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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Synthesis and evaluation of an oil-soluble viscosity reducer for heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To reduce the viscosity of highly-viscous oil of the Tahe oilfield (Xinjiang, China), an oilsoluble polybasic copolymer viscosity reducer for heavy oil was synthesized using the orthogonal method. The optimum ...

Jixiang Guo; Heyi Wang; Chaogang Chen; Yun Chen; Xiaohai Xie

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Effects of petroleum distillate on viscosity, density and surface tension of intermediate and heavy crude oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to better understand the effects of additives on viscosity, density and surface tension of intermediate and heavy crude oils. The studies have been conducted for the following oil samples...

Abdullayev, Azer

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Effect of Heavy Oil Viscosity Reduction by Solvent Dissolution on Natural Convection in the Boundary Layer of VAPEX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the effect of viscosity on natural convection in the boundary layer of the vapor extraction (VAPEX) process. VAPEX is a heavy oil recovery method that uses solvents to reduce oil viscosity, and...

Mohammad Javaheri; Jalal Abedi

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The USA deposits of heavy oils and tar sands contain significant energy reserves. Thermal methods, particularly steam drive and steam soak, are used to recover heavy oils and bitumen. Thermal methods rely on several displacement mechanisms to recover oil, but the most important is the reduction of crude viscosity with increasing temperature. The main objective of this research is to propose a simple procedure to predict heavy oil viscosity at reservoir conditions as a function of easily determined physical properties. This procedure will avoid costly experimental testing and reduce uncertainty in designing thermal recovery processes. First, we reviewed critically the existing literature choosing the most promising models for viscosity determination. Then, we modified an existing viscosity correlation, based on the corresponding states principle in order to fit more than two thousand commercial viscosity data. We collected data for compositional and black oil samples (absence of compositional data). The data were screened for inconsistencies resulting from experimental error. A procedure based on the monotonic increase or decrease of key variables was implemented to carry out the screening process. The modified equation was used to calculate the viscosity of several oil samples where compositional data were available. Finally, a simple procedure was proposed to calculate black oil viscosity from common experimental information such as, boiling point, API gravity and molecular weight.

Dr. Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Relation between viscosity and stability for heavy oil emulsions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relation between viscosity and stability has been hics. found by investigating the effect of surfactant concentration on emulsion stability. Based on the Bingham plastic model for viscosity as a function of shear rate, two parameters were found...

Ye, Sherry Qianwen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

Experimental and Theoretical Determination of Heavy Oil Viscosity Under Reservoir Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this research was to propose a simple procedure to predict heavy oil viscosity at reservoir conditions as a function of easily determined physical properties. This procedure will avoid costly experimental testing and reduce uncertainty in designing thermal recovery processes.

Gabitto, Jorge; Barrufet, Maria

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

7

Relation between viscosity and stability for heavy oil emulsions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The relation between viscosity and stability has been hics. found by investigating the effect of surfactant concentration on emulsion stability. Based on the Bingham plastic… (more)

Ye, Sherry Qianwen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS FINAL PROGRESS REPORT PERIOD: OCT 1999-MAY 2003 CONTRACT NUMBER: DE-FG26-99FT40615 PROJECT START DATE: October 1999 PROJECT DURATION: October 1999 - May 2003 TOTAL FUNDING REQUESTED: $ 199,320 TECHNICAL POINTS OF CONTACT: Jorge Gabitto Maria Barrufet Prairie View A&M State University Texas A&M University Department of Chemical Engineering Petroleum Engineering Department Prairie View, TX 77429 College Station TX, 77204 TELE:(936) 857-2427 TELE:(979) 845-0314 FAX: (936) 857-4540 FAX:(979) 845-0325 EMAIL:jgabitto@aol.com EMAIL:barrufet@spindletop. tamu.edu 1 EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS

9

Preliminary study of natural zeolite as catalyst for decreasing the viscosity of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural zeolite such as heulandite and clipnotilolite are found in abundant quantities in many regions in the world particularly in Indonesia. The catalytic ability of natural zeolites were investigated in aquathermolysis in order to decreasing the viscosity of heavy oil. Prior to test the ability a milling treatment of natural zeolite was carried out on variation of time 4 6 and 8 hrs and subsequently followed by activation with a simple heating at 300°C. The physical and chemical properties of zeolites before and after of milling as well as the activation were characterized using XRD SEM and EDS. XRD results indicated the decreasing crystallinity of the treated zeolite. SEM results showed that the particle size was from 0.5 to 2 ?m indicating the reducing of particle size after the treatment. The catalytic test showed that the addition of natural zeolite (0.5 wt.%) on the mixed of heavy oil and water in an autoclave at temperature 200°C during 6 hrs can reduce the viscosity of heavy oil up to 65%.

Shanti Merissa; Pipit Fitriani; Ferry Iskandar; Mikrajuddin Abdullah; Khairurrijal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Heavy Oil Production Technology Challenges and the Effect of Nano Sized Metals on the Viscosity of Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Heavy oil and bitumen make up 70% of the discovered petroleum resources in the world. Only a very small fraction of these resources have… (more)

Bjřrnseth, Fabian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Research on viscosity-reduction technology by electric heating and blending light oil in ultra-deep heavy oil wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Tahe oilfield in China, heavy oil is commonly lifted using the light oil blending technology. However, due to the lack of light oil, the production of heavy oil has been seriously limited. Thus, a new c...

Mo Zhu; Haiquan Zhong; Yingchuan Li…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Biodegradation of asphalt by Garciaella petrolearia TERIG02 for viscosity reduction of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum hydrocarbon is an important energy resource, but it is difficult to exploit due to the presence of dominated heavy constituents such as asphaltenes. In this study, viscosity reduction of Jodhpur heav...

Meeta Lavania; Simrita Cheema; Priyangshu Manab Sarma; Ajoy Kumar Mandal…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Rheology of heavy crude oil and viscosity reduction for pipeline transportation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The rheological properties of heavy crude oil have been investigated using RheoStress RS100 from Haake. The effects of shear rate, temperature and oil concentration on… (more)

Hasan, Shadi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fe 3 O 4 / Zeolite nanocomposites synthesized by microwave assisted coprecipitation and its performance in reducing viscosity of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fe 3 O 4 / Zeolite nanocomposites have been synthesized via microwave assisted coprecipitation method and show to be efficient in reducing viscosity of heavy oil compared to other Fe 3 O 4 / Zeolite nanocomposites prepared by conventional method. The following precursors such as FeCl 3 ?6 H 2 O FeSO 4 ?7 H 2 O NH 4 OH and natural zeolite of heulandite type were used in the sample preparation. In this study the effect of Fe 3 O 4 composition in the composite and microwave time heating were investigated. Fe 3 O 4 / Zeolite nanocomposites were then characterized to study the influence on crystal structures morphology and physicochemical properties. The characterization techniques include X-ray diffraction (XRD) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen physisorption. The results show that by increasing the microwave heating time the degree of nanocomposite intergrowth can be enhanced. The nanocomposite was tested in catalytic aquathermolysis of heavy oil at 200°C for 6 h and the Fe 3 O 4 / zeolite of 1 to 4 ratios performed the highest viscosity reduction of heavy oil reaching 92%.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Zeolite nanocomposites synthesized by microwave assisted coprecipitation and its performance in reducing viscosity of heavy oil  

SciTech Connect

Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Zeolite nanocomposites have been synthesized via microwave assisted coprecipitation method and show to be efficient in reducing viscosity of heavy oil compared to other Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Zeolite nanocomposites prepared by conventional method. The following precursors such as FeCl{sub 3}?6H{sub 2}O, FeSO{sub 4}?7H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 4}OH, and natural zeolite of heulandite type were used in the sample preparation. In this study, the effect of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composition in the composite and microwave time heating were investigated. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Zeolite nanocomposites were then characterized to study the influence on crystal structures, morphology and physicochemical properties. The characterization techniques include X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen physisorption. The results show that by increasing the microwave heating time, the degree of nanocomposite intergrowth can be enhanced. The nanocomposite was tested in catalytic aquathermolysis of heavy oil at 200°C for 6 h and the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/zeolite of 1 to 4 ratios performed the highest viscosity reduction of heavy oil reaching 92%.

Iskandar, Ferry, E-mail: ferry@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fitriani, Pipit; Merissa, Shanty; Khairurrijal,; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin [Physics of Electronic Materials Research Division, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Mukti, Rino R. [Division of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

16

Desulfurization of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Strategies for heavy oil desulfurization were evaluated by reviewing desulfurization literature and critically assessing the viability of the various methods for heavy oil. The desulfurization methods includin...

Rashad Javadli; Arno de Klerk

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bioconversion of Heavy oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??70 % of world?s oil reservoirs consist of heavy oil, and as the supply of conventional oil decreases, researchers are searching for new technologies to… (more)

Steinbakk, Sandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of tests funded by STWA, Inc. ("STWA") to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs for pipeline operators. The testing is managed by RMOTC, and conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, also known as the Teapot Dome oil field. RMOTC is providing the infrastructure and technical expertise to support companies such as STWA in their efforts to validate new technologies and bring those products and

19

Recovery of stranded heavy oil by electromagnetic heating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High oil-viscosity is a major concern for the recovery of oil from heavy-oil reservoirs. Introducing energy to the formation has proven to be an effective… (more)

Carrizales, Maylin Alejandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Exploiting heavy oil reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

Levi, Ran

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

SciTech Connect

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Heating of heavy oil by circulating hot water in closed double casing in ultra-deep wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In heavy oil production, the loss of energy to ambient surroundings decreases the temperature of the heavy oil flowing upwards in a vertical wellbore, which increases the oil viscosity and the oil may not flow...

Riyi Lin; Fangzheng Wang; Xinwei Wang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Bulk viscosity in heavy ion collision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of a temperature dependent bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio~($\\zeta/s$) along with a constant shear viscosity to entropy density ratio~($\\eta/s$) on the space time evolution of the fluid produced in high energy heavy ion collisions have been studied in a relativistic viscous hydrodynamics model. The boost invariant Israel-Stewart theory of causal relativistic viscous hydrodynamics is used to simulate the evolution of the fluid in 2 spatial and 1 temporal dimension. The dissipative correction to the freezeout distribution for bulk viscosity is calculated using Grad's fourteen moment method. From our simulation we show that the method is applicable only for $\\zeta/s<0.004$.

Victor Roy; A. K. Chaudhuri

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Utah Heavy Oil Program  

SciTech Connect

The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

Heavy Oil Transportation as a Solid-Liquid Dispersion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, heavy oil pipelines are designed to handle liquids with effective viscosity below 0.5 Pa s at the pump outlet, in order to minimize the frictional pressure gradient and obtain a pipeline size an...

Adriana Brito; H. Salazar; Ramón Cabello…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Chapter 1 - Refining Heavy Oil and Extra-heavy Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The definitions of heavy oil, extra-heavy oil, and tar sand bitumen are inadequate insofar as the definitions rely upon a single physical property to define a complex feedstock. This chapter presents viable options to the antiquated definitions of the heavy feedstocks (heavy oil, extra-heavy oil, and tar sand bitumen) as well as an introduction to the various aspects of heavy feedstock refining in order for the reader to place each feedstock in the correct context of properties, behavior, and refining needs.

James G. Speight

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

heavy_oil | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Oil Publications KMD Contacts Project Summaries EPAct 2005 Arctic Energy Office Announcements Software Stripper Wells Heavy oil is a vast U.S. oil resource that is...

28

Monitoring Seismic Attenuation Changes Using a 4D Relative Spectrum Method in Athabsca Heavy Oil Reservoir, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating heavy oil reservoirs is a common method for reducing the high viscosity of heavy oil and thus increasing the recovery factor. Monitoring these changes in the reservoir is essential for delineating the heated region ...

Shabelansky, Andrey Hanan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rheological properties of heavy oils and heavy oil emulsions  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the author investigated the effects of a number of process variables such as shear rate, measurement temperature, pressure, the influence of pretreatment, and the role of various amounts of added water on the rheology of the resulting heavy oil or the emulsion. Rheological properties of heavy oils and the corresponding emulsions are important from transportation and processing standpoints.

Khan, M.R. [Texaco, Inc., Beacon, NY (United States). Fuels and Lubricants Technology Dept.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Heavy oil transportation by pipeline  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide there are a number of pipelines used to transport heavy crude oils. The operations are facilitated in a variety of ways. For example, the Alyeska pipeline is an insulated pipeline transporting warm oil over 800 miles. This 48-inch line experiences limited heat loss due to the insulation, volume of oil contained, and heat gain due to friction and pumping. Some European trunk lines periodically handle heavy and waxy crudes. This is achieved by proper sizing of batches, following waxy crudes with non-waxy crudes, and increased use of scrapers. In a former Soviet republic, the transportation of heavy crude oil by pipeline has been facilitated by blending with a lighter Siberian crude. The paper describes the pipeline transport of heavy crudes by Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc. The paper describes enhancing heavy oil transportation by emulsion formation, droplet suspension, dilution, drag reducing agents, and heating.

Gerez, J.M.; Pick, A.R. [Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

SOVENT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY FOR IN-SITU UPGRADING OF HEAVY OIL SANDS  

SciTech Connect

With the depletion of conventional crude oil reserves in the world, heavy oil and bitumen resources have great potential to meet the future demand for petroleum products. However, oil recovery from heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs is much more difficult than that from conventional oil reservoirs. This is mainly because heavy oil or bitumen is partially or completely immobile under reservoir conditions due to its extremely high viscosity, which creates special production challenges. In order to overcome these challenges significant efforts were devoted by Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University and The Center for Energy Economics (CEE) at the University of Texas. A simplified model was developed to assess the density of the upgraded crude depending on the ratio of solvent mass to crude oil mass, temperature, pressure and the properties of the crude oil. The simplified model incorporated the interaction dynamics into a homogeneous, porous heavy oil reservoir to simulate the dispersion and concentration of injected CO2. The model also incorporated the characteristic of a highly varying CO2 density near the critical point. Since the major challenge in heavy oil recovery is its high viscosity, most researchers have focused their investigations on this parameter in the laboratory as well as in the field resulting in disparaging results. This was attributed to oil being a complex poly-disperse blend of light and heavy paraffins, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes, which have diverse behaviors at reservoir temperature and pressures. The situation is exacerbated by a dearth of experimental data on gas diffusion coefficients in heavy oils due to the tedious nature of diffusivity measurements. Ultimately, the viscosity and thus oil recovery is regulated by pressure and its effect on the diffusion coefficient and oil swelling factors. The generation of a new phase within the crude and the differences in mobility between the new crude matrix and the precipitate readily enables removal of asphaltenes. Thus, an upgraded crude low in heavy metal, sulfur and nitrogen is more conducive for further purification.

Munroe, Norman

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

A generalized viscosity equation for pure heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method for the correlation and prediction of the viscosity of pure heavy hydrocarbons listed in API Research Project 42. The 273 heavy hydrocarbons in the database include branched/unbranched paraffins and olefins together with a variety of complex nonfused/fused aromatic and naphthenic compounds. A generalized one-parameter viscosity-temperature equation, log ({mu} + 0.8) = 100(0.01T){sup b}, is proposed (overall AAD {lt} 7-10%) for all heavy hydrocarbons in the database. For each hydrocarbon, an optimum value of parameter b is provided. It is shown that parameter b varies linearly with the logarithm of molar mass as well as the inverse of boiling temperature (at 10 mmHg). This important observation leads to the development of a predictive method for the liquid-phase viscosity of pure heavy hydrocarbons.

Mehrotra, A.K. (Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (CA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Determination of metals in heavy oil residues by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is proposed for the sample preparation of heavy oil residues characterized by viscosity of more than 700 mm2/sec at 100°C to study their elemental composition. It is shown that a wide range of elements c...

T. A. Maryutina; N. S. Musina

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Necessity and feasibility of improving the residual resistance factor of polymer flooding in heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The efficiency of water flooding in heavy oil reservoirs would be improved by increasing the viscosity of the displacing phase, but the sweep efficiency is not of significance due to the low mobility of the vi...

Leiting Shi; Zhongbin Ye; Zhuo Zhang; Changjiang Zhou; Shanshan Zhu…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Understanding foamy oil mechanisms for heavy oil reservoirs during primary production  

SciTech Connect

A set of experiments in porous media was performed to determine oil recovery factor during natural depletion for a heavy oil reservoir. Results on {open_quotes}critical or mobile{close_quotes} gas saturation, produced fluid characterization, residual oil saturation, production profile and effective viscosity versus pressure are presented. In order to characterize the ability of the heavy oil to trap the released gas, conventional and non conventional PVT tests were carried out. By comparing the experimental results during differential liberation tests, a gas trapping factor for the oil was obtained. It accounts for the amount of solution gas that has been thermodynamically released but does not form instantaneously a free gas cap. The so called pseudo-bubble pressure was obtained. In this work the hypothesis involved in the {open_quotes}Low Viscosity Model{close_quotes} was also tested.

Huerta, M.; Otero, C.; Rico, A.; Jimenez, I.; Mirabal, M. de; Rojas, G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

From Stopping to Viscosity in Heavy Ion Collisions  

SciTech Connect

Stopping in heavy ion collisions is investigated with the aim of learning about the shear viscosity of nuclear matter. Boltzmann equation simulations are compared to available data on stopping in the energy range of 20-117 MeV/nucleon. Stopping observables used include momentum anisotropy and linear momentum transfer. The data show that modeling the transport with free nucleon-nucleon cross-sections is inaccurate and reduced cross-sections are required. Reduction of the cross-sections produces an increase in the shear viscosity of nuclear matter, compared to calculations based on free cross-sections.

Barker, Brent W.; Danielewicz, Pawel [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Compositional changes in heavy oil steamflood simulators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The numerical simulation of heavy oil steamfloods has generally been conducted assuming that the oil is non-volatile. Reservoir simulation has traditionally ignored compositional effect s… (more)

Lolley, Christopher Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Heavy oil production from Alaska  

SciTech Connect

North Slope of Alaska has an estimated 40 billion barrels of heavy oil and bitumen in the shallow formations of West Sak and Ugnu. Recovering this resource economically is a technical challenge for two reasons: (1) the geophysical environment is unique, and (2) the expected recovery is a low percentage of the oil in place. The optimum advanced recovery process is still undetermined. Thermal methods would be applicable if the risks of thawing the permafrost can be minimized and the enormous heat losses reduced. Use of enriched natural gas is a probable recovery process for West Sak. Nearby Prudhoe Bay field is using its huge natural gas resources for pressure maintenance and enriched gas improved oil recovery (IOR). Use of carbon dioxide is unlikely because of dynamic miscibility problems. Major concerns for any IOR include close well spacing and its impact on the environment, asphaltene precipitation, sand production, and fines migration, in addition to other more common production problems. Studies have indicated that recovering West Sak and Lower Ugnu heavy oil is technically feasible, but its development has not been economically viable so far. Remoteness from markets and harsh Arctic climate increase production costs relative to California heavy oil or Central/South American heavy crude delivered to the U.S. Gulf Coast. A positive change in any of the key economic factors could provide the impetus for future development. Cooperation between the federal government, state of Alaska, and industry on taxation, leasing, and permitting, and an aggressive support for development of technology to improve economics is needed for these heavy oil resources to be developed.

Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Thomas, C.P. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sovent Based Enhanced Oil Recovery for In-Situ Upgrading of Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect

With the depletion of conventional crude oil reserves in the world, heavy oil and bitumen resources have great potential to meet the future demand for petroleum products. However, oil recovery from heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs is much more difficult than that from conventional oil reservoirs. This is mainly because heavy oil or bitumen is partially or completely immobile under reservoir conditions due to its extremely high viscosity, which creates special production challenges. In order to overcome these challenges significant efforts were devoted by Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University and The Center for Energy Economics (CEE) at the University of Texas. A simplified model was developed to assess the density of the upgraded crude depending on the ratio of solvent mass to crude oil mass, temperature, pressure and the properties of the crude oil. The simplified model incorporated the interaction dynamics into a homogeneous, porous heavy oil reservoir to simulate the dispersion and concentration of injected CO{sub 2}. The model also incorporated the characteristic of a highly varying CO{sub 2} density near the critical point. Since the major challenge in heavy oil recovery is its high viscosity, most researchers have focused their investigations on this parameter in the laboratory as well as in the field resulting in disparaging results. This was attributed to oil being a complex poly-disperse blend of light and heavy paraffins, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes, which have diverse behaviors at reservoir temperature and pressures. The situation is exacerbated by a dearth of experimental data on gas diffusion coefficients in heavy oils due to the tedious nature of diffusivity measurements. Ultimately, the viscosity and thus oil recovery is regulated by pressure and its effect on the diffusion coefficient and oil swelling factors. The generation of a new phase within the crude and the differences in mobility between the new crude matrix and the precipitate readily enables removal of asphaltenes. Thus, an upgraded crude low in heavy metal, sulfur and nitrogen is more conducive for further purification.

Norman Munroe

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Impact and future of heavy oil produciton  

SciTech Connect

Heavy oil resources are becoming increaingly important in meeting world oil demand. Heavy oil accounts for 10% of the worlds current oil production and is anticipated to grow significantly. Recent narrowing of the price margins between light and heavy oil and the development of regional heavy oil markets (production, refining and marketing) have prompted renewed investment in heavy oil. Production of well known heavy oil resources of Canada, Venezuela, United States, and elsewhere throughout the world will be expanded on a project-by-project basis. Custom refineries designed to process these heavy crudes are being expanded. Refined products from these crudes will be cleaner than ever before because of the huge investment. However, heavy oil still remains at a competitive disadvantage due to higher production, transportation and refining have to compete with other investment opportunities available in the industry. Expansion of the U.S. heavy oil industry is no exception. Relaxation of export restrictions on Alaskan North Slope crude has prompted renewed development of California's heavy oil resources. The location, resource volume, and oil properties of the more than 80-billion barrel U.S. heavy oil resource are well known. Our recent studies summarize the constraints on production, define the anticipated impact (volume, location and time frame) of development of U.S. heavy oil resources, and examines the $7-billion investment in refining units (bottoms conversion capacity) required to accommodate increased U.S. heavy oil production. Expansion of Canadian and Venezuelan heavy oil and tar sands production are anticipated to dramatically impact the U.S. petroleum market while displacing some imported Mideast crude.

Olsen, D.K, (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research/BDM-Oklahoma Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Impact and future of heavy oil produciton  

SciTech Connect

Heavy oil resources are becoming increaingly important in meeting world oil demand. Heavy oil accounts for 10% of the worlds current oil production and is anticipated to grow significantly. Recent narrowing of the price margins between light and heavy oil and the development of regional heavy oil markets (production, refining and marketing) have prompted renewed investment in heavy oil. Production of well known heavy oil resources of Canada, Venezuela, United States, and elsewhere throughout the world will be expanded on a project-by-project basis. Custom refineries designed to process these heavy crudes are being expanded. Refined products from these crudes will be cleaner than ever before because of the huge investment. However, heavy oil still remains at a competitive disadvantage due to higher production, transportation and refining have to compete with other investment opportunities available in the industry. Expansion of the U.S. heavy oil industry is no exception. Relaxation of export restrictions on Alaskan North Slope crude has prompted renewed development of California`s heavy oil resources. The location, resource volume, and oil properties of the more than 80-billion barrel U.S. heavy oil resource are well known. Our recent studies summarize the constraints on production, define the anticipated impact (volume, location and time frame) of development of U.S. heavy oil resources, and examines the $7-billion investment in refining units (bottoms conversion capacity) required to accommodate increased U.S. heavy oil production. Expansion of Canadian and Venezuelan heavy oil and tar sands production are anticipated to dramatically impact the U.S. petroleum market while displacing some imported Mideast crude.

Olsen, D.K, [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research/BDM-Oklahoma Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

[en] VISCOSITY OF HEAVY FRACTIONS OF OIL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[pt] Os processos de destilaçăo atmosférica e a vácuo do petróleo tęm como sub-produtos mais pesados os resíduos atmosféricos e de vácuo, respectivamente. Modelos encontrados… (more)

MARCIA SOARES GAMA

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Heavy oils (natural and refined)  

SciTech Connect

This section of the Petroleum and Coal review again contains discussions on the analysis of asphalts, bitumens, tars, and pitches as well as heavy natural and refined oils. The characterization of these heavy (high-boiling) materials impacts the way they are produced, their effect on the processing environment, and their suitability for various end products. The analysis of these heavy materials is becoming increasingly important as crude oil stocks get heavier and larger quantities of high-boiling materials are processed to derive clean lower boiling products. This review covers articles found in the literature in the last two years. This review will cover new or improved analytical procedures and applications to new sources of heavy oils. This review will be subdivided into individual separation or analytical techniques. Combined analytical techniques (e.g., GC-FT-IR) will be included under the technique most emphasized in the article. The review is categorized further by chromatographic techniques, spectroscopic techniques, thermal techniques, and miscellaneous. 71 refs.

Lintelmann, K.A. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States)

1995-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Effect of dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) and lauric amine (LA) on the associating state and rheology of heavy oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effects of two amphiphiles, DBSA and LA, on the associating state and viscosity of three heavy oils with different resin/asphaltene (R/A) mass ratios were investigated through DSC analysis, rheological test and electrical conductivity measurement. The wax appearance temperatures of the three heavy oils are lower than 40 °C. The viscosity of heavy oils at temperature range 50~70 °C increases with increasing DBSA concentration but decreases with increasing LA concentration. Addition of DBSA increases the electrical conductivity of heavy oils, which implies that the DBSA acts as asphaltene dispersants; the electrical conductivity of heavy oils decreases after LA addition, which implies that the LA acts as asphaltene flocculants. The addition of DBSA decreases the size of asphaltene particles and generates new solvation layers, both of which favor the increase of heavy oil viscosity; the addition of LA increases the size of asphaltene particles and releases some liquid oils bounded by asphaltene particles, both of which favor the decrease of heavy oil viscosity. With the increase of R/A mass ratio, the stability of heavy oils increases while the viscosity enhancing/reducing efficiency of DBSA/LA decreases.

Fei Yang; Chuanxian Li; Shuang Yang; Qin Zhang; Jie Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Electromagnetic Induction Heat Generation of Nano?ferrofluid and Other Stimulants for Heavy Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nano?ferrofluid and graphite?fluid are proposed to be used as stimulants for heavy oil recovery processes using electromagnetic induction. The heat generation in the stimulants will be used for reducing the viscosity of heavy oil. The temperature increase of the stimulants are observed with the presence of electromagnetic induction. These increments are better compared to those of the varying concentration of salt water (brine) usually exist in the oil reservoir.

A. A. Pramana; D. Abdassah; S. Rachmat; A. Mikrajuddin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-heavy oil, and oil shale. Tremendous amounts of heavy oil resources are available in the world. Fig. 1.1 shows the total world oil reserves, and indicates that heavy oil, extra heavy oil, and bitumen make up about 70% of the world?s total oil resources...

Yang, Daegil

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

SUPRI heavy oil research program  

SciTech Connect

The 14th Annual Report of the SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Program includes discussion of the following topics: (1) A Study of End Effects in Displacement Experiments; (2) Cat Scan Status Report; (3) Modifying In-situ Combustion with Metallic Additives; (4) Kinetics of Combustion; (5) Study of Residual Oil Saturation for Steam Injection and Fuel Concentration for In-Situ Combustion; (6) Analysis of Transient Foam Flow in 1-D Porous Media with Computed Tomography; (7) Steam-Foam Studies in the Presence of Residual Oil; (8) Microvisualization of Foam Flow in a Porous Medium; (9) Three- Dimensional Laboratory Steam Injection Model; (10) Saturation Evaluation Following Water Flooding; (11) Numerical Simulation of Well-to-Well Tracer Flow Test with Nonunity Mobility Ratio.

Aziz, K.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Castanier, L.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Co-cracking Experiment and Application Route of Waste Plastics and Heavy Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The co-cracking experiment of waste plastics and heavy oil was done in the condition of 400 °C and pressure not higher than 2.0 MPa. The experimental results showed that the yield of heavy oil and coke decreased but the light oil and gas yield increased with the increasing amount of waste plastics. The products of heavy oil's solidifying point, flash point, viscosity and density decreased and had a good pour point depression effect. Heavy oil containing heat conduction oil and solvent contributed to heat transfer, melting and transport and had the effect of dissolution and co-cracking. It would have a good prospect when the co-cracking of waste plastics and heavy oil was applied to the combination processes of visbreaking and delayed coking and catalytic cracking and delayed coking.

Shikui Wu; Kaixiong Xu; Lusen Jiang; Li Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Viscosity and solute dependence of F-actin translocation by rabbit skeletal heavy meromyosin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Viscosity and solute dependence of F-actin translocation by rabbit skeletal heavy meromyosin P, Ying Chen, Kristi L. Kulin, and Thomas L. Daniel. Viscosity and solute dependence of F the hypothesis that solvent viscosity affects transloca- tion of rhodamine phalloidin-labeled F-actin by rabbit

Daniel, Tom

54

Plateau Field Test of Diesel Engine Oils with Different Viscosity Grades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The degradation of SF/CD 0W/30, CD5W/30 and SF/CD 15W/40 general engine oils has been investigated by Plateau field test with STYER 91 trucks. The experimental results have shown that on the Plateau viscosity grade of the oil hardly impacts on its service ... Keywords: Plateau, field test, viscosity grade, oil, diesel engine

Su Bin; Shi Yonggang; Gong Haifeng; Xu Jinlong; Wei Wei; Mei Lin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

Mustafa Hamid Al-abbas; Wan Aini Wan Ibrahim; Mohd. Marsin Sanagi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity is a measure of the resistance of ... forces that act within a moving fluid. Viscosity can also be defined as the ratio...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

OPEC Prices Make Heavy Oil Look Profitable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...barrels of heavy oil, a lighter...defined as any oil heavier than...flows into production lines at a profitable rate. Oil from the sands...strip-mine operations linked by...upgrading" equipment, in the industry...Ath-abaska field. Construction...summer. Its cost was $2...894 nerve gas ("Weteye...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1979-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

Seismic properties of a Venezuelan heavy oil in water emulsion  

SciTech Connect

Several procedures for the production of low-viscosity, surfactant-stabilized, easy-transportable dispersions of heavy crude oil in water-briefly, oil in water (or o/w) emulsions - have been recently patented. Some of them propose to form the o/w emulsion in the reservoir, after the injection of a mixture of water and surfactants, increasing significantly the per well daily production. Progression of the o/w emulsion front, through the reservoir to the production wells, can be monitored in seismic planar slices with successive 3D seismic surveys (413 seismic), if enough contrast exists between the seismic velocity value of the o/w emulsion and the one of the oil in place. To facilitate the analysis of the contrast, this study presents high frequency acoustic velocity measurements performed in the laboratory. The experimental setup includes two reflectors and an ultrasonic transducer with double burst train emission. The estimated velocity precision is 0.02%. The measured samples are: a Venezuelan heavy o/w emulsion, a mixture of the same heavy oil and gasoil and a saturated sandstone core containing the o/w emulsion. Additionally, seismic velocities of the actual pore fluids - live oil and five o/w emulsion - and saturated sandstone are calculated using the above laboratory measurements, Wood`s equation, and Gassman`s and Biot`s models.

