been used to obtain echoes from the walls and septa of the beating heart. The apparatus can be used over a center frequency range of 0.5 to 2.5 Mc. The sound beam is directed into the heart through the spaces between the ribs

John M. Reid

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

Pope, K.E.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Pressure suppression containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (San Jose, CA)

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Pressure suppression containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Testing wall panels for earthquake response  

SciTech Connect

As part of the structural response research program being conducted for the Nevada Operations Office of ERDA a testing program for the investigation of nonstructural wall panels subjected to racking was developed and conducted. The objectives of the testing program were to determine thresholds for damage to partitions due to horizontal adjacent story displacement in high-rise buildings and to gather data that can be used to determine the influence of nonstructural partitions on the structural response of high-rise buildings. In general, the wall panels were constructed to represent typical partitions used in high-rise building construction. Some of the panels were used for special parameter studies or for comparisons with other test programs. A specially designed testing frame simulated cyclic lateral displacement, parallel to the plane of the wall panels, that might be experienced during the response of a building to strong winds or earthquake motion. Stiffness and strength characteristics, estimates of equivalent viscous damping, and damage threshold results were obtained. The data appear to give a good approximate evaluation of the performance of non-load-bearing partitions under cyclic loading. (LCL)

Freeman, S.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Polysulfone /Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Nanocomposites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Polyurethane (PU)/ polysulfone/multi-walled carbon nanotubes ( MWNTs) hybrid nanocomposites of different weight ratio have been prepared...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cooperative Dynamics of a 'Conjugated' Domain Wall in Giant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Cooperative Dynamics of a 'Conjugated' Domain Wall in Giant ... Appropriately designed, such a superstructure can cooperatively move...

302

A 3 MEGAJOULE HEAVY ION FUSION DRIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research, Office of Inertia! Fusion, Research Division ofA 3 MEGAJOULE HEAVY ION FUSION DRIVER* A. Faltens, E. Hoyer,Research, Office of Inertial Fusion, Research Division of

Faltens, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Structure and Heavy-Ton Fusion* A series of lecturesthe cross section for fusion in the experiments consideredEffects g in III. Subharrier Fusion Cross Sections for Light

Stokstad, R.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Magnetism and superconductivity of heavy fermion matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interplay of magnetism and unconventional superconductivity (d singlet wave or p triplet wave) in strongly correlated electronic system (SCES) is discussed with recent examples found in heavy fermion compounds. A short presentation is given on the formation of the heavy quasiparticle with the two sources of a local and intersite enhancement for the effective mass. Two cases of the coexistence or repulsion of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity are given with CeIn3 and CeCoIn5. A spectacular example is the emergence of superconductivity in relatively strong itinerant ferromagnets UGe2 and URhGe. The impact of heavy fermion matter among other SCES as organic conductor or high TC oxide is briefly pointed out. Key words: heavy fermion, superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, ferromagnetism

J. Flouquet A; G. Knebel A; D. Braithwaite A; D. Aoki B; J. P. Brison C; F. Hardy A; A. Huxley A; S. Raymond A; B. Salce A; I. Sheikin D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review hadron production in heavy ion collisions with emphasis on pion and kaon production at energies below 2 AGeV and on partonic collectivity at RHIC energies.

Helmut Oeschler; Hans Georg Ritter; Nu Xu

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

306

Statistics of Heavy Rainfall Occurrences in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal variations of heavy rainfall days over Taiwan are analyzed using 6-yr (19972002) hourly rainfall data from about 360 rainfall stations, including high-spatial-resolution Automatic Rainfall and Meteorological Telemetry System ...

Ching-Sen Chen; Yi-Leng Chen; Che-Ling Liu; Pay-Liam Lin; Wan-Chin Chen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

An Early History of Heavy Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1945 Canada has had a nuclear power industry based on reactor design which uses natural uranium and heavy water. The tortuous and improbable sequence of events which led to this situation is examined. 1 1

Chris Waltham

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Heavy hadrons in quark-gluon plasma  

SciTech Connect

We use the nonperturbative quark-antiquark potential derived within the Field Correlator Method and the screened Coulomb potential to calculate binding energies and melting temperatures of heavy mesons and baryons in the deconfined phase of quark-gluon plasma.

Narodetskii, I. M., E-mail: naro@itep.ru; Simonov, Yu. A.; Veselov, A. I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

The search for a heavy Higgs boson  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical limits on the mass of the Higgs boson from vacuum stability and perturbative unitarity are examined. Search techniques for heavy Higgs bosons, M/sub H/ > 200 GeV, are also reviewed. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Dawson, S.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Light-Heavy Crude & Product Price Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Similar light-heavy price difference trends are seen in both the crude oil and the product markets. However, there are some short-term product market changes that ...

311

Status of Heavy-lepton Searches  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Searches for heavy leptons using e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, lepton-hadron collisions, photon-hadron collisions, hadron-hadron collisions, and studies of macroscopic matter are reviewed. The present experimental status and future possibilities are summarized.

Perl, M. L.

1981-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

312

Updated Satellite Technique to Forecast Heavy Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain satellite interpretation techniques have proven quite useful in the heavy snow forecast process. Those considered best are briefly reviewed, and another technique is introduced. This new technique was found to be most valuable in cyclonic ...

Edward C. Johnston

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Current status of nonthermal heavy oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy oils are an important resource worldwide, and yet two-thirds of the heavy oil deposits cannot be exploited by means of thermal recovery methods, because the effective energy production approaches energy input for reasons of formation thickness, depth, oil saturation and/or porosity. In such instances, especially if the heavy oil is not too viscous (below ca 1000 cp), it may be economical to employ nonthermal recovery methods. These include polymer flooding, alkaline flooding, CO/sub 2/ (gaseous) floods, solvent floods, and other more specialized recovery methods, such as emulsion flooding, and combination techniques. This work discusses nonthermal heavy oil recovery methods, based upon their application in the field. The processes and their mechanistic features are discussed in the light of laboratory observations, which tend to be more optimistic than field results. 48 references.

Alikhan, A.A.; Farouq Ali, S.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Treatment of Heavy Metal Wastes - III - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ltd., Flin Fion, Manitoba, Canada R8A 1N9. 3:15 pm BREAK. 3:30 pm. An Integrated Bioremediation Route for Heavy Metal Contaminated Land Based on the...

315

Dispersion of Heavy Particles by Turbulent Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate prediction of heavy particle dispersion in turbulent flows requires a simultaneous consideration of particle's inertia and particle's drift velocity. A mathematically simple and physically comprehensive analysis was developed to solve ...

Lian-Ping Wang; Davd E. Stock

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Wellbore pressure transducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Einstein's Gravity Under Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mysterious `dark energy' needed to explain the current observations, poses a serious confrontation between fundamental physics and cosmology. The present crisis may be an outcome of the (so far untested) prediction of the general theory of relativity that the pressure of the matter source also gravitates. In this view, a theoretical analysis reveals some surprising inconsistencies and paradoxes faced by the energy-stress tensor (in the presence of pressure) which is used to model the matter content of the universe, including dark energy.

Ram Gopal Vishwakarma

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Standard guide for mutual inductance bridge applications for wall thickness determinations in boiler tubing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide describes a procedure for obtaining relative wall thickness indications in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic steels using the mutual inductance bridge method. The procedure is intended for use with instruments capable of inducing two substantially identical magnetic fields and noting the change in inductance resulting from differing amounts of steel. It is used to distinguish acceptable wall thickness conditions from those which could place tubular vessels or piping at risk of bursting under high temperature and pressure conditions. 1.2 This guide is intended to satisfy two general needs for users of industrial Mutual Inductance Bridge (MIB) equipment: (1) the need for a tutorial guide addressing the general principles of Mutual Inductance Bridges as they apply to industrial piping; and (2) the need for a consistent set of MIB performance parameter definitions, including how these performance parameters relate to MIB system specifications. Potential users and buyers, as well as experienced M...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Simulation of terrace wall methane-steam reforming reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrace wall arrangement is one of the most common arrangements for methane-steam reforming reactor furnaces. In this work, a mathematical model of heat transfer in terrace wall furnaces has been developed. The model has been coupled with a reliable ... Keywords: heat transfer modeling, methane-steam reforming, reformer simulation, terrace wall furnace

J. S. Soltan Mohammadzadeh; A. Zamaniyan

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBXM 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBX­M 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University; OUTLINE 1. Mini­conference on Lithium walls and low recycling regime. 2. PBX­M Capabilities. 3. Motivation "Lithium covered walls and low recycling regimes in toka­ maks". APS meeting, October 23­27, 2000, Quebec