Maldonado, F.; Liu, Y.; Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluating oil quality and monitoring production from heavy oil reservoirs using geochemical methods: Application to the Boscan Field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

Many oil fields worldwide contain heavy oil in one or more reservoir units. The low gravity of these oils is most frequently due to biodegradation and/or low maturity. The challenge is to find ways to economically recover this oil. Methods which reduce the operating costs of producing heavy oil add significant value to such projects. Geochemical techniques which use the composition of the reservoir fluids as natural tracers offer cost effective methods to assist with reservoir management. The low viscosity and gravity of heavy oil, combined with frequent high water cuts, low flow rates, and the presence of downhole artificial lift equipment, make many conventional production logging methods difficult to apply. Therefore, monitoring production, especially if the produced oil is commingled from multiple reservoirs, can be difficult. Geochemical methods can be used to identify oil/water contacts, tubing string leaks and to allocate production to individual zones from commingled production. An example of a giant heavy oil field where geochemical methods may be applicable is the Boscan Field in Venezuela. Low maturity oil, averaging 10{degrees} API gravity, is produced from the Eocene Upper and Lower Boscan (Miosa) Sands. Geochemical, stratigraphic and engineering data have helped to better define the controls on oil quality within the field, identified new reservoir compartments and defined unique characteristics of the Upper and Lower Boscan oils. This information can be used to identify existing wells in need of workovers due to mechanical problems and to monitor production from new infill wells.

Kaufman, R.L.; Noguera, V.H.; Bantz, D.M. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, San Ramon, CA (United States); Rodriguez, R. [Maraven, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Molecule-based modeling of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A molecular-level kinetics model has been developed for the pyrolysis of heavy residual oil. Resid structure was modeled in terms of three attribute groups: cores, inter-core linkages, and side chains. The con...

Scott R. Horton; Zhen Hou; Brian M. Moreno; Craig A. Bennett…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Alaska Heavy Oils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluid and Rock Property Controls On Production and Seismic Monitoring Alaska Heavy Oils Last Reviewed 12/20/2012 Fluid and Rock Property Controls On Production and Seismic Monitoring Alaska Heavy Oils Last Reviewed 12/20/2012 DE-NT0005663 Goal The goal of this project is to improve recovery of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) heavy oil resources in the Ugnu formation by improving our understanding of the formationÂ’s vertical and lateral heterogeneities via core evaluation, evaluating possible recovery processes, and employing geophysical monitoring to assess production and modify production operations. Performers Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 Earthworks, Newtown, CT 06470 BP, Anchorage, AK 99519 Background Although the reserves of heavy oil on the North Slope of Alaska are enormous (estimates are up to 10 billion barrels in place), difficult

63

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Low NOx combustion system for heavy oil  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the increasing demand for white oil as one of countermeasures for pollution control and as a fuel for motor vehicle, coupled with the increasing import of heavy crude oil, heavy oils such as asphalt and distillation residue have become surplus in Japan. It is difficult by the conventional low NOx technology to control the NOx emission from the industrial small and medium capacity boilers, which use heavy oil as their fuels. The authors have been developing and improving NOx control technologies for boilers such as low NOx burners, two-stage combustion methods and so on. They have developed a new combustion system for heavy oil, which generates less NOx and soot than conventional systems, by applying the knowledge, obtained in the course of their development of Coal Partial Combustor (CPC). The conventional low NOx combustion method for oil firing boilers has been developed based on decreasing the flame temperature and delaying the combustion reaction. In the system, however, the heavy oil shall be combusted in the intense reducing atmosphere at the high flame temperature between 1,500 C and 1,600 C, and then the combustions gas shall be cooled and oxidized by two-stage combustion air. With this system, NOx emission can be suppressed below 100ppm (converted as O{sub 2}=4%).

Kurata, Chikatoshi; Sasaki, Hideki

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Feasibility of heavy oil recovery in the U.S. midcontinent (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)  

SciTech Connect

The Midcontinent of the United States (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma) has three heavy oil resource areas: the carbonates of central and western Kansas, the Pennsylvanian Age consolidated sandstone reservoirs of the Tristate Heavy Oil Belt (southeastern Kansas, western Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma), and the unconsolidated or easily friable sand- stone reservoirs of south-central Oklahoma. The heavy oil resource volume of the carbonates is unknown and relatively untested because of the difficulty in producing viscous oil from low-permeability carbonates. Since the 1960s, the Tristate Heavy Oil Belt has been the site of numerous pilots and operations that tested many different techniques for oil production. The region was a proving ground for many thermal enhanced oil recovery projects (steam, cyclic steam, in situ combustion, hot solvent injection, etc.). Most of the projects produced more oil than primary production, but the geology of the formations limited significant economic oil production. The best opportunity for significant, economic heavy oil production is from the steeply dipping, unconsolidated or easily friable sandstone reservoirs of south-central Oklahoma. Several of these reservoirs are thicker, more continuous, have high permeability and can be exploited by using gravity drainage and steam to reduce oil viscosity. The Midcontinent is not anticipated to become a significant heavy oil producer even if oil prices were significantly higher than $151 barrel because of the nature of the resource and the limited refining capability in the area. Local refineries were designed to process light sweet crude and have little heavy ends processing capability to accommodate additional heavy oil.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Canadian operators boost heavy oil production  

SciTech Connect

Recent technological advances in slurry pipelining, horizontal wells, and thermal recovery techniques have made recovery of Canadian heavy oil resources more economical. In addition, reduced government royalties have made investment in these difficult reservoirs more attractive. As a result, activity has increased in heavy-oil fields in Alberta and Saskatchewan. This paper review the various oil sand recovery projects under development in the area and the current government policies which are helping to develop them. The paper also provides brief descriptions of the equipment and technologies that have allowed a reduced cost in the development. Items discussed include surface mining techniques, horizontal drilling, reservoir engineering techniques, separation processes, and thermal recovery.

Perdue, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mass Transfer Mechanisms during the Solvent Recovery of Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Canada has the second largest proven oil reserves next to Saudi Arabia which is mostly located in Alberta and Saskatchewan but is unconventional heavy oil… (more)

James, Lesley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Inversion of heavy crude oil-in-brine emulsions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A large portion of Canada's reserves of crude oil consists of extra heavy crude and natural bitumens. As the reserves of conventional crude oil continue… (more)

Sun, Ruijun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Gasflooding-assisted cyclic solvent injection (GA-CSI) for enhancing heavy oil recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cyclic solvent injection (CSI) process has showed great potential to enhance heavy oil recovery because it takes advantages of solution-gas drive and foamy oil flow for oil production. However, CSI suffers from solvent release during the production period so that the viscosity of the solvent-diluted heavy oil is re-increased and its mobility is re-decreased. How to effectively recover the solvent-diluted heavy oil becomes a key technical challenge in a CSI process. This paper first experimentally analyzed a conventional CSI process that used a solvent injector as an oil producer alternately. It is found that foamy oil was induced and flowed to the producer during the production period of a cycle but some foamy oil was pushed back by solvent during the solvent injection period of the following cycle. Such “back-and-forth” movement of foamy oil seriously hindered the productivity of the CSI process. On the basis of this knowledge, this study proposed a new process, gasflooding-assisted cyclic solvent injection (GA-CSI), to enhance the performance of CSI. In a GA-CSI process, the solvent injector and the oil producer were placed horizontally apart. An additional solvent gasflooding process was applied immediately after the pressure drawdown process to produce the foamy oil that lost its mobility due to solvent release. The experimental results showed that the oil production rate of the newly proposed GA-CSI process is 3?4 times of that for a conventional CSI process.

Xinfeng Jia; Fanhua Zeng; Yongan Gu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

This technical progress report describes work performed from January 1 through March 31, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history matching techniques. During this period, previous analysis of experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation was verified by comparison among analytic, dual-porosity simulation, and fine-grid simulation. We continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured porous media at high pressure and high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. A new experiment was conducted on diatomite core. Significantly, we show that elevated temperature induces fines release in sandstone cores and this behavior may be linked to wettability. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitatively, a measure of this property, defined as the shear stress divided by the rate of shear in steady simple-shear flow. Often used synonymously with apparent viscosity [Pa.s.].

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...any internal resistance of substance to deformation or relative motion within itself, when it is subjected to shear stress by a liquid or gas. The ratio is called coefficient of viscosity, in units of poise. A...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Research on Oil Recovery Mechanisms in Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to increase recovery of heavy oils. Towards that goal studies are being conducted in how to assess the influence of temperature and pressure on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in site combustion process; to develop and understand mechanisms of surfactants on for the reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; and to improve techniques of formation evaluation.

Louis M. Castanier; William E. Brigham

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Heavy oil component characterization with multidimensional unilateral NMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heavy oil is a complicated mixture and a potential resource and has attracted much attention since the end of last century. It is important to characterize the composition of heavy oil to enhance its recovery ...

Huabing Liu; Lizhi Xiao; Baoxin Guo; Zongfu Zhang; Fangrong Zong…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

An extension of Pedersen's viscosity model for saturated black oil systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) December 2000 Major Subject: Petmleum Engineering ABSTRACT An Extension of Pederscn's Viscosity Model lor Saturated Black Oil Systems. (December 2000) Adeyemi Adejuwon, M. Eng. , University ol' Surrey, United Kingdom Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr...

Adejuwon, Adeyemi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

The effective approach for predicting viscosity of saturated and undersaturated reservoir oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting reservoir oil viscosity with numerical correlation equations using field-measured variables is widely used in the petroleum industry. Most published correlation equations, however, have never profoundly realized the genuine relationship...

Kulchanyavivat, Sawin

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

CHAPTER 45 - STIMULATING RECOVERY FROM HEAVY OIL RESOURCES--MID-CONTINENT AREA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses stimulating recovery from heavy oil resources, mid-continent area. In western Missouri, eastern Kansas, and northeastern Oklahoma, heavy-oil deposits occur over an area of roughly 8,000 mi2 and extend for about 250 mi along the Kansas-Missouri border reaching a width of about 80 miles. Heavy-oil deposits are found throughout the region, although lighter oil deposits do occur. Oil saturation and viscosity vary from one reservoir to another and from one depth to another in the same well. The formations of prime interest are the Wayside, Bartlesville, and the Burgess. A research project at the Bartlesville Energy Research Center of ERDA combines modern chemical explosive fracturing techniques with heat and solvent treatment to extract the crude oil. It is found that of primary concern are the heavy-oil reservoirs, which contain low gravity crude oil that cannot be produced by conventional means and reservoirs that have no reservoir energy and consequently have produced no oil. The oil neither flows into the wellbore at an economic rate nor can it simply be pushed to the production well by the injection of water, as in waterflooding.

Larman J. Heath

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Electromagnetic Heating Methods for Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The most widely used method of thermal oil recovery is by injecting steam into the reservoir. A well-designed steam injection project is very efficient in recovering oil, however its applicability is limited in many situations. Simulation studies and field experience has shown that for low injectivity reservoirs, small thickness of the oil-bearing zone, and reservoir heterogeneity limits the performance of steam injection. This paper discusses alternative methods of transferring heat to heavy oil reservoirs, based on electromagnetic energy. They present a detailed analysis of low frequency electric resistive (ohmic) heating and higher frequency electromagnetic heating (radio and microwave frequency). They show the applicability of electromagnetic heating in two example reservoirs. The first reservoir model has thin sand zones separated by impermeable shale layers, and very viscous oil. They model preheating the reservoir with low frequency current using two horizontal electrodes, before injecting steam. The second reservoir model has very low permeability and moderately viscous oil. In this case they use a high frequency microwave antenna located near the producing well as the heat source. Simulation results presented in this paper show that in some cases, electromagnetic heating may be a good alternative to steam injection or maybe used in combination with steam to improve heavy oil production. They identify the parameters which are critical in electromagnetic heating. They also discuss past field applications of electromagnetic heating including technical challenges and limitations.

Sahni, A.; Kumar, M.; Knapp, R.B.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Research on oil recovery mechanisms in heavy oil reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties, (2) in-situ combustion, (3) additives to improve mobility control, (4) reservoir definition, and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx.

Kovscek, Anthony R.; Brigham, William E., Castanier, Louis M.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

OPEC Prices Make Heavy Oil Look Profitable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...19 (Canadian) per barrel. He seemed...000 barrels a day by 1986. It will...underground in-to production wells, and will...heavy oil's day has come. Brian...of capital cost per SCIENCE, VOL. 204 barrel a day of production, conventional...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1979-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

82

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

This technical progress report describes work performed from October 1 through December 31, 2002 , for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition was analyzed to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation. It is shown that the usual assumption of constant, time-independent shape factors is incorrect. In other work, we continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured media at high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased the apparent wettability and affected water relative permeability of cores used in previous experiments. A phenomenological and mechanistic cause for this behavior is sought. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Foamy Oil Flow and its Role in Heavy Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two?phase oil?gas flow in porous media is often encountered during oil production from oil bearing sedimentary rocks. Traditionally such flow is modeled by extending the Darcy’s law to two?phase flow by employing the concept of saturation dependent relative permeability. This model is remarkably successful as long as the fluid distribution within the porous medium is controlled by capillary forces. Under this condition the two fluids appear to flow in their own continuous flow channels. This flow description is applicable to most reservoir flow scenarios encountered in light oil production. However in primary production of heavy oil under solution?gas drive this flow model often fails to provide a satisfactory match of the observed behaviour.

Brij B. Maini; Bashir Busahmin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Neutron scattering studies of crude oil viscosity reduction with electric field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The small angle neutron scattering experiment has confirmed the theoretical prediction that a strong electric field induces the suspended nano-particles inside crude oil to aggregate into short chains along the field direction. This aggregation breaks the symmetry, making the viscosity anisotropic: along the field direction, the viscosity is significantly reduced. The experiment enables us to determine the induced chain size and shape, verifies that the electric field works for all kinds of crude oils, paraffin-based, asphalt-based, and mix-based. The basic physics of such field induced viscosity reduction is applicable to all kinds of suspensions.

R. Tao; E. Du; H. Tang; X. Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

This technical progress report describes work performed from July 1 through September, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, work focused on completing project tasks in the area of multiphase flow and rock properties. The area of interest is the production mechanisms of oil from porous media at high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on oil recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. Work continued to delineate how the wettability of reservoir rock shifts from mixed and intermediate wet conditions to more water-wet conditions as temperature increases. One mechanism for the shift toward water-wet conditions is the release of fines coated with oil-wet material from pore walls. New experiments and theory illustrate the role of temperature on fines release.

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Burning Behaviour of Heavy Gas Oil from the Canadian Oil Sands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents the first systematic investigation and characterisation of the burning behaviour of untreated heavy gas oil from the Canadian oil sands, an intermediate… (more)

Mulherin, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mathematical and Statistical Investigation of Steamflooding in Naturally Fractured Carbonate Heavy Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A significant amount of Viscous Oil (e.g., heavy oil, extra heavy oil, and bitumen) is trapped in Naturally Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs also known as NFCRs.… (more)

Shafiei, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Bulk viscosity-driven freeze-out in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an review the HBT puzzle, and argue that its resolution requires the introduction of new physics close to the phase transition scale. We argue that a candidate for this new physics is bulk viscosity, recently postulated to peak, and even diverge, close to the phase transition temperature. We show that such a viscosity peak can force the system created in heavy ion collisions to become unstable, and filament into fragments whose size is weakly dependent on the global size of the system, thereby triggering freeze-out.

Giorgio Torrieri; Igor Mishustin; Boris Tomášik

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Enhanced oil recovery from heavy oil reservoirs utilizing a displacement agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An oil displacement agent consisting of nonionic and anionic surfactants and emulsion stabilizers has been developed to enhance oil recovery from heavy oil reservoirs. The experimental results show that the pr...

Fusheng Zhang; Jian Ouyang; Xintong Ma…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Preparation and characterization of a viscosity index improver for naphthenic and paraffinic base oils  

SciTech Connect

Copolymers of [alpha]-methyl styrene and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate were prepared in a benzene solution. The presence of the copolymers were confirmed by solubility, IR and NMR tests. The molecular weight and the polydispersity of the polymers were estimated by GPC. The copolymers obtained were blended with paraffinic and naphthenic base oils. The viscosity, the viscosity index (VI), the Q value as well as the stability to shear and oxidation were obtained for these blends. The results are compared with the results obtained with an oil blend containing a commonly used high temperature additive. Two of the copolymers obtained have shown to be good alternatives for specific applications.

Bataille, P. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)); Sharifi-Sangani, N.; Evin, E. (Univ. of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Influence of Shear Viscosity of Quark-Gluon Plasma on Elliptic Flow in Ultrarelativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the influence of a temperature-dependent shear viscosity over entropy density ratio {eta}/s on the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow of hadrons in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find that the elliptic flow in {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC is dominated by the viscosity in the hadronic phase and in the phase transition region, but largely insensitive to the viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). At the highest LHC energy, the elliptic flow becomes sensitive to the QGP viscosity and insensitive to the hadronic viscosity.

Niemi, H. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Denicol, G. S.; Huovinen, P. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Molnar, E. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); MTA-KFKI, Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Rischke, D. H. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Spring-Supported thrust bearings for hydroelectric generators: Influence of oil viscosity on power loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy losses in the spring-supported thrust bearings used in many large hydroelectric generator units were estimated to be small compared to the rate of energy (power) generation but, nevertheless, commercially significant. The purpose of the present study was examine the influence of oil viscosity on power loss. Experiments were performed using a test facility containing a thrust bearing of 1.2 m outer diameter and both power loss and temperature rise were measured for oils of ISO grade 32, 46 and 68, all at various oil pot temperatures. Power loss and temperature rise decreased as the viscosity of the oil in the oil pot decreased. Minimum oil film thicknesses were predicted with numerical analysis using a specialized software package (GENMAT). The accuracy of this calculation was supported by the good agreement between the temperature rise predicted by numerical analysis and the experimentally determined values. Provided film thickness were adequate to avoid any danger of wiping (10 – 15 ?m), the present study showed clearly that significant energy savings could be realized in the large spring-supported thrust bearings and associated guide bearings by lowering oil viscosities.

J.H. Ferguson; J.H. Yuan; J.B. Medley

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Heavy metals removal from oil sludge using ion exchange textiles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this research, ion exchange textiles were used for the first time for the removal of heavy metals from oil sludge. The target metals which… (more)

Muslat, Ziyad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Viscosity of plant oils as a function of temperature, fatty acid chain length, and unsaturation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VISCOS1TY OF PLANT OILS AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE, FATIY ACID CHAIN LENGTH, AND UNSATURATION A Thesis by TONG HENG NEO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering VISCOSITY OF PLANT OILS AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE, FATTY ACID CHAIN LENGTH, AND UNSATURATION A Thesis by TONG HENG NEO Approved as to style and content by...

Neo, Tong Heng

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Relationship of Viscosity, Surface Tensions, and Coefficient of Friction of Lubricating Oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in that a para- fine contains two atoms more hydrogen than the corresponding 22 number of the olefino group; for example, the lowest number of each group is respectively: Harsh Gas CE4 Olefiant Gas CHZ Americans and Russians lubricating mineral oils...RELATI01ISHII OF VISCOSITY, SUHFACE TEUSIOUS, A3D COEFFICIENT O? FlilCTIOB 0? LUBRICATING OILS. A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School, University of Kansas, Lawrence. For The Degree of Master of Science ilechanioal...

Carson, Earl

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Viscosity and thermal conductivity effects at first-order phase transitions in heavy-ion collisions  

SciTech Connect

Effects of viscosity and thermal conductivity on the dynamics of first-order phase transitions are studied. The nuclear gas-liquid and hadron-quark transitions in heavy-ion collisions are considered. We demonstrate that at nonzero thermal conductivity, {kappa} {ne} 0, onset of spinodal instabilities occurs on an isothermal spinodal line, whereas for {kappa} = 0 instabilities take place at lower temperatures, on an adiabatic spinodal.

Voskresensky, D. N., E-mail: D.Voskresensky@gsi.de [National Research Nuclear University 'MEPhI' (Russian Federation); Skokov, V. V., E-mail: V.Skokov@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Bulk viscosity, particle spectra and flow in heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of bulk viscosity on pT spectra and elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions. For this purpose we compute the dissipative correction df to the single particle distribution functions in leading-log QCD, and in several simplified models. We consider, in particular, the relaxation time approximation and a kinetic model for the hadron resonance gas. We implement these distribution functions in a hydrodynamic simulation of Au + Au collisions at RHIC. We find significant corrections due to bulk viscosity in hadron pT spectra and the differential elliptic flow parameter v2(pT). These corrections are dominated by viscous corrections to the distribution function. We find that the relation between df and the bulk viscosity is different in the quark gluon plasma and hadronic phases. Reliable bounds on the bulk viscosity require accurate calculations of df in a hadronic resonance gas. Based on v2 spectra at RHIC we conservatively estimate zeta/s viscosity on the pT integrated v2 are small.

Kevin Dusling; Thomas Schaefer

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope  

SciTech Connect

The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited amount of geographically diverse data, it is not possible to develop a comprehensive predictive model. Based on the comprehensive phase behavior analysis of Alaska North Slope crude oil, a reservoir simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of a gas injection enhanced oil recovery technique for the West Sak reservoir. It was found that a definite increase in viscous oil production can be obtained by selecting the proper injectant gas and by optimizing reservoir operating parameters. A comparative analysis is provided, which helps in the decision-making process.

Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Biochemical processing of heavy oils and residuum  

SciTech Connect

During the past several decades, the petroleum industry has adjusted gradually to accommodate the changes in market product demands, government regulations, and the quality and cost of feedstock crude oils. For example, the trends show that the demand for distillate fuels, such as diesel, as compared to gasoline are increasing. Air-quality standards have put additional demand on the processing of heavier and higher sulfur feed stocks. Thus, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments require the industry to produce greater quantities of oxygenated gasoline, and lower sulfur diesel and reformulated gasoline. Biochemical technology may play an important role in responding to these demands on the petroleum industry. Since oil is of biological origin, some biochemical reactions started at the beginning of its formation are still continuing in reservoirs on a geological time scale. Although these rates are very slow, many reactions can proceed readily under optimal conditions. This article will address some of the reactions that may be useful for processing heavy oils and refinery residuum. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.; Yablon, J.H.; Zhou, Wei-Min [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques  

SciTech Connect

This final report and technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007 for the project 'Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy Oil Recovery Techniques', DE-FC26-04NT15526. Critical year 3 activities of this project were not undertaken because of reduced funding to the DOE Oil Program despite timely submission of a continuation package and progress on year 1 and 2 subtasks. A small amount of carried-over funds were used during June-August 2007 to complete some work in the area of foamed-gas mobility control. Completion of Year 3 activities and tasks would have led to a more thorough completion of the project and attainment of project goals. This progress report serves as a summary of activities and accomplishments for years 1 and 2. Experiments, theory development, and numerical modeling were employed to elucidate heavy-oil production mechanisms that provide the technical foundations for producing efficiently the abundant, discovered heavy-oil resources of the U.S. that are not accessible with current technology and recovery techniques. Work fell into two task areas: cold production of heavy oils and thermal recovery. Despite the emerging critical importance of the waterflooding of viscous oil in cold environments, work in this area was never sanctioned under this project. It is envisioned that heavy oil production is impacted by development of an understanding of the reservoir and reservoir fluid conditions leading to so-called foamy oil behavior, i.e, heavy-oil solution gas drive. This understanding should allow primary, cold production of heavy and viscous oils to be optimized. Accordingly, we evaluated the oil-phase chemistry of crude oil samples from Venezuela that give effective production by the heavy-oil solution gas drive mechanism. Laboratory-scale experiments show that recovery correlates with asphaltene contents as well as the so-called acid number (AN) and base number (BN) of the crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal steam injection wells and implementation of steam trap control that limits steam entry into hor

Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Construction Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5 million per site Program Info Funding Source Government of Quebec State Quebec Program Type Rebate Program Provider Agence de l'efficacité énergétique This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out various analyses as well as implement energy efficient measures relating to heavy fuel oil or to switch to other forms of energy containing fewer pollutants, such as natural gas,

102

Low gas-liquid ratio foam flooding for conventional heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recovery of heavy oil by water flooding is 10% lower than that of conventional crude oil, so enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is of great significance for heavy oil. In this paper, foam flooding with a gas-liqu...

Jing Wang; Jijiang Ge; Guicai Zhang; Baodong Ding; Li Zhang…

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Viscosity index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1929) n....An arbitrary number assigned as a measure of the constancy of the viscosity of a lubricating oil with change of temperature with higher numbers indicating viscosities that change little with temperatu...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Co-processing of heavy oil  

SciTech Connect

In co-processing of petroleum and coal, the petroleum fraction may serve as the {open_quotes}liquefaction solvent,{close_quotes} or hydrogen donor, and the aromatics present in the coal liquid may serve as hydrogen {open_quotes}shuttlers{close_quotes} by efficiently transferring hydrogen moieties to places where they are most deficient. The important advantages of co-processing include the following: (1) upgrading of heavy petroleum in a reaction with coal and (2) conversion of coal to synthetic crudes which could be further upgraded to a premium liquid fuel. Co-processing of coal with petroleum, heavy crudes, and residues through catalytic hydrogenation or solvent extraction have been extensively investigated. The studies were typically conducted in the temperature range of 450{degrees}-500{degrees}C under pressurized hydrogen; catalysts are generally also added for hydroconversion of the feedstocks. However, relatively little has been reported in the literature regarding co-processing of coal with heavy petroleum by simple pyrolysis. In this study, co-processing of heavy oil and coal at relatively middle conditions was conducted without the complicating influences of pressurized hydrogen or catalysts. The resulted demonstrate that there is a synergism during co-processing of petroleum and coal. This synergism enhances both the yield and quality of the liquid products. In general, liquids from co-processing the mixture contain a higher content of alkane/alkene, neutral aromatics, lower content of monophenols, and other oxygen containing compounds as compared to the liquids from coal alone. The liquid from the mixture also contains a higher content of naphthenic carbon and naphthenic rings/molecules than those from coal liquid. This suggests that the product from the mixture can be easily upgraded to a premium quality fuel.

Khan, M.R. [Texaco Research and Development, Beacon, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process localiser la chambre Ă  vapeur. INTRODUCTION [1] Huge quantities of heavy oils (heavy oil, extra heavy oil. Larribau 64018 Pau Cedex, France Oil and Gas Science and Technology 2012, 67 (6), 1029-1039, doi:10

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

106

Hydrodynamic flow in heavy-ion collisions with large hadronic viscosity  

SciTech Connect

Using the (2+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic code vish2+1 with a temperature-dependent specific shear viscosity ({eta}/s)(T), we present a detailed study of the influence of a large hadronic shear viscosity and its corresponding relaxation time {tau}{sub {pi}} on the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow of hadrons produced in 200A GeV Au+Au collisions. Although theory, in principle, predicts a well-defined relation {tau}{sub {pi}T}={kappa}(T)x({eta}/s)(T), the precise form of {kappa}(T) for the matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is not known. For the popular choice {kappa}=3 the hadron spectra are found to be insensitive to a significant rise of {eta}/s in the hadronic stage, whereas their differential elliptic flow v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) is strongly suppressed by large hadronic viscosity. The large viscous effects on v{sub 2} are strongly reduced if (as theoretically expected) {kappa}(T) is allowed to grow with decreasing temperature in the hadronic stage. This implies that, until reliable calculations of {kappa}(T) become available, an extraction of the hadronic shear viscosity from a comparison between vish2+1 and a microscopic hadron cascade or experimental data requires a simultaneous fit of ({eta}/s)(T) and {kappa}(T).

Shen Chun; Heinz, Ulrich [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Process for converting heavy oil deposited on coal to distillable oil in a low severity process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing oil from coal fines that have been agglomerated or blended with heavy oil comprises the steps of heating the coal fines to temperatures over 350.degree. C. up to 450.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere, such as steam or nitrogen, to convert some of the heavy oil to lighter, and distilling and collecting the lighter oils. The pressure at which the process is carried out can be from atmospheric to 100 atmospheres. A hydrogen donor can be added to the oil prior to deposition on the coal surface to increase the yield of distillable oil.

Ignasiak, Teresa (417 Heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Strausz, Otto (13119 Grand View Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (417 heffernan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Janiak, Jerzy (17820 - 76 Ave., Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (3046 - 11465 - 41 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Szymocha, Kazimierz (3125 - 109 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Increasing Oil Productivity Through Electromagnetic Induction Heat Generation of Salt Water as a Stimulant for Heavy Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brine is usually exist in the oil reservoir. Varying salinity brine are used as stimulants for heavy oil recovery processes using electromagnetic induction heating. The heated heavy oil is floating on top of the brine since it becomes less viscous and lighter. As the temperature increased more heavy oil is “produced/recovered”. An increasing salinity of brine will result in more recovery of heavy oil.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Kinetic study of degradation of heavy oil over MCM-41  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermogravimetry was applied in order to investigate the catalytic degradation of heavy oil (15.4oAPI) over silica-based MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieve. This material was synthesised by the hydrothermal method...

Edjane F. B. Silva; Marcílio P. Ribeiro…

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Identification of petroleum acids in Liaohe super-heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, petroleum acids were extracted from the super-heavy oil of Liaohe oilfield, North-east China, by using acetic acid, and their structural components and properties were investigated by using FT-I...

Bencheng Wu; Jianhua Zhu

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Project 5 -- Solution gas drive in heavy oil reservoirs: Gas and oil phase mobilities in cold production of heavy oils. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the authors present the results of their first experiment on a heavy crude of about 35,000 cp. A new visual coreholder was designed and built to accommodate the use of unconsolidated sand. From this work, several clear conclusions can be drawn: (1) oil viscosity does not decrease with the evolution of gas, (2) the critical gas saturation is in the range of 4--5%, and (3) the endpoint oil relative permeability is around 0.6. However, the most important parameter, gas phase mobility, is still unresolved. Gas flows intermittently, and therefore the length effect becomes important. Under the conditions that the authors run the experiment, recovery is minimal, about 7.5%. This recovery is still much higher than the recovery of the C{sub 1}/C{sub 10} model system which was 3%. After a duplicate test, they plan to conduct the experiment in the horizontal core. The horizontal core is expected to provide a higher recovery.

Firoozabadi, A.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Use of Heavy Oil Fly Ash as a Color Ingredient in Cement Mortar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) is a byproduct generated by the burning of heavy fuel oil. Chemical analysis showed that HOFA is mainly composed of unburned carbon with a significant amount of heavy metals. Due to to...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Scientific research and field applications of polymer flooding in heavy oil recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heavy oil resources worldwide are estimated at 3,396 billion barrels. With depletion of light oil, we have to face the technical and economical challenges of developing heavy oil fields. Due to severe visc...

Chang Hong Gao

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Laboratory study to determine physical characteristics of heavy oil after CO/sub 2/ saturation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As part of an on-going research program for enhanced oil recovery, the Bartlesville (Oklahoma) Energy Technology Center (BETC), US Department of Energy is performing research and development of recovery techniques for heavy oils. These techniques are being studied and developed to ultimately aid production from shallow, low productivity, heavy oil sand deposits in southeastern Kansas, southwestern Missouri, and northeastern Oklahoma. Four heavy oil samples ranging, from 10/sup 0/ to 20/sup 0/ API gravity, were tested to determine their physical characteristics before and after CO/sub 2/ saturation. The experimentation was conducted using a modified PVT apparatus designed and constructed at BETC. Viscosity, density, solubility, and swelling factor were determined at temperatures of 75/sup 0/, 140/sup 0/, and 200/sup 0/F and at 11 pressures ranging from 200 to 5000 psi at each temperature. The physical property changes of heavy oils due to CO/sub 2/ saturation appear to be crude-oil dependent. Future studies should include more types of crude oils and probably higher temperatures. 14 references, 31 figures, 19 tables.

Miller, J.S.; Jones, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development Practices for Optimized MEOR in Shallow Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas using a combination of microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and hydraulic fracturing of vertical wells.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hydrogen solubility in heavy oil systems: Experiments and modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrogen solubility measurements in heavy oils are required in order to develop accurate process models. Nevertheless, these solubility measurements are challenging at elevated temperatures and pressures and the amount of data points is scarce in the literature. This paper presents measured hydrogen solubilities in heavy oil systems at a temperature range from 498 to 598 K and a pressure range from 2 to 11 MPa. The experiments were conducted with a continuous flow apparatus. One of the well-characterized heavy oil systems was a hydrocracked vacuum gas oil and the second system consisted of a modified vacuum residue from Urals crude and toluene. The modified vacuum residue and toluene mixtures were prepared gravimetrically (mass fractions of vacuum residue: 0.25, 0.34 and 0.50). The experiments demonstrated that increasing the partial pressure of hydrogen and temperature increased the hydrogen solubility. Another finding was that the amount of toluene in the system had great impact to the hydrogen solubility. Four modeling approaches were compared based on their predictions on the hydrogen solubility in heavy oil systems measured in this work and four heavy oils found from the literature. The chosen models were PC-SAFT, Peng–Robinson, a simple correlation based on the corresponding theory and a method based on the Scatchard–Hildebrand theory. PC-SAFT with applied a heavy oil characterization method and the correlation based on the corresponding theory were found to predict the hydrogen solubility equally well and accurately. The benefit of using PC-SAFT instead of the simple correlation is that with PC-SAFT, phase behavior of multicomponent systems can be predicted and other properties, such as densities, can be obtained simultaneously. Peng–Robinson with a single carbon number characterization method overestimated the hydrogen solubility in the studied heavy oils and the method based on the Scatchard–Hildebrand theory could model the hydrogen solubility well after parameter regression.

Meri Saajanlehto; Petri Uusi-Kyyny; Ville Alopaeus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to compile data on reservoirs that contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range, contain at least ten million barrels of oil currently in place, and are non-carbonate in lithology. The reservoirs within these constraints were then analyzed in light of applicable recovery technology, either steam-drive or in situ combustion, and then ranked hierarchically as candidate reservoirs. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I presents the project background and approach, the screening analysis, ranking criteria, and listing of candidate reservoirs. The economic and environmental aspects of heavy oil recovery are included in appendices to this volume. This study provides an extensive basis for heavy oil development, but should be extended to include carbonate reservoirs and tar sands. It is imperative to look at heavy oil reservoirs and projects on an individual basis; it was discovered that operators, and industrial and government analysts will lump heavy oil reservoirs as poor producers, however, it was found that upon detailed analysis, a large number, so categorized, were producing very well. A study also should be conducted on abandoned reservoirs. To utilize heavy oil, refiners will have to add various unit operations to their processes, such as hydrotreaters and hydrodesulfurizers and will require, in most cases, a lighter blending stock. A big problem in producing heavy oil is that of regulation; specifically, it was found that the regulatory constraints are so fluid and changing that one cannot settle on a favorable recovery and production plan with enough confidence in the regulatory requirements to commit capital to the project.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A methodical study of reliability analysis of the crude oil unit in processing heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel approach to analyse the safety and reliability issues on the crude oil unit in processing heavy oil. Based on the discussions of the corrosion mechanism, it uses fault tree analysis to identify the key factors that may lead to failure of crude oil unit when processing heavy oil. It has found that factors such as temperature, consistence, relatively move speed and material, critically affect the corrosion rate of the naphthenic acid. In order to explore the relationships between the identified factors and the corrosion rate of the naphthenic acid, this paper uses artificial neural networks to identify such normally non-linear relationships. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to collect data of the corrosion rate using different materials in different temperatures, consistence and velocity. The analyses show that the proposed research method is sound and can be used in safety and reliability analysis of crude oil unit in processing heavy oil.

Qingyou Liu; Guorong Wang; Yan Yang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Pulping black liquor used directly as a green and effective source for neat oil and as an emulsifier of catalytic cracking heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to evaluate the use of emulsified heavy oils to conduct the FCC reaction. The emulsified heavy oil was prepared by homogenizing. Properties of emulsified heavy oil, including int...

Ge Xu; Ji-he Yang; Hui-hui Mao; Zhi Yun

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum Seeps Near Coal Oil Point, CA C pattern for heavy oil from the persistent surface slicks; average surface currents appear to modulate by the National Research Council (2). An important emerging issue is the fate of heavy oils introduced

Fabrikant, Sara Irina

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121

Application of Carbon Nanocatalysts in Upgrading Heavy Crude Oil Assisted with Microwave Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of Carbon Nanocatalysts in Upgrading Heavy Crude Oil Assisted with Microwave Heating, Stanford, California 94305, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Heavy crude oil can that by using carbon nano- catalysts, heavy crude oil can be efficiently upgraded to lighter oil at a relatively

Cui, Yi

122

Heavy oil characterization method for PC-SAFT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oil characterization is a crucial step in modeling heavy oil systems. Since heavy oil consists of thousands of components, for modeling purpose it is required to lump hydrocarbons into pseudocomponents. New generation equation of state (EoS), Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT), has shown promising results for modeling heavy oil systems. However, single carbon number type characterization approach has been lacking for PC-SAFT until now. The characterization method presented in this paper is based on sorting the pseudocomponents according to their boiling points. Further, each boiling point cut is split into saturate, aromatic and polyaromatic fractions. Asphaltenes are treated as a single pseudocomponent. For calculations, the PC-SAFT parameters were obtained for each pseudocomponent. The characterization procedure was validated by predicting densities for two heavy oils, three heavy oil cuts and propane + Athabasca bitumen (AB) and CO2 + propane + AB systems and comparing the results with measured data (109 data points). The relative average deviation was at its highest 2.1 % for density. In addition, saturation pressures were predicted for propane + AB and CO2 + propane + AB systems (57 data points). The saturation pressure predictions were as good as predicted earlier in the literature with Peng–Robinson EoS (in this work: the relative average deviations were 7.2 % and 2.0 % for propane + AB and CO2 + propane + AB systems). The calculations demonstrated that densities and gas solubilities for heavy oil systems can be accurately predicted with PC-SAFT without any adjustable PC-SAFT parameters if the distillation curve is available.

Meri Saajanlehto; Ville Alopaeus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Refiner options for converting and utilizing heavy fuel oil  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing advances in established technologies, together with recent commercial applications of residue fluid catalytic cracking (RFCC), automated residue demetallization, solvent deasphalting and gasification of pitch and coke, have markedly enhanced options for processing and economically using residues. Key long-term driving forces for processing strategies are: the need for flexibility to handle heavy, high-metals crude oils, and the economic benefit of being able to convert low-value residues to high-value light transportation fuels, hydrogen and electric power. Narrowing light/heavy crude oil price differentials and relatively low crude oil price levels since the early 1990s until the first quarter of 1996 have slowed the addition of new bottom-of-the-barrel conversion projects over the past two years. At the same time, world crude oil demand has increased at an annual average rate of nearly one million barrels/day (MMbpd) since 1985. Some major producer/refining companies forecast this rate of increase to continue well into the next decade. The inevitable net result will be the increased production of heavier crude oils. The authors project that this will be accompanied by flat or declining markets for heavy fuel oil and a resultant need for additional residue conversion/utilization capacity. The paper discusses technology application and status, economic observations, and technology outlook.

Dickenson, R.L.; Biasca, F.E.; Schulman, B.L.; Johnson, H.E. [SFA Pacific, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Promising Aspects of Heavy Oil and Native Asphalt Conversion Under Field Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heavy oils and native asphalt commercial field development is concerned with research on different issues, refer to production, transportation and processing. Investigation on the possibility of heavy oils and...

B. P. Tumanyan; G. V. Romanov…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands Derived Fuels Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands Derived Fuels 2003 DEER Conference Presentation:...

126

Mechanisms of hydrocracking of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on research data, a technology of low-pressure residual fuel oil hydrocracking with a suspended catalyst has been developed. The process has been refined on a laboratory setup. The reaction kinetics has ...

Kh. I. Abad-zade; F. M. Velieva…

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A heavy oil thermal cracking simulation program  

SciTech Connect

Correlations were developed to simulate the thermal cracking reaction of petroleum vacuum distillation residues through pilot plant data analysis. They use charge properties like specific gravity, viscosity, sulphur content and initial boiling point to give the yield and quality of products as a function of conversion, which is measured in terms of wt.% products with normal boiling point below 350{degrees}C. The mixture is represented with 24 lumps, and kinetic parameters for the reaction feed {r_arrow} products were also found as a function of feedstock properties. Finally, a computer program was developed to simulate fired heater operation for visbreaking and delayed coking units. 3 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Maciel, R. [UNICAMP, Campinas (Brazil); Sugaya, M.F. [Petrobrais, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Possible Loss of Venezuelan Heavy Crude Oil Imports Underscores the Strategic Importance of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Possible Loss of Venezuelan Heavy Crude Oil Imports Underscores the Strategic Importance crude, making reliance on Canadian heavy crude oil more significant, and the approval of the Keystone XL of ConocoPhillips' Petrozuata- Hamaca and ExxonMobil's Cerro Negro Orinoco Belt heavy oil projects

Texas at Austin, University of

129

Analysis of Heavy Oil Recovery by Thermal EOR in a Meander Belt: From Geological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Heavy Oil Recovery by Thermal EOR in a Meander Belt: From Geological to Reservoir Energies nouvelles2 INTRODUCTION SAGD will become increasingly important for heavy oil recovery because assessment, well placement and production performance prediction. One of the most famous heavy oil provinces

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

Canadian oilsands, heavy oil poised for surge in development  

SciTech Connect

Operators in Canada`s oilsands and heavy oil regions are on the brink of a period of growth that could last well into the next century. Several factors are combining in a scenario a National Task Force report on oilsands says could dramatically increase investment and production in the next 25 years. By then, massive oilsands and heavy oil reserves in northern Alberta could account for as much as 50%--perhaps more--of Canada`s oil production. Technological improvements in recovery and processing have slashed production costs and put nonconventional oil on a more competitive footing with declining reserves of conventional crude in western Canada. At the same time, persistent lobbying by industry and a well researched national study have persuaded federal and provincial governments to introduce a new royalty and fiscal regime designed to bolster oilsands investment. New policies give clear incentives to investors to put money into oilsands and heavy oil projects. Policies also will provide a generic tax treatment for all new projects, long a major objective of oilsands promoters. Previously, royalty and tax agreements were negotiated for project case by case. This paper reviews the resource base and the new operational developments resulting from these policies.

NONE

1996-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

System and method for preparing near-surface heavy oil for extraction using microbial degradation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil in an oil extraction environment by feeding nutrients to a preferred microbial species (bacteria and/or fungi). A method is described that includes the steps of: sampling and identifying microbial species that reside in the oil extraction environment; collecting fluid property data from the oil extraction environment; collecting nutrient data from the oil extraction environment; identifying a preferred microbial species from the oil extraction environment that can transform the heavy oil into a lighter oil; identifying a nutrient from the oil extraction environment that promotes a proliferation of the preferred microbial species; and introducing the nutrient into the oil extraction environment.

Busche, Frederick D. (Highland Village, TX); Rollins, John B. (Southlake, TX); Noyes, Harold J. (Golden, CO); Bush, James G. (West Richland, WA)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

132

New lube oil for stationary heavy fuel engines  

SciTech Connect

An extensively field-tested diesel engine lubricating oil for medium speed, heavy fuel stationary engine applications has been introduced by Caltex Petroleum, in Dallas, Texas. The new oil is similar to a product developed and marketed for marine medium speed heavy fuel propulsion and auxillary engine applications by one of its two parent companies, Chevron. Detailed are results of two field evaluations in Caterpillar 3600 series engines installed at Kimberly Clark (KCPI) and Sime Darby (SDPI), both in the Philippines. Both were one year, 7000-plus hour field evaluations of a new, 40 BN trunk piston engine oil (TPEO), identified as Caltex Delo 3400, SAE 40 engine lube oil. The oil uses the new Phenalate additive technology developed by Chevron Chemical Company`s Oronite Additives Division. This technology is designed to improve engine cleanliness in regard to soft black sludge and piston deposits. The focus of the field evaluations was the performance of the lubricating oil. During controlled tests at Sime Darby, the most noticeable improvement over another technology was in the control of sludge deposits. This improvement was seen in all areas where black sludge forms, such as the rocker cover, crankcase cover and valve assemblies. 4 figs.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Biochemical processing of heavy oils and residuum  

SciTech Connect

During the past several decades, the petroleum industry has adjusted gradually to accommodate the changes in market product demands, government regulations, and the quality and cost of feedstock crude oils. For example, the trends show that the demand for distillate fuels, such as diesel, as compared to gasoline are increasing. Air-quality standards have put additional demand on the processing of heavier and higher sulfur feed stocks. Thus, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments require the industry to produce greater quantities of oxygenated gasoline, and lower sulfur diesel and reformulated gasoline. Biochemical technology may play an important role in responding to these demands on the petroleum industry.

Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, T.; Yablon, J.H.; Zhou, Wei-Min

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative for the transportation of heavy crude oils. The lubricating effect of the aqueous film leads of such surfaces by crude oils through contact angle measurements in systems containing heavy oil/aqueous phase Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Heavy oil; Asphaltenes; Naphthenic acids; Wettability; Oil

Loh, Watson

135

The measurement of solubility and viscosity of oil/refrigerant mixtures; At high pressures and temperatures test facility and initial results for R-22/naphthenic oil mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The design and construction of a test facility for measuring the solubility and viscosity of lubricating oil/refrigerant mixtures at high pressures and temperatures are described. An auxiliary charging system, developed to provide precisely measured quantities of oil and refrigerant to the test facility, is also presented. Initial results for liquid mixtures of 10% to 40% R-22 (by mass) in a 150 SUS naphthenic oil are reported over the temperature range 70 {degrees} F (20{degrees}C) to 300 {degrees} F(150 {degrees}C). Good agreement with existing data from the open literature is obtained over the limited temperature range for which previously published data are available.

Van Gaalen, N.A.; Zoz, S.C.; Pate, M.B. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A study on ultra heavy oil gasification technology  

SciTech Connect

Raising the thermal efficiency of a thermal power plant is an important issue from viewpoints of effective energy utilization and environmental protection. In view of raising the thermal efficiency, a gas turbine combined cycle power generation is considered to be very effective. The thermal efficiency of the latest LNG combined cycle power plant has been raised by more than 50%. On the other hand, the diversification of fuels to ensure supply stability is also an important issue, particularly in Japan where natural resources are scarce. Because of excellent handling characteristics petroleum and LNG which produces clean combustion are used in many sectors, and so the demand for such fuels is expected to grow. However, the availability of such fuels is limited, and supplies will be exhausted in the near future. The development of a highly efficient and environment-friendly gas turbine combined cycle using ultra heavy oil such as Orimulsion{trademark} (trademark of BITOR) is thus a significant step towards resolving these two issues. Chubu Electric Power Co, Inc., the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) conducted a collaboration from 1994 to 1998 with the objective of developing an ultra heavy oil integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Construction of the ultra heavy oil gasification testing facility (fuel capacity:2.4t/d) was completed in 1995, and Orimulsion{trademark} gasification tests were carried out in 1995 and 1996. In 1997, the hot dedusting facility with ceramic filter and the water scrubber used as a preprocessor of a wet desulfurization process were installed. Gasification and clean up the syngs tests were carried out on Orimulsion{trademark}, Asmulsion{trademark} (trademark of Nisseki Mitsubishi K.K.), and residue oil in 1997 and 1998. The results of the collaboration effort are described below.

Kidoguchi, Kazuhiro; Ashizawa, Masami; Taki, Masato; Ishimura, Masato; Takeno, Keiji

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Venezuelan projects advance to develop world`s largest heavy oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

A number of joint venture projects at varying stages of progress promise to greatly increase Venezuela`s production of extra heavy oil. Units of Conoco, Chevron, Total, Arco, and Mobil have either signed agreements or are pursuing negotiations with affiliates of state-owned Petroleos de Venezuela SA on the development of huge reserves of 8--10{degree} gravity crude. Large heavy oil resources are present in the oil producing areas of eastern and western Venezuela, and the largest are in eastern Venezuela`s Orinoco heavy oil belt. The paper discusses the Orinoco heavy oil belt geology and several joint ventures being implemented.

Croft, G.; Stauffer, K. [Pantera Petroleum Inc., San Leandro, CA (United States)

1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

138

INDUCED BIOCHEMICAL INTERACTIONS IN IMMATURE AND BIODEGRADED HEAVY CRUDE OILS  

SciTech Connect

Studies in which selective chemical markers have been used to explore the mechanisms by which biocatalysts interact with heavy crude oils have shown that the biochemical reactions follow distinct trends. The term biocatalyst refers to a group of extremophilic microorganisms which, under the experimental conditions used, interact with heavy crude oils to (1) cause a redistribution of hydrocarbons, (2) cause chemical changes in oil fractions containing sulfur compounds and lower the sulfur content, (3) decrease organic nitrogen content, and (4) decrease the concentration of trace metals. Current data indicate that the overall effect is due to simultaneous reactions yielding products with relatively higher concentration of saturates and lower concentrations of aromatics and resins. The compositional changes depend on the microbial species and the chemistry of the crudes. Economic analysis of a potential technology based on the available data indicate that such a technology, used in a pre-refinery mode, may be cost efficient and promising. In the present paper, the background of oil biocatalysis and some recent results will be discussed.

PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; SHELENKOVA,L.; ZHOU,W.M.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

Induced biochemical interactions in immature and biodegraded heavy crude oils  

SciTech Connect

Studies in which selective chemical markers have been used to explore the mechanisms by which biocatalysts interact with heavy crude oils have shown that the biochemical reactions follow distinct trends. The term biocatalyst refers to a group of extremophilic microorganisms which, under the experimental conditions used, interact with heavy crude oils to (1) cause a redistribution of hydrocarbons, (2) cause chemical changes in oil fractions containing sulfur compounds and lower the sulfur content, (3) decrease organic nitrogen content, and (4) decrease the concentration of trace metals. Current data indicate that the overall effect is due to simultaneous reactions yielding products with relatively higher concentration of saturates and lower concentrations of aromatics and resins. The compositional changes depend on the microbial species and the chemistry of the crudes. Economic analysis of a potential technology based on the available data indicate that such a technology, used in a pre-refinery mode, may be cost efficient and promising. In the present paper, the background of oil biocatalysis and some recent results will be discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Shelenkova, L.; Zhou, W.M.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Lube oil for medium-speed, heavy-fuel engines  

SciTech Connect

A new generation of trunk-piston engine lube oils has been introduced by Chevron International Marine Lubricants for medium-speed, heavy-fuel, four-stroke engines. The new Chevron Delo 1000, 2000, 3000, and 3400 marine lubricants are specially designed for the demands of medium-speed diesel engines in today`s marine and stationary power markets. The new lube oil has been formulated to provide high levels of engine cleanliness, with low levels of wear. Testing by Chevron engineers shows that the new oils prevent the buildup of black sludge, a sticky, viscous deposit that can accumulate on the surfaces of medium-speed engines that run on heavy residual fuel. The performance of the new lube oils has been thoroughly evaluated by Chevron in a number of ongoing field tests. Results from 5000 hour teardown of a 6600 kW, model 6 MaK 601C engine in the cargo ship MV Germania serve as a good example of the field testing. 3 figs.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Bulk Viscosity driven clusterization of quark-gluon plasma and early freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new scenario for heavy ion collisions that could solve the lingering problems associated with the so-called HBT puzzle. We postulate that the system starts expansion as the perfect quark-gluon fluid but close to freeze-out it splits into clusters, due to a sharp rise of bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the hadronization transition. We then argue that the characteristic cluster size is determined by the viscosity coefficient and the expansion rate. Typically it is much smaller and independent of the total system volume. These clusters maintain the pre-existing outward-going flow, as a spray of droplets, but develop no flow of their own, and hadronize by evaporation. We provide an ansatz for converting the hydrodynamic output into clusters.

Giorgio Torrieri; Boris Tomasik; Igor Mishustin

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Bulk Viscosity driven clusterization of quark-gluon plasma and early freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new scenario for heavy ion collisions that could solve the lingering problems associated with the so-called HBT puzzle. We postulate that the system starts expansion as the perfect quark-gluon fluid but close to freeze-out it splits into clusters, due to a sharp rise of bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the hadronization transition. We then argue that the characteristic cluster size is determined by the viscosity coefficient and the expansion rate. Typically it is much smaller and independent of the total system volume. These clusters maintain the pre-existing outward-going flow, as a spray of droplets, but develop no flow of their own, and hadronize by evaporation. We provide an ansatz for converting the hydrodynamic output into clusters.

Torrieri, G; Mishustin, I

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Availability of heavy fuel oils by sulfur level, September 1981  

SciTech Connect

A narrative analysis of the status of the United States' total new supply of heavy fuel oils, is given with emphasis on sulfur levels. Tables detail refinery production, stocks, and imports of residual fuel oil and No. 4 fuel oil by sulfur content. All data except stock figures are reported on a monthly and on a year-to-date basis; stock data are reported on an end-of-current-month basis. Units of measure are thousands of barrels. Stocks held, refineries and bulk terminals and refinery production are given by Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) and refinery Districts. Imports are given by PAD District, by country of origin, and by importing State. Waterborne movements from PAD District III to other districts are detailed for the most recent month only. This report was previously published by the Bureau of Mines in the Minerals Industries Surveys Series under the same title. Publication was discontinued with the December 1981 issue. 2 figures, 13 tables.

Wolfrey, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of a shallow heavy-oil deposit in Missouri  

SciTech Connect

Shallow deposits of heavy-oil in western Missouri have become more attractive to exploit recently. Aside from problems of producing the low-gravity, viscous oil, part of the difficulty in successfully developing these deposits has been the geologic nature of the reservoir sandstone. Recognition of the origin of the reservoir sandstone in Eastburn field as a series of point bars in an upper deltaic, fluvial distributary environment has affected the selection of drilling locations, drilling and coring procedures, estimation of reserves, and location of producing facilities. Recognition of the uneven distribution of permeability, the intergranular type of porosity, and the presence of potentially troublesome clays and iron-bearing minerals in this sandstone influenced the methods selected for evaluation, completion, and stimulation of producing wells. This teamwork approach between geologists and engineers is important in maximizing the chances for success of technically difficult enhanced oil recovery projects.

Ebanks, J.W.J.; Weber, J.F.

1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

145

Improving the Modeling of Hydrogen Solubility in Heavy Oil Cuts Using an Augmented  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the Modeling of Hydrogen Solubility in Heavy Oil Cuts Using an Augmented Grayson Streed -- Improving the Modeling of Hydrogen Solubility in Heavy Oil Cuts Using an Augmented Grayson Streed (AGS for calculating hydrogen solubility in petroleum fluids. However, its accuracy becomes very bad when very heavy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil  

SciTech Connect

Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to determine the throughput capability of the coker so a scaled design could be developed that maximized feed rate for a given size of reactor. These tests were only partially successful because of equipment problems. A redesigned coker, which addressed the problems, has been build but not operated. A preliminary economic analysis conducted by MEG and an their engineering consultant concluded that the WRITE{trademark} process is a technically feasible method for upgrading bitumen and that it produces SCO that meets pipeline specifications for density. When compared to delayed coking, the industry benchmark for thermal upgrading of bitumen, WRITE{trademark} produced more SCO, less coke, less CO{sub 2} per barrel of bitumen fed, and had lower capital and operating costs. On the other hand, WRITE{trademark}'s lower processing severity yielded crude with higher density and a different product distribution for naphtha, light gas oil and vacuum oil that, taken together, might reduce the value of the SCO. These issues plus the completion of more detailed process evaluation and economics need to be resolved before WRITE{trademark} is deployed as a field-scale pilot.

Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

2009-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Modeling a set of heavy oil aqueous pyrolysis experiments  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous pyrolysis experiments, aimed at mild upgrading of heavy oil, were analyzed using various computer models. The primary focus of the analysis was the pressure history of the closed autoclave reactors obtained during the heating of the autoclave to desired reaction temperatures. The models used included a means of estimating nonideal behavior of primary components with regard to vapor liquid equilibrium. The modeling indicated that to match measured autoclave pressures, which often were well below the vapor pressure of water at a given temperature, it was necessary to incorporate water solubility in the oil phase and an activity model for the water in the oil phase which reduced its fugacity below that of pure water. Analysis also indicated that the mild to moderate upgrading of the oil which occurred in experiments that reached 400{degrees}C or more using a FE(III) 2-ethylhexanoate could be reasonably well characterized by a simple first order rate constant of 1.7xl0{sup 8} exp(-20000/T)s{sup {minus}l}. Both gas production and API gravity increase were characterized by this rate constant. Models were able to match the complete pressure history of the autoclave experiments fairly well with relatively simple equilibria models. However, a consistent lower than measured buildup in pressure at peak temperatures was noted in the model calculations. This phenomena was tentatively attributed to an increase in the amount of water entering the vapor phase caused by a change in its activity in the oil phase.

Thorsness, C.B.; Reynolds, J.G.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Integrated Remediation Process for a High Salinity Industrial Soil Sample Contaminated with Heavy Oil and Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A highly saline industrial soil sample contaminated with heavy oils and several heavy metals, was tested for remediation using NRC’s Solvent Extraction Soil Remediation (SESR) process. The sample was provided ...

Abdul Majid; Bryan D. Sparks

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Impact of solvent type and injection sequence on Enhanced Cyclic Solvent Process (ECSP) for thin heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A considerable portion of the western Canada's heavy oil resides in thin formations. In this situation, thermal methods cannot be used due to heat loss to overburden and underburden. Vapor extraction (VAPEX) fails because of inefficient gravity drainage and low initial production rate. Studies have been done on the cyclic solvent process (CSP) in an attempt to speed up the oil production rate in the solvent injection process. CSP performs poorly because the presence of continuous free methane saturation at the start of production cycles results in high gas mobility, and, consequently, quick methane production, quick pressure depletion, and a significant loss of oil viscosity reduction. As a result, the drive energy becomes depleted by methane production. Also, if low or intermediate initial production pressures are used, the methane solubility in the oil is not high, and the viscosity reduction is not significant. To resolve the above problems of CSP, Yadali Jamaloei et al. (2012) introduced a new process for thin reservoirs – Enhanced Cyclic Solvent Process (ECSP). In ECSP, two types of hydrocarbon solvents are injected separately, in a cyclic manner; one slug is more volatile (methane) and the other is more soluble (propane or ethane) in heavy oil and bitumen. The focus of this study is finding the optimum solvent injection sequence; this will be accomplished through examining the impact of the solvent injection sequence on the performance of ECSP, using different solvent pairs. The experimental results obtained from four series of ECSP tests, each consisting of six cycles, show higher oil recovery and production rate, and lower gas requirement and drawdown when methane is injected before ethane or propane. Wabiskaw formation in the Pelican oilfield in northern Alberta with 17 wells was chosen for performing simulation of ECSP. History matching was conducted for field-scale cumulative oil, gas and water production, and average reservoir pressure. Injection rate and injection time of methane and propane, soaking time and minimum well bottom-hole pressure in the methane–propane ECSP scheme were optimized to predict the field production performance of ECSP. Field-scale simulation revealed that the proposed methane–propane ECSP scheme is a highly effective method for improving heavy oil recovery in thin reservoirs.

Benyamin Yadali Jamaloei; Mingzhe Dong; Ping Yang; Daoyong Yang; Nader Mahinpey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. In the twelve to eighteen-month project period, three wells were equipped with ERT arrays. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) background measurements were taken in the three ERT equipped wells. Pumping equipment was installed on the two fracture stimulated wells and pumping tests were conducted following the hydraulic fracture treatments. All wells were treated monthly with microbes, by adding a commercially available microbial mixture to wellbore fluids. ERT surveys were taken on a monthly basis, following microbial treatments. Worked performed to date demonstrates that resistivity changes are occurring in the subsurface, with resistivity increasing slightly. Pumping results for the hydraulically fractured wells were disappointing, with only a show of oil recovered and an increase in well shut-in pressure.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Multi-level analysis of field synergy in the displacement mechanisms of heavy oil thermal recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the major problems of heavy oil thermal recovery is the inadequacy of understanding the multi-field coupling displacement mechanisms to improve the oil production and extraction ratio. From the perspect...

Yang Liu; Qinglin Cheng; Xuxu Wang; Xinyao Xiang

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Simulation studies of steam-propane injection for the Hamaca heavy oil field.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Simulation studies were performed to evaluate a novel technology, steam-propane injection, for the heavy Hamaca crude oil. The oil has a gravity of 9.3?API and… (more)

Venturini, Gilberto Jose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Simulation study to investigate development options for a super-heavy oil reservoir.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A reservoir simulation study was performed on a heavy oil reservoir with the main objective of evaluating possible development options beyond the existing cold production… (more)

Diaz Franco, Jose Manuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Phytoremediation combined with mycorrhizal fungi of soil contaminated by heavy oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to investigate efficiencies of phytoremediation for heavy oil contaminated soils by plants infected with mycorrhizal fungi. Plants inoculated with… (more)

Kuo, Hsiu-Chi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Methods of analysis modified size exchange chromatography method for analysis of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A modified size exchange chromatography method is used to obtain molecular weight distributions, average molecular weight, and other characteristics of heavy oil residues: coal asphalt, petroleum asphalt, vacu...

Changming Zhang; Adnan Alhajji…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Numerical Simulation of Displacement Mechanisms for Enhancing Heavy Oil Recovery during Alkaline Flooding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a simulation technique has been developed and successfully applied to numerically simulate the experimentally determined displacement mechanisms governing alkaline flooding for enhancing oil recovery in heavy oil reservoirs. ... (8-13) The existing simulation techniques used for alkaline flooding in the conventional oil reservoirs result in significant discrepancy between the experimental and simulated pressure drop for alkaline flooding in heavy oil reservoirs. ... Both the scientific findings and the newly developed simulation technique will facilitate simulating and designing field-scale alkaline flooding for heavy oil reservoirs. ...

Mohamed Arhuoma; Daoyong Yang; Mingzhe Dong; Heng Li; Raphael Idem

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ionizing Electron Incidents as an Efficient Way to Reduce Viscosity of Heavy Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Qmin minimum energy loss in a single collision (eV) Qmax maximum energy loss in a single collision (eV) Qavg average energy loss in a single collision (eV) W (Q) Probability density ( 1eV) Macroscopic cross section ( 1m), viscosity of the uids (cp...