Zakharov, Leonid E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electronics Properties of Single-Walled Twisted Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic properties are calculated and simulited by using density functional theory based on the nonequilibrium Green's function when a zigzag single-wall carbon nanotube (SCNTs) is twisted. We found that the twist of the single-wall carbon nanotube ... Keywords: single-wall twisted carbon nanotubes, nonequilibrium Green's function, density functional theory, electric structure, electronic transmission

Qing-fang Fu; Da-peng Hao; Xiao-mi Yan; Dao-wei He; Zhi-shun Chen; Li-guang Wang; Terence K. S. W

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inner wall instead of molten-salt walls [10], necessitatingof molten Li 2 BeF 4 (FLiBe) or other lithium salt to

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Optimal Tracking of Distributed Heavy Hitters and Hong Kong, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Tracking of Distributed Heavy Hitters and Quantiles Ke Yi HKUST Hong Kong, China yike heavy hitters and quantiles in the distributed streaming model. The heavy hitters and quantiles are two the universe U = {1, . . . , u}. For a given 0 1, the -heavy hitters are those elements of A whose frequency

Yi, Ke "Kevin"

324

Anomalous Radiative Decay of Heavy Higgs Boson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radiative decay width of a heavy Higgs boson $H \\rightarrow W^+W^-\\gamma$ for a {\\it hard} photon is calculated in the Standard Model and its extension with anomalous $\\gamma WW$ couplings. Its dependence on the Higgs mass, the two unknown anomalous couplings, and the photon energy cutoff are studied in detail. We show that this radiative decay of a heavy Higgs is not very sensitive to a wide range of the anomalous couplings compared to the Standard Model result.

Tzu Chiang Yuan

1992-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

Earth pressures and deformations in civil infrastructure in expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation includes the three major parts of the study: volume change, and lateral earth pressure due to suction change in expansive clay soils, and design of civil infrastructure drilled pier, retaining wall and pavement in expansive soils. The volume change model in expansive clay has been refined to reinforce realistic characteristics of swelling and shrinkage behavior of expansive clay soils. Refinements include more realistic design soil suction versus depth profiles and improved characterizations of the effects of soil cracking, overburden stress, and lateral earth pressure. The refined model also includes an algorithm of assigning suctionvolumetric water content curves and diffusivity through the soil. The typical lateral earth pressure distribution during wetting against a stationary wall is proposed. The proposed stationary retaining wall-soil system in expansive soils includes an upper movement active zone and a lower anchor zone. Mohr s circles and failure envelopes are used to define the effective horizontal stress and shear failure in an unsaturated soil. The prediction of the horizontal pressures due to suction change in a soil is compared with the in situ measurement of natural horizontal pressures and the measurements from the large scale tests. It is found that agreement between the measured and predicted horizontal pressures is satisfactory. Case studies of axial and bending of the pier are presented with both uniform and non-uniform wetting. The pier case study for axial behavior shows a good agreement with a heave at ground surface and uplift forces. Three case studies for bending behavior of the pier and retaining wall are presented based on suction change. Pavement design program has been refined to extend the design capabilities into both flexible and rigid pavements supported by pavement treatments. The comparative case studies using both current and new methods in pavement design show that the current method criterion of 1-inch is unnecessarily conservative. Furthermore, the current method does not provide a means of anticipating subgrade shrinkage that will result in longitudinal cracking along the edge of the pavement. The design calculations with both methods lead to the conclusion that neither the swelling movement, as in the current method, nor the total movement, as in the new method, is a reliable indicator of likely acceptable pavement performance. Instead, all of these case studies show that it is important to use the predicted history of the present serviceability index and the international roughness index as the proper design guideline for an acceptable treatment of the subgrade of an expansive soil.

Hong, Gyeong Taek

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

Meyer, R.F.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Time dependence of gases from plasma-wall interactions in ISX-A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous papers have been published concerning radiation damage and thermal properties of first walls in tokamak reactors. However vacuum properties are also important, particularly as regards the adsorption and release of gases during and immediately following tokamak discharges. We have studied the time evolution of working and impurity gases by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer attached to the ISX-A tokamak. These results were compared with measurements in a similar (304L stainless steel) laboratory vacuum system, with no tokamak discharges. Laboratory tests were made with a 100-msec-long H/sub 2/ puff. The partial pressures of CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O, and CO all exhibited very small intermediate peaks followed by a second rise which began 25 to 50 msec after the beginning of the puff and peaked some 200 to 300 msec later. When Ar was substituted for the H/sub 2/ puff the partial pressures of these impurities behaved in a similar manner except that the magnitude of the increase was less. The pressure rise of the impurity gases following the H/sub 2/ puffs varied, depending on the vacuum system configuration, differences in wall preparation of the tokamak and the absence of a plasma in the laboratory systems.

Simpkins, J.E.; Colchin, R.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Idle Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement Heavy-duty vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 8,500

329

Reactor pressure vessel nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Pressure swing adsorption process  

SciTech Connect

An adiabatic pressure swing adsorption process is described for the separation of gas mixtures by adsorbing at least one gas component in each of at least 8 phase staggered operated adsorbent beds, which can continue to be operated without any stoppage of installation even if one adsorbent bed is removed from operation due to a defective valve. 6 claims.

De Meyer, H.; Doclo, R.; Seynaeve, J.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

331

Matching heavy-light currents with NRQCD and HISQ quarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the one loop renormalisation parameters for the heavy-light axial-vector and vector currents using lattice perturbation theory. We use NonRelativistic QCD (NRQCD) heavy quarks and the Highly Improved Staggered Quark (HISQ) action for the light quarks. We present results for heavy-light currents with massless HISQ quarks and briefly discuss the extension to heavy-heavy currents with massive HISQ quarks.

Christopher Monahan; Christine Davies; Ron Horgan; G. Peter Lepage; Heechang Na; Junko Shigemitsu

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Asymmetric error field interaction with rotating conducting walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of error fields with a system of differentially rotating conducting walls is studied analytically and compared to experimental data. Wall rotation causes eddy currents to persist indefinitely, attenuating and rotating the original error field. Superposition of error fields from external coils and plasma currents are found to break the symmetry in wall rotation direction. The vacuum and plasma eigenmodes are modified by wall rotation, with the error field penetration time decreased and the kink instability stabilized, respectively. Wall rotation is also predicted to reduce error field amplification by the marginally stable plasma.

Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper will address the following. 1. Factors that determine the feasibility of reducing the plant steam operating pressure. 2. The operating advantages and disadvantages associated with the decreased steam pressure. 3. The economics of steam pressure reduction. Appropriate visual aids will be utilized as part of the discussion.

Sylva, D. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project The Department of Energy is currently conducting research into highly energy efficient wall systems. Walls with high R-values are better insulators, and their development can help buildings come closer to having zero net energy consumption. Project Description This project seeks to develop a commercially viable wall system up to R-40 through integration of vacuum technology with the exterior insulated façade system (EIFS). Dow Corning will develop a wall system configuration of expanded polystyrene vacuum isolation panels that can be specified for R-values of 20, 30, and 40. This project also aims to develop a unitized protection system of vacuum isolation panels and to validate current code

335

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

336

Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall  

SciTech Connect

We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: ??? = ??? ?. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

S.P. Smith and S.C. Jardin

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Thermodynamics of a quantized electromagnetic field in rectangular cavities with perfectly conducting walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermodynamical properties of a quantized electromagnetic field inside a box with perfectly conducting walls are studied using a regularization scheme that permits to obtain finite expressions for the thermodynamic potentials. The source of ultraviolet divergences is directly isolated in the expression for the density of modes, and the logarithmic infrared divergences are regularized imposing the uniqueness of vacuum and, consequently, the vanishing of the entropy in the limit of zero temperature. We thus obtain corrections to the Casimir energy and pressures, and to the specific heat that are due to temperature effects; these results suggest effects that could be tested experimentally.

R. Jauregui; C. Villarreal; S. Hacyan

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

338

Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy baryon/meson ratios Lambda(c)/D(0) and Lambda(b)/(B) over bar (0) in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks as well as with bounded light diquarks that might exist in the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma produced in these collisions. Including the contribution from decays of heavy hadron resonances and also that due to fragmentation of heavy quarks that are left in the system after coalescence, the resulting Lambda(c)/D(0) and Lambda(b)/(B) over bar (0) ratios in midrapidity (vertical bar y vertical bar heavy baryon/meson ratios is found to be sensitive to the heavy quark mass, with the Lambda(b)/(B) over bar (0) ratio being much flatter than the Lambda(c)/D(0) ratio. The latter peaks at the transverse momentum p(T) similar or equal to 0.8 GeV but the peak shifts to p(T) similar or equal to 2 GeV in the absence of diquarks.

Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

WELDING THIN-WALLED URANIUM CYLINDERS  

SciTech Connect

One of Its Monograph Series, The Industrial Atom.'' The development of a satisfactory process for the fusion welding of thin-walled uranium cylinders is discussed. Optimum results were obtained using the inert-gas shielded-arc method without the use of filler metal. The ductility of the welded joints, however, was lower than that of cast metal. Surface conditions and and the purity of the inert gas used affected the weld soundness. Straight polarity direct current was used for welding to achieve maximum penetration and to provide are stability. Welding must be done in the flat position. (auth)

Brundige, E.L.; Taub, J.M.; Hanks, G.S.; Doll, D.T.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Pressure suppression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

Morris, D.E.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

High pressure storage vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

Liu, Qiang

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

347

SURPI Heavy Oil Research Program, Twenty-Second Annual Report, SUPRI TR-117  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute is to conduct research directed toward increasing the recovery of heavy oils. Present, SUPRI is working in five main directions: (1) Flow Properties Studies - To assess the influence of different reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure) on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; (2) In-Situ Combustion - To evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in-situ combustion process. This project includes the study of the kinetics of the reactions; (3) Steam with Additives- To develop and understand the mechanisms of the process using commercially available surfactants for reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; (4) Formation Evaluation - To develop and improve techniques of formation evaluation such as tracer tests and pressure transient tests; and (5) Field Support Services - To provide technical support for design and monitoring of DOE sponsored or industry initiated field projects.

Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

348

SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Program Twenty-First Annual Report, SUPRI TR-111  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute is to conduct research directed toward increasing the recovery of heavy oils. Present, SUPRI is working in five main directions: (1) Flow Properties Studies - To assess the influence of different reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure) on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; (2) In-Situ Combustion - To evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in-situ combustion process. This project includes the study of the kinetics of the reactions; (3) Steam with Additives- To develop and understand the mechanisms of the process using commercially available surfactants for reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; (4) Formation Evaluation - To develop and improve techniques of formation evaluation such as tracer tests and pressure transient tests; and (5) Field Support Services - To provide technical support for design and monitoring of DOE sponsored or industry initiated field projects.

Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis; Kovscek, Anthony R.

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

349

pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL. Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated March 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords DOE humidity irrandiance NREL NWTC pressure temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (8/24/2001 - 3/10/2011) (txt, 681 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Field IDs for above .txt file (xls, 69.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Scientists and Technicians are notified real-time via email of instruments outside the above min/max or delta comparisons (http://www.nrel.gov/midc/nwtc_m2/) Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html).

350

Effect of temperature on wave velocities in sands and sandstones with heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of temperature on wave velocities in well cemented Massillon and Boise sandstones and unconsolidated Ottawa sand saturated with heavy hydrocarbons, as well as the dependence of compressional velocities in the hydrocarbons themselves as a function of temperature. The hydrocarbons selected as pore saturants were a commercial paraffin wax, 1-Eicosene, natural heavy crude, and natural tar. The experimental results show that the compressional wave velocities in the hydrocarbons decrease markedly with increasing temperature. In contrast wave velocities in the Massillon and Boise sandstones and unconsolidated Ottawa sand saturated with air or water decrease only little with increasing temperatures. The main reason for the large decreases in rocks with hydrocarbons is the melting of solid hydrocarbons, and high pore pressure. Thermal expansion of the saturants, and possibly thermal cracking of the heavy fractions and vaporization of the light fractions of the hydrocarbons may also contribute. The large decreases of the compressional and shear wave velocities in the hydrocarbon-saturated rocks and sands with temperature, suggest that seismic measurements such as used in seismology or borehole tomography may be very useful in detecting steam fronts in heavy hydrocarbon reservoirs undergoing steam flooding.

Wang, Z.; Nur, A.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

Robert J. Englar

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

352

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants

354

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium- and Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Transit Vehicles Trucks Idle Reduction Oil Bypass Filter Airport Ground Support Equipment Medium and Heavy Duty Hybrid Electric Vehicles

355

Experimental Evaluation of Innovative Wall Daylighting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daylighting offers the potential to save electrical energy and reduce peak demand for lighting, the major consumer of energy in a variety of buildings. However, widespread adoption of daylighting techniques is hampered by the lack of both daylight resource information and simple, reliable methods of testing daylighting designs. To surmount these obstacles, facilities for collecting illuminance data and for testing small-scale and full-size models have been established. These are (1) an extensively instrumented resource measurement station, (2) a sun angle simulator for exploring the geometries of the sun and the building during the early stages of design, (3) a heliodon to allow detailed illuminance and luminance distribution measurements in scale models, and (4) a rotating test building for quantitative and qualitative assessments of full-scale components. The current research efforts have been using these facilities to seek ways of projecting light admitted through walls deep into interior spaces. Sidelighting systems are of interest because the wall is the only available source of daylight in many commercial buildings. Innovative static and dynamic reflector assemblies have been examined and proven effective. Compared with typical sidelighting designs, the systems examined in this study project light deeper and produce more uniform illuminance across the space.

Place, J. W.; Howard, T. C.; Paulos, S.; Chung, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

"A Wall Victim from the West": Migration, German Division, and Multidirectional Memory in Kreuzberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19502000. The German Wall: Fallout in Europe. Ed. Marcin Berlin. The German Wall: Fallout in Europe. Ed. Marc

Jurgens, Jeffrey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.  

SciTech Connect

The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

Jensen, Richard Pearson

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Surface studies of hydroxylated multi-wall carbon nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CVD grown MWCNTs, of typical diameter 5 to 50 nm and with approximately 15-20 concentric graphene layers in the multi-walls, have been surface functionalised using the Fenton hydroxylation reaction. HRTEM reveals little physical difference between the treated and untreated materials; images from both exhibit similar multi-wall structure and contain evidence for some low-level disruption of the very outermost layers. Raman spectra from the two types of nanotubes are almost identical displaying the disorder (D) peaks at approximately 1350 cm{sup -1} and graphite (G) peaks at approximately 1580 cm{sup -1}, characteristic of graphene-based carbon materials, in approximately equal intensity ratios. Equilibrium adsorption data for nitrogen at 77 K leads to BET surface areas of 60.4 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} for the untreated and 71.8 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} for the hydroxylated samples; the increase in area being due to separation of the tube-bundles during functionalization. This is accompanied by a decrease in measured porosity, mostly at high relative pressures of nitrogen, i.e. where larger (meso 2-5 nm and macro >5 nm) pores are being filled, which is consistent with an attendant loss of inter-tube capillarity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that hydroxylation increases the nanotube surface oxygen level from 4.3 at.% to 22.3 at.%; chemical shift data indicate that approximately 75% of that oxygen is present as hydroxyl (-OH) groups. Water vapour adsorption by the hydroxylated surfaces leads to Type II isotherms which are characteristic of relatively high numbers of hydrogen bonding interactions compared to the untreated materials which exhibit Type III curves. This difference in polar surface energy is confirmed by calorimetric enthalpies of immersion in water which are -54 mJ m{sup -2} for the untreated and -192 mJ m{sup -2} for the hydroxylated materials. The treated materials therefore have significantly increased water wettability/dispersivity and a greater potential for cross-linking with matrix compounds. The mechanism by which hydroxylation occurs i.e. free radical (OH{sm_bullet}) attack and subsequent electrophilic addition at CC bonds in the graphene basal planes, is discussed.

Bradley, Robert [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK; Cassity, Kelby [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Andrews, Rodney [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Meier, Mark [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Osbeck, Susan [The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 1FR, U.K.; Andreu, Aurik [The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB10 1FR, U.K.; Johnston, Colin [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK; Crossley, Alison [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Methane storage in multi-walled carbon nanotubes at the quantity of 80 g  

SciTech Connect

Methane storage in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is studied at ambient temperature and pressures of 0-10.5 MPa, with a quantity of 80 g samples that were synthesized by nano-agglomerate fluidized-bed reactors (NAFBR). The volume of methane released by MWNTs was measured by volumetric method. We study the effects of purification and the pretreatments on methane storage. Results show that mixed acid treatment, alkali treatment, and mechanical shearing can obviously enhance gas uptake while high-temperature treatment can only slightly reduce it. For properly pretreated samples, an optimal 11.7% of mass storage capacity was achieved at room temperature and the pressure of 10.5 MPa, indicating that CNTs is a potential material for methane uptake.