Alfi, Masoud

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

159

Calculating single layer production contribution of heavy oil commingled wells by analysis of aromatic parameters in whole-oil GC-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditional fluid production profile logging is not usually suitable for heavy-viscous crude oil wells. Biodegradation of heavy oil can lead to the loss of n-ahkanes, and the use of chromatogram fingerprint techn...

Yaohui Xu; Li Ma; Linxiang Li; Wenfu Cui; Xiaowei Cheng; Xiaoping Wang

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Elongational viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(extensional viscosity, Trouton viscosity) n. The viscosity that characterizes an element undergoing elongational flow ... rate, unlike the usual reduction of shear viscosity with rate. Tensile viscosities are ap...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On the evaluation of Fast-SAGD process in naturally fractured heavy oil reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Very recently, Fast-SAGD as a modification of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) has been much attended due to lower cumulative steam oil ratio as well as higher cumulative oil production. However, there are still many suspicions about the successful application of this method in naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) in which faults, fissures, vugs, micro-fractures, poorly interconnected matrix pore structure as well as undesirable wettability are combined with high-viscosity oil. In this communication, initially, Fast-SAGD has been compared with traditional SAGD in an Iranian naturally fractured heavy oil reservoir with oil wet rock using CMG-STARS thermal simulator. Moreover, the effects of operational parameters on Fast-SAGD method have been investigated. In addition, a novel economical model has been established in which all economical parameters including input cash flow costs such as the rate of oil production and oil price, and the output cash flow costs such as capital expenditures (CAPEX), operating expenditures (OPEX), injection material and pipe line tariffs, have been considered. During the optimization of the operational parameters, it was observed that by increasing steam injection rate into both offset and SAGD wells in Fast-SAGD system, ultimate recovery factor (RF) increased, but ultimate net present value (NPV) increased up to an optimal point which could be due to the increased SOR value. By increasing steam injection pressure into offset well, both the ultimate RF and NPV increased up to an optimal point. To optimally select parameters such as the number of cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) cycles, elevation of CSS well and well spacing of SAGD well pair, sensitivity analysis should be performed to achieve the best case economically and technically due to the lack of a decrease or increase trend. In contrast to conventional reservoirs, the performance affected by start-up time at the offset well during Fast-SAGD process in fractured reservoirs indicates that earlier start-up time of steam injection leads to high RF and NPV.

Arash Kamari; Abdolhossein Hemmati-Sarapardeh; Amir H. Mohammadi; Hani Hashemi-Kiasari; Erfan Mohagheghian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 83.0 96.4 146.4 153.3 182.2 226.1 220.3 342.3 248.3 Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium 155.1 160.4 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 115.7 117.8 180.4 141.5 198.4 222.4 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Cuba NA NA NA 183.4 NA NA NA NA NA

163

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. Tasks completed in the first six-month period include soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. Work performed to date demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

164

Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A... UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by SAMIR HUSEYNZADE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Huseynzade, Samir

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Availability of heavy fuel oils by sulfur levels, February 1981  

SciTech Connect

This monthly report includes a narrative analysis of the status of the United States' total new supply of heavy fuel oils, with an emphasis on sulfur levels. Tables detail refinery production, stocks, and imports of residual fuel oil and No. 4 fuel oil by sulfur content. All data except stock figures are reported on a monthly and on a year-to-date basis; stock data are reported on an end-of-current-month basis. Units of measure are thousands of barrels. Stocks held at refineries and bulk terminals and refinery production are given by Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) and Refinery Districts. Imports are given by PAD District, by country or origin, and by importing state. Waterborne movements from PAD District III to other districts are detailed for the most recent month only. The December issue repeats the seven major tables with final data in all categories for the previous calendar year. This report was previously published by the Bureau of Mines in the Minerals Industries Surveys Series under the same title. 2 figs., 13 tabs.

Wolfrey, J.

1981-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Availability of heavy fuel oils by sulfur levels, March 1981  

SciTech Connect

This monthly report includes a narrative analysis of the status of the United States' total new supply of heavy fuel oils, with an emphasis on sulfur levels. Tables detail refinery production, stocks, and imports of residual fuel oil and No. 4 fuel oil by sulfur content. All data except stock figures are reported on a monthly and on a year-to-date basis; stock data are reported on an end-of-current-month basis. Units of measure are thousands of barrels. Stocks held at refineries and bulk terminals and refinery production are given by Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) and Refinery Districts. Imports are given by PAD District, by country of origin, and by importing state. Waterborne movements from PAD District III to other districts are detailed for the most recent month only. The December issue repeats the seven major tables with final data in all categories for the previous calendar year. This report was previously published by the Bureau of Mines in the Minerals Industries Survey Series under the same title. 2 figs., 13 tabs.

Wolfrey, J.

1981-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Availability of heavy fuel oils by sulfur level, August 1981  

SciTech Connect

A narrative analysis of the status of the United States' total new supply of heavy fuel oils, is given with emphasis on sulfur levels. Tables detail refinery production, stocks, and imports of residual fuel oil and No. 4 fuel oil by sulfur content. All data except stock figures are reported on a monthly and on a year-to-date basis; stock data are reported on an end-of-current-month basis. Units of measure are thousands of barrels. Stocks held at refineries and bulk terminals and refinery production are given by Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) and Refinery Districts. Imports are given by PAD District, by country of origin, and by importing State. Waterborne movements from PAD District III to other districts are detailed for the most recent month only. This report was previously published by the Bureau of Mines in the Minerals Industries Surveys Series under the same title. Publication was discontinued with the December 1981 issue. 1 figure, 14 tables.

Wolfrey, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Availability of heavy fuel oils by sulfur level, October 1981  

SciTech Connect

A narrative analysis of the status of the United States' total new supply of heavy fuel oils, is given with emphasis on sulfur levels. Tables detail refinery production, stocks, and imports of residual fuel oil and No. 4 fuel oil by sulfur content. All data except stock figures are reported on a monthly and on a year-to-date basis; stock data are reported on an end-of-current-month basis. Units of measure are thousands of barrels. Stocks held at refineries and bulk terminals and refinery production are given by Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) and refinery Districts. Imports are given by PAD District, by country of origin, and by importing State. Waterbone movements from PAD District III to other districts are detailed for the most recent month only. This report was previously published by the Bureau of Mines in the Minerals Industries Surveys Series under the same title. Publication was discontinued with the December 1981 issue. 1 figure, 14 tables.

Wolfrey, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A case study of multipole acoustic logging in heavy oil sand reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The multipole acoustic logging tool (MPAL) was tested in the heavy oil sand reservoirs of Canada. Compared with near shales the P-wave slowness of heavy oil sands does not change obviously with the value of about 125?s/ft; the dipole shear slowness decreases significantly to 275?s/ft. The heavy oil sands have a Vp/Vs value of less than 2.4. The slowness and amplitude of dipole shear wave are good lithology discriminators that have great differences between heavy oil sands and shales. The heavy oil sand reservoirs are anisotropic. The crossover phenomenon in the fast and slow dipole shear wave dispersion curves indicates that the anisotropy is induced by unbalanced horizontal stress in the region.

Xiaohua Che

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea-sured and modeled data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea) properties of heavy-oil sands over a range of frequencies (2 - 2000Hz) covering the seismic bandwidth and at ultrasonic frequencies (0.8MHz). The measurements were carried on heavy-oil sand sample from Asphalt Ridge

171

Optimal Control of Vapor Extraction of Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vapor extraction (Vapex) process is an emerging technology for viscous oil recovery that has gained much attention in the oil industry. However, the oil production… (more)

Muhamad, Hameed (Author)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Evaluation of Development Options for Alaska North Slope Viscous and Heavy Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current estimates of discovered viscous and heavy oil in Alaska’s North Slope are 12 billion barrels of oil-in-place and 12–18 billion barrels of oil-in-place, respectively (see Appendix 1 for conversion to SI un...

Emil D. Attanasi; Philip A. Freeman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Comprehensive kinetic models for the aquathermolysis of heavy oils  

SciTech Connect

Aquathermolysis experiments over the temperature range 360 to 422{degrees}C were performed on core samples taken from three large bitumen and heavy oil deposits found in Alberta: Athabasca, North Bodo, and Frisco Countess. The purpose of this work was to facilitate the development of comprehensive thermal cracking models for predicting gas and liquid phase product distributions under conditions anticipated during thermal recovery. Previous studies have shown by material balance on oxygen that water is implicated in many of the chemical reactions leading to the formation of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}, yet most of the reported thermal cracking studies have not included water. Additionally, experimental investigations in this area have, for the most part, not involved realistic time frames, and as such certain phenomena observed in this work have not been previously reported.

Belgrave, J.D.M.; Moore, R.G.; Ursenbach, M.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs which contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range and are susceptible to recovery by in situ combustion and steam drive. The reservoirs for steam recovery are less than 2500 feet deep to comply with state-of-the-art technology. In cases where one reservoir would be a target for in situ combustion or steam drive, that reservoir is reported in both sections. Data were collectd from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs thermally recoverable by steam drive which are equal to or greater than 2500 feet deep and contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range. Data were collected from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A new method to optimize the fracture geometry of a frac-packed well in unconsolidated sandstone heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The worldwide proven recoverable reserves of conventional oil are less than the amount of the heavy oil. Owing to weakly consolidated formation, sand production is an important problem encountered during oil p...

XiaoBing Bian; ShiCheng Zhang; JingChen Zhang…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Reduced viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n. (1) (IUPAC: viscosity number) Reduced viscosity is the fluid viscosity increase per unit of polymer solute concentration.... where ? ...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Study on reaction property of China Yangcun coal with heavy oils  

SciTech Connect

The reaction properties in coprocessing of China Yangcun coal with three heavy oils (coal tar, petroleum residua and mixed heavy oil) were investigated at different temperatures and 7.0 MPa cold-initial pressure (H{sub 2}) by using a GJ-02 resonance agitation tube reactor. The analyses of feedstock and reaction residua were conducted with GC-MS and FTIR. Experimental results showed: (1) A quantity of low molecular compounds were dissolved in Yangcun coal and these compounds mostly were preasphaltene. (2) The temperature of the highest conversion of Yangcun coal was 390 C. The highest conversion temperature mainly depended upon the coal property and not upon the categories of heavy oils. (3) Conversion order of coprocessing of Yangcun coal with three heavy oils: coal tar > mixed heavy oils > petroleum residua. Aromatic components in heavy oils were media which produced and transferred active hydrogen during reactions. (4) Ash in the coal had a self-catalytic effect. FeS in the coal was catalyst species during coprocessing of coal with heavy oils. (5) Conversion-time curves of coprocessing of Yangcun coal with petroleum residua at 390 C and 430 C were studied. It was discussed that the coprocessing process could be divided into three stages: beginning high reactivity stage, slower-rate hydrogenation stage and condensation polymerization stage. Reaction rate constant of each stage was also calculated. (6) The reaction mechanism of coprocessing was discussed.

Ling Kaicheng; Shen Jun; Zhou Gangming; Wang Zhizhong [Taiyuan Univ. of Technology (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Non-thermal plasma enhanced heavy oil upgrading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A process was proposed for upgrading heavy oil using non-thermal plasma technology in a conventional thermal cracking system under atmospheric pressure. Results from a comparison of the reactivity of a N2, H2 and CH4 plasma showed that the plasma can increase the trap oil yield significantly. The trap oil yield increased by ?9% when the N2 plasma was applied and showed a further increase of ?19% when the H2 or CH4 plasma was applied. A detailed study on the H2 plasma-enhanced upgrading process was carried out and the results showed that the trap oil yields of the plasma-on runs can be 8–33% higher than those of the plasma-off runs, depending on experimental conditions. Compared with the plasma-off runs, trap oil from the plasma-on runs had a higher (H/C)atomic but less heteroatoms (S and N). Over-balanced hydrogen in the products from plasma-on runs revealed the H2 plasma reactivity, which was further demonstrated by an increase in the substitution and condensation indices of trap oil from the plasma-on runs. Although thermal cracking was mainly involved whether the plasma was applied or not, the electrical field for generating the plasma and the generated plasma may assist with hydrocarbon bond cleavage. This was shown by the increased trap oil yield with the N2 plasma and the hydrogen and carbon residue distribution. Compared with the feedstock, more aromatic and ?-hydrogen (HA and H?, respectively) and less ?- and ?-hydrogen (H? and H?, respectively) were present in the residues, which agrees with the bond dissociation energy data. Similarly, the amounts of saturated (Cs) and alkyl (Cp) carbons in the residues were significantly lower than those in the feedstock while the amount of aromatic carbons (Ca) in the residues was higher than the feedstock. The changes in hydrogen and carbon distribution were more significant for the plasma-on runs. This implies that mainly side chain losses and bridged bond breakage are involved in the processes. This was demonstrated further by the molecular weight distribution. In general, the molecular weight of the residues was lower than that of the feedstock, especially for residues from the plasma-on runs. However, compared with the feedstock, the residues contained less saturated, aromatic and resin fractions but more asphaltene and toluene insoluble fractions. This implies that intra-molecular condensation was more significant than inter-molecular condensation, especially in the plasma-on runs. This should be attributed to the higher stabilization ability of the H2 plasma for fragments or radicals and gas (plasma) flow by which the fragments or radicals are separated rapidly.

Haigang Hao; Bao S. Wu; Jianli Yang; Qiang Guo; Yong Yang; Yong W. Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles James Francfort American Filtration and Separations Society April 2005 Presentation Outline * Background & Objectives * Oil bypass filters - features & reported benefits * INL testing method * puraDYN oil bypass filters * Refined Global Solutions (RGS) oil bypass filters * Testing results & trends * Particulate and ferrography testing * Initial INL Oil Bypass Filter Economics * Potential fleet oil savings * Testing Status Bypass Filter Evaluation - Background * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) * Vehicles operated by Idaho National Laboratory's Fleet Operations group * Idaho National Laboratory

182

Intrinsic Viscosity and Kinematic Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Intrinsic Viscosity and Kinematic Viscosity ... Hydrodynamic Characterization of Lupin Proteins: Solubility, Intrinsic Viscosity, and Molar Mass ... Hydrodynamic Characterization of Lupin Proteins: Solubility, Intrinsic Viscosity, and Molar Mass ...

Charles Tanford

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nanoparticle technology for heavy oil in-situ upgrading and recovery enhancement: Opportunities and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With more than 170 billion barrels of estimated oil sands reserves in Canada, Canada has the third largest oil reserves in the world. However, more than 80% of oil sand’s reserves are located deep underground and could not be accessed by surface mining. Nonetheless, a number of in-situ recovery methods have been developed to extract heavy oil and bitumen from deep reservoirs. Once produced, bitumen is transferred to upgraders converting low quality oil to synthetic crude oil. However, in the present context, heavy oil and bitumen exploitation process is not just high-energy and water intensive, but also it has significant environmental footprints as it produces significant amount of gaseous emissions and wastewater. In addition, the level of contaminants in bitumen requires special equipment, and has also environmental repercussions. Recently, nanotechnology has emerged as an alternative technology for in-situ heavy oil upgrading and recovery enhancement. Nanoparticle catalysts (nanocatalysts) are one of the important examples on nanotechnology applications. Nanocatalysts portray unique catalytic and sorption properties due to their exceptionally high surface area-to-volume ratio and active surface sites. In-situ catalytic conversion or upgrading of heavy oil with the aid of multi-metallic nanocatalysts is a promising cost effective and environmentally friendly technology for production of high quality oils that meet pipeline and refinery specifications. Further, nanoparticles could be employed as inhibitors for preventing or delaying asphaltene precipitation and subsequently enhance oil recovery. Nevertheless, as with any new technologies, there are a number of challenges facing the employment of nanoparticles for in-situ catalytic upgrading and recovery enhancement. The main goal of this article is to provide an overview of nanoparticle technology usage for enhancing the in-situ catalytic upgrading and recovery processes of crude oil. Furthermore, the article sheds lights on the advantages of employment of nanoparticles in heavy oil industry and addresses some of the limitations and challenges facing this new technology.

Rohallah Hashemi; Nashaat N. Nassar; Pedro Pereira Almao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Research on oil recovery mechanisms in heavy oil reservoirs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Research on Heavy Oil Recovery Mechanisms at Stanford University has been ongoing for the past twenty years. During this span of time, 106 technical reports have been published by the Department of Energy, over 200 technical papers have been presented at meetings of professional societies, and most importantly, over 120 students have performed research as graduate research assistants and are now employed by the oil industry or research institutions. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy and also by a group of oil companies. The support of industry is very important to us, not only from the financial viewpoint, but also from the constant exchange of ideas with technical experts from the companies. Meetings are held yearly with industry representatives and informal exchange of information is constant. Support from industry has been steady since 1980. SUPRI personnel is also active in participating in technical meetings and seminars organized by technical societies and other research organizations. We strongly believe that information exchange is one of the most cost effective way to improve research.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Numerical Study of Heavy Oil Flow on Horizontal Pipe Lubricated by Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter reports information related to multiphase flow with emphasis to core-annular flow. Industrial application has been given to transient water-heavy ultraviscous oil two-phase flow in horizontal pipe...

Tony Herbert Freire de Andrade…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Formation mechanism and geochemical characteristics of shallow natural gas in heavy oil province, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shallow gas reservoirs are distributed widely in Chinese heavy oil-bearing basins. At present, shallow gas resources have opened up giant potentials. The previous researches indicate the intimate genetic relat...

GuangYou Zhu; ShuiChang Zhang; WenZhi Zhao…

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nervous system disruption and concomitant behavioral abnormality in early hatched pufferfish larvae exposed to heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spills of heavy oil (HO) over the oceans have been proven to have an adverse effect on marine life. It has been hypothesized that exposure of early larvae of sinking eggs to HO leads largely to normal morpholo...

Masahumi Kawaguchi; Yuki Sugahara…

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evaluation of environmental pollution and possible management options of heavy oil fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the presence of toxic metals, dumping of heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) is causing ever-growing environmental problem including the pollution of air, water and soil. The present study investigates the possibl...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Comparative Analysis of Extractive Methods of Porphyrin Separation from Heavy Oil Asphatenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparative analysis has been made of the methods of porphyrin extraction from high-vanadium heavy oil asphaltenes using polar solvents and sulfuric acid. Chromatographic separation of the extracts, followed...

D. V. Milordov; G. Sh. Usmanova…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Pore-Level Investigation of Heavy Oil Recovery During Water Alternating Solvent Injection Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study concerns with the microscopic and macroscopic fluid distribution and flow behavior during water alternating solvent (WAS) injection process to heavy oil using micromodel generated from thin section ...

A. A. Dehghan; S. A. Farzaneh; R. Kharrat; M. H. Ghazanfari…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Optimizing Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon produced from heavy oil fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to explore the beneficial utilization of heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) generated in the power plants, the present study is intended to optimize the chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)] adsorption on activated carbon prod...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain; Bing Chen

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The evaluation of CO2-based vapour extraction (VAPEX) process for heavy-oil recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vapor extraction (VAPEX) has been proposed as an alternative for heavy-oil recovery in reservoirs where thermal methods face technical and economic problems. In VAPEX, a pair of horizontal injector-producer we...

Farshid Torabi; Benyamin Yadali Jamaloei…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy to Determine the Glass Transition Temperature of Heavy Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is used to measure the temperature-dependent refractive index of heavy oils down to 80 K. Evidence for a glass transition is observed, providing...

Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim; Titova, Lyubov; Wang, Zhenyou; Kabir, Amin; Indo, Kentaro; Abivin, Patrice; Taylor, Shawn; Cheng, Yuesheng; Hegmann, Frank

194

Molecular size characterization of heavy oil fractions in vacuum and solution by molecular dynamic simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two kinds of heavy oils were fractionated into eight fractions by Liquid-Solid Adsorption Chromatography, respectively, and samples were collected to measure properties. According to the elemental analysis, mo...

Wenpo Ren; Honggang Chen; Chaohe Yang…

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mathematical Model for Heavy Oil–Water–Gas Stratified Flow in Horizontal Pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A one-dimensional, isothermal, transient model for the stratified flow of heavy oil, water and gas, in horizontal pipelines, is presented. The two-fluid mathematical model consists of mass, momentum and energy...

C. Centeno-Reyes; O. Cazarez-Candia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Heavy oil exposure increases viral production in natural marine bacterial populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined whether heavy oil (HO) increases viral production and how that change may affect the marine bacterial community. The addition of a relatively low concentration (10 ?g/mL) of HO to seawater ...

Mitsuhiro Yoshida; Satoru Suzuki

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Survey on ionic liquids effect based on metal anions over the thermal stability of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A survey on the effect of ionic liquids (ILs) over the thermal stability of a heavy Mexican oil was performed. ILs used were based on [Cnim]+ and [Cnpyr]+ organic cations with FeCl 4 ...

J. A. Murillo-Hernández; S. López-Ramírez…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

GEOTHERMAL A N D HEAVY-OIL RESOURCES I N TEXAS TOPICAL REPORT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

an Aft gravity greater than 100 and less than o r equal tu 20" (Lane and Carton, 1925; Smith, 1968; lissot between heavy and medium oil, however, is not universally accepted....

199

Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands Derived Fuels W. Stuart Neill 9 th DEER Conference, Newport, Rhode Island August...

200

Assessing the potential and limitations of heavy oil upgrading by electron beam irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and effect of different solvents on the viscosity of irradiated crude oil by comparing selected physical properties of irradiated samples to a non-irradiated control group; � Investigate effect of e-beam radiation on the yields of light fractions...

Zhussupov, Daniyar

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electromagnetic Assisted Carbonated Water Flooding in Heavy Oil Recovery:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbonated water flooding (CWF) is an enhanced oil recovery method where an oil reservoir is flooded with water containing dissolved CO2. The CO2 is then… (more)

Son Tran, T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Viscosity races  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity races ... A simple demonstration that illustrates the relationship between molecular size and viscosity. ...

William M. Hemmerlin; Kenton B. Abel

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Simulation of heavy oil reservoir performance using a non-Newtonian flow model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIMULATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE USING A NON-NEWTONIAN FLOW MODEL A Thesis by GENE MASAO NARAHARA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AILM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE USING A NON-NEWTONIAN FLOW MODEL A Thesis by GENE MASAO NARAHARA Approved as to style and content by: lng . U an of Committee) R. . Morse...

Narahara, Gene Masao

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Rheological behavior of heavy oil and water mixtures at high pressures and high temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is divided into two categories. The first part was done by using a mercury capillary viscometer. A heavy oil sample (over 2,000 cp at standard condition) and three synthetic oil samples were analyzed at a range of temperatures up to about 350°F. The results...

Setiadarma, Agustinus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Experimental Study of Steam Surfactant Flood for Enhancing Heavy Oil Recovery After Waterflooding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surfactant flow due to the reduced steam override effect as well as reduced interfacial tension between oil and water in the formation. To investigate the ability to improve recovery of 20.5oAPI California heavy oil with steam surfactant injection, several...

Sunnatov, Dinmukhamed

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstrated Petroleum Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy Murphy Larry Zirker Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program * Performed by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Fleet Operations * Goal - Support DOE's efforts to reduce petroleum consumption & ensure the energy security of the United States Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Objectives - Test the concept of using oil bypass filters to minimize engine oil changes & the generation of waste oils - Demonstration the economics of oil bypass filter systems - Estimate potential engine oil saving from bypass filter technologies that can be achieved by INEEL,

208

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with little capital investment. The first year period was divided into two phases--Phase I and Phase II. Each phase was 6 months in duration. Tasks completed in first six month period included soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. During the second six month period, five vertical wells were drilled through the Bluejacket and Warner Sands. These wells were drilled with air and logged openhole. Drilling locations were selected after reviewing results of background ERT and geochemical surveys. Three ERT wells (2,3,4) were arranged in an equilateral triangle, spaced 70 feet apart and these wells were completed open hole. ERT arrays constructed during Phase I, were installed and background surveys were taken. Two wells (1,5) were drilled, cased, cemented and perforated. These wells were located north and south of the three ERT wells. Each well was stimulated with a linear guar gel and 20/40 mesh Brady sand. Tiltmeters were used with one fracture treatment to verify fracture morphology. Work performed during the first year of this research project demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand. ERT work also provided a background image for future MEOR treatments. Well logs from the five wells drilled were consistent with previous logs from historical coreholes, and the quality of the formation was found to be as expected. Hydraulic fracturing results demonstrated that fluid leakoff is inadequate for tip screenout (TSO) and that a horizontal fracture was generated. At this point it is not clear if the induced fracture remained in the Warner Sand, or propagated into another formation. MEOR treatments were originally expected to commence during Phase II. Due to weather delays, drilling and stimulation work was not completed until September, 2003. Microbial treatments therefore will commence in October, 2003. Phase III, the first 10 months of the second project year, will focus primarily on repeated cycles of MEOR treatments, ERT measurements and well pumping.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect

The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose the interaction of flow transport and reaction at various scales from the pore network to the field scales were studied. Particular mechanisms to be investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam processes, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art in heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the Recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes.

Yorstos, Yanis C.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

210

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Process  

SciTech Connect

The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil, with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose, the interaction of flow, transport and reaction at various scales (from the pore-network to the field scales) were studied. Particular mechanisms investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam process, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art in heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes.

Yortsos, Yanis C.; Akkutlu, Yucel; Amilik, Pouya; Kechagia, Persefoni; Lu, Chuan; Shariati, Maryam; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis; Zhan, Lang

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Viscosity number  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n. The IUPAC term for reduced viscosity. , where ? is the viscosity of the polymer solution; ? 0 is the viscosity of the pure s...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Elongational Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n (extensional viscosity, Trouton viscosity) The viscosity that characterizes an element undergoing Elongational Flow ...(above). It is equal to the tensile ...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Shear velocity as the function of frequency in heavy oils De-hua Han and Jiajin Liu, Rock Physics Lab, UH;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shear velocity as the function of frequency in heavy oils De-hua Han and Jiajin Liu, Rock Physics of heavy oils is discussed based on the measured data in our lab. Havriliak and Negami (HN) model is suggested to describe the frequency dispersion of heavy oils. Introduction The velocity behavior in heavy

214

Removal of selected heavy metals from aqueous solutions using a solid by-product from the Jordanian oil shale refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?The potential use of treated solid by-product of oil shale to treat aqueous solutions containing several heavy ... Results indicate that the solid by-product of oil shale removes Cd(II), Cu(II),...

W. Y. Abu-El-Sha'r; S. H. Gharaibeh; M. M. Al-Kofahi

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Environmental factors affecting heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent (Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma) USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) of shallow heavy oil by cyclic steam injection or steamflooding is a commercial technology that has evolved over the past 30 years. Although TEOR may have adverse effects on the environment, these can be mitigated by careful management of standard oil field practices during TEOR process implementation. Poorly plugged old wells, natural fracturing, vertical communication between oil reservoirs and underground aquifers, and impact on air quality are a few of the environmental factors under consideration that may limit production of the midcontinent heavy oil resources. Air quality conditions and legislation are compared to those in California, which has air quality standards that are more stringent than those of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Early in the life of determining the feasibility of TEOR for a specific site, the combined resources of engineering, geological and economic feasibility, process design, and environmental assessment must be coordinated to determine the environmental impact of process implementation.

W.I. Johnson; D.K. Olsen; P.S. Sarathi

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Inherent viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(logarithmic viscosity number) n. In measurement of dilute-solution viscosities, the inherent viscosity is the ratio of the natural logarithm of the relative viscosity to the concentration of the polymer in... ...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Intrinsic viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

\\in-¦trin-zik-\\ (limiting viscosity number) n. In measurements of dilute-solution viscosity, intrinsic viscosity is the limit of the reduced and inherent viscosities as the concentration of polymer solute approac...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Inherent Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n (logarithmic viscosity number) In measurement of dilute-solution viscosities, the inherent viscosity is the ratio of the natural logarithm of the relative viscosity to the concentration of the poly...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Influence of steam-drive production on the properties of high-molecular weight components of heavy Ashal`chinsk crude oil  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis has been made of the composition and properties of heavy Ashal`chinsk crude oil produced both by natural flow and by the steam-drive method. It has been shown that the use of the steam-drive method in order to improve Elie oil yield leads to certain changes in the composition of the oil produced, which is reflected in a change in quality of the target petroleum products. In particular, because of the additional presence in the crude oil of high-molecular weight n-alkanes, there is an increase in the pour point and viscosity index of paraffinic-naphthenic hydrocarbons, which are the main components of residual base oils. An experimental study of the influence of temperatures characteristic of the steam-drive method (300{degrees}C) on the asphaltene-resinous components of Ashal`chinsk crude oil confirmed that during steam-drive production these substances undergo degradation processes associated with detachment of alkyl substituents at peripheral fragments containing sulphur, oxygen, nitrogen and other heteroatoms and consequently are a potential source of alkane hydrocarbons.

Kayukova, G.P.; Kurbskii, G.P.; Lifanova, Ye.V. [and others

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Kinematic Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In classical fluid mechanics, kinematic viscosity equals the dynamic viscosity divided by the density of the material...2 s-1].

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The stimulation of heavy oil reservoirs with electrical resistance heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-307. Stuckey, W. D. : "A Study of the Pyrolysis of Oil Shale By Microwave Heating, " MS Thesis, University of Colorado, Boulder (1977). Bridges, J. E. , Taflove, A. , and Snow, R. H. : eNet Energy Recoveries for the In-Situ Dielectric Heating of Oil Shales..., w Proc. 1978 Oil Shale Symposium, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Apr. 12-14. Solomon, B. : "Shale Oil Via Microwaves: Illinois Institute Says Yes, e Energy Daily (May 1978) 2-4; Energy Abstr. Policy Anal. (Nov. 1978) 831. Snowi R H i et. el...

Baylor, Blake Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Preliminary Study of In-situ Combustion in Heavy Oil Field in the North of Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small oil field in the north of Thailand has medium viscous and low gas-content heavy oil. Since conventional production methods are ineffective, thermal recovery is potentially suitable to enhance oil recovery for this reservoir. In -situ combustion is a complex EOR process used for medium to heavy crude oils. The process involves the multi-phase fluid flow through porous media with chemical and physical transition of the crude oil components under high temperature and pressure conditions. The simulation results with STARS were investigated by conducting a number of sensitivity studies with varying the parameters like gridblock sizes, air-injection rates, oxygen concentrations, and injected air temperature. The 0.5m-block size was chosen due to the optimum running time with acceptable accuracy. From the results, it can be concluded that changing injection rate from 100 Mscf/d to 400 Mscf/d does not significantly affect cumulative oil production – less than 6% incremental recovery. Increase oxygen concentration from 29% to 100% shows an increase in 40.67% oil production. Moreover, if the injected fluid temperature is increased from 80?F to 500?F, total oil production increases 97.14%. Furthermore, optimal operating conditions to enhance recovery of oil were also studied.