Wu Yulong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wei Fei [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: wf-dce@tsinghua.edu.cn; Luo Guohua; Ning Guoqing [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang Mingde [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

360

Experimental investigation of caustic steam injection for heavy oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study has been conducted to compare the effect of steam injection and caustic steam injection in improving the recovery of San Ardo and Duri heavy oils. A 67 cm long x 7.4 cm O.D (outer diameter), steel injection cell is used in the study. Six thermocouples are placed at specific distances in the injection cell to record temperature profiles and thus the steam front velocity. The injection cell is filled with a mixture of oil, water and sand. Steam is injected at superheated conditions of 238oC with the cell outlet pressure set at 200 psig, the cell pressure similar to that found in San Ardo field. The pressure in the separators is kept at 50 psig. The separator liquid is sampled at regular intervals. The liquid is centrifuged to determine the oil and water volumes, and oil viscosity, density and recovery. Acid number measurements are made by the titration method using a pH meter and measuring the EMF values. The interfacial tensions of the oil for different concentrations of NaOH are also measured using a tensionometer. Experimental results show that for Duri oil, the addition of caustic results in an increase in recovery of oil from 52% (steam injection) to 59 % (caustic steam injection). However, caustic has little effect on San Ardo oil where oil recovery is 75% (steam injection) and 76 % (caustic steam injection). Oil production acceleration is seen with steam-caustic injection. With steam caustic injection there is also a decrease in the produced oil viscosity and density for both oils. Sodium hydroxide concentration of 1 wt % is observed to give the lowest oil-caustic interfacial tension. The acid numbers for San Ardo and Duri oil are measured as 6.2 and 3.57 respectively.

Madhavan, Rajiv

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Heavy Quarks, QCD, and Effective Field Theory  

SciTech Connect

The research supported by this OJI award is in the area of heavy quark and quarkonium production, especially the application Soft-Collinear E#11;ective Theory (SCET) to the hadronic production of quarkonia. SCET is an e#11;ffective theory which allows one to derive factorization theorems and perform all order resummations for QCD processes. Factorization theorems allow one to separate the various scales entering a QCD process, and in particular, separate perturbative scales from nonperturbative scales. The perturbative physics can then be calculated using QCD perturbation theory. Universal functions with precise fi#12;eld theoretic de#12;nitions describe the nonperturbative physics. In addition, higher order perturbative QCD corrections that are enhanced by large logarithms can be resummed using the renormalization group equations of SCET. The applies SCET to the physics of heavy quarks, heavy quarkonium, and similar particles.

Thomas Mehen

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

362

Pipelineable syncrude (synthetic crude) from heavy oil  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for converting a metals-contaminated heavy crude oil characterized by an API gravity less than about 20{degrees} and a substantial Conradson Carbon Residue to a pipelineable and substantially upgraded syncrude with concomitant recovery of blown asphalt. It comprises: air-blowing at least the 650{degrees} F.{sup +} fraction of the heavy crude oil at a temperature of 390{degrees} to 600{degrees} F. under conditions effective to increase its combined oxygen content by at least 0.5 weight percent; deasphalting the air-blown crude oil with solvent whereby separately recovering a blown asphalt and an intermediate syncrude having a substantially lower concentration of metals and less Conradson Carbon residue than the heavy crude oil; and, visbreaking the intermediate syncrude at 800{degrees} to 950{degrees} F. and at a severity effective to impart to it pipelineable viscosity characteristics.

Rankel, L.A.

1989-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

Milam, David

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Neutral-fueling pressure measurements and modeling near the plasma edge in TMX-U. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Large variations in pressure from external gas-fueling sources and from plasma-induced wall reflux along the TMX-U plasma have been observed. These pressure variations can produce locally high neutral density in the plasma, which strongly affects the plasma parameters. These local pressure measurements include data from a newly installed neutral-pressure diagnostic system of fast magnetron gauges. The plasma-induced warm-wall reflux has been observed to be primarily HD and H/sub 2/ as opposed to D/sub 2/. This observation supports the model that all of the neutral D/sub 2/ gas enters the plasma region, strikes the plasma first, and is dissociated. The part of the D/sub 2/ gas, which is not absorbed as ions, strikes a wall, where it is converted to HD. Electron induced wall desorption measured by a mass spectroscopy and actual analysis of the Ti indicates predominately H/sub 2/ instead of D/sub 2/ wall loading in TMX-U.

Pickles, W.L.

1984-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

365

Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

Marshall, B.W.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Recent developments in heavy flavour production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review one-particle inclusive production of heavy-flavoured hadrons in a framework which resums the large collinear logarithms through the evolution of the FFs and PDFs and retains the full dependence on the heavy-quark mass without additional theoretical assumptions. We focus on presenting results for the inclusive cross section for the production of charmed mesons in p anti-p collisions and the comparison with CDF data from the Tevatron as well as on inclusive B-meson production and comparison with recent CDF data. The third topic is the production of D^* mesons in photoproduction and comparison with recent H1 data from HERA.

G. Kramer

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Heavy Nuclei from RHIC to the Cosmos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions produce a high-temperature, thermalized system that may mimic the conditions present shortly after the big bang. This writeup will given an overview of early results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and discuss what we have learned about hot, strongly interacting nuclear systems. The thermal and chemical composition of the system will be discussed, along with observables that are sensitive to the early evolution of the system. I will also discuss the implications of the RHIC results for cosmic ray air showers.

Spencer R. Klein

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

1 Heavy-light physics with NRQCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First results are obtained for B mesons using a heavy propagator calculated using NRQCD, and a light Wilson propagator. Results from 13 quenched configurations of size 16 3 48 at ? = 6.0 give a value for fB of less than 200 MeV and a B ? ?B splitting of 32(8) MeV. Superior signal/noise behaviour is observed over static propagators on the same configurations. No extrapolation to the b mass for the heavy quark is required. 1.

unknown authors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- `` bioremoval`` -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulations thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R&D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes.

Benemann, J.R. [Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States); Wilde, E.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery  

SciTech Connect

Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- bioremoval'' -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulations thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes.

Benemann, J.R. (Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States)); Wilde, E.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

372

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

373

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

374

Thermal Performance of Uninsulated and Partially Filled Wall Cavities: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Low-rise, wood-framed homes are the most common type of residential structures in the United States. Wood wall construction supports roofs efficiently and provides a stable frame for attaching interior and exterior wall coverings. Wall cavities are prevalent and increase thermal resistance, particularly when they are filled with insulating material. This paper describes detailed computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially filled wall cavities and accounts for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. Parameters are ambient outdoor temperature, cavity surface emissivity, cavity aspect ratio, and insulation height. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated or partially insulated wall cavities is essential for conserving energy in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools such as DOE2 and EnergyPlus for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of new and older homes with uninsulated or partially insulated walls.

Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

376

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

377

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Pressure Data Within BOP- ODS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file describes the components within the BOP and the pressure readings taken during diagnostic operations on May 25.

379

Pressure Data Within BOP- XLS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file describes the components within the BOP and the pressure readings taken during diagnostic operations on May 25.

380

Fiber-optic pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure wave sensor utilizing fiber optic interferometry techniques to determine pressure in a bar. Light from a fiber optic coil around the bar is mixed with light from a reference optical fiber to produce interference fringes as a function of time. These fringes over time are related to the pressure versus time existing in the bar. 2 figs.

Dingus, R.S.

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Trombe Walls in Low-Energy Buildings: Practical Experiences; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low-energy buildings today improve on passive solar design by incorporating a thermal storage and delivery system called a Trombe wall. Trombe walls were integrated into the envelope of a recently completed Visitor Center at Zion National Park and a site entrance building at the National Wind Technology Center located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. NREL helped to design these commercial buildings to minimize energy consumption, using Trombe walls as an integral part of their design.

Torcellini, P.; Pless, S.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' 'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' DEC 5 1984 Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Mr. Wallo: The Divisfon of Remedial Action Projects staff has reviewed the authority review documents for Gardinler, Inc., Tampa, Florida; Conserv (formerly Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co.), Nichols, Florida; and Blockson Chemical co., Joliet, Illinois. Based on the content therein and in consultation with Mr. Steve Miller, Office of General Counsel (C&11), Departamt of Energy, It has been determined that the Department has no authority, through the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, to conduct remedial action at the aforementioned sites, Therefore, please prepare the document packages necessary to notify the appropriate state authorities and the

383

An Exploration of Wall Retrofit Best Practices  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments were performed to examine wall retrofit options including replacing the cladding, adding insulation under the cladding, and multiple sealing methods that can be used when installing replacement windows in well-built or loosely-built rough openings. These experiments included thermal measurements in a hot box and air-leakage measurements. The retrofit claddings considered included wood-lap siding, vinyl siding, and vinyl siding with an integrated and formed foam insulation. Retrofit insulations included expanded and extruded polystyrene and foil-faced polyisocyanurate in various thicknesses. Air sealing methods for replacement windows included traditional caulking, exterior trim variations, loose-fill fiberglass, low-expansion foam, self-expanding foam inserts, and specialty tape. Results were applied to a model to estimate whole-house energy impacts for multiple climates.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Petrie, Thomas [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Hulvey, Kimberly D [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Walls Falling Faster for Solid-State Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... found that flaws in the structure of magnetic nanoscale wires play an ... the domain walls, and the information they enclose, through the wire and past ...

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Charged Domain Walls in Ferroelectrics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monday, February 4, 2013 11:00 am Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Charged Domain Walls in Ferroelectrics Alexander K. Tagantsev Ceramics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of...

386

Changes in Cell Wall Carbohydrate Extractability Are Correlated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Short Communication Changes in Cell Wall Carbohydrate Extractability Are Correlated with Reduced Recalcitrance of HCT Downregulated Alfalfa Biomass Sivakumar Pattathil, 1 Trina...

387

Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Polyacrylonitrile Composite Fiber .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs), discovered in 1993, have good mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) is an important fiber for textiles as well (more)

Liang, Jianghong

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Reinforced Concrete Wall Research Based on the Experience ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the Experience and Observations from the February 2010 Maule, Chile, Earthquake ... of walls as observed in Chile could be realized in the US. ...

2013-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

390

Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls  

SciTech Connect

The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermal performance of concrete masonry unit wall systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New materials, modern building wall technologies now available in the building marketplace, and unique, more accurate, methods of thermal analysis of wall systems create an opportunity to design and erect buildings where thermal envelopes that use masonry wall systems can be more efficient. Thermal performance of the six masonry wall systems is analyzed. Most existing masonry systems are modifications of technologies presented in this paper. Finite difference two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer modeling and unique methods of the clear wall and overall thermal analysis were used. In the design of thermally efficient masonry wall systems is t to know how effectively the insulation material is used and how the insulation shape and its location affect the wall thermal performance. Due to the incorrect shape of the insulation or structural components, hidden thermal shorts cause additional heat losses. In this study, the thermal analysis of the clear wall was enriched with the examination of the thermal properties of the wall details and the study of a quantity defined herein the Thermal Efficiency of the insulation material.

Kosny, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

1996-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Combustor oscillation pressure stabilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In accordance with the objective of the present invention, the active control of unsteady combustion induced oscillations in a combustion chamber fired by a suitable fuel and oxidizer mixture, such as a hydrocarbon fuel and air mixture, is provided by restructuring and moving the position of the main flame front and thereby increasing the transport time and displacing the pressure wave further away from the in-phase relationship with the periodic heat release. The restructuring and repositioning of the main flame are achieved by utilizing a pilot flame which is pulsed at a predetermined frequency corresponding to less than about one-half the frequency of the combustion oscillation frequency with the duration of each pulse being sufficient to produce adequate secondary thermal energy to restructure the main flame and thereby decouple the heat release from the acoustic coupling so as to lead to a reduction in the dynamic pressure amplitude. The pulsating pilot flame produces a relatively small and intermittently existing flame front in the combustion zone that is separate from the oscillating main flame front but which provides the thermal energy necessary to effectively reposition the location of the oscillating main flame front out of the region in the combustion zone where the acoustic coupling can occur with the main flame and thereby effectively altering the oscillation-causing phase relationship with the heat of combustion.

Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Heavy-section steel irradiation program. Progress report, October 1992--March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is one of only two more safety-related components of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the capabilities and limitations of the integrity inherent in the RPV. In particular, it is vital to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV`s fracture resistance that occurs during service. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The primary goal of this major safety program is to provide a thorough, quantitative assessment of the effects of neutron irradiation on the material behavior (in particular, the fracture toughness properties) of typical pressure-vessel steels as they relate to light-water-reactor pressure-vessel integrity. The program centers on experimental assessments of irradiation-induced embrittlement (including the completion of certain irradiation studies previously conducted by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program) augmented by detailed examinations and modeling of the accompanying microstructural changes. Effects of specimen size; material chemistry; product form and microstructure; irradiation fluence, flux, temperature, and spectrum; and postirradiation annealing are being examined on a wide range of fracture properties.

Corwin, W.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

YEAR-END REPORT: HEAVY ION FUSION PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978-Mar. 1979, Heavy Ion Fusion Program, Lawrence BerkeleyOlson, Proceedings of the Heavy Ion Fusion Workshop, ArgonneUniversity Ravi N. Sudan KMS Fusion, Inc. Stanford Linear

Fusion Staff, Heavy Ion

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HIFAN 1830 INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMSAC02-05CH11231. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION467 (1992). [38] R. W. Moir, Fusion Tech. 25, 5 (1994) [39

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Analysis of a Heavy Rainfall Event during TAMEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heavy rainfall event during the Taiwan Area Mesoscale Experiment intensive observing period 13 has been studied using upper-air, surface mesonet, and dual-Doppler radar data. The heavy rainfall (?231 mm day?1) occurred over northwestern Taiwan ...

Jun Li; Yi-Leng Chen; Wen-Chau Lee

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Twisted mass QCD and the FNAL heavy quark formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At tree level, I discuss modifying the FNAL heavy quark formalism to include a twisted mass term. I find that at maximal twist the so called KLM factor is independent of the heavy mass.

Craig McNeile

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Texas Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Texas Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable ...

402

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #363: March 14, 2005 Heavy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: March 14, 2005 Heavy Truck Miles by Age to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 363: March 14, 2005 Heavy Truck Miles by Age on Facebook Tweet about...

403

The high current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, Princeton, 1996, edited by J.Conference on Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications (FOR HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION 1 L. R. Prost, D. Baca, F. M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Modular Point Design for Heavy Ion Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POINT DESIGN FOR HEAVY ION FUSION S.S. Yu 1 , J.J. BarnardUpdated Point Design for Heavy Ion Fusion, Proc. 2002 Amer.Nucl. Soc. Fusion Topical Meeting, 17-21 November 2002,

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

Thieberger, P.; Abendroth, H.; Alessi, J.; Cannizzo, L.; Carlson, C.; Gustavsson, A.; Minty, M.; Snydstrup, L.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

Heavy metals behaviour in a gasification reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sludge coming from cleaning processes of wastewater, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) can be exploited for producing energy because of their heating value. Cleaning the produced syngas is important because of environmental troubles, ... Keywords: heavy metals, syngas, thermodynamic, waste gasification

Martino Paolucci; Carlo Borgianni; Paolo De Filippis

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Carbon foils as heavy ion strippers  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of the advantages and disadvantages of thin carbon foil strippers for heavy ion beams from tandem electrostatic accelerators. Foil lifetimes were increased by radiative heating and by the evaporation of a thin layer of gold on the foil. (PMA)

Yntema, J.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Joint resummation for heavy quark production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present joint threshold and recoil resummed transverse momentum distributions for heavy quark hadroproduction, at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. We study the dependence of these distributions on the production channel, the color configurations and the differences with the pure threshold-resummed distribution.

Andrea Banfi; Eric Laenen

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

A cost analysis model for heavy equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total cost is one of the most important factors for a heavy equipment product purchase decision. However, the different cost views and perspectives of performance expectations between the different involved stakeholders may cause customer relation problems ... Keywords: Cost responsibilities, Operating costs, Ownership costs, Post-Manufacturing Product Cost (PMPC), System life-cycle cost

Shibiao Chen; L. Ken Keys

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Some Common Ingredients for Heavy Orographic Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to synthesize some common synoptic and mesoscale environments conducive to heavy orographic rainfall. Previous studies of U.S. and Alpine cases and new analyses of some Alpine and east Asian cases have shown the ...