Kreangkrai Maneeintr et al

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effect of Mixtures of Polysorbate 80 and Low Molecular Weight Alcohols on Density and \\(^\\circ \\) API Gravity of Treated Venezuelan Extra Heavy Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Formulations of extra heavy oil with biocompatible polyethoxilated compounds have not received much attention. We investigate the behaviour of biocompatible mixtures in the treatment of Venezuelan extra heavy ...

Efrén D. J. Andrades; Ledys Y. Sánchez…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Using biomarkers to improve heavy oil reservoir management: An example from the cymric field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

For biodegraded oil accumulations, field development can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of bacterial alteration. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. In the Cymric field (Kern County, California), sidewall core extracts reveal that the extent of oil biodegradation changes substantially over extremely short vertical distances in a shallow, low-permeability reservoir. Zones of more degraded oil can extend laterally for more than a mile. The relationships between oil viscosity and biomarker biodegradation parameters in this field were calibrated from analyses of produced oils, and these relationships were used to convert sidewall core biomarker analyses into quantitative predictions of lateral and vertical changes in oil viscosity and gravity. Compositional variations were also used to allocate production to discrete zones. Viscosity prediction and production allocation can be used to optimize (1) the placement of new wells, (2) the placement of completion intervals, (3) the thickness of steam injection intervals, and (4) the spacing between injection intervals in the same well.

McCaffrey, M.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Legarre, H.A.; Johnson, S.J. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Soil remediation demonstration project: Biodegradation of heavy fuel oils. Special report  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of oil-contaminated soils is necessary to protect water supplies, human health, and environmental quality; but because of limited funds, cleanup costs are often prohibitive. High costs are exacerbated in cold regions such as Alaska, where spills are often in areas inaccessible to heavy equipment and where there is limited infrastructure. Owing to the lack of infrastructure, widespread fuel distribution systems, and the need for heating in the cold climate, there are numerous small-scale oil spills. Low-cost treatments applicable to small-scale spills are needed. The object of this CPAR project was to examine using cost-effective, on-site bioremediation techniques for heavy-oil-contaminated soil in cold regions. Both heavy-oil and diesel-contaminated soils were used to compare landfarming, a low-intensity treatment, to pile bioventing, a costlier treatment. For each soil-contaminant combination, we compared nutrient additions to a control with no nutrient additions. Under the conditions of this study, landfarming with nutrient additions was as effective for treating diesel-contaminated soil as was bioventing with nutrient additions. For heavy oils, landfarming with nutrients resulted in lower soil concentrations after one year, but differences among treatments were not statistically significant. Because landfarming does not require pumps, electricity, or plumbing, all costs are less than for bioventing. The minimal requirements for infrastructure also make landfarming attractive in remote sites typical of cold regions.

Reynolds, C.M.; Bhunia, P.; Koenen, B.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Process and economic model of in-field heavy oil upgrading using aqueous pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

A process and economic model for aqueous pyrolysis in-field upgrading of heavy oil has been developed. The model has been constructed using the ASPEN PLUS chemical process simulator. The process features cracking of heavy oil at moderate temperatures in the presence of water to increase oil quality and thus the value of the oil. Calculations with the model indicate that for a 464 Mg/day (3,000 bbl/day) process, which increases the oil API gravity of the processed oil from 13.5{degree} to 22.4{degree}, the required value increase of the oil would need to be at least $2.80/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API($0.40/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API) to make the process economically attractive. This level of upgrading has been demonstrated in preliminary experiments with candidate catalysts. For improved catalysts capable of having the coke make and increasing the pyrolysis rate, a required price increase for the oil as low as $1.34/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API ($0.21/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API)has been calculated.

Thorsness, C. B., LLNL

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Low-molecular-mass asphaltene compounds from Usa heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By the extraction, adsorption chromatography, it has been shown that asphaltene macromolecules from Usa crude oil contain compounds with a relatively low molecular mass represented by normal and branched alkan...

V. P. Sergun; E. Yu. Kovalenko; T. A. Sagachenko; R. S. Min

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Thermoanalysis and reaction kinetics of heavy oil combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study deals with fingerprinting the oxidation behavior of a Brazilian crude (12° API) oil. It focuses on the determination of reaction kinetic parameters through classical thermal analysis techniques ...

Anderson N. Pereira; Osvair V. Trevisan

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

1980 annual heavy oil/EOR contractor presentations: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-five papers were presented on thermal recovery, chemical flooding, and carbon dioxide methods for enhanced oil recovery. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the papers; the remaining paper was previously abstracted. (DLC)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Applicability of Total Acid Number Analysis to Heavy Oils and Bitumens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The standard method employed for TAN, ASTM D664, was not even developed for crude oils, let alone heavy oil and bitumens. ... Funding from the following CCQTA TAN II project members is acknowledged:? Alberta Research Council, Inc., BP, Baker Petrolite, ConocoPhillips Canada, Enbridge Pipelines, Inc., ENCANA Corp., GE Betz, Husky Energy, Japan Canada Oil Sands Ltd., Marathon Petroleum Co., Maxxam Analytics, Inc., Nalco Canada, Inc., National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Petro-Canada, Shell Pipelines US, Suncor Energy, Inc., Terasen Pipelines, and Total E&P Canada Ltd. ...

Bryan Fuhr; Branko Banjac; Tim Blackmore; Parviz Rahimi

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Analysis of Microscopic Displacement Mechanisms of Alkaline Flooding for Enhanced Heavy-Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(8, 11, 12) Accordingly, some numerical simulations of alkaline flooding for heavy oil were conducted on the basis of the formation of W/O emulsion. ... The waterflood recovery of low-gravity, viscous crude oils was increased by caustic flooding at ?0.05-0.5 wt.% NaOH [1310-73-2], which increased recovery before water breakthrough and lowered the producing water-oil ratios during the flood. ... In this paper, a simulation technique has been developed and successfully applied to numerically simulate the exptl. ...

Haihua Pei; Guicai Zhang; Jijiang Ge; Luchao Jin; Xiaoling Liu

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Unconventional Hydrocarbons: Oil Shales, Heavy Oil, Tar Sands, Shale Gas and Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many decades conventional oil which could be produced at low cost was present in abundance. A low oil price gave no incentive to look for other types of resources. It is now clear, however, that we are gra...

Knut Bjřrlykke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Heavy oil fraction removal from sand using hydrotropes containing oil-in-water microemulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil-in-water microemulsions were prepared with a nonionic surfactant and different cosurfactants using as the oil phase a hydrocarbon mixture of linear, cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons. This organic mixture e...

M. C. K. Oliveira; E. F. Lucas; G. González; J. F. Oliveira

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Microbial Communities in Oil Shales, Biodegraded and Heavy Oil Reservoirs, and Bitumen Deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subsurface hydrocarbon and oil shale deposits, once thought sterile, are being re-evaluated as habitats for ancient and contemporary microbial activity. Although oil shales have not been rigorously examined mi...

J. Foght

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Improved reservoir management of heavy oil assets using biomarker variability in sidewall cores and produced oils: An example from the Cymric Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Development of biodegraded oil accumulations can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of biodegradation. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. Using the Cymric Field (Kern County, California), we show that the extent of oil biodegradation can change substantially over extremely short vertical distances (feet) in shallow, low-permeability reservoirs. These variations can be mapped laterally for more than a mile using reservoir sidewall core extract compositions. The relationship between oil viscosity and biomarker biodegradation parameters can be calibrated from analyses of produced oils. These relationships can then be used to convert sidewall core biomarker parameters into quantitative predictions of lateral and vertical changes in oil viscosity and gravity. These compositional variations can be used to optimize the placement of new wells and well completion intervals, as well as to assess the relative production from discrete zones. We discuss how this new technique can be used to optimize field development, including parameters such as (1) the placement of completion intervals, (2) the thickness of steam injection intervals, and (3) the spacing between injection intervals in the same well.

Legarre, H.A.; Johnson, S.J. (Chevron Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); McCaffrey, M.A. (Chevron Petroleum Technology, Co., La Habra, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Improved reservoir management of heavy oil assets using biomarker variability in sidewall cores and produced oils: An example from the Cymric Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Development of biodegraded oil accumulations can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of biodegradation. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. Using the Cymric Field (Kern County, California), we show that the extent of oil biodegradation can change substantially over extremely short vertical distances (feet) in shallow, low-permeability reservoirs. These variations can be mapped laterally for more than a mile using reservoir sidewall core extract compositions. The relationship between oil viscosity and biomarker biodegradation parameters can be calibrated from analyses of produced oils. These relationships can then be used to convert sidewall core biomarker parameters into quantitative predictions of lateral and vertical changes in oil viscosity and gravity. These compositional variations can be used to optimize the placement of new wells and well completion intervals, as well as to assess the relative production from discrete zones. We discuss how this new technique can be used to optimize field development, including parameters such as (1) the placement of completion intervals, (2) the thickness of steam injection intervals, and (3) the spacing between injection intervals in the same well.

Legarre, H.A.; Johnson, S.J. [Chevron Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States); McCaffrey, M.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology, Co., La Habra, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Viscosity and Lubrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... oils in the tubes supplied. Further, each laboratory was invited to report the kinematic viscosity of the oils in absolute units at 20° C, according to the method used ... tubes may be selected from a set of apparently equally good tubes.

1945-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis Nathan K. Kaiser, John P. Quinn, Greg T. Blakney NHMFL 9.4 T FT- species in petroleum crude oil and its products, extending to "heavy" crudes for unequivocal identification of sulfur-containing components in petroloeum heavy crude oils. Facilities: NHMFL 9

239

Reproducing MEES Is Strictly Prohibited MEES 47:11 15 March 2004 The Value Of Extra-Heavy Crude Oil From The Orinoco Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petrolífera del Orinoco) began in 1920 but with disappointing re- sults: the oil discovered was too heavy was made in 1956-57, which led to up to 20,000 b/d of heavy oil put into production, and at this point conjectures, explorations revealed that the Belt mainly contained `heavy' oil ­ according to the present day

O'Donnell, Tom

240

Transport and Phase Equilibria Properties for Steam Flooding of Heavy Oils  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research included experimental determination and rigorous modeling and computation of phase equilibria, volumetric, and transport properties of hydrocarbon/CO2/water mixtures at pressures and temperatures typical of steam injection processes for thermal recovery of heavy oils.

Gabitto, Jorge; Barrufet, Maria

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hydroconversion of heavy crude oils using soluble metallic compounds in the presence of hydrogen or methane  

SciTech Connect

The hydroconversion of heavy crude oil was studied under thermal and catalytic conditions using soluble organo-metallic compounds of Mo, Fe, Cr, V, Ni, and Co as a catalyst precursors. All catalysts are effective for the hydroconversion, however, molybdenum and nickel compounds are preferred.

Morales, A.; Salazar, A.; Ovalles, C.; Filgueiras, E. [INTEVEP, Caracas (Venezuela)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Transport and Phase Equilibria Properties for Steam Flooding of Heavy Oils  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research included experimental determination and rigorous modeling and computation of phase equilibrium diagrams, volumetric, and transport properties of hydrocarbon/CO2/water mixtures at pressures and temperatures typical of steam injection processes for thermal recovery of heavy oils.

Gabitto, Jorge; Barufet, Maria

2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

243

Heavy Oil Database from the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Heavy Oil Database resulted from work funded by DOE and performed at the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER). It contains information on more than 500 resevoirs in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The information was collected in 1992 and updated periodically through 2003. Save the zipped file to your PC, then open to access the data.

244

Specific Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n Equal to the relative viscosity of the same solution minus one. It represents the increase in viscosity that may be contributed by the polymeric solute. The specific viscosity, ?sp is defined by th...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Use of Microemulsion Systems in the Solubilization of Petroleum Heavy Fractions for the Prevention of Oil Sludge Waste Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of Microemulsion Systems in the Solubilization of Petroleum Heavy Fractions for the Prevention of Oil Sludge Waste Formation† ... In the present paper we studied eight model particles coated with asphaltenes from different oils in order to mimic the wettability changes and behavior in water after contact with oil. ...

Tereza Neuma de Castro Dantas; Afonso Avelino Dantas Neto; Ca?tia Guaraciara F. T. Rossi; Diego A?ngelo de Arau?jo Gomes; Alexandre Gurgel

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluation of soy based heavy fuel oil emulsifiers for energy efficiency and environmental improvement  

SciTech Connect

It is known that the emulsification of water into heavy fuel oil (No. 6) can result in improved atomization of the fuel in a combustion chamber, which results in several benefits. In this study, two soybean lecithin based emulsifiers were evaluated. The emulsifiers were added to the No. 6 fuel at 0.5% and 1 % levels and emulsions of 10% and 15% water were prepared and burned in a pilot scale combustion chamber. The results showed a significant decrease in NO{sub x} emissions, and a reduction in carbon particulates, as well as a decrease in the excess oxygen requirement when the emulsions were burned when compared to fuel oil alone and a fuel oil/water mixture without the emulsifier. It was concluded that the use of a soybean lecithin based emulsifier may be used to increase the burning efficiency of heavy fuel oils, reduce emissions and particulates, and reduce down time for cleaning. This can be very important in utility plants which burn large volumes of heavy fuel oil and are located near urban areas.

Lee, P.K.; Szuhaj, B.F. [Central Soya Company, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Diego, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect

This project is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect

This report is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

Yortsos, Y.C.

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Assessment of the effect of low viscosity oils usage on a light duty diesel engine fuel consumption in stationary and transient conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regarding the global warming due to CO2 emissions, the crude oil depletion and its corresponding rising prices, \\{OEMs\\} are exploring different solutions to increase the internal combustion engine efficiency, among which, the use of Low Viscosity Oils (LVO) represents one attractive cost-effective way to accomplish this goal. Reported in terms of fuel consumption, the effect of LVO is round 2%, depending on the test conditions, especially if the test has taken place in laboratory or “on road” conditions. This study presents the fuel consumption benefits of a commercial 5W20, compared against higher SAE grade oils, on a light duty diesel engine, when it is running under motored test, stationary fired test and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC).

Vicente Macián; Bernardo Tormos; Vicente Bermúdez; Leonardo Ramírez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Influence of viscosity modifier nature and concentration on the viscous flow behaviour of oil-based drilling fluids at high pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work deals with the effect of viscosity modifier nature and concentration on the rheological properties of model oil-based drilling fluids (OBM) submitted to high pressure. The oil-based fluids were formulated by dispersing, with a high shear mixer, two selected organobentonites in a mineral oil, at room temperature. The viscous flow behaviour of the corresponding dispersions was characterised as a function of pressure, organoclay nature and organoclay concentration, using a controlled-stress rheometer equipped with both pressure cell and coaxial cylinder geometries. A factorial Sisko–Barus model, which takes into account both shear and pressure effects in the same equation, fitted the experimental pressure–viscosity data fairly well. The influence of disperse phase concentration on the shear-thinning characteristics of these organoclay dispersions is related to the development of different microstructures, which depend on organoclay nature. In this sense, the resulting microstructure has been attributed to the cohesion energy between microgels domains. From the experimental results obtained, it can be concluded that the viscous flow behaviour of the OBM investigated is strongly affected by organoclay nature and concentration. The pressure–viscosity behaviour of these dispersions is mainly influenced by the piezoviscous properties of the oil and the properties of the continuous phase. The Sisko–Barus model proposed can be a useful tool, from an engineering point of view, for calculating pressure losses in the different sections of the bore, as well as being of significant help to solve other additional problems, such as hole cleaning, induced fracturing, and hole erosion during the drilling operation.

J. Hermoso; F. Martinez-Boza; C. Gallegos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Waste Biomass-Extracted Surfactants for Heavy Oil Removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential synergism between biobased surfactants, produced from the alkaline extraction of waste biomass, and a synthetic surfactant was assessed. ... Since the principles of soil washing (critical Ca) were first developed for reservoir engineering, one expects that the ultralow (surfactant-enhanced oil recovery operations. ...

Matthew D. Baxter; Edgar Acosta; Enzo Montoneri; Silvia Tabasso

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Influence of temperature dependent shear viscosity on elliptic flow at back- and forward rapidities in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the influence of a temperature-dependent shear viscosity over entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ on the azimuthal anisotropies v_2 and v_4 of hadrons at various rapidities. We find that in Au+Au collisions at full RHIC energy, $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV, the flow anisotropies are dominated by hadronic viscosity at all rapidities, whereas in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC energy, $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2760$ GeV, the flow coefficients are affected by the viscosity both in the plasma and hadronic phases at midrapidity, but the further away from midrapidity, the more dominant the hadronic viscosity is. We find that the centrality and rapidity dependence of the elliptic and quadrangular flows can help to distinguish different parametrizations of $(\\eta/s)(T)$. We also find that at midrapidity the flow harmonics are almost independent of the decoupling criterion, but show some sensitivity to the criterion at back- and forward rapidities.

Etele Molnar; Hannu Holopainen; Pasi Huovinen; Harri Niemi

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Heavy metals in water base drilling muds used in several locations of oil fields in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Heavy metals are parameters to be considered among other parameters such as pH, salts, hydrocarbons, cutting and fluids when water base muds are to be disposed. In most cases reducing or eliminating heavy metals, either as additives or contaminants, will reduce the problems associated with disposal. Even if all heavy metals are eliminated from the additives placed in a mud system, however, these contaminants can still become incorporated into the mud from the formation that is being drilled. In Indonesia, drilling muds are classified as hazardous material according to the Governmental Regulation PP 19/1994. This paper try to investigate the concentration of some of heavy metals in drilling muds used in several locations of oil fields in Indonesia using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extracted with several acids and other extracting agents. {open_quotes}Total heavy metals{close_quotes} content as released through refluxing in strong acids are also determined to correlate between Total Heavy Metals and Extractable Heavy Metals, in order to examine the type of compounds which could be considered as potential pollutants.

Mulyono, M.; Desrina, R.; Priatna, R. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Large scale image projection setup for observation of flocculation in heavy oil?water emulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A heavy oil-in-water emulsion is heated by a continuous wave laser beam thus producing an ascending thermoconvective liquid flow. Once at the open free surface the oil particles are directly heated by the incoming laser beam which gives rise to flocculation and eventually to coalescence. A bright enlarged image of the heated region is formed in a projection screen using the backscattered light of their own laser beam. The device thus allows direct observation and high speed photographic recording of the flocculation process as a function of the sample temperature which is monitored by means of a thermographic camera.

Germán Da Costa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the thrust areas include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

257

Relation between the characteristics of the pitches produced on the basis of heavy gas-oil of catalytic cracking  

SciTech Connect

Mesophase pitches are often used to produce carbon fibers. Results of microanalysis and fiber-forming ability of the pitches are described. The pitches were obtained by the catalytic cracking of heavy gas-oil.

Nikolaeva, L.V.; Bulanova, V.V. [Rossiiskaya Akadeiya, Nauk (Russian Federation)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Coupled thermo-hydro analysis of steam flow in a horizontal wellbore in a heavy oil reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel model for dynamic temperature distribution in heavy oil reservoirs is derived from the principle of energy conservation. A difference equation of the model is firstly separated into radial and axial di...

Mingzhong Li; Yiping Wang; Weiyang Wang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An Analytical Model for Determination of the Solvent Convective Dispersion Coefficient in the Vapor Extraction Heavy Oil Recovery Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article, a new model is developed to determine the solvent convective dispersion coefficient in a solvent vapor extraction (VAPEX) heavy oil recovery process. It is assumed that solvent mass transfer b...

Mohammad Derakhshanfar; Yongan Gu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A new profile control design based on quantitative identification of steam breakthrough channel in heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steam breakthrough has a great negative influence on the development of steam flooding in heavy oil reservoirs. In this article, a new profile control design based on quantitative identification of steam break...

Chuan Lu; Huiqing Liu; Zhanxi Pang…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SOLVENT-BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES TO DEVELOP WEST SAK ALASKA NORTH SLOPE HEAVY OIL RESOURCES  

SciTech Connect

A one-year research program is conducted to evaluate the feasibility of applying solvent-based enhanced oil recovery processes to develop West Sak and Ugnu heavy oil resources found on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The project objective is to conduct research to develop technology to produce and market the 300-3000 cp oil in the West Sak and Ugnu sands. During the first phase of the research, background information was collected, and experimental and numerical studies of vapor extraction process (VAPEX) in West Sak and Ugnu are conducted. The experimental study is designed to foster understanding of the processes governing vapor chamber formation and growth, and to optimize oil recovery. A specially designed core-holder and a computed tomography (CT) scanner was used to measure the in-situ distribution of phases. Numerical simulation study of VAPEX was initiated during the first year. The numerical work completed during this period includes setting up a numerical model and using the analog data to simulate lab experiments of the VAPEX process. The goal was to understand the mechanisms governing the VAPEX process. Additional work is recommended to expand the VAPEX numerical study using actual field data obtained from Alaska North Slope.

David O. Ogbe; Tao Zhu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Investigating the Temperature Dependency of Oil and Water Relative Permeabilities for Heavy Oil Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A look into the literature on the temperature dependency of oil and water relative permeabilities reveals contradictory reports. There are some publications reporting shifts in the water saturation range as we...

Mohammad Ashrafi; Yaser Souraki; Ole Torsaeter

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Heavy Oil and Oil (Tar) Sands in North America: An Overview & Summary of Contributions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As conventional oil and gas reservoirs become depleted other unconventional energy sources have to be recovered and produced. Four of the major unconventional resources that are strategic for North American in...

Frances J. Hein

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Case Study of the Emissions from a Heavy-Oil-Fueled Hungarian Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Case Study of the Emissions from a Heavy-Oil-Fueled Hungarian Power Plant ... More than 50% of the electric power in Hungary is produced by fossil-fuel-burning power plants. ... 15 The concentration of the pollutant at a location is described by an explicit function in Descartes coordinate system, where the origin is the source; the direction of the abscissa is the same as the wind direction. ...

János Osán; Szabina Török; Jenő Fekete; Anders Rindby

2000-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect

Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity is needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this past quarter, work continued on: the development of relative permeabilities during steam displacement; the optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optical control methods; and in the area of chemical additives, work continued on the behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

Yortsos, Y.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this quarter work continued on: development of relative permeabilities during steam injection; optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optimal control methods; and behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

A two-component heavy fuel oil evaporation model for CFD studies in marine Diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents an evaporation model for Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO) combustion studies. In the present work, HFO is considered as a mixture of a heavy and a light fuel component, with the thermophysical properties of the heavy component calculated from the recently introduced model of Kyriakides et al. (2009) [1]. The model proposes a proper treatment of convective heat transfer to the evaporating fuel droplets. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of HFO spray combustion in constant volume chambers are performed, utilizing a modified characteristic time combustion model. The results are in good agreement with literature experimental data. Computational results for a two-stroke marine Diesel engine also compare favorably against experiments. The present development yields a basis for detailed CFD studies of HFO combustion in large marine Diesel engines.

Nikolaos Stamoudis; Christos Chryssakis; Lambros Kaiktsis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

SUPRI heavy oil research program. Fourteenth annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The 14th Annual Report of the SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Program includes discussion of the following topics: (1) A Study of End Effects in Displacement Experiments; (2) Cat Scan Status Report; (3) Modifying In-situ Combustion with Metallic Additives; (4) Kinetics of Combustion; (5) Study of Residual Oil Saturation for Steam Injection and Fuel Concentration for In-Situ Combustion; (6) Analysis of Transient Foam Flow in 1-D Porous Media with Computed Tomography; (7) Steam-Foam Studies in the Presence of Residual Oil; (8) Microvisualization of Foam Flow in a Porous Medium; (9) Three- Dimensional Laboratory Steam Injection Model; (10) Saturation Evaluation Following Water Flooding; (11) Numerical Simulation of Well-to-Well Tracer Flow Test with Nonunity Mobility Ratio.

Aziz, K.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Castanier, L.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Predicted and actual productions of horizontal wells in heavy-oil fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the comparison of predicted and actual cumulative and daily oil production. The predicted results were obtained from the use of Joshi's equation, wherein, the effects of anisotropy and eccentricity were included. The cumulative production obtained from the use of equations developed by Borisov, Giger, Renard and Dupuy resulted in errors in excess of 100%, thus, they were not considered applicable for predicting cumulative and daily flows of heavy oils in horizontal wells. The wells considered in this analysis varied from 537 to 1201 metres with corresponding well bores of 0.089 to. 0.110 m. Using Joshi's equation, the predicted cumulative oil-production was within a 20% difference for up to 12 months of production for long wells and up to 24 months for short wells. Short wells were defined as those being under 1000 m.

Peter Catania

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

272

Initial viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n....A term used in the vinyl plastisol industry to denote the viscosity measured immediately after the plastisol has been mixed. The viscosity normally rises at a declining rate after...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Viscosity depressant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n....A substance that, when added in a relatively minor amount to a liquid, lowers its viscosity. Such materials, e.g., ethoxylated ... often incorporated in vinyl plastisols to lower their viscosities

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Initial Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n...A term used in the vinyl plastisol industry to denote the viscosity measured immediately after the plastisol has been mixed. The viscosity normally rises at a declining rate after...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 159172 Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach Hamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas the dynamics of water- and oil- base mud-filtrate invasion that produce wellbore supercharging were developed

Torres-VerdĂ­n, Carlos

276

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

277

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

278

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

279

Use of coal liquefaction catalysts for coal/oil coprocessing and heavy oil upgrading  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic hydrogenation of coal and model solvents using dispersed or supported catalysts at different pressures has been the focus of several recent studies at PETC. The effectiveness of these catalysts has been studied in coal liquefaction and coal-oil coprocessing. Coal-oil coprocessing involves the co-reaction of coal and petroleum-derived oil or resid. The results of these studies have indicated that both dispersed and supported catalysts are effective in these systems at elevated H{sub 2} pressures ({approximately}2,500 psig). Attempts to reduce pressure indicated that a combination of catalyst concentration and solvent quality could be used to compensate for reductions in H{sub 2} pressure. Comparison of the coal and coprocessing systems reveals many similarities in the catalytic requirements for both systems. Both hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis activities are required and the reactive environments are similar. Also, the use of catalysts in the two systems shares problems with similar types of inhibitors and poisons. The logical extension of this is that it may be reasonable to expect similar trends in catalyst activity for both systems. In fact, many of the catalysts selected for coal liquefaction were selected based on their effectiveness in petroleum systems. This study investigates the use of supported and dispersed coal liquefaction catalysts in coal-oil coprocessing and petroleum-only systems. The focus of the study was delineating the effects of coal concentration, pressure, and catalyst type.

Cugini, A.V.; Krastman, D.; Thompson, R.L. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ciocco, M.V.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Tertiary development of heavy oil sands through thermal stimulation in the Wilmington Oil Field, California: A geological perspective  

SciTech Connect

In 1995, a DOE cost share project was initiated to extend thermal recovery in the Tar Zone, Fault Block 11 of the West Wilmington Oil Field, California. The project involved the collection of old oil well data and the construction of a modern digital data base in order to develop a deterministic geological model. The plan was to rigorously define the geology such that horizontal wells could be accurately placed within the sands containing heavy oil to facilitate gravity drainage. A detailed deterministic geological model was constructed using a state of the art 3D mapping and modeling package. Beginning in July, 1995, five observation wells were drilled. Data inconsistencies were revealed when core hole OB2-003 was drilled. It was discovered that the data used to make the maps was corrupted; as a result, the predicted coring point was missed by more than 20'. Significant modifications to the data base were required due to inaccurate subsidence corrections in the original data set. Horizontal wells were then laid out based on the revised data and the geological model was completely reconstructed. Detailed cross sections extracted from the model were use for geosteering. These cross sections proved to be highly accurate and five more wells are now planned for the target sands. This detailed deterministic model will be further refined and combined with our geostatistical mode for geological control in an advanced reservoir simulator. If successful, the thermal stimulation project will be expanded to other fault blocks.

Clarke, D.D. (Department of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States)); Henry, M.J.; Strehle, R.W. (Dept. of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Tertiary development of heavy oil sands through thermal stimulation in the Wilmington Oil Field, California: A geological perspective  

SciTech Connect

In 1995, a DOE cost share project was initiated to extend thermal recovery in the Tar Zone, Fault Block 11 of the West Wilmington Oil Field, California. The project involved the collection of old oil well data and the construction of a modern digital data base in order to develop a deterministic geological model. The plan was to rigorously define the geology such that horizontal wells could be accurately placed within the sands containing heavy oil to facilitate gravity drainage. A detailed deterministic geological model was constructed using a state of the art 3D mapping and modeling package. Beginning in July, 1995, five observation wells were drilled. Data inconsistencies were revealed when core hole OB2-003 was drilled. It was discovered that the data used to make the maps was corrupted; as a result, the predicted coring point was missed by more than 20`. Significant modifications to the data base were required due to inaccurate subsidence corrections in the original data set. Horizontal wells were then laid out based on the revised data and the geological model was completely reconstructed. Detailed cross sections extracted from the model were use for geosteering. These cross sections proved to be highly accurate and five more wells are now planned for the target sands. This detailed deterministic model will be further refined and combined with our geostatistical mode for geological control in an advanced reservoir simulator. If successful, the thermal stimulation project will be expanded to other fault blocks.

Clarke, D.D. [Department of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States); Henry, M.J.; Strehle, R.W. [Dept. of Oil Properties, Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fire-flooding technologies in post-steam-injected heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism and problems associated with development engineering of fire-flooding in post-steam-injected heavy oil reservoirs was studied using 1D & 3D physical simulation experiments and reservoir numerical simulation. The temperature of combustion zone decreased and high-temperature zone enlarged because there existed secondary water formed during steam injection, which could absorb and carry heat towards producers out of the combustion front during fire flooding, but high saturation of water in layers caused by secondary water had less influence on the quantity of fuel deposit and air consumption. In the process of 3D fire flooding experiment, air override was observed during the combustion front moving forward and resulted in a coke zone in the bottom of the layer, and the ultimate recovery factor reached 65% on fact that the remaining oil saturation within the coke zone was no more than 20%. The flooding model, well pattern, well spacing, and air injection rate were optimized according to the specific property and the existed well pattern in the post-steam-injected heavy oil reservoir, and the key techniques of ignition, lifting, and anticorrosion was also selected at the same time. The pilot of fire flooding in the H1 block in the Xinjiang Oilfield was carried out from 2009 based on these research works, and now begins to show better performance.

Wenlong Guan; Changfeng Xi; Yaping Chen; Xia Zhang; Muhetar; Jinzhong Liang; Jihong Huang; Jian Wu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Study on the connectivity of heavy oil reservoirs by ultraviolet spectrum technique in the western part of the QHD32-6 oilfield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a new method, the ultraviolet spectrum technique is applied to studying the connectivity of biodegradable heavy oil reservoirs. The similarity of crude oils can be judged according to the extinction coeffic...

Yaohui Xu; Dan Chen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

New technology of optimizing heavy oil reservoir management by geochemical means: A case study in block Leng 43, Liaohe Oilfield, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geochemical methods can be used to optimize heavy oil reservoir management. The distribution of some biomarkers in oils is different with the degree of biodegradation. Geochemical parameters can be used to pre...