Yuh-Lang Lin; Sen Chiao; Ting-An Wang; Michael L. Kaplan; Ronald P. Weglarz

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermal processes for heavy oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This status report summarizes the project BE11B (Thermal Processes for Heavy Oil Recovery) research activities conducted in FY93 and completes milestone 7 of this project. A major portion of project research during FY93 was concentrated on modeling and reservoir studies to determine the applicability of steam injection oil recovery techniques in Texas Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoirs. In addition, an in-depth evaluation of a steamflood predictive model developed by Mobil Exploration and Production Co. (Mobil E&P) was performed. Details of these two studies are presented. A topical report (NIPER-675) assessing the NIPER Thermal EOR Research Program over the past 10 years was also written during this fiscal year and delivered to DOE. Results of the Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoir simulation studies indicated that though these reservoirs can be successfully steamflooded and could recover more than 50% of oil-in-place, steamflooding may not be economical at current heavy oil prices. Assessment of Mobil E&P`s steamflood predictive model capabilities indicate that the model in its present form gives reasonably good predictions of California steam projects, but fails to predict adequately the performance of non-California steam projects.

Sarkar, A.K.; Sarathi, P.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Talon Heavy Hoist and Safety Latch  

Engineers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have devised a new design for a latching hoist hook with remote unlatching capabilities. The TalonTM hoist hook and safety latch is designed for lifting heavy loads as well as locking the load in place with ...

413

Abstract: Isochoric Heat Capacity of Light and Heavy Water at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isochoric Heat Capacity of Light and Heavy Water at Subcritical and Supercritical Conditions. IM Abdulagatov, JW Magee ...

414

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

415

HEAVY WATER PRODUCTION: A REVIEW OF PROCESSES.  

SciTech Connect

Methods of heavy water production are examined in detail. Processes based on chemical exchange have the greatest potential for further development but distillation, electrolytic and chromatographic methods are also discussed. In the immediate future most of the world output of heavy water will be produced by hydrogen sulphide/water exchange (the GS process) but there is limited scope for further reduction in GS production costs. Recent advances in process development make the ammonia/hydrogen route an attractive alternative since the enrichment obtainable in each stage is greater while the energy consumption is less. A variation of the ammonia/hydrogen scheme involving the use of amines as additives to, or substitutes for ammonia also appears promising. The greatest obstacle to the development of either the ammonia/hydrogen or amine/hydrogen schemes on a large scale is the limitation on the supply of hydrogen. Ammonia synthesis gas is currently the most plentiful supply available but 1500 tonnes/day of ammonia capacity is needed for each 100 tonnes of heavy water produced annually. Unlimited production could be achieved using an equilibration stage in which hydrogen depleted in deuterium is exchanged with water at high temperature. The economics of this scheme depend on the development of a satisfactory catalyst for water/hydrogen equilibration. Distillation of water, methane and hydrogen have been proposed as econmic routes to heavy water production but design studies and experimental data would need to be clarified if optimistic forecasts are to be substantiated. Processes based on chromatography or selective adsorption have received scant attention in the past. Many problems would need to be overcome before such processes could be adapted to large scale production of heavy water, but in view of recent advances in plant scale chromatography, they should be re-examined. (auth)

Levins, D.M.

1970-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

LYSINE, METHIONINE AND CYSTINE REQUIREMENTS OF SEMI-HEAVY LAYERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LYSINE, METHIONINE AND CYSTINE REQUIREMENTS OF SEMI-HEAVY LAYERS M. PICARD S. BERTRAND J. SALVERT Service zootechnique, A. E. C., 03600 Commentry Two different strains of commercial semi-heavy layers of lysine. This trial confirms our previous works. A semi-heavy layer is largely satisfied by a feed

Recanati, Catherine

417

BUCSTR2000017 1 TCP Congestion Control and Heavy Tails  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUCS­TR­2000­017 1 TCP Congestion Control and Heavy Tails LIANG GUO MARK CROVELLA IBRAHIM MATTA­ ies have shown that there is a close relationship between heavy­tailed distribution of various traffic traffic with heavy­tailed OFF, or idle, periods, and therefore introduces long­range de­ pendence

Texas at Arlington, University of

418

Efficient Algorithms for Heavy-Tail Analysis under Interval Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Algorithms for Heavy-Tail Analysis under Interval Uncertainty Vladik Kreinovich1 heavy-tailed distri- butions, i.e., distributions in which (x) decreases as (x) x- . To properly take for computing these ranges. Keywords: heavy-tailed distributions, interval uncertainty, efficient algorithms

Kreinovich, Vladik

419

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Developer Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Location Wall Lake IA Coordinates 42.281965°, -95.094098° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.281965,"lon":-95.094098,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

Explicit finite element analysis of lightly reinforced masonry shear walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explicit finite element analysis (FEA) of masonry shear walls containing reinforcement at spacing between 800mm and 2000mm, referred to as wide spaced reinforced masonry (WSRM), are modelled using macroscopic material characteristics for the unreinforced ... Keywords: Characteristic length, Ductility, Explicit finite element method, Failure mode, Masonry shear walls: Reinforced masonry, Quasi-static modelling

M. Dhanasekar; W. Haider

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Particle production by the expanding thin-walled bubble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neglecting the effect of particle production at the moment of bubble nucleation, the spectrum of created particles during the bubble expansion is evaluated in the thin-wall approximation. It is shown that the expanding thin-walled bubble makes the dominant contribution to the particle production.

Michael Maziashvili

2003-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

Mound Isotope Power Systems; AMTEC Integral Cell Wall Compression Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion) device is tested under a compression load at a rate of 0.0025 inches/minute. The integral cell wall is made of Haynes Alloy 25. The wall buckled at 724 pounds load.

None

1997-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

423

Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Majeski,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Kaita, a R. Majeski, a S. Luckhardt, b R. Doerner, b M ABSTRACT The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used

424

Progressive collapse simulation of precast panel shear walls during earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A distinct element method (DEM) program is modified to model precast panel shear walls. The influence of collapse time t"0 of local failure of a panel is presented. Integrity analyses of a twelve-storey, three-bay precast panel shear wall in different ... Keywords: Concrete panels, Distinct element method, Earthquakes, Failure process simulation, Progressive collapse

O. A. Pekau; Yuzhu Cui

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Bending and shear moduli of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) obtained experimentally and computationally are reviewed. Attention is paid particularly on the evaluation of Young's and shear moduli of SWCNT. A finite element method (FEM) previously presented ... Keywords: Finite element method, Mechanical properties, Single-walled carbon nanotubes

Cho W. S. To

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Reducing the beta-shift in domain wall fermion simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beta-shift induced from dynamical domain wall quarks leads to increased roughness of the gauge field, thus reversing the effect of smoothing from the gauge action improvement. By exploiting the relation of overlap and domain wall fermions in greater detail,we propose an algorithm which reduces the beta-shift to the level of dynamical overlap fermions.

Alban Allkoci; Artan Borici

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

427

Documentation of Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Codes Used for Reactor Pressure Vessels Subjected to Pressurized Thermal Shock Loa ding: Parts 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) can impact the safety and operability of PWR vessels with significant radiation embrittlement in the vessel walls. This report documents the results of probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis benchmark studies performed to validate the use of several codes for evaluating vessel PTS. Such benchmark studies provide the industry with a standard reference method for verifying probabilistic fracture mechanics codes used in PTS analyses.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Abstract Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360 degree views of the borehole wall from which the character and orientation of lithologic and structural features can be defined for fractured-bedrock aquifer investigations. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing

429

Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Wall Effects  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report provides information about how variations in proportional counter radius and gas pressure in a typical coincident counter design might affect the observed signal from boron-lined tubes. A discussion comparing tubes to parallel plate counters is also included.

Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Accuracy of EGSnrc calculations at {sup 60}Co energies for the response of ion chambers configured with various wall materials and cavity dimensions  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, five experimental data sets are used to evaluate the ability of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to calculate the change in chamber response associated with changes in wall material and cavity dimension at {sup 60}Co energies. Calculations of the ratios of response per unit mass of air as a function of cavity volume for walls ranging from polystyrene to lead are generally within 1%-3% of experiments. A few exceptions, which are discussed, include 20%-30% discrepancies with experiments involving lead-walled chambers used by Attix et al. [J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 60, 235-243 (1958)] and Cormack and Johns [Radiat. Res. 1, 133-157 (1954)], and 5% discrepancies for the graphite chamber of Attix et al. (relative to data for other wall materials). Simulations of the experiment by Whyte [Radiat. Res. 6, 371-379 (1957)], which varied cavity air pressure in a large cylindrical chamber, are generally within 0.5% (wall/electrode materials ranging from beryllium to copper). In all cases, the agreement between measurements and EGSnrc calculations is much better when the response as a function of cavity height or air pressure is considered for each wall material individually. High-precision measurements [Burns et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 52, 7125-7135 (2007)] of the response per unit mass as a function of cavity height for a graphite chamber are also accurately reproduced, and validate previous tests of the transport mechanics of EGSnrc. Based on the general agreement found in this work between corresponding experimental results and EGSnrc calculations it can be concluded that EGSnrc can reliably be used to calculate changes in response with changes in various wall materials and cavity dimensions at {sup 60}Co energies within a accuracy of a few percent or less.