Zhao Hongjing; Zhang Chunming; Mei Bowen; S. R. Larter…

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Combustion Assisted Gravity Drainage (CAGD): An In-Situ Combustion Method to Recover Heavy Oil and Bitumen from Geologic Formations using a Horizontal Injector/Producer Pair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion assisted gravity drainage (CAGD) is an integrated horizontal well air injection process for recovery and upgrading of heavy oil and bitumen from tar sands. Short-distance air injection and direct mobilized oil production are the main...

Rahnema, Hamid

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply of about 8000 Tonnes of Heavy Fuel Oil per Year over a Period of Three Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply of about 8000 Tonnes of Heavy Fuel Oil per Year over a Period of Three Years

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

SUPRI heavy oil research program. Annual report, February 8, 1995--February 7, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI) is to conduct research directed toward increasing the recovery of heavy oils. Presently SUPRI is working in five main directions: (1) flow properties studies to assess the influence of different reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure) on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; (2) in-situ combustion to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in-situ combustion process; (3) steam with additives to develop and understand the mechanisms of the process using commercially available surfactants for reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; (4) formation evaluation to develop and improve techniques of formation evaluation such as tracer tests and pressure transient tests; and (5) field support services to provide technical support for design and monitoring of DOE sponsored or industry initiated field projects. This report consists of abstracts of reports and copies of technical papers presented or published.

Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

SURPI Heavy Oil Research Program, Twenty-Second Annual Report, SUPRI TR-117  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute is to conduct research directed toward increasing the recovery of heavy oils. Present, SUPRI is working in five main directions: (1) Flow Properties Studies - To assess the influence of different reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure) on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; (2) In-Situ Combustion - To evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in-situ combustion process. This project includes the study of the kinetics of the reactions; (3) Steam with Additives- To develop and understand the mechanisms of the process using commercially available surfactants for reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; (4) Formation Evaluation - To develop and improve techniques of formation evaluation such as tracer tests and pressure transient tests; and (5) Field Support Services - To provide technical support for design and monitoring of DOE sponsored or industry initiated field projects.

Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

SUPRI heavy oil research program. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute is to conduct research directed toward increasing the recovery of heavy oils. Presently, SUPRI is working in five main directions: (1) flow properties studies to assess the influence of different reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure) on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; (2) in-situ combustion to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in-situ combustion process and to study the kinetics of the reactions; (3) steam with additives to develop and understand the mechanisms of the process using commercially available surfactants for reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; (4) formation evaluation to develop and improve techniques of formation evaluation such as tracer tests and pressure transient tests; and field support services to provide technical support for design and monitoring of DOE sponsored or industry initiated field projects.

Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Castanier, L.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

SUPRI Heavy Oil Research Program Twenty-First Annual Report, SUPRI TR-111  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute is to conduct research directed toward increasing the recovery of heavy oils. Present, SUPRI is working in five main directions: (1) Flow Properties Studies - To assess the influence of different reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure) on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; (2) In-Situ Combustion - To evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in-situ combustion process. This project includes the study of the kinetics of the reactions; (3) Steam with Additives- To develop and understand the mechanisms of the process using commercially available surfactants for reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; (4) Formation Evaluation - To develop and improve techniques of formation evaluation such as tracer tests and pressure transient tests; and (5) Field Support Services - To provide technical support for design and monitoring of DOE sponsored or industry initiated field projects.

Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis; Kovscek, Anthony R.

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect

This project involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field, California. Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contained approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred W.; Bridges, Robert A.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Lorinovich, Caitlin J.; Lu, Silong

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

Computational Fluid Dynamics of a Semi Batch Reactor for Heavy Oil Hydroconversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents the numerical results of the computational fluid dynamics of a semi batch reactor used for hydroconversion of heavy oil. The reactor is a multicomponent system and it is modeled as a pseudo two phase system ( gas + slurry ). The equations used are the continuity equations the momentum equation (Navier?Stokes) and the k?? for turbulence. The numerical method used to solve the mathematical method was the finite volume where the problem was divided in two domains in order to account for the moving part of the impeller. The numerical results indicated convergence of the procedure for the velocity profiles.

T. S. Yamada; R. Guirardello

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Removal of heteroatoms and metals from heavy oils by bioconversion processes  

SciTech Connect

Biocatalysts, either appropriate microorganisms or isolated enzymes, will be used in an aqueous phase in contact with the heavy oil phase to extract heteroatoms such as sulfur from the oil phase by bioconversion processes. Somewhat similar work on coal processing will be adapted and extended for this application. Bacteria such as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans will be studied for the reductive removal of organically-bound sulfur and bacteria such as Rhodococcus rhodochrum will be investigated for the oxidative removal of sulfur. Isolated bacteria from either oil field co-produced sour water or from soil contaminated by oil spills will also be tested. At a later time, bacteria that interact with organic nitrogen may also be studied. This type of interaction will be carried out in advanced bioreactor systems where organic and aqueous phases are contacted. One new concept of emulsion-phase contacting, which will be investigated, disperses the aqueous phase in the organic phase and is then recoalesced for removal of the contaminants and recycled back to the reactor. This program is a cooperative research and development program with the following companies: Baker Performance Chemicals, Chevron, Energy BioSystems, Exxon, Texaco, and UNOCAL. After verification of the bioprocessing concepts on a laboratory-scale, the end-product will be a demonstration of the technology at an industrial site. This should result in rapid transfer of the technology to industry.

Kaufman, E.N.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Early dissipation and viscosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider dissipative phenomena due to the relaxation of an initial anisotropic local pressure in the fireball created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both for the Bjorken boost-invariant case and for the azimuthally symmetric radial expansion with boost-invariance. The resulting increase of the entropy can be counterbalanced by a suitable retuning of the initial temperature. An increase of the transverse collective flow is observed. The influence of the shear viscosity on the longitudinal expansion is also studied. Viscosity reduces the cooling rate from the longitudinal work and counteracts the pressure gradients that accelerate the longitudinal flow.

Piotr Bozek

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

Kinematic Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n (kinetic viscosity) The absolute (dynamic) viscosity of a fluid divided by the density...2/s, but the cgs unit, the stoke, which equals 10?4 m2/s, is still in wide use, as is its submultiple, the c...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Features of hydrotreating catalytic cracking feed and heavy slow coking gas oils  

SciTech Connect

A possible means of more extensive processing of crude oil is the use, in catalytic cracking, of heavy coking gas oils (HCGOs), a feature of which is a higher content of polycyclic aromatic compounds and resins by comparison with straight-run vacuum distillates. The presence of these compounds in catalytic cracking feed causes a reduction in the product yield and increased coke formation. Therefore, one of the problems of hydrotreating feedstock of this kind is the hydrogenation of polycyclic arenes. Processes of extensive desulphurization and denitration occur in parallel, since the sulphur and nitrogen compounds of HCGO are chiefly condensed benzoderivatives of thiophene, pyridine and carbazole, and largely concentrated in heavy aromatic and resinous fractions. The composition of the saturated part of the cracking feed plays a large role in achieving the optimum yields of gaseous and gasoline fractions. Thus an increase in the proportion of cyclanes in the feed raises the gasoline yield. In this way, an investigation of the hydrocarbon conversions during the hydrotreatment of cracking feed is of great importance. The present paper sets out the results for studying the change in the group-structural characteristics of the hydrogenation products of a mixture containing 30% HCGOs according to data of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Yefremov, N.I.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Frolov, P.A.; Chagovets, A.N.; Kalabin, G.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

An Analytical Model for Simulating Heavy-Oil Recovery by Cyclic Steam Injection Using Horizontal Wells, SUPRI TR-118  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation, existing analytical models for cyclic steam injection and oil recovery are reviewed and a new model is proposed that is applicable to horizontal wells. A new flow equation is developed for oil production during cyclic steaming of horizontal wells. The model accounts for the gravity-drainage of oil along the steam-oil interface and through the steam zone. Oil viscosity, effective permeability, geometry of the heated zone, porosity, mobile oil saturation, and thermal diffusivity of the reservoir influence the flow rate of oil in the model. The change in reservoir temperature with time is also modeled, and it results in the expected decline in oil production rate during the production cycle as the reservoir cools. Wherever appropriate, correlations and incorporated to minimize data requirements. A limited comparison to numerical simulation results agrees well, indicating that essential physics are successfully captured. Cyclic steaming appears to be a systematic met hod for heating a cold reservoir provided that a relatively uniform distribution of steam is obtained along the horizontal well during injection. A sensitivity analysis shows that the process is robust over the range of expected physical parameters.

Diwan, Utpal; Kovscek, Anthony R.

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

298

A distinct DGAT with sn-3 acetyltransferase activity that synthesizes unusual, reduced-viscosity oils in Euonymus and transgenic seeds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diesel engines; biodiesel is therefore synthesized...a heavier fuel used mainly in...Additionally, the introduction of acTAG into...2008 ) Metabolic engineering of hydroxy fatty...and of diesel fuel . Trans ASAE 36 : 503...Cahoon EB ( 2007 ) Engineering oilseeds for sustainable...Specifications for Diesel Fuel Oils ( American Society...

Timothy P. Durrett; Daniel D. McClosky; Ajay W. Tumaney; Dezi A. Elzinga; John Ohlrogge; Mike Pollard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Preparation of Co–Mo supported multi-wall carbon nanotube for hydrocracking of extra heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) supported Co–Mo nanocatalysts with changes in synthesis steps, one and two-step, were prepared through impregnation to be used in extra heavy oil hydrocracking process. In both of the synthesized nanocatalysts, the Co/Mo weight ratio was 1/3. The nanocatalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and accelerated surface area and porosimetry (ASAP) methods. The results showed that the nanocatalysts prepared through a two-step impregnation method had higher surface area and pore volume than the other synthesized nanocatalysts. The nanocatalysts were used in hydrocracking process under mild operating conditions, 260–300 °C and at H2 initial pressure of 5 MPa. Hydrocracking of extra heavy oil was conducted in an autoclave reactor. The results indicated that both nanocatalysts were capable of hydrocracking heavy oil at mild operating conditions. However, the nanocatalysts synthesized through the two-step impregnation exhibited higher performance, better heavy oil to light oil conversion, and better sulfur removal than the other methods. This superiority is due to the nanocatalyst's structure and better distribution of metal clusters on the support.

Mohsen Rahimi Rad; Alimorad Rashidi; Leila Vafajoo; Maryam Rashtchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Estimates of future regional heavy oil production at three production rates--background information for assessing effects in the US refining industry  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications from a project considering the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degree} to 20{degree} API gravity inclusive) production being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The report includes projections of future heavy oil production at three production levels: 900,000; 500,000; and 300,000 BOPD above the current 1992 heavy oil production level of 750,000 BOPD. These free market scenario projections include time frames and locations. Production projections through a second scenario were developed to examine which heavy oil areas would be developed if significant changes in the US petroleum industry occurred. The production data helps to define the possible constraints (impact) of increased heavy oil production on the US refining industry (the subject of a future report). Constraints include a low oil price and low rate of return. Heavy oil has high production, transportation, and refining cost per barrel as compared to light oil. The resource is known, but the right mix of technology and investment is required to bring about significant expansion of heavy oil production in the US.

Olsen, D.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of neural network models for the prediction of dewpoint pressure of retrograde gases and saturated oil viscosity of black oil systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Initial Reservoir Conditionst c pt Pat ol Prodo lion E ~ I 0 e o epItr Conditions rrem pereture Fig. 2. 1 A schematic phase diagram for a gas condensate reservoir Several studies have been camed out to evaluate the phenomena of retrograde.... pressure. This correlation is applicable only for gas/oil ratio of 15, 000-40, 000 sfc/STB, for temperature of 100-220 'F, and for API oil gravity in the range of 52" ? 64". Organick and Golding' (1952) presented a simple correlation for the prediction...

Gonzalez Zambrano, Alfredo Antonio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Major heavy oil deposits are present in Lower Cretaceous strata of west-central Saskatchewan. The Winter Heavy Oil Pool (approximately 566 044 mmbl) consists of bitumen-rich sands from the AptianAlbian Dina and Cummings members of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-central Saskatchewan. The Winter Heavy Oil Pool (approximately 566 044 mmbl) consists of bitumen-rich sands from dans les strates du Crétacé inférieur du centre-ouest de la Saskatchewan. Le gisement de pétrole lourd of the Winter Pool, west-central Saskatchewan DUSTIN B. BAUER University of Calgary Department of Geoscience

303

The flow and heat transfer characteristics of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore coupled with flow in heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a new improved oil-recovery technique, multi-thermal fluid injection technology through a horizontal well has been widely used in the development process of heavy oil reservoirs. The flow and heat transfer characteristic of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore is significantly important for the productivity evaluation and parameters design of the horizontal well. Considering the specific physical properties of multi-thermal fluid, fluid absorption in perforation holes and pressure drop characteristics along the horizontal wellbore, this paper developed the flow and heat transfer model of multi-thermal fluid in perforated horizontal wellbore. In order to evaluate the heating effect of the multi-thermal fluid, a concept of effective heating length of a horizontal well is proposed. Then, a sensitivity analysis process is performed to study the influence of reservoir/fluid parameters and operating parameters on the flowing process of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore. Simultaneously, using the method of orthogonal numerical test, differential analysis and variance analysis are also conducted. Results show that the flowing process of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore includes a single-phase flowing process and a gas–liquid two-phase flowing process. The influence of oil viscosity on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of multi-thermal fluid in horizontal wellbore is most significant. Thereafter, the solution of our semi-analytical model is compared against the test results of an actual horizontal well from an oilfield in China. It is shown that the model results are in good agreement with the real test results. This model could be used to calculate and predict the flow and heat transfer characteristics of multi-thermal fluid (or saturated steam) in a perforated horizontal wellbore.

Xiaohu Dong; Huiqing Liu; Zhaoxiang Zhang; Changjiu Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Melt Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n...The resistance to shear in a molten resin, quantified as the quotient of shear stress divided by shear rate at any point in the flowing material. Elongational viscosity, which comes into plan in ...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Viscosity Coefficient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n...(1866) The shearing stress necessary to induce a unit velocity flow gradient in a material. In actual measurement, the viscosity coefficient of a material is obtained from...Physical Chemistry of...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Magnetic Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1893 research-article Magnetic Viscosity J. Hopkinson E. Wilson F. Lydall The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. www.jstor.org

1893-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Nuclear viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The decay rate of momentum in a nuclear reaction is given by an exact formula expressed in terms of the T matrix. A special case, where a viscosity coefficient can be estimated, is considered.

B. Giraud; J. Le Tourneux; E. Osnes

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Survey of tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, and shallow light oil fields of the United States for underground coal gasification applications  

SciTech Connect

A literature survey was conducted to identify areas of the United States where tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, or shallow light oil fields might be suitably associated with coal deposits for production of oil by in situ thermal recovery methods using heat derived from underground coal gasification (UCG) processes. The survey is part of a Department of Energy-sponsored program to develop new applications for UCG technology in utilizing coal resources that are unattractive for mining. Results from the survey indicate tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, or light oil fields are probably or possibly located within 5 miles of suitable coal in 17 states (Table 1). Especially promising areas are in the Uinta Basin of Utah; the North Slope of Alaska; the San Miguel deposit in southwest Texas; the Illinois-Eastern Interior Basin area of western Kentucky, southwestern Indiana and Illinois; the tri-state area of Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma; and the northern Appalachian Basin in eastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania. The deposits in these areas warrant further evaluation. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Trudell, L.G.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Drilling fluid technology for horizontal wells to protect the formations in unconsolidated sandstone heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Major factors that cause damage in drilling in unconsolidated sandstone heavy oil reservoirs include: invasion of solids in drilling fluid, incompatibility between the liquid phase of drilling fluid and crude oil, and hydration and expansion of reservoir clay minerals. Therefore, a solid-free weak gel drilling fluid system for horizontal wells to protect the formations was developed that contains seawater + 0.1%–0.2% NaOH + 0.2% Na2CO3+ 0.7% VIS + 2.0% FLO + 2.0% JLX, weighed with \\{KCl\\} or sodium formate. The drilling fluid system has unique rheological properties, temporally independent gel strength, and excellent lubricating and inhibition performance. It is compatible with formation fluids, it not only meets the needs of horizontal well drilling, but also effectively protects the reservoir. The technique is well performed in tens of horizontal wells in offshore oilfields, such as WC13-1, BZ34-1, NP35-2, and BZ25-1 oilfields.

Yue Qiansheng; Liu Shujie; Xiang Xingjin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

On the use of biosurfactants for the removal of heavy metals from oil-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using biodegradable biosurfactants to remove heavy metals from an oil-contaminated soil was evaluated by batch washes with surfactin, a rhamnolipid and a sophorolipid. The soil contained 890 mg/kg of zinc and 420 mg/kg of copper with a 12.6% oil and grease content. Highest levels of zinc removal were obtained using 12% rhamnolipid and 4% sophorolipid/0.7% HCl. Highest copper removal rates were achieved with 12% rhamnolipid or with 2% rhamnolipid/1% NaOH or 0.25% surfactin/1% NaOH. A series of five batch washes removed 70% of the copper with 0.1% surfactin/1% NaOH while 4% sophorolipid/0.7% HCl was able to remove 100% of the zinc. Sequential extraction procedures showed that the carbonate and oxide fractions accounted for over 90% of the zinc present in the soil and the organic fraction in the soil constituted over 70% of the copper. Sequential extraction of the soil after washing with the surfactin or rhamnolipid indicated that these surfactants could remove the organically-bound copper and that the sophorolipid with acid could remove the carbonate and oxide-bound zinc. In conclusion, the results clearly indicated the feasibility of removing the metals with the anionic biosurfactants tested even though the exchangeable metal fractions were very low.

Mulligan, C.N. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering; Yong, R.N. [Univ. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Gibbs, B.F. [Bivan Consultants Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Environmental Div.] [Bivan Consultants Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Environmental Div.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

TRANSPORT AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA PROPERITIES FOR STEAM FLOODING OF HEAVY OILS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon/water and CO{sub 2} systems are frequently found in petroleum recovery processes, petroleum refining, and gasification of coals, lignites and tar sands. Techniques to estimate the phase volume and phase composition are indispensable to design and improve oil recovery processes such as steam, hot water, or CO{sub 2}/steam combinations of flooding techniques typically used for heavy oils. An interdisciplinary research program to quantify transport, PVT, and equilibrium properties of selected oil/CO{sub 2}/water mixtures at pressures up to 10,000 psia and at temperatures up to 500 F has been put in place. The objectives of this research include experimental determination and rigorous modeling and computation of phase equilibrium diagrams, and volumetric properties of hydrocarbon/CO{sub 2}/water mixtures at pressures and temperatures typical of steam injection processes for thermal recovery of heavy oils. Highlighting the importance of phase behavior, researchers ([1], and [2]) insist on obtaining truly representative reservoir fluids samples for experimental analysis. The prevailing sampling techniques used for compositional analysis of the fluids have potential for a large source of error. These techniques bring the sample to atmospheric conditions and collect the liquid and vapor portion of the samples for further analysis. We developed a new experimental technique to determine phase volumes, compositions and equilibrium K-values at reservoir conditions. The new methodology is able to measure phase volume and composition at reservoir like temperatures and pressures. We use a mercury free PVT system in conjunction with a Hewlett Packard gas chromatograph capable of measuring compositions on line at high pressures and temperatures. This is made possible by an essentially negligible disturbance of the temperature and pressure equilibrium during phase volume and composition measurements. In addition, not many samples are withdrawn for compositional analysis because a negligible volume (0.1 {micro}l to 0.5 {micro}l) is sent directly to the gas chromatograph through sampling valves. These amounts are less than 1 x 10{sup -5} % of total volume and do not affect the overall composition or equilibrium of the system. A new method to compute multi-component phase equilibrium diagrams based on an improved version of the Peng-Robinson equation has been developed [3]. This new version of the Peng-Robinson equation uses a new volume translation scheme and new mixing rules to improve the accuracy of the calculations. Calculations involving multicomponent mixtures of CO{sub 2}/water and hydrocarbons have been completed. A scheme to lump multi-component materials such as, oils into a small set of ''pseudo-components'' according to the technique outlined by Whitson [4] has been implemented. This final report presents the results of our experimental and predicted phase behavior diagrams and calculations for mixtures of CO{sub 2}/water and real oils at high pressures and temperatures.

Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interplay between shear and bulk viscosities on the flow harmonics, $v_n$'s, at RHIC is investigated using the newly developed relativistic 2+1 hydrodynamical code v-USPhydro that includes bulk and shear viscosity effects both in the hydrodynamic evolution and also at freeze-out. While shear viscosity is known to attenuate the flow harmonics, we find that the inclusion of bulk viscosity decreases the shear viscosity-induced suppression of the flow harmonics bringing them closer to their values in ideal hydrodynamical calculations. Depending on the value of the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\zeta/s$, in the quark-gluon plasma, the bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics may require a re-evaluation of the previous estimates of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, of the quark-gluon plasma previously extracted by comparing hydrodynamic calculations to heavy ion data.

J. Noronha-Hostler; J. Noronha; F. Grassi

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09, 2013 09, 2013 Innovative Technology Improves Upgrading Process for Unconventional Oil Resources Washington, D.C. - An innovative oil-upgrading technology that can increase the economics of unconventional petroleum resources has been developed under a U.S. Department of Energy -funded project. The promising technology, developed by Ceramatec of Salt Lake City, Utah, and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been licensed to Western Hydrogen of Calgary for upgrading bitumen or heavy oil from Canada. A new company, Field Upgrading (Calgary, Alberta), has been formed dedicated to developing and commercializing the technology. Heavy oil is crude oil that is viscous and requires thermally enhanced oil recovery methods, such as steam and hot water injection, to reduce its viscosity and enable it to flow. The largest U.S. deposits of heavy oil are in California and on Alaska's North Slope. Estimates for the U.S. heavy oil resource total about 104 billion barrels of oil in place - nearly five times the United States' proved reserves. In addition, although no commercial-scale development of U.S. oil sands or oil shale has yet occurred, both represent another potential future domestic unconventional oil resource.

314

Viscosity of polymer solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity of polymer solutions ... Abstracts for Volume 5A, Number 2. This program contains three components: "Density of Liquids", "Viscosity of Liquids", and "Viscosity of Polymer Solutions". ...

Gary L. Bertrand

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of polymer-SBA15 nanocomposites will be conducted by changing the amount and chemistry of the zeolitic precursors added; and (4) Investigation on the catalytic properties of the materials using probe catalytic reactions (such as cumene cracking), followed by catalytic testing for heavy oil conversion.

Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Study of Oil Degradation in Extended Idle Operation Heavy Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in engine oil technology and increased combustion efficiency has resulted in the longer oil intervals in vehicles. Current oil change interval practice only takes into account the mileage a vehicle has driven and does not consider other...

Kader, Michael Kirk

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Intrinsic Biodegradation of Heavy Oil from Nakhodka and the Effect of Exogenous Fertilization at a Coastal Area of the Sea of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We performed a field experiment in thebiodegradation of heavy oil spilled from the Russian tankerNakhodka on a beach in the Sea of Japan. We collectedoil-contaminated cobbles and treated half with nitrogen andpho...

Hideaki Maki; Mao Utsumi; Hiroshi Koshikawa…

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Viscosity near phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probably the most enticing observation in theoretical physics during the last decade was the discovery of the great amount of consequences obtained from the AdS/CFT conjecture put forward by Maldacena. In this work we review how this correspondence can be used to address hydrodynamic properties such as the viscosity of some strongly interacting systems. We also employ the Boltzmann equation for those systems closer to low-energy QCD, and argue that this kind of transport coefficients can be related to phase transitions, in particular the QGP/hadronic phase transition studied in heavy ion collisions.

Antonio Dobado; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres-Rincon

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Viscosity, specific (for liquids)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n. The ratio between the viscosity of a liquid and the viscosity of water at the same temperature. Specific viscosity is sometimes used interchangeably with relative viscosity for liquids.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lunar Viscosity Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

31 March 1977 research-article Lunar Viscosity Models R. Meissner Viscosity values as estimated from isostatic processes and...depth seem to be connected with a limited range of viscosity values. A tentative relation between viscosity...

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Prediction of Shale Plugs between Wells in Heavy Oil Sands using Seismic Attributes  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental geologic problem in the Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) heavy oil developments in the McMurray Formation of Northern Alberta is to determine the location of shales in the reservoirs that may interfere with the steaming or recovery process. Petrophysical analysis shows that a key acoustic indicator of the presence of shale is bulk density. In theory, density can be derived from seismic data using Amplitude Versus Offset (AVO) analysis of conventional or multicomponent seismic data, but this is not widely accepted in practice. However, with billions of dollars slated for SAGD developments in the upcoming years, this technology warrants further investigation. In addition, many attributes can be investigated using modern tools like neural networks; so, the density extracted from seismic using AVO can be compared and combined with more conventional attributes in solving this problem. Density AVO attributes are extracted and correlated with 'density synthetics' created from the logs just as the seismic stack correlates to conventional synthetics. However, multiattribute tests show that more than density is required to best predict the volume proportion of shale (Vsh). Vsh estimates are generated by passing seismic attributes derived from conventional PP, and multicomponent PS seismic, AVO and inversion from an arbitrary line following the pilot SAGD wells through a neural network. This estimate shows good correlation to shale proportions estimated from core. The results have encouraged the application of the method to the entire 3D.

Gray, F. David [Veritas DGC, Inc., 2200 (Canada); Anderson, Paul F. [Apache Canada Ltd. (Canada); Gunderson, Jay A. [Veritas DGC, Inc., 2200 (Canada)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Ultrapyrolytic upgrading of plastic wastes and plastics/heavy oil mixtures to valuable light gas products  

SciTech Connect

Viable operating conditions were identified experimentally for maximizing the production of high-value products such as ethylene, propylene, styrene, and benzene, from the ultrapyrolysis of waste plastics. Using both a batch microreactor and a pilot-plant-sized reactor, the key operating variables considered were pyrolysis temperature, product reaction time, and quench time. In the microreactor experiments, polystyrene (PS), a significant component of waste plastics, was pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 800 to 965 C, with total reaction times ranging from 500 to 1,000 ms. At a temperature of 965 C and 500 ms, the yields of styrene plus benzene were greater than 95 wt %. In the pilot-plant experiments, the recently patented internally circulating fluidized bed (ICFB) reactor (Milne et al., US Patent Number 5,370,789, 1994b) was used to ultrapyrolyze low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in addition to LDPE (5% by weight)/heavy oil mixtures at a residence time of 600 ms. Both experiments produced light olefin yields greater than 55 wt % at temperatures above 830 C.

Lovett, S.; Berruti, F.; Behie, L.A. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering] [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The effects of heavy fuels on the M/V Bill Elmer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the operational experience of using blended or heavy fuels for inland marine service. The experience outlined here is with a vessel retrofitted to specifically use 2000 Redwood No. 1, seconds, fuel and designed to increase blended fuel-oil viscosity rising as high as 3500 Redwood. An engine teardown was performed and no abnormal wear was noticed.

Molin, W.A.; Barras, B.; Welchel, R.O.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute] [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G. [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)] [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. New results indicated that good quality highly ordered nanoporous silica host can be synthesized in the presence of zeolite Y seed precursor depending on the amount of precursor added. Preliminary research on the catalytic performance of the materials is underway. Probe acid catalyzed reactions, such as the cracking of cumene is currently being conducted. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of ZeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite catalysts of improved structural and physicochemical characteristics will be conducted by changing the amount and chemistry of the zeolitic precursors added; and (4) Investigation on the catalytic properties of the materials using probe catalytic reactions (such as cumene cracking), followed by catalytic testing for heavy oil conversion.

Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Project Title: VIscosity Reduction Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4t 3 4t 3 l I Project lnfonnatlon Project Title: VIscosity Reduction Date: 11-22-2010 DOE Code: 673()-()20-51141 Contractor Code: 8067-778 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview 1. The purpose of the project is to test a tool that temporarily reduces the viscosity of oil which allows it to be 1. Brief project description ~nclude pumped through pipelines easier. The test will require about 4 miles of line to pump the oil through after anything that could impact the treatment (hence the need to connect the 31oops together), a holding volume for recovery, then repeat. environmenJ] There will be tanks to hold the original volume, tanks to receive the volume after treatment and pumping 2. Legal location through the line, possible transfer between tanks, transport (trucking) of the oil to the site (by the COC) and

328

Weathering and the Fallout Plume of Heavy Oil from Strong Petroleum Seeps Near Coal Oil Point, CA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Similarities in the distribution and relative abundance of hopane biomarkers between all sediment samples, reservoir material from the seep field, and seep oil strongly suggest that oils derived from the Monterey formation, such as those seeping from COP, serve as the primary source of petroleum to these sediments. ... Thus, it is likely that oily sediments resuspended in the bottom waters are transported to the west and settle in a pattern consistent with that observed. ...

Christopher Farwell; Christopher M. Reddy; Emily Peacock; Robert K. Nelson; Libe Washburn; David L. Valentine

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

329

IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST  

SciTech Connect

Composite materials of SBA-15/zeolite Y were synthesized from zeolite Y precursor and a synthesis mixture of mesoporous silicate SBA-15 via a hydrothermal process in the presence of a slightly acidic media of pH 4-6 with 2M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The SBA-15/ZY composites showed Type IV adsorption isotherms, narrow BJH average pore size distribution of 4.9 nm, surface areas up to 800 m{sup 2}2/g and pore volumes 1.03 cm{sup 3}, all comparable to pure SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Chemical analysis revealed Si/Al ratio down to 8.5 in the most aluminated sample, and {sup 27}AlSS MAS NMR confirmed aluminum was in tetrahedral coordination. This method of introduction of Al in pure T{sub d} coordination is effective in comparison to other direct and post synthesis alumination methods. Bronsted acid sites were evident from a pyridinium peak at 1544 cm-1 in the FTIR spectrum after pyridine adsorption, and from NH{sub 3} -TPD experiments. SBA-15/ZY composites showed significant catalytic activities for the dealkylation of isopropylbenzene to benzene and propene, similar to those of commercial zeolite Y. It was observed that higher conversion for catalysts synthesized with high amount of ZY precursor mixture added to the SBA-15. Over all the composites has shown good catalytic activity. Further studies will be focused on gaining a better understand the nature of the precursor, and to characterize and to locate the acid sites in the composite material. The composite will also be evaluated for heavy oil conversion to naphtha and middle distillates.

Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Viscosity and dissipation - early stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A very early start up time of the hydrodynamic evolution is needed in order to reproduce observations from relativistic heavy-ion collisions experiments. At such early times the systems is still not locally equilibrated. Another source of deviations from local equilibrium is the viscosity of the fluid. We study these effects at very early times to obtain a dynamical prescription for the transition from an early 2-dimensional expansion to a nearly equilibrated 3-dimensional expansion at latter stages. The role of viscosity at latter stages of the evolution is also illustrated.

P. Bozek

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Charm contribution to bulk viscosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the range of temperatures reached in future heavy ion collision experiments, hadronic pair annihilations and creations of charm quarks may take place within the lifetime of the plasma. As a result, charm quarks may increase the bulk viscosity affecting the early stages of hydrodynamic expansion. Assuming thermalization, we estimate the charm contribution to bulk viscosity within the same effective kinetic theory framework in which the light parton contribution has been computed previously. The time scale at which this physics becomes relevant is related to the width of the transport peak associated with the trace anomaly correlator, and is found to be 600 MeV.

Laine, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Charm contribution to bulk viscosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the range of temperatures reached in future heavy ion collision experiments, hadronic pair annihilations and creations of charm quarks may take place within the lifetime of the plasma. As a result, charm quarks may increase the bulk viscosity affecting the early stages of hydrodynamic expansion. Assuming thermalization, we estimate the charm contribution to bulk viscosity within the same effective kinetic theory framework in which the light parton contribution has been computed previously. The time scale at which this physics becomes relevant is related to the width of the transport peak associated with the trace anomaly correlator, and is found to be 600 MeV.

M. Laine; Kiyoumars A. Sohrabi

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

A study of heavy oil fractions by Fourier-transform near-infrared Raman spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil fractions with a boiling-point step size of 20°C (300 to 560°C) for six different crude oils of Western Siberia have been studied by Fourier-transform Raman and Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy. Weak band...

A. Kh. Kuptsov; T. V. Arbuzova

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Isoconversional Kinetic Analysis of the Combustion of Heavy Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One method to access unconventional, heavy-oil resources as well as waterflood residual oil is to apply in situ combustion (ISC) to oxidize in place a small fraction of the hydrocarbon, thereby providing heat to reduce oil viscosity and pressure that enhances recovery. ... As shown by Vyazovkin,(12) these deviations of temperature yield erroneous values of activation energy, when such a data set is used with a model that assumes linear heating. ... Estimates were made of the heat produced, and a formula was derived for computing the heat of combustion of hydrocarbons in the high-temp. ...

Murat Cinar; Louis M. Castanier; Anthony R. Kovscek

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

335

Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

Scott Hara

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Phonon Viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boltzmann equation for thermal phonons in a dielectric crystal in the presence of a slowly varying but otherwise arbitrary, strain field is solved formally by expanding the phonon distribution function in terms of eigenfunctions of the collision operator. The macroscopic stress is then calculated in terms of the macroscopic strain and the phonon distribution function by using the quasiharmonic approximation. The resulting equation for the stress is of the same form as that given by thermoelasticity, except for the presence of an extra term which is linear in the strain rate. The coefficient of the strain rate in this term is identified with the phonon viscosity tensor, and a formal expression for this tensor is obtained.

H. J. MARIS

1969-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Thermal Conversion of Heavy Oil Systems and Analysis of Structural Changes of their High Components with PMR Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Heavy oil systems are thermolyzed with different ratios of amount of resins and asphaltenes: 3.4, 3.8, 5.3, and 12.4. The change in yield and composition of gaseous, liquid and solid products of thermolysis is shown depending on the ratio of the resin: asphaltenes. In the liquid products of thermolysis, resins content decreases and s the amount of asphaltenes and oils increases. According to PMR spectroscopy, the distribution of protons is compared in the secondary resin and asphaltene molecules of the initial samples and the thermolysis products. It is shown that the relative content of hydrogen aromatic rings in the molecules of asphaltenes is higher, and for ?- and ?- positions relative to the aromatic rings and heterofunction, it is lower than in the resin molecules.

G.C. Pevneva; A.K. Golovko; D.S. Korneev; A.I. Levashova

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Heavy fuel oil fired CHP plant -- Impact on environment: Case Germany  

SciTech Connect

In 1995 Waertsilae NSD Finland Oy got the order to build a 14 MWe CHP (simultaneous heat and power) diesel power plant for Cerestar GMBH in Germany. The order consisted of a complete delivery, installation and commissioning of the fuel treatment system, the diesel engine with alternator, the process control system, the exhaust gas cleaning system (SCR and DESOX) and the heat recovery system. The factory producing starch is situated in the city of Krefeld close to Dusseldorf. The process integration of the diesel power plant into the existing factory was done in a close cooperation between the client and Waertsilae and the result is a CHP-plant suiting well into the existing factory. The diesel power plant went into operation in January 1996. The operating experience has been very encouraging, the annual running time is above 8,000 h and by the end of December 1997 about 16,300 running hours had been accumulated. The power plant is fulfilling the strict TA-LUFT emission limits and even half TA-LUFT values regarding NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}. The measured total efficiency of the power plant is above 90%. The choice of the most economical DESOX-method is dependent on several factors: investment and running cost, plant size, environmental legislation requirements, commercially available heavy fuel oil brands, etc. In small diesel plants the NaOH-scrubber is the most competitive desulfurization (DESOX) method, due to the lower investment cost compared to other DESOX-systems. A wet NaOH scrubbers system is installed. The used reagent is an about 50 wt-% aqueous NaOH solution. Low SO{sub x}-emissions of the flue gas is easily achieved by adjusting the pH of the scrubber liquid. The dissolved salt in the generated liquid end-product consists mainly of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, due to the high oxygen content of the diesel flue gas. Running experiences have shown that the installed wet NaOH scrubber is easy to operate and suits the factory in Krefeld well.

Boij, J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on

Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-situ upgrading of oil using hydrogen donors is a new process. In particular, very little research has been conducted with respect to in-situ oil upgrading using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion. Several papers describe the use of metal...

Huseynzade, Samir

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Viscosity of Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The viscosity of air has been remeasured with the rotating cylinder apparatus used by Day and Bleakney. All of the constants have been redetermined, and especial attention has been given to the corrections to the simple theory. The value obtained at 22°C is ?=1.8243±0.0045 c.g.s. units. This raises the oil drop value of e to 4.796 e.s.u. It is shown in the appendix that a correction must be applied for the opening between the suspended cylinder and the guard cylinders, and also a correction must be applied for the moment of inertia of the air carried around by the cylinder when determining its moment of inertia. Neglect of these corrections has introduced some additional uncertainty into other work.

W. V. Houston

1937-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Tsunamis, Viscosity and the HBT Puzzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state and bulk and shear viscosities are shown to be able to affect the transverse dynamics of a central heavy ion collision. The net entropy, along with the femtoscopic radii are shown to be affected at the 10-20% level by both shear and bulk viscosity. The degree to which these effects help build a tsunami-like pulse is also discussed.

Scott Pratt

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

344

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

Increasing Heavy Oil Reservers in the Wilmington Oil field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, Scott [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydroconversion of polyethylene and tire rubber in a mixture with heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of studies on the processing of solid polymer wastes in a mixture with the heavy petroleum residues by hydroconversion with the use of the precursors of nanosized catalysts are given. It was found ...

Kh. M. Kadiev; A. U. Dandaev; A. M. Gyul’maliev; A. E. Batov…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effects of bulk viscosity at freezeout  

SciTech Connect

We investigate particle spectra and elliptic flow coefficients in relativistic heavy-ion collisions by taking into account the distortion of phase space distributions by bulk viscosity at freezeout. We first calculate the distortion of phase space distributions in a multicomponent system with Grad's 14-moment method. We find some subtle issues when macroscopic variables are matched with microscopic momentum distributions in a multicomponent system, and we develop a consistent procedure to uniquely determine the corrections to the phase space distributions. Next, we calculate particle spectra by using the Cooper-Frye formula to see the effect of the bulk viscosity. Despite the relative smallness of the bulk viscosity, we find that it is likely to have a visible effect on particle spectra and elliptic flow coefficients. This indicates the importance of taking into account bulk viscosity together with shear viscosity to constrain the transport coefficients with better accuracy from comparison with experimental data.

Monnai, Akihiko; Hirano, Tetsufumi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Marine Fuel Oil on a Mixed Base  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three grades of high–viscosity marine fuel oil are manufactured according to TU 38. ... developing the composition and technology for production of marine fuel oils [1– 4].

S. V. Kotov; A. G. Oltyrev; I. N. Kankaeva…

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

Scott Hara

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

Scott Hara

2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Oil Sands Feedstocks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centre for Upgrading Technology 'a Canada-Alberta alliance for bitumen and heavy oil research' Oil Sands Feedstocks C Fairbridge, Z Ring, Y Briker, D Hager National Centre...

353

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

Scott Hara

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that were being addressed in 2001. As the fluid production is hot, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001.

Scott Hara

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001.

Scott Hara

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Second Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A steamflood reservoirs have been operated over fifteen months at relatively stable pressures, due in large part to the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase in January 1999. Starting in the Fourth Quarter 2000, the project team has ramped up activity to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001. Much of the second quarter was spent writing DOE annual and quarterly reports to stay current with contract requirements.

Scott Hara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

357

Removal of heteroatoms and metals from heavy oils by bioconversion processes. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Cooperative research and Development Agreement project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( O W ) and Baker Performance Chemicals (BPC), Chevron, Energy BioSystems, Exxon, UNOCAL and Texaco is to investigate the biological desukrization of crude oil. Biological removal of organic s&%r fiom crude oil offers an attractive alternative to conventional thermochemical treatment due to the mild operating conditions afforded by the biocatalyst. In order for biodesulfbrization to realize commercial success, reactors must be designed which allow for sufficient liquid / liquid and gas / liquid mass transfer while simultaneously reducing operating costs. To this end we have been developing advanced bioreactors for biodesufirization and have been studying their performance using both actual crude oil as well as more easily characterized model systems.

Kaufman, E N; Borole, A P

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the work performed in the various physicochemical factors for the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. In this context the following general areas were studied: (1) The understanding of vapor-liquid flows in porous media, including processes in steam injection; (2) The effect of reservoir heterogeneity in a variety of foams, from pore scale to macroscopic scale; (3) The flow properties of additives for improvement of recovery efficiency, particularly foams and other non-Newtonian fluids; and (4) The development of optimization methods to maximize various measures of oil recovery.

Yortsos, Yanis C.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Upgrading of heavy oil from the San Joaquin valley of California by aqueous pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Midway Sunset crude oil and well-head oil were treated at elevated temperatures in a closed system with the presence of water. Mild to moderate upgrading, as measured by increasing in API gravity, was observed at 400 C or above. Reduced pressure operation exhibited upgrading activity comparable to upgrading under normal aqueous pyrolysis conditions. Reduced pressure operation was obtained by the use of specific blending methods, a surfactant, and the proper amount of water. The use of metal complexes provided additional upgrading. The best of the minimum set tested was Co(II) 2-ethylhexanoate. Fe, Zn, Mo, Cu, and Ni complexes also showed some levels of activity.

Reynolds, J.G.; Murray, A.M.; Nuxoll, E.V.; Fox, G.A.; Thorsness, C.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Khan, M.R. [Texaco R and D, Beacon, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Investigation on combustion characteristics of crude rice bran oil methyl ester blend as a heavy duty automotive engine fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work, an attempt was made to test the suitability of crude rice bran oil methyl ester (CRBME) blend as a heavy duty automotive engine fuel. A four stroke, six cylinder direct injection 117.6 kW turbo-charged compression ignition (CI) engine was used for the work. The operation of the engine with CRBME blend showed that the peak pressure increased with lower maximum rate of pressure rise and maximum heat release rate with shorter delay period. Burning rate of the CRBME blend was slower and required a higher crank angle to complete the combustion cycle when compared to diesel. The brake thermal efficiency of the CRBME blend was lower than that of diesel at all speeds except at 2300rpm. As the measured combustion and performance parameters for CRBME blend differs only by a smaller magnitude when compared with diesel, this investigation ensures the suitability of the CRBME blend as fuel for heavy duty automotive engine without any design modifications [Received: August 12, 2010; Accepted: August 29, 2010

S. Saravanan; G. Nagarajan; S. Sampath

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 1999, project work has been completed related to data preparation, basic reservoir engineering, developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model, and a rock-log model, well drilling and completions, and surface facilities. Work is continuing on the stochastic geologic model, developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Fault Block IIA Tar (Tar II-A) Zone, and operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the steamflood project. Last quarter on January 12, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations. Seven water injection wells were placed in service in November and December 1998 on the flanks of the Phase 1 steamflood area to pressure up the reservoir to fill up the existing steam chest. Intensive reservoir engineering and geomechanics studies are continuing to determine the best ways to shut down the steamflood operations in Fault Block II while minimizing any future surface subsidence. The new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulator model is being used to provide sensitivity cases to optimize production, steam injection, future flank cold water injection and reservoir temperature and pressure. According to the model, reservoir fill up of the steam chest at the current injection rate of 28,000 BPD and gross and net oil production rates of 7,700 BPD and 750 BOPD (injection to production ratio of 4) will occur in October 1999. At that time, the reservoir should act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection can be operated at lower net injection rates to be determined. Modeling runs developed this quarter found that varying individual well injection rates to meet added production and local pressure problems by sub-zone could reduce steam chest fill-up by up to one month.

Scott Hara

2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

Viscosity of Metallic Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Viscosity measurements which have been recently carried out in this Department show that certain views normally ... not supported by experiments. For example, it is generally assumed1 that the relationship of viscosity to temperature is given by:

T. P. YAO; V. KONDIC

1950-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Density measurements Viscosity measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Density measurements Viscosity measurements Temperature measurements Pressure measurements Flow rate measurements Velocity measurements Sensors How to measure fluid flow properties ? Am´elie Danlos Ravelet Experimental methods for fluid flows: an introduction #12;Density measurements Viscosity

Ravelet, Florent

364

Heavy Oil Process Monitor: Automated On-Column Asphaltene Precipitation and Re-Dissolution  

SciTech Connect

An automated separation technique was developed that provides a new approach to measuring the distribution profiles of the most polar, or asphaltenic components of an oil, using a continuous flow system to precipitate and re-dissolve asphaltenes from the oil. Methods of analysis based on this new technique were explored. One method based on the new technique involves precipitation of a portion of residua sample in heptane on a polytetrafluoroethylene-packed (PTFE) column. The precipitated material is re-dissolved in three steps using solvents of increasing polarity: cyclohexane, toluene, and methylene chloride. The amount of asphaltenes that dissolve in cyclohexane is a useful diagnostic of the thermal history of oil, and its proximity to coke formation. For example, about 40 % (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolves in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. The automated procedure takes one hour. Another method uses a single solvent, methylene chloride, to re-dissolve the material that precipitates on heptane on the PTFE-packed column. The area of this second peak can be used to calculate a value which correlates with gravimetric asphaltene content. Currently the gravimetric procedure to determine asphaltenes takes about 24 hours. The automated procedure takes 30 minutes. Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric methods. Methods based on the new on-column precipitation and re-dissolution technique provide significantly more detail about the polar constituent's oils than the gravimetric determination of asphaltenes.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Mark Sanderson

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we added numerical solution along streamline subroutines to our streamline compositional simulator. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We studied the wettability of the reservoir oil and formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The effect of new relative permeability formulations on a five-spot pattern WAG recovery was evaluated. Effect of horizontal wells on pattern sweep has been initiated. A model quarter five-spot experiment is being designed. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, evaluation of complex well-architecture and design of model quarter five-spot experiment.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Viscosity at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of physical phenomena can lead to viscous effects. In this talk we review several sources of shear and bulk viscosity with an emphasis on the bulk viscosity associated with chiral restoration. We show that in the limit of a second order phase transition, the viscosity peaks in a singularity at the critical point.

Scott Pratt; Kerstin Paech

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

From Stopping to Viscosity in Nuclear Reactions  

SciTech Connect

Data on stopping in intermediate-energy central heavy-ion collisions are analyzed following transport theory based on the Boltzmann equation. In consequence, values of nuclear shear viscosity are inferred. The inferred values are significantly larger than obtained for free nucleon dispersion relations and free nucleon-nucleon cross sections.

Danielewicz, Pawel; Barker, Brent; Shi Lijun [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

From Stopping to Viscosity in Nuclear Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data on stopping in intermediate-energy central heavy-ion collisions are analyzed following transport theory based on the Boltzmann equation. In consequence, values of nuclear shear viscosity are inferred. The inferred values are significantly larger than obtained for free nucleon dispersion relations and free nucleon-nucleon cross sections.

Danielewicz, P; Shi, L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

From Stopping to Viscosity in Nuclear Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data on stopping in intermediate-energy central heavy-ion collisions are analyzed following transport theory based on the Boltzmann equation. In consequence, values of nuclear shear viscosity are inferred. The inferred values are significantly larger than obtained for free nucleon dispersion relations and free nucleon-nucleon cross sections.

P. Danielewicz; B. Barker; L. Shi

2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

Development and field testing of a process for recovering heavy crude oil in the Carlyle pool-Allen County, Kansas using the Vapor Therm generator. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A Vapor Therm generator capable of producing steam and inert gases was built for conditions encountered in the Carlyle pool, and is capable of delivering heated gases at 900 psi and 700/sup 0/F. New wells were drilled in a five spot pattern with an inter-well distance of 208.7 ft. Logs and cores from these new wells were obtained and the subsurface reservoir was evaluated. Oil content of 1197 BSTO/Ac-Ft was encountered. This oil was 19.5/sup 0/ API with a viscosity of 1026 cps at 70/sup 0/F. The net pay thickness beneath the pattern exceeded thirty-five feet. Bartlesville sand porosity was 23.6% and absolute permeability was 695 md. Initial reservoir pressure was 235 psi. The oil reservoir is underlain by an extensive aquifer whose thickness exceeds one hundred feet. On January 31, 1977, the first of four stimulation cycles in the Bartleville sand was begun. The final cycle was concluded on March 5, 1978. During these months of cyclic stimulation-production, the wells produced at a sustained average rate of 7.82 BSTO/day and a water/oil ratio of 1.3. Over three barrels of oil per barrel of steam injected was recovered on the 4th cycle. Maximum production rate is 151 BSTO/well/week. Total oil production during the four cycles was 9034 barrels of stock tank oil, indicating an enhanced recovery of 6.04% of original oil in place or 71.2 BSTO/Ac-Ft.

Sperry, J.S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In thermally enhanced recovery processes like cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) or steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), continuous steam injection entails changes in pore fluid, pore pressure and temperature in the rock reservoir, that are most often unconsolidated or weakly consolidated sandstones. This in turn increases or decreases the effective stresses and changes the elastic properties of the rocks. Thermally enhanced recovery processes give rise to complex couplings. Numerical simulations have been carried out on a case study so as to provide an estimation of the evolution of pressure, temperature, pore fluid saturation, stress and strain in any zone located around the injector and producer wells. The approach of Ciz and Shapiro (2007) - an extension of the poroelastic theory of Biot-Gassmann applied to rock filled elastic material - has been used to model the velocity dispersion in the oil sand mass under different conditions of temperature and stress. A good agreement has been found between these pre...

Nauroy, Jean-François; Guy, N; Baroni, Axelle; Delage, Pierre; Mainguy, Marc; 10.2516/ogst/2012027

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Modeling the kinetics of parallel thermal and catalytic hydrotreating of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A series of experiments were performed for obtaining the kinetics of the parallel thermal and catalytic hydrotreating reactions. The reactions considered were: hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation (basic and non-basic), hydrodemetallization, hydrodeasphaltenization and hydro Conradson carbon removal. Hydrodesulfurization reaction was described by Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetics while the other reactions were modeled with power-law approach. The tests were carried out in a CSTBR at the following conditions: 380–420 °C, 9.8 MPa, 891 std m3/m3 of hydrogen-to-oil ratio, 0.98–2.56 of g feed/(g cat h), and 200 h of time-on-stream. The developed kinetic model incorporates the effectiveness factor and a time-dependant deactivation function for obtaining the intrinsic kinetic parameters. It was demonstrated that at low severity reaction conditions the reactions occur via catalytic route, while at high severity conditions thermal reactions are more favored.

Jeremías Martínez; Jorge Ancheyta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Viscosity measurements in dense microemulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the results of a measurement of the shear viscosity as a function of the temperature and of the water volume fraction in a three-component sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate-decane-water microemulsion. The explored concentration range is 0???0.73 and the packing fraction of the water-in-oil spherical droplets has been changed in order to obtain a very dense glass-forming liquid. Well-defined maxima in the relative viscosity have been observed at different concentrations and the corresponding temperature values decrease with increasing ?. The data are discussed considering the system as a colloidal one in which aggregation phenomena are present. In such a way, on the basis of a two-fluid model, we can consider two different contributions to the viscosity. One is directly connected to the repulsive interaction potential, while the second one is directly connected to the attractive interaction that contributes indirectly, through the formation of aggregates. The results are compatible with those previously obtained by light-scattering measurements that gives clear evidence of the presence of a large structural order at the glass transition.

D. Majolino; F. Mallamace; S. Venuto; N. Micali

1990-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Note: Laser-induced acoustic desorption/synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry for analysis of fragile compounds and heavy oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we coupled synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization (SVUV PI) method with the laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) technique for mass spectrometric analysis. The LIAD technique is a “soft” desorption method which could avoid the degradation of analytes during desorption process. Meanwhile SVUV PI is an efficient “soft” ionization source. The new combination of the “soft” desorption technique and “soft” photoionization method is well suitable to reduce the difficulty for interpreting the mass spectra of the fragile compounds and heavy oils.

Liangyuan Jia; Junjie Weng; Zhongyue Zhou; Fei Qi; Wenyue Guo; Lianming Zhao; Juan Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. Objectives of this work contract are to carry out new studies in the following areas: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. Specific projects address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. In the area of vapor-liquid flow, we present the continuation of work on the pore network modeling of bubble growth in porous media driven by the application of a prescribed heat flux or superheat. The scaling of bubble growth in porous media is also discussed. In another study we study the problem of steam injection in fractured systems using visualization in micromodels. The interplay of drainage, imbibition and bubble growth problems is discussed.

Yortsos, Y.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Modeling of asphaltene precipitation from n-alkane diluted heavy oils and bitumens using the PC-SAFT equation of state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, the PC-SAFT equation of state was applied to the modeling of asphaltene precipitation from n-alkane diluted heavy oils and bitumens. Liquid–liquid equilibrium was assumed between a dense liquid phase (asphaltene-rich phase) and a light liquid phase. The liquid–liquid equilibrium calculation, in which only asphaltenes were allowed to partition to the dense phase, was performed using an efficient method with Michelsen's stability test. The bisection or Newton–Raphson method was used to improve convergence. Experimental information of the heavy oils and bitumens, characterized in terms of solubility fractions (saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes), was taken from the literature. Asphaltenes were divided into fractions of different molar masses using a gamma distribution function. Predictions of the PC-SAFT equation of state using linear correlations of the binary interaction parameters between asphaltene subfractions and the n-alkane were compared with the measured onset of precipitation and the amount of precipitated asphaltene (fractional yield) of the heavy oils and bitumens diluted with n-alkanes. Results of the comparison showed a satisfactory agreement between the experimental data and the calculated values with the PC-SAFT equation.

María A. Zúńiga-Hinojosa; Daimler N. Justo-García; Marco A. Aquino-Olivos; Luis A. Román-Ramírez; Fernando García-Sánchez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE  

SciTech Connect

North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Viscosity in modified gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shown that, on the basis of a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found for quantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions may incorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition in the cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided.

Iver Brevik

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST  

SciTech Connect

Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalysts with strong Broensted acid sites and Al stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination was synthesized from the addition of hydrothermally aged zeolite Y precursor to SBA-15 synthesis mixture under mildly acidic condition of pH 5.5. The materials possessed surface areas between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Up to 2 wt. % Al was present in the most aluminated sample that was investigated, and the Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination, even after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. The catalyst's activity was not affected by the aging time of the precursor for up to the 24 hr aging time investigated. This method of introducing Al and maintaining it in a total tetrahedral coordination is very effective, in comparison to other direct and post synthesis alumination methods reported. The catalytic performance of the zeolite Y/SBA-15 composite materials will be compared with that of pure SBA-15. The catalysts will then be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOSTS  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this project is to improve the catalytic performance of zeolite Y for heavy petroleum hydrocracking by synthesizing nanoparticles of the zeolite ({approx}20-30 nm) inside nanoporous silicate or aluminosilicate hosts of similar pore diameters. The encapsulated zeolite nanoparticles are expected to possess pores of reduced diffusional path lengths, hence hydrocarbon substrates will diffuse in, are converted and the products quickly diffused out. This is expected to prevent over-reaction, hence minimizing pore blockage and active sites deactivation. In this phase of the project, research activities were focused on refining procedures to: (a) improve the synthesis of ordered, high surface area nanoporous silica, such as SBA-15, with expanded pore size using trimethylbenzene as additive to the parent SBA-15 synthesis mixture; and (b) reduce the particle size of zeolite Y such that they can be effectively incorporated into the nanoporous silicas. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica containing enlarged pores of diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished.

Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host  

SciTech Connect

The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, Al-SBA-15, containing strong Broensted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt% Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst will be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks to naphtha and middle distillates.

Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Viscosity of Silicate Melts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Viscosity of silicate melts is of fundamental importance in understanding volcanic and magmatic processes in Earth. In this dissertation, experiments were conducted to obtain high-pressure… (more)

Hui, Hejiu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Viscosity, Absolute Dynamic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

where A is the area (cm2). (dv/dx) is the velocity gradient (s?1...), and ? is the coefficient of absolute viscosity (poise).

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Viscosity, absolute dynamic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

where A is the area (cm2), (dv/dx) the velocity gradient (s–1), and ? is the coefficient of absolute viscosity (poise).

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Viscosity of Neopentane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The viscosity of neopentane has been measured between ?15°C and 30°C. These results are consistent with published work covering the temperature range 30°C to 150°C. The viscosity data for neopentane have been compared with similar data for the other pentanes. This comparison has provided an example of the importance of molecular shape for viscosity behavior. The possible significance of molecular shape for the interpretation of viscosity curves of binary mixtures is noted. Finally it has been suggested that further work on liquids composed of spherical molecules might be worthwhile.

M. K. Phibbs

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Viscosity Measurements with Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 May 1925 research-article Viscosity Measurements with Glass Vaughan H. Stott Edith Irvine D. Turner The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

HEAVY OIL PROCESS MONITOR: AUTOMATED ON-COLUMN ASPHALTENE PRECIPITATION AND RE-DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

About 37-50% (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolve in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. This solubility measurement can be used after coke begins to form, unlike the flocculation titration, which cannot be applied to multi-phase systems. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. A more rapid method to measure asphaltene solubility was explored using a novel on-column asphaltene precipitation and re-dissolution technique. This was automated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment with a step gradient sequence using the solvents: heptane, cyclohexane, toluene:methanol (98:2). Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric method. The measurement time was reduced from three days to forty minutes. The separation was expanded further with the use of four solvents: heptane, cyclohexane, toluene, and cyclohexanone or methylene chloride. This provides a fourth peak which represents the most polar components, in the oil.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr; Mark Sanderson

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

HEAVY-DUTYDIEGRINDERS EXTRAROBUSTERECTIFIEUSESPOURMATRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAVY-DUTYDIEGRINDERS EXTRAROBUSTERECTIFIEUSESPOURMATRICES HEAVYDUTYRECTIFICADORDEMATRICES OPERATOR tool. Keep cord away from heat, oil, sharp edges, or moving parts. Damaged or entangled cords increase

Kleinfeld, David

389

Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host  

SciTech Connect

The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of a mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, AlSBA-15. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst contains strong Br{umlt o}nsted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt % Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at a temperature of 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into a psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst is being evaluated for the conversion of a heavy petroleum feedstock to naphtha and middle distillates. This phase was significantly delayed during the past six months due to a serious malfunction of the fume hoods in the Clark Atlanta University's Research Center for Science and Technology, where the project is being conducted. The fume hood system was repaired and the catalyst evaluation is now underway.

Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Bulk viscosity of anisotropically expanding hot QCD plasma  

SciTech Connect

The bulk viscosity, {zeta} and its ratio with the shear viscosity, {zeta}/{eta} have been studied in an anisotropically expanding pure glue plasma in the presence of turbulent color fields. It has been shown that the anisotropy in the momentum distribution function of gluons, which has been determined from a linearized transport equation eventually leads to the bulk viscosity. For the isotropic (equilibrium) state, a recently proposed quasiparticle model of pure SU(3) lattice QCD equation of state has been employed where the interactions are encoded in the effective fugacity. It has been argued that the interactions present in the equation of state, significantly contribute to the bulk viscosity. Its ratio with the shear viscosity is significant even at 1.5T{sub c}. Thus, one needs to take in account the effects of the bulk viscosity while studying the hydrodynamic expansion of quark-gluon plasma in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

Chandra, Vinod [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai-400005 (India)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nonequilibrium viscosity of glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since glass is a nonequilibrium material, its properties depend on both composition and thermal history. While most prior studies have focused on equilibrium liquid viscosity, an accurate description of nonequilibrium viscosity is essential for understanding the low temperature dynamics of glass. Departure from equilibrium occurs as a glass-forming system is cooled through the glass transition range. The glass transition involves a continuous breakdown of ergodicity as the system gradually becomes trapped in a subset of the available configurational phase space. At very low temperatures a glass is perfectly nonergodic (or “isostructural”), and the viscosity is described well by an Arrhenius form. However, the behavior of viscosity during the glass transition range itself is not yet understood. In this paper, we address the problem of glass viscosity using the enthalpy landscape model of Mauro and Loucks [Phys. Rev. B 76, 174202 (2007)] for selenium, an elemental glass former. To study a wide range of thermal histories, we compute nonequilibrium viscosity with cooling rates from 10?12 to 1012?K/s. Based on these detailed landscape calculations, we propose a simplified phenomenological model capturing the essential physics of glass viscosity. The phenomenological model incorporates an ergodicity parameter that accounts for the continuous breakdown of ergodicity at the glass transition. We show a direct relationship between the nonequilibrium viscosity parameters and the fragility of the supercooled liquid. The nonequilibrium viscosity model is validated against experimental measurements of Corning EAGLE XG™ glass. The measurements are performed using a specially designed beam-bending apparatus capable of accurate nonequilibrium viscosity measurements up to 1016?Pa?s. Using a common set of parameters, the phenomenological model provides an accurate description of EAGLE XG™ viscosity over the full range of measured temperatures and fictive temperatures.

John C. Mauro; Douglas C. Allan; Marcel Potuzak

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

The Viscosity of Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of momentum between them. In the case of a gas, Maxwell showed how the viscosity can be derived by considering this momentum as being communicated by molecules transferring themselves bodily ... fulfilment of the conditions postulated in Maxwell's treatment, and the fact that while gas viscosity goes up with temperature liquid ...

E. N. DA C. ANDRADE

1930-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Viscosity Measurements on Nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity Measurements on Nitrogen ... (15)?Clarke, A. G.; Smith, E. B. Low-temperature viscosities and intermolecular forces of simple gases. ... The coupling also serves as a frictionless bearing for a slender rotating cylindrical body which is slowed down due to the viscous drag of the fluid surrounding the cylinder. ...

Daniel Seibt; Eckhard Vogel; Eckard Bich; Daniel Buttig; Egon Hassel

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

Viscosity model of high-viscosity dispersing system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-viscosity dispersing system is formed by dispersing the solid particles in the high-viscosity continuous medium. It is very easy to ... the rheology behavior becomes complicated. The apparent viscosity of th...