La Russa, Daniel J.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Ottawa Carleton Institute of Physics, Carleton University Campus, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Blowdown of hydrocarbons pressure vessel with partial phase separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model for the simulation of the blowdown of vessels containing two-phase (gas-liquid) hydrocarbon fluids, considering non equilibrium between phases. Two phases may be present either already at the beginning of the blowdown process (for instance in gas-liquid separators) or as the liquid is formed from flashing of the vapor due to the cooling induced by pressure decrease. There is experimental evidence that the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium is not appropriate, since the two phases show an independent temperature evolution. Thus, due to the greater heat transfer between the liquid phase with the wall, the wall in contact with the liquid experiences a stronger cooling than the wall in contact with the gas, during the blowdown. As a consequence, the vessel should be designed for a lower temperature than if it was supposed to contain vapor only. Our model is based on a compositional approach, and it takes into account internal heat and mass transfer processes, as well as heat transfer with ...

Speranza, Alessandro; 10.1142/9789812701817_0046

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Pressure Driven Flow of Polymer Solutions in Nanoscale Slit Pores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer solutions subject to pressure driven flow and in nanoscale slit pores are systematically investigated using the dissipative particle dynamics approach. We investigated the effect of molecular weight, polymer concentration and flow rate on the profiles across the channel of the fluid and polymer velocities, polymers density, and the three components of the polymers radius of gyration. We found that the mean streaming fluid velocity decreases as the polymer molecular weight or/and polymer concentration is increased, and that the deviation of the velocity profile from the parabolic profile is accentuated with increase in polymer molecular weight or concentration. We also found that the distribution of polymers conformation is highly anisotropic and non-uniform across the channel. The polymer density profile is also found to be non-uniform, exhibiting a local minimum in the center-plane followed by two symmetric peaks. We found a migration of the polymer chains either from or towards the walls. For relatively long chains, as compared to the thickness of the slit, a migration towards the walls is observed. However, for relatively short chains, a migration away from the walls is observed.

J. A. Millan; W. Jiang; M. Laradji; Y. Wang

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

433

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

434

Computer Based Training: Pressure Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ETTM Pressure Measurement is a computer based training module that allows users to access training when desired and review it at their own pace. It provides graphics and limited interactive features to enhance learning. The purpose of this training module is to provide an understanding of the engineering principles associated with pressure measurement through the review of: Definitions and laws, Operation of some typical plant pressure instruments and, Installation and correction considerations that will...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

435

16. Heavy-Quark and Soft-Collinear Effective Theory 1 16. Heavy-Quark and Soft-Collinear Effective Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16. Heavy-Quark and Soft-Collinear Effective Theory 1 16. Heavy-Quark and Soft-Collinear Effective the quantum fluctuations of such heavy particles are "integrated out" from the generating functional integral.lbl.gov) February 16, 2012 14:07 #12;2 16. Heavy-Quark and Soft-Collinear Effective Theory 16.2. Heavy

436

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Progress Report 3 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on

437

Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

O' Neill, Malcolm A. (Winterville, GA); Pellerin, Patrice J. M. (Montpellier, FR); Warrenfeltz, Dennis (Athens, GA); Vidal, Stephane (Combaillaux, FR); Darvill, Alan G. (Athens, GA); Albersheim, Peter (Athens, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

439

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Progress Report 4 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on

440

A Deep-Sea Differential Pressure Gauge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressure gauge configured to respond to the difference between the ocean pressure and the pressure within a confined volume of compressible oil is found to be especially useful for detecting pressure fluctuations in the frequency range from a ...

Charles Cox; Thomas Deaton; Spahr Webb

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy walled pressure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High Pressure Studies of Superconductivity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Superconductivity has been studied extensively since it was first discovered over 100 years ago. High pressure studies, in particular, have been vital in furthering our (more)

Hillier, Narelle Jayne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL/TM-200015 ORNL/TM-200015 MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions November 2000 Prepared by H. 1. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrolton, Illinois R. W. Crawford R.W. Crawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee - UT-BATTELLE -. ORNL-27 (4.00) II ORNL/TM-200015 A VECTOR APPROACH TO REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND ITS APPLICATION TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS H. T. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrollton, Illinois R. W. Crawford RWCrawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee November 2000 Prepared for Office of Energy Effkiency and Renewable Energy

443

DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK A271 DISRUPTION MITIGATION WITH HIGH-PRESSURE NOBLE GAS INJECTION. High-pressure gas jets of neon and argon are used to mitigate the three principal damaging effects of tokamak disruptions: thermal loading of the divertor surfaces, vessel stress from poloidal halo currents and the buildup and loss of relativistic electrons to the wall. The gas jet penetrates as a neutral species through to the central plasma at its sonic velocity. The injected gas atoms increase up to 500 times the total electron inventory in the plasma volume, resulting in a relatively benign radiative dissipation of >95% of the plasma stored energy. The rapid cooling and the slow movement of the plasma to the wall reduce poloidal halo currents during the current decay. The thermally collapsed plasma is very cold ({approx} 1-2 eV) and the impurity charge distribution can include > 50% fraction neutral species. If a sufficient quantity of gas is injected, the neutrals inhibit runaway electrons. A physical model of radiative cooling is developed and validated against DIII-D experiments. The model shows that gas jet mitigation, including runaway suppression, extrapolates favorably to burning plasmas where disruption damage will be more severe. Initial results of real-time disruption detection triggering gas jet injection for mitigation are shown.

WHYTE, DG; JERNIGAN, TC; HUMPHREYS, DA; HYATT, AW; LASNIER, CJ; PARKS, PB; EVANS, TE; TAYLOR, PL; KELLMAN, AG; GRAY, DS; HOLLMANN, EM

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

High pressure heterogeneous catalysis in a low pressure UHV environment  

SciTech Connect

The major thrust of our research is to carry out for the first time a heterogeneous catalytic reaction that normally is observed only at high pressures (>1 atm) of reactant gas at low pressures (<10{sup {minus}4} Torr) in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. The reaction we have chosen is the steam reforming of methane on a Ni(111) crystal.

Ceyer, S.T.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Lifecycle-analysis for heavy vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various alternative fuels and improved engine and vehicle systems have been proposed in order to reduce emissions and energy use associated with heavy vehicles (predominantly trucks). For example, oil companies have proposed improved methods for converting natural gas to zero-aromatics, zero-sulfur diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process. Major heavy-duty diesel engine companies are working on ways to simultaneously reduce particulate-matter and NOX emissions. The trend in heavy vehicles is toward use of lightweight materials, tires with lower rolling resistance, and treatments to reduce aerodynamic drag. In this paper, we compare the Mecycle energy use and emissions from trucks using selected alternatives, such as Fisher-Tropsch diesel fuel and advanced fuel-efficient engines. We consider heavy-duty, Class 8 tractor-semitrailer combinations for this analysis. The total life cycle includes production and recycling of the vehicle itself, extraction, processing, and transportation of the fuel itself, and vehicle operation and maintenance. Energy use is considered in toto, as well as those portions that are imported, domestic, and renewable. Emissions of interest include greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. Angonne's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is used to generate per-vehicle fuel cycle impacts. Energy use and emissions for materials manufacturing and vehicle disposal are estimated by means of materials information from Argonne studies. We conclude that there are trade-offs among impacts. For example, the lowest fossil energy use does not necessarily result in lowest total energy use, and lower tailpipe emissions may not necessarily result in lower lifecycle emissions of all criteria pollutants.

Gaines, L.

1998-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Radiographic Technique With Heavy Ion Microbeams  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we introduce a new technique to perform densitometric and multielemental analysis of samples at the same time using a simple detector with heavy ion micro-beams. It consists in the simultaneous analysis of X-rays induced in the sample and in a secondary target arranged behind the specimen. The X-rays originated in the secondary target are attenuated when crossing the specimen producing a radiographic image with a monochromatic source.

Muscio, J. [ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Valda, A. A. [ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, A. J. [U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Kesque, J. M.; Minsky, D. M. [U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

447

Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Heavy flavour physics from top to bottom  

SciTech Connect

We review the status of heavy flavour physics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by summarizing recent top quark and B physics results from CDF and D0. In particular we discuss the measurement of the top quark mass and top production cross section as well as B meson lifetimes and time dependent B{anti B} mixing results. An outlook of perspectives for top and B physics in Run II starting in 1999 is also given.

Paulini, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); CDF and D0 Collaboration

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment study  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment (HIFSA) study was conducted with the specific objective of evaluating the prospects of using induction linac drivers to generate economical electrical power from inertial confinement fusion. The study used algorithmic models of representative components of a fusion system to identify favored areas in the multidimensional parameter space. The resulting cost-of-electricity (COE) projections are comparable to those from other (magnetic) fusion scenarios, at a plant size of 100 MWe.

Dudziak, D.J.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

CONTAM Libraries - Appendix B: CONTAM Wind Pressure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Appendix B: CONTAM Wind Pressure Profile Library. The table below contains information on the wind pressure profiles ...

451

Heavy Traffic Analysis for EDF Queues with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a heavy-traffic analysis of the behavior of a single-server queue under an Earliest-Deadline-First (EDF) scheduling policy, in which customers have deadlines and are served only until their deadlines elapse. The performance of the system is measured by the fraction of reneged work (the residual work lost due to elapsed deadlines), which is shown to be minimized by the EDF policy. The evolution of the lead time distribution of customers in queue is described by a measure-valued process. The heavy traffic limit of this (properly scaled) process is shown to be a deterministic function of the limit of the scaled workload process, which, in turn, is identified to be a doubly reflected Brownian motion. This paper complements previous work by Doytchinov, Lehoczky and Shreve on the EDF discipline, in which customers are served to completion even after their deadlines elapse. The fraction of reneged work in a heavily loaded system and the fraction of late work in the corresponding system without reneging are compared using explicit formulas based on the heavy

John Lehoczky; Kavita Ramanan; Steven Shreve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

453

Heavy fermions in an optical lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We employ a mean-field theory to study ground-state properties and transport of a two-dimensional gas of ultracold alkaline-earth-metal atoms governed by the Kondo lattice Hamiltonian plus a parabolic confining potential. In a homogenous system, this mean-field theory is believed to give a qualitatively correct description of heavy-fermion metals and Kondo insulators: It reproduces the Kondo-like scaling of the quasiparticle mass in the former and the same scaling of the excitation gap in the latter. In order to understand ground-state properties in a trap, we extend this mean-field theory via local-density approximation. We find that the Kondo insulator gap manifests as a shell structure in the trapped density profile. In addition, a strong signature of the large Fermi surface expected for heavy-fermion systems survives the confinement and could be probed in time-of-flight experiments. From a full self-consistent diagonalization of the mean-field theory, we are able to study dynamics in the trap. We find that the mass enhancement of quasiparticle excitations in the heavy-Fermi liquid phase manifests as slowing of the dipole oscillations that result from a sudden displacement of the trap center.

Foss-Feig, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); JILA, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Hermele, Michael; Gurarie, Victor [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rey, Ana Maria [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); JILA, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Program. Seventeenth annual report, February 8, 1993--February 7, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Research in the SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Project is summarized here. There are six subdivisions in this project. The goal of Project 1 is to assess the influence of different reservoir conditions on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure. Project 2 deals with the evaluation of the effects of different reservoir parameters on the in-situ combustion process including reaction kinetics. The object of Project 3 is to develop and understand the mechanisms of the process using commercially available surfactants for reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam. Project 4 is concerned with the development of techniques of formation evaluation such as tracer tests and pressure transient tests. Finally, Project 5 is concerned with the technical support for the design and monitoring of DOE sponsored or industry initiated field projects.

Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Wall Orientation and Shear Stress in the Lattice Boltzmann Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wall shear stress is a quantity of profound importance for clinical diagnosis of artery diseases. The lattice Boltzmann is an easily parallelizable numerical method of solving the flow problems, but it suffers from errors of the velocity field near the boundaries which leads to errors in the wall shear stress and normal vectors computed from the velocity. In this work we present a simple formula to calculate the wall shear stress in the lattice Boltzmann model and propose to compute wall normals, which are necessary to compute the wall shear stress, by taking the weighted mean over boundary facets lying in a vicinity of a wall element. We carry out several tests and observe an increase of accuracy of computed normal vectors over other methods in two and three dimensions. Using the scheme we compute the wall shear stress in an inclined and bent channel fluid flow and show a minor influence of the normal on the numerical error, implying that that the main error arises due to a corrupted velocity field near ...

Matyka, Maciej; Miros?aw, ?ukasz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Penetration through a wall: Is it reality?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tennis ball is not expected to penetrate through a brick wall since a motion under a barrier is impossible in classical mechanics. With quantum effects a motion of a particle through a barrier is allowed due to quantum tunneling. According to usual theories of tunneling, the particle density decays inside a classical barrier resulting in an extremely slow pentration process. However, there are no general laws forbidding fast motion through classical barriers. The problem addressed is investigation of unusual features o quantum tunneling through a classic static barrier which is at least two-dimensional. Here we show that penetration through such barrier can be not slow. When the barrier satisfies the certain conditions, a regime of quantum lens is possible with formation of caustics. De Broglie waves are reflected from the caustics, interfere, and result in a not small flux from under the barrier. This strongly contrasts to the usual scenario with a decaying under-barrier density. We construct a particular example of fast motion through a classical barrier. One can unexectedly conclude that, in principle, nature allows fast penetration through classical barriers which against common sense. The phenomenon may be responsible for a variety of processes in labs and nature. For example, tunneling in solids may occur with a different scenario, in biophysics and chemistry one can specify conditions for unusual reactions, and evanescent optical waves may strongly change their properties. In condensed matter and cosmic physics there are phenomena with misterious reasons of an energy emission, for instance, gamma-ray bursts. One can try to treat them in the context of fast escape from under some barriers.

B. Ivlev

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

457

Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report and technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007 for the project 'Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy Oil Recovery Techniques', DE-FC26-04NT15526. Critical year 3 activities of this project were not undertaken because of reduced funding to the DOE Oil Program despite timely submission of a continuation package and progress on year 1 and 2 subtasks. A small amount of carried-over funds were used during June-August 2007 to complete some work in the area of foamed-gas mobility control. Completion of Year 3 activities and tasks would have led to a more thorough completion of the project and attainment of project goals. This progress report serves as a summary of activities and accomplishments for years 1 and 2. Experiments, theory development, and numerical modeling were employed to elucidate heavy-oil production mechanisms that provide the technical foundations for producing efficiently the abundant, discovered heavy-oil resources of the U.S. that are not accessible with current technology and recovery techniques. Work fell into two task areas: cold production of heavy oils and thermal recovery. Despite the emerging critical importance of the waterflooding of viscous oil in cold environments, work in this area was never sanctioned under this project. It is envisioned that heavy oil production is impacted by development of an understanding of the reservoir and reservoir fluid conditions leading to so-called foamy oil behavior, i.e, heavy-oil solution gas drive. This understanding should allow primary, cold production of heavy and viscous oils to be optimized. Accordingly, we evaluated the oil-phase chemistry of crude oil samples from Venezuela that give effective production by the heavy-oil solution gas drive mechanism. Laboratory-scale experiments show that recovery correlates with asphaltene contents as well as the so-called acid number (AN) and base number (BN) of the crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal steam injection wells and implementation of steam trap control that limits steam entry into hor

Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Critical review: Plasma-surface reactions and the spinning wall method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reviews methods for studying reactions of atoms and small molecules on substrates and chamber walls that are immersed in a plasma, a relatively unexplored, yet very important area of plasma science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the ''spinning wall'' technique. With this method, a cylindrical section of the wall of the plasma reactor is rotated, and the surface is periodically exposed to the plasma and then to a differentially pumped mass spectrometer, to an Auger electron spectrometer, and, optionally, to a beam of additional reactants or surface coatings. Reactants impinging on the surface can stick and react over time scales that are comparable to the substrate rotation period, which can be varied from {approx}0.5 to 40 ms. Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction probabilities can be derived from a measurement of the absolute desorption product yields as a function of the substrate rotation frequency. Auger electron spectroscopy allows the plasma-immersed surface to be monitored during plasma operation. This measurement is critical, since wall ''conditioning'' in the plasma changes the reaction probabilities. Mass spectrometer cracking patterns are used to identify simpl