Xian-fu Wei ???; Na Wang ??…

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy-momentum tensor correlators and viscosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collective flow has been observed in heavy ion collisions, with a large anisotropic component, and ideal hydrodynamic calculations had significant successful in describing the distribution of produced particles at the RHIC experiments. In order to account for this near ideal fluid behavior, the shear and bulk viscosity of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) must be computed from first principles in a regime where the QGP is not weakly coupled. In this talk I describe recent progress in computing energy-momentum tensor correlators on the lattice from which the viscosities can be extracted via Kubo formulas. I also show how to cumulate information from several channels, including at non-vanishing spatial momentum, in order to best constrain the viscosities. These methods should soon yield predictions at the higher temperatures that will be explored at the LHC experiments.

Harvey B. Meyer

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Comparison of the combustion behavior of Orimulsion{trademark} and heavy fuel oil in 70 MW flames  

SciTech Connect

Results of an experimental study are shown in this publication to compare the combustion behavior of heavy fuel oil (HFO) and Orimulsion in 70 MW flames. The investigation was carried out with the use of the combustion test rig at the International Combustion Limited in Derby, UK. The main objective of this test work was to quantify the extent of differences in flame properties, particulate and gaseous emissions of Orimulsion and HFO. Under identical combustion conditions, axial profiles of flame temperature and radiation heat flux were determined at 70 MW thermal input and 1% O{sub 2} for both fuels. Gas compositions at flame tail and furnace exit were obtained to estimate flame length and emission of gaseous pollutants. Stack concentration, carbon content, size and chemical composition of fly ash were also measured. The effect of excess air level on exit NOx and CO concentration were studied. Results of detailed flame measurements and the parametric study have shown that orimulsion fuel can be burnt with 99.97% efficiency at 1% exit O{sub 2} with a modified burner system of Dunamenti Power Station. However, significant implications of Orimulsion firing were observed. Gas temperature data and CO concentrations at flame tail have indicated a 1.5--2 m longer flame for Orimulsion. At flame tail, gas temperature in the Orimulsion flame was higher by 100 C than that for HFO. Lower radiant heat flux was measured in the near burner region for Orimulsion. Higher SO{sub 3}, SO{sub 2} and lower NOx emission were found when firing Orimulsion. Despite the higher ash content of Orimulsion, its combustion resulted in smaller particulate emission, which might be due to fly ash deposition in the furnace.

Barta, L.E. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Horvath, G. [Hungarian Power Companies, Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Allen, J.W.; Darar, J.S.; Wright, J.A. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls Royce Industrial Power Group; Szederkenyi, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and...

398

Experimental study of enhancement of injectivity and in-situ oil upgrading by steam-propane injection for the Hamaca heavy oil field.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Experiments were conducted to study the feasibility of using propane as a steam additive to accelerate oil production and improve steam injectivity in the Hamaca… (more)

Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Viscosity Measurements on Gaseous Ethane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity Measurements on Gaseous Ethane ... Only the pressures, densities, and viscosities are given in the table with regard to the large number of experimental points. ...

Jörg Wilhelm; Daniel Seibt; Eckhard Vogel; Daniel Buttig; Egon Hassel

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Shear viscosity of pion gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using chiral perturbation theory we investigate the QCD shear viscosity ($\\eta $) to entropy density ($s$) ratio below the deconfinement temperature ($\\sim 170$ MeV) with zero baryon number density. It is found that $\\eta /s$ of QCD is monotonically decreasing in temperature ($T$) and reaches 0.6 with estimated $\\sim 50%$ uncertainty at T=120 MeV. A naive extrapolation of the leading order result shows that $\\eta /s$ reaches the $1/4\\pi $ minimum bound proposed by Kovtun, Son, and Starinets using string theory methods at $T\\sim 210$ MeV. This suggests a phase transition or cross over might occur at $T\\lesssim 210$ MeV in order for the bound to remain valid. Also, it is natural for $\\eta /s$ to stay close to the minimum bound around the phase transition temperature as was recently found in heavy ion collisions.

Eiji Nakano

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Viscosity/Concentration Relationships for Emulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Empirical and theoretical relationships are developed to describe the viscosity/concentration behavior of Newtonian and non?Newtonian emulsions having dispersed?phase concentrations less than 74% by volume. The developed equations are valid for both oil in water and water in oil types of emulsions.Emulsions exhibiting electroviscous effect (increase in viscosity due to presence of electric charge on the surface of droplets) could also be described adequately by these equations. The proposed equations have the ability to predict the emulsionviscosity as a function of dispersed?phase concentration and shear rate if the flow curve (shear stress versus shear rate plot) is known experimentally at a single value of the dispersed?phase concentration.

Rajinder Pal; Edward Rhodes

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

403

Zahn Viscosity Cup  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n A one-shot devices for obtaining quick measurements in a roughly linear way, of the Kinematic Viscosity of the test liquid, typically a free-flowing fluid...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Viscosity of Ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new representation of the viscosity of ammonia is presented. The representative equations are based on a set of experimental data selected as a result of a critical assessment of the available information. The validity of the representation extends from 196 K to the critical temperature for both liquid and vapor phases. In the supercritical region the temperature range extends to 680 K for pressures at or below ambient and to 600 K for pressures up to 50 MPa. The accuracy of the representation varies from 0.5% for the viscosity of the dilute gas phase at moderate temperatures to about 5% for the viscosity at high pressures and temperatures. Tables of the viscosity generated by the correlating equation at selected temperatures and pressures and along the saturation line are presented to provide easy reference as well as for the validation of computer codes.

A. Fenghour; William A. Wakeham; V. Vesovic; J. T. R. Watson; J. Millat; E. Vogel

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Viscosity of Ice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

11 September 1908 research-article The Viscosity of Ice R. M. Deeley The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings of...

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery. [Quarterly report], January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this quarter, work continued on the development of relative permeabilities during steam displacement. Most of the work concentrated on the representation of the three-phase flow in terms of a double-drainage process. Work continued on the optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optimal control methods. The effort at present is concentrating in fine-tuning the optimization algorithm as well as in developing control methodologies with different constraints. In parallel, we continued experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell with two controlled injection wells and one production well. In the area of chemical additives work continued on the behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

Yortsos, Y.C. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Viscosity and Riemann solutions On the Influence of Viscosity on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Viscosity and Riemann solutions On the Influence of Viscosity on Riemann Solutions SunŸcica Ÿ Cani and uniqueness of Riemann solutions are affected by the precise form of viscosity which is used to select shock on viscosity and distinguish between Lax shock waves with and without a profile. These bifurcations

Canic, Suncica

408

Viscosity of colloidal suspensions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simple expressions are given for the Newtonian viscosity ?N(?) as well as the viscoelastic behavior of the viscosity ?(?,?) of neutral monodisperse hard-sphere colloidal suspensions as a function of volume fraction ? and frequency ? over the entire fluid range, i.e., for volume fractions 0viscosity as composed as the sum of two relevant physical processes: ?(?,?)=??(?)+?cd(?,?), where ??(?)=?0?(?) is the infinite frequency (or very short time) viscosity, with ?0 the solvent viscosity, ?(?) the equilibrium hard-sphere radial distribution function at contact, and ?cd(?,?) the contribution due to the diffusion of the colloidal particles out of cages formed by their neighbors, on the Péclet time scale ?P, the dominant physical process in concentrated colloidal suspensions. The Newtonian viscosity ?N(?)=?(?,?=0) agrees very well with the extensive experiments of van der Werff et al., [Phys. Rev. A 39, 795 (1989); J. Rheol. 33, 421 (1989)] and others. Also, the asymptotic behavior for large ? is of the form ??(?)+?0A(?)(??P)-1/2, in agreement with these experiments, but the theoretical coefficient A(?) differs by a constant factor 2/?(?) from the exact coefficient, computed from the Green-Kubo formula for ?(?,?). This still enables us to predict for practical purposes the viscoelastic behavior of monodisperse spherical colloidal suspensions for all volume fractions by a simple time rescaling.

R. Verberg; I. M. de Schepper; E. G. D. Cohen

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Viscosity and boost invariance at RHIC and LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the longitudinal hydrodynamic evolution of the fireball created in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. Nonzero shear viscosity reduces the colling rate of the system and hinders the acceleration of the longitudinal flow. As a consequence, the initial energy density needed to reproduce the experimental data at RHIC energies is significantly reduced. At LHC energies, we expect that shear viscosity helps to conserve a Bjorken plateau in the rapidity distributions during the expansion.

Piotr Bozek

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The West Sak (Upper Cretaceous) sands, overlaying the Kuparuk field, would rank among the largest known oil fields in the US, but technical difficulties have so far prevented its commercial exploitation. Steam injection is the most successful and the most commonly-used method of heavy oil recovery, but its application to the West Sak presents major problems. Such difficulties may be overcome by using a novel approach, in which steam is generated downhole in a catalytic Methanator, from Syngas made at the surface from endothermic reactions (Table 1). The Methanator effluent, containing steam and soluble gases resulting from exothermic reactions (Table 1), is cyclically injected into the reservoir by means of a horizontal drainhole while hot produced fluids flow form a second drainhole into a central production tubing. The downhole reactor feed and BFW flow downward to two concentric tubings. The large-diameter casing required to house the downhole reactor assembly is filled above it with Arctic Pack mud, or crude oil, to further reduce heat leaks. A quantitative analysis of this production scheme for the West Sak required a preliminary engineering of the downhole and surface facilities and a tentative forecast of well production rates. The results, based on published information on the West Sak, have been used to estimate the cost of these facilities, per daily barrel of oil produced. A preliminary economic analysis and conclusions are presented together with an outline of future work. Economic and regulatory conditions which would make this approach viable are discussed. 28 figs.

Gondouin, M.

1991-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Constraining a Heavy Oil Reservoir to Temperature and Time Lapse Seismic Data Using the EnKF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Proper understanding of the distribution of porosity and vertical permeability is required for optimal extraction of hydrocarbons. While porosity defines the amount of oil resources, permeability determines th...

Yevgeniy Zagayevskiy; Amir H. Hosseini; Clayton V. Deutsch

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Development of artificial neural networks for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) recovery method in heavy oil reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As no alternative energy source has been introduced to efficiently replace fossil fuels yet, the demand for oil and gas is still increasing in the… (more)

Sengel, Ayhan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Bulk viscosity, chemical equilibration and flow at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of bulk viscosity on p_T spectra and elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. We argue that direct effect of the bulk viscosity on the evolution of the velocity field is small, but corrections to the freezeout distributions can be significant. These effects are dominated by chemical non-equilibration in the hadronic phase. We show that a non-zero bulk viscosity in the range $\\zeta/s \\lsim 0.05$ improves the description of spectra and flow at RHIC.

Thomas Schaefer; Kevin Dusling

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil - Impact on Wear Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils...

415

Rheological Behavior of Castor Oil Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rheological Behavior of Castor Oil Biodiesel ... This work aims at assessing the rheological behavior of castor oil, castor oil biodiesel, and undegraded and degraded biodiesel at different exposure times and temperatures. ... Castor oil biodiesel presents viscosity higher than diesel oil, but this drawback can be corrected by means of blends of both components at different proportions. ...

Marta M. Conceiçăo; Roberlúcia A. Candeia; Hermesson J. Dantas; Luiz E. B. Soledade; Valter J. Fernandes, Jr.; Antonio G. Souza

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope & Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft (Figure 1), but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Schamel, Steven

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

417

Note: Precision viscosity measurement using suspended microchannel resonators  

SciTech Connect

We report the characterization of a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) for viscosity measurements in a low viscosity regime (<10 mPa s) using two measurement schemes. First, the quality factor (Q-factor) of the SMR was characterized with glycerol-water mixtures. The measured Q-factor at 20 Degree-Sign C exhibits a bilinear behavior with the sensitivity of 1281 (mPa s){sup -1} for a lower (1-4 mPa s) and 355 (mPa s){sup -1} for a higher viscosity range (4-8 mPa s), respectively. The second scheme is the vibration amplitude monitoring of the SMR running in a closed loop feedback. When compared in terms of the measurement time, the amplitude-based measurement takes only 0.1 {approx} 1 ms while the Q-factor-based measurement takes {approx}30 s. However, the viscosity resolution of the Q-factor-based measurement is at least three times better than the amplitude-based measurement. By comparing the Q-factors of heavy water and 9.65 wt.% glycerol-water mixture that have very similar viscosities but different densities, we confirmed that the SMR can measure the dynamic viscosity without the density correction. The obtained results demonstrate that the SMR can measure the fluid viscosity with high precision and even real-time monitoring of the viscosity change is possible with the amplitude-based measurement scheme.

Lee, I.; Lee, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, K. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial, and Systems Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood in increase heavy oil recovery. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this contract is to carry our fundamental research in heavy oil recovery in the following areas: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on oil recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs. This report covers the work performed in these three areas in the past year. In the area of vapor-liquid flow we present a theoretical and numerical study of steam injection in a pore network. We characterize the displacement in terms of an effective mobility ratio and heat transfer parameters. Displacement patterns axe identified in the parameter space. In another study we discuss the problem of steam injection in fractured systems using visualization with micromodels. The interplay of drainage, imbibition and bubble growth is visualized. Conclusions are reached regarding the potential for steamflooding fractured systems. A third study focuses on the development of a pore-network model for foam formation and propagation in porous media. This model, for the first time, accounts for the fundamental mechanisms of foam propagation at the microscale and leads to the determination of various parameters that are currently treated empirically. The effect of viscous forces in displacements in heterogeneous media is described in two separate studies, one involving an extension of percolation theory to account for viscous effects, and another discussing the effect of geometry in general displacement processes.

Yortsos, Y.C

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Viscosity of Interfacial Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective shear viscosity and frequency-dependent dynamic oscillatory shear spectra of water containing monovalent or divalent ions (ionic strength 25 mM), confined between mica crystals at 1–2 water molecules thickness, oscillated with twist angle with the period expected for the pseudohexagonal surface lattice. The effective viscosity varied by orders of magnitude as the twist angle was changed. Confinement appeared to imprint lateral spatial correlation on the ultrathin liquid, the more so the better the confining lattices were aligned, but the oft-proposed “ice structure” was not observed dynamically.

Yingxi Zhu and Steve Granick

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

Quantitative Analysis of Constituents in Heavy Fuel Oil by 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This applies in particular to the shipping industry. ... The fuel oil samples were collected during the bunkering of the oil in various ports around the world and sent to Lloyd’s Register’s Fuel Oil Bunker Analysis and Advisory Service (FOBAS) for detailed physicochemical characterization. ... The mixture of two incompatible fuels leads to extensive formation of solid material, with devastating effects in the case where the precipitation takes place in the engine or tank of a HFO-powered ship or power plant. ...

Katrine Ellemann Nielsen; Jens Dittmer; Anders Malmendal; Niels Chr. Nielsen

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A time-course study of immune response in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus exposed to heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The immunotoxicities of oil and its components on fish immunities have been investigated, but there is little literature on the recovery of the fish from the immune suppression. Therefore, the recovery of Japa...

Jun-Young Song; Sho Ohta; Kei Nakayama…

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Viscosity of meson matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report a calculation of the shear viscosity in a relativistic multicomponent meson gas as a function of temperature and chemical potentials. We approximately solve the Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation of kinetic theory, appropriate for a boson gas, with relativistic kinematics. Since at low temperatures the gas can be taken as mostly composed of pions, with a fraction of kaons and etas, we explore the region where binary elastic collisions with at least one pion are the dominant scattering processes. Our input meson scattering phase shifts are fits to the experimental data obtained from chiral perturbation theory and the inverse amplitude method. Our results take the correct nonrelativistic limit (viscosity proportional to the square root of the temperature), show a viscosity of the order of the cube of the pion mass up to temperatures somewhat below that mass, and then a large increase due to kaons and etas. Our approximation may break down at even higher temperatures, where the viscosity follows a temperature power law with an exponent near 3.

Antonio Dobado and Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

423

Viscosity of Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

6 November 1952 research-article Viscosity of Liquids E. N. da C. Andrade The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. www.jstor.org

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Mechanisms of Aqueous Extraction of Soybean Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mechanisms of Aqueous Extraction of Soybean Oil ... showed also that the inertial turbulent regime is inappropriate for emulsification of oils with viscosity ?500 mPa s, if drops of micrometer size are to be obtained. ...

K. A. Campbell; C. E. Glatz

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

U.S. Crude Oil Export Policy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or use therein. * Crude exported from Alaska's Cook Inlet. * Heavy California crude oil. * Exports connected to refining or exchange of petroleum reserve oil. * Re-exportation...

428

Viscosity Measurements on Gaseous Propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity Measurements on Gaseous Propane ... However, in that case, the viscosities will have to be re-evaluated too, which also requires the parameters of the wire oscillation, the logarithmic decrement and the frequency. ...

Jörg Wilhelm; Eckhard Vogel

2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

429

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region. In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft, but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Steven Schamel

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

Viscosity-average molecular weight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n .... An averaged molecular weight for high polymers that relates most closely to measurements of dilute-solution viscosities ...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Viscosity of Ring Polymer Melts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viscosity of Ring Polymer Melts ... The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts ?0,linear to their ring counterparts ?0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. ... For this reason we have determined the viscosities by fitting the complex viscosity curves with different methods to obtain reliable estimates and error bars (see Supporting Information). ...

Rossana Pasquino; Thodoris C. Vasilakopoulos; Youn Cheol Jeong; Hyojoon Lee; Simon Rogers; George Sakellariou; Jürgen Allgaier; Atsushi Takano; Ana R. Brás; Taihyun Chang; Sebastian Gooßen; Wim Pyckhout-Hintzen; Andreas Wischnewski; Nikos Hadjichristidis; Dieter Richter; Michael Rubinstein; Dimitris Vlassopoulos

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

QGP viscosity at RHIC and the LHC - a 2012 status report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we briefly review the recent progress related to extracting the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) specific shear viscosity from the flow data measured at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

Huichao Song

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region.

Steven Schamel

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region.

Steven Schamel

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Viscosity in spherically symmetric accretion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......October 2003 research-article Papers Viscosity in spherically symmetric accretion Arnab...Calcutta 700 032, India The influence of viscosity on the flow behaviour in spherically...at least for the transonic solution, viscosity acts as a mechanism that detracts from......

Arnab K. Ray

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Viscosity from elliptic flow: the path to precision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using viscous relativistic hydrodynamics we show that systematic studies of the impact parameter dependence of the eccentricity scaled elliptic flow can distinguish between different models for the calculation of the initial source eccentricity. This removes the largest present uncertainty in the extraction of the specific viscosity of the matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions from precise elliptic flow measurements.

Ulrich W. Heinz; J. Scott Moreland; Huichao Song

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

Stress tensor and bulk viscosity in relativistic nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the influence of different initial conditions for the stress tensor and the effect of bulk viscosity on the expansion and cooling of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, we explore the evolution...however, it does not significantly increase the entropy produced....

Fries, Rainer J.; Mueller, Berndt; Schaefer, Andreas.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Viscosity of silica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental measurements of the viscosity of silica ( SiO 2 ) are critically examined; the best measurements show an activation energy of 515 kJ/mole above 1400 °C and 720 kJ/mole below this temperature. The diffusion of silicon and oxygen in silica have temperature dependencies close to that of the high temperature viscosity. Mechanisms of viscous flow and diffusion of silicon and oxygen in silica are proposed that involve motion of SiO molecules. Viscous flow is proposed to result from the motion of line defects composed of SiO molecules At temperatures below 1400 °C the fraction of SiO molecules in line defects changes with temperature. The relaxation of this fraction to an equilibrium value depends on the time. These proposed mechanisms are consistent with experimental measurements of silicaviscosity.

Robert H. Doremus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery. [Quarterly report], January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. During this quarter, we focused on the development of relative permeabilities during steam displacement. Two particular directions were pursued: One involves the derivation of relative permeabilities based on a recently completed work on the pore-level mechanics of steam displacement. Progress has been made to relate the relative permeabilities to effects such as heat transfer and condensation, which are specific to steam injection problems. The second direction involves the development of three-phase relative permeabilities using invasion percolation concepts. We have developed models that predict the specific dependence of the permeabilities of three immiscible phases (e.g. awe, water and gas) on saturations and the saturation history. Both works are still in progress. In addition, work continues in the analysis of the stability of phase change fronts in porous media using a macroscopic approach.

Yortsos, Y.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "heavy oil viscosity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The technologies include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

Experimental investigation of in situ upgrading of heavy oil by using a hydrogen donor and catalyst during steam injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Catalysts have been used for decades in refineries to improve and extract the maximum value from each barrel of produced oil, by using upgrading processes such as hydro-treating, and hydro-cracking. Catalysts have also been used for the removal...

Mohammad, Ahmad A A

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

An evaluation of the benefits of combined steam and fireflooding as a recovery process for heavy oils  

SciTech Connect

Lack of oil mobility is a major problem with in situ combustion field projects, since the combustion front displaces oil into an essentially unheated reservoir. One way of ensuring oil mobility is to utilize steam injection during the early life of the process, and then switch to combustion when heated communication paths have been developed. The in situ combustion characteristics of cores from the Primrose reservoir of Northeastern Alberta were investigated in a comprehensive series of 22 combustion tube tests. The program was carried out in order to evaluate the effectiveness of fireflooding in both cores that had been preheated to the extent that the oil was mobile and in those which were steam-flooded prior to dry combustion. Both normal- and 95% oxygen-enriched air were evaluated. Wet combustion tests were performed utilizing both liquid water and steam injection. The effects of parameters such as pressure, oxygen enrichment and injection flux on the combustion characteristics were examined. This paper will discuss the results of this study, which show that steam co-injection is more effective at lowering the oxygen requirement than was combustion following steam. Additionally, the cores which were preheated exhibited similar oxygen requirements to those which were presteamed to a near-residual saturation.

Moore, R.G.; Laureshen, C.J.; Belgrave, J.D.M.; Ursenbach, M.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Jha, K.N. [Dept. of Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

On bulk viscosity and moduli decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This pedagogically intended lecture, one of four under the header "Basics of thermal QCD", reviews an interesting relationship, originally pointed out by Bodeker, that exists between the bulk viscosity of Yang-Mills theory (of possible relevance to the hydrodynamics of heavy ion collision experiments) and the decay rate of scalar fields coupled very weakly to a heat bath (appearing in some particle physics inspired cosmological scenarios). This topic serves, furthermore, as a platform on which a number of generic thermal field theory concepts are illustrated. The other three lectures (on the QCD equation of state and the rates of elastic as well as inelastic processes experienced by heavy quarks) are recapitulated in brief encyclopedic form.

M. Laine

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. This is the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the project. Through September 1996, the project continues to make good progress but is slightly behind schedule. Estimated costs are on budget for the work performed to date. Technical achievements accomplished during the quarter include placing the first two horizontal wells on production following cyclic steam stimulation, completing several draft technical reports and preparing presentations on the deterministic geologic model, steam channel crossing and horizontal well drilling for technical transfer. Cyclic steam injection into the first two horizontal wells was completed in June 1996 and initial oil production from the project began the same month. Work has commenced on the stochastic geologic and reservoir simulation models. High temperature core work and reservoir tracer work will commence in the First Quarter 1997.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Viscosity Destabilizes Sonoluminescing Bubbles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar as larger viscosity normally stabilizes the dynamics. Suslick and co-workers call this new mysterious state of SBSL “moving-SBSL.” We identify the history force (a force nonlocal in time) as the origin of this destabilization and show that the instability is parametric. A force balance model quantitatively accounts for the observed quasiperiodic bubble trajectories.

Ruediger Toegel; Stefan Luther; Detlef Lohse

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Critical exponent for viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the critical exponent y characterizing the divergence of the viscosity ???T-Tc?-y for carbon dioxide and xenon. The values of y for both fluids fall within the range y=0.041±0.001 and are consistent with the range y=0.042±0.002 spanned by our earlier data for four binary liquid mixtures. This agreement is the strongest evidence that pure fluids and binary liquids are in the same dynamic universality class; however, the results for y are inconsistent with the recent theoretical value of 0.032.

Robert F. Berg and Michael R. Moldover

1990-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Shear viscosity of nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk I report my recent study on the shear viscosity of neutron-rich nuclear matter from a relaxation time approach. An isospin- and momentum-dependent interaction is used in the study. Effects of density, temperature, and isospin asymmetry of nuclear matter on its shear viscosity have been discussed. Similar to the symmetry energy, the symmetry shear viscosity is defined and its density and temperature dependence are studied.

Jun Xu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Viscosity of Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

26 July 1912 research-article The Viscosity of Carbon Dioxide P. Phillips The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings...

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

System approach to reducing NO{sub x} emissions on a three cell high burner, heavy oil-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the installation of plug-in low NO{sub x} burners on a utility boiler with cell burners. The original rapid mix burners and typical close burner centerline spacing produced a very hot furnace environment resulting in extremely high NO{sub x} emissions, in this case as high as 1.0 lbs/MMBtu. The unit was a {number_sign}6 oil-fired, 560 MW{sub e} supercritical pressure, three-cell burner boiler at Commonwealth Electric`s Canal Station, Unit {number_sign}1. This paper presents the results including emissions and boiler performance of the retrofit of DB Riley low NO{sub x} STS (Swirl Tertiary Stage) burners. Low NO{sub x} burners were used in conjunction with close-coupled overfire air using existing burner openings. The project reduced NO{sub x} emissions greater than 705 while firing {number_sign}6 oil, and this was accomplished with less than 10% flue gas recirculation.

Green, R.W.; Dorai, X.A. [DB Riley, Inc., Worcester, MA (United States); Hurley, B.A. [Commonwealth Electric Co., Wareham, MA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Heavy Petroleum Composition. 3. Asphaltene Aggregation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. ... fractions of heavy petroleums were examd. ... changes, introduction of miscible gases and liqs., mixing with diluents and other oils, and, during acid stimulation, hot oiling and other oilfield operations. ...

Amy M. McKenna; Lynda J. Donald; Jade E. Fitzsimmons; Priyanka Juyal; Victor Spicer; Kenneth G. Standing; Alan G. Marshall; Ryan P. Rodgers

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

452

Application of a three-stage approach for modeling the complete period of catalyst deactivation during hydrotreating of heavy oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Modeling the catalyst deactivation due to hydrodeasphaltenization (HDAsph), hydrodemetallization (HDM) and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reactions with time-on-stream (TOS) was carried out by using a model that considers three deactivation stages: start-of-run (SOR), middle-of-run (MOR) and end-of-run (EOR). Experimental data of kinetics, intra-particle mass transfer and conversion affected by deactivation phenomena were obtained from laboratory scale reactor. Loss of activity was studied at constant operating conditions of temperature, pressure, liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV) and H2-to-oil ratio for a range of time-on-stream. It is found that different deactivation patterns are obtained depending on the considered reaction. It is predicted that catalyst exhibits higher rate of deactivation for HDS than for HDM at long TOS.

Ignacio Elizalde; Jorge Ancheyta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Viscosity of Quantum Hall Fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The viscosity of quantum fluids with an energy gap at zero temperature is related to the adiabatic curvature on the space parametrizing flat background metrics. For quantum Hall fluids on two-dimensional tori, the quantum viscosity is computed. It turns out to be isotropic, constant, and proportional to the magnetic field strength.

J. E. Avron; R. Seiler; P. G. Zograf

1995-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

An application of Crosswell Tomography using a hydrophone receiver array and airgun source to monitor steam migration in an unconsolidated, heavy-oil sandstone, West Coalinga Field, California  

SciTech Connect

This crosswell tomography field trial demonstrates the viability and cost- reducing benefits of a hydrophone receiver array and airgun source for monitoring steam (heat) migration within an unconsolidated, heavy-oil sandstone. This project represents one of the first applications of hydrophone receivers in such an environment. Data quality from the hydrophone array proved more than adequate for P-wave tomography while costs were reduced dramatically from estimates using a clamped geophone array. Additionally, the resolution provided by the capture of travel-time data from interwell areas offered a distinct advantage over conventional monitoring techniques limited to observation wells. Two crosswell surveys were conducted in the vicinity of a new, infill steam injector. The purpose was to monitor steam migration within an 80-foot thick, sandstone interval by detecting the heat-induced velocity decrease between the first survey, conducted just before steam injection, and the second survey conducted approximately three months later. Difference plots of the two surveys clearly define regions of significant temperature change and contact temperature logs corroborate the zone of peak change. The crosswell tomography data and the inferred steam migration characteristics immediately altered an operational strategy for the drive and were later a factor in the abandonment of continuous steam injection.

Blevens, D.M. (Chevron USA Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Fairborn, J.W. (Wellseismic Computing Services, Balboa, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

An application of Crosswell Tomography using a hydrophone receiver array and airgun source to monitor steam migration in an unconsolidated, heavy-oil sandstone, West Coalinga Field, California  

SciTech Connect

This crosswell tomography field trial demonstrates the viability and cost- reducing benefits of a hydrophone receiver array and airgun source for monitoring steam (heat) migration within an unconsolidated, heavy-oil sandstone. This project represents one of the first applications of hydrophone receivers in such an environment. Data quality from the hydrophone array proved more than adequate for P-wave tomography while costs were reduced dramatically from estimates using a clamped geophone array. Additionally, the resolution provided by the capture of travel-time data from interwell areas offered a distinct advantage over conventional monitoring techniques limited to observation wells. Two crosswell surveys were conducted in the vicinity of a new, infill steam injector. The purpose was to monitor steam migration within an 80-foot thick, sandstone interval by detecting the heat-induced velocity decrease between the first survey, conducted just before steam injection, and the second survey conducted approximately three months later. Difference plots of the two surveys clearly define regions of significant temperature change and contact temperature logs corroborate the zone of peak change. The crosswell tomography data and the inferred steam migration characteristics immediately altered an operational strategy for the drive and were later a factor in the abandonment of continuous steam injection.

Blevens, D.M. [Chevron USA Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States); Fairborn, J.W. [Wellseismic Computing Services, Balboa, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Viscosity, Specific (for Suspensions and Solutions)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n The viscosity of a composition (?) minus the viscosity of the liquid (? o), divided by the viscosity of the liquid phase. The symbol is...? sp. (Kamide, K., and dobashi, T.,...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Polyacrylamide polymer viscosity as a function of brine composition  

SciTech Connect

A computer model has been developed which predicts the viscosity of polymer and oil field brine mixtures. The polymers used were Amoco- Sweepaid 103 and Dow- Pusher 500 polyacrylamide polymers. All of the experiments were conducted at 1200 ppM polymer concentration. The computer input consists of the ionic strength of the brine in the mixture and the fraction of that ionic strength due to sodium ions. The computer program makes predictions of viscosity by referencing a family of viscosity curves for various mixtures of sodium chloride and calcium chloride in 1200 ppM polymer solutions. The model has been tested using 59 mixtures of brines and polymers. The ionic strength of the brine in the mixtures varied from 0.0018 to 0.025. The fraction of the brines' total ionic strength due to sodium ions varied from 0.22 to 0.49. The brines consisted predominantly of sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, chloride, bicarbonate and sulfate ions.

French, T.R.; Stacy, N.; Collins, A.G.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Heavy-duty engine and light-duty vehicle experiments were conducted to investigate the...

459

Anomalous - viscosity current drive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

Stix, Thomas H. (Princeton, NJ); Ono, Masayuki (Princeton Junction, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z