Sample records for heavy naphtha boiling

  1. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  2. Naphtha | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNSNanotecture Ltd JumpNapakiakNaphtha

  3. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, Dennis C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bricklemyer, Bruce A. (Avonmore, PA); Svoboda, Joseph J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone (24) and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment.

  4. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

    1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

  5. Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer Tore Lid Statoil Mongstad-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has a important function

  6. Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer Tore Lid Statoil Mongstad-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has an important function

  7. Importance of Delayed Neutrons on the Coupled Neutronic-Thermohydraulic Stability of a Natural Circulation Heavy Water-Moderated Boiling Light Water-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayak, A.K. [Bhaha Atomic Research Centre (India); Aritomi, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Raj, V. Venkat [Bhaha Atomic Research Centre (India)

    2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic stability characteristics of a natural circulation heavy water-moderated boiling light water-cooled reactor was investigated analytically considering the effects of prompt and delayed neutrons. For this purpose, the reactor considered is the Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor. The analytical model considers a point kinetics model for the neutron dynamics, a homogeneous two-phase flow model for the coolant thermal hydraulics, and a lumped heat transfer model for the fuel thermal dynamics. A higher mode of oscillation having a frequency much greater than the density-wave oscillation frequency was observed if prompt neutrons alone were considered. The occurrence of a higher mode of oscillation was found to be dependent on the concentration of delayed neutrons, the void reactivity coefficient, and the fuel time constant. The core inlet subcooling is found to have different effects on the decay ratio of the fundamental and higher modes of oscillations. The influences of void reactivity coefficient and fuel time constant on the fundamental and higher modes of oscillations were also found to be opposite in nature.

  8. Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular...

  9. We study the continuous extractive distillation of minimum and maximum boiling azeotropic mixtures A-B with a heavy or a light entrainer E, intending to assess its feasibility based on thermodynamic insights.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    #12;#12;Abstract We study the continuous extractive distillation of minimum and maximum boiling on operating parameters: distillate product purity and recovery, reflux ratio R and entrainer ­ feed flow rate. For the 1.0-2 class both A and B can be distillated. For one of them there exists a maximum entrainer - feed

  10. A NOVEL VAPOR-PHASE PROCESS FOR DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF NAPHTHA/DIESEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.S. Turk; R.P. Gupta; S.K. Gangwal

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tier 2 regulations issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require a substantial reduction in the sulfur content of gasoline. Similar regulations have been enacted for the sulfur level in on-road diesel and recently off-road diesel. The removal of this sulfur with existing and installed technology faces technical and economic challenges. These challenges created the opportunity for new emerging technologies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) with subcontract support from Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc., (KBR) used this opportunity to develop RTI's transport reactor naphtha desulfurization (TReND) process. Starting with a simple conceptual process design and some laboratory results that showed promise, RTI initiated an accelerated research program for sorbent development, process development, and marketing and commercialization. Sorbent development has resulted in the identification of an active and attrition resistant sorbent that has been prepared in commercial equipment in 100 lb batches. Process development has demonstrated both the sulfur removal performance and regeneration potential of this sorbent. Process development has scaled up testing from small laboratory to pilot plant transport reactor testing. Testing in the transport reactor pilot plant has demonstrated the attrition resistance, selective sulfur removal activity, and regeneration activity of this sorbent material. Marketing and commercialization activities have shown with the existing information that the process has significant capital and operating cost benefits over existing and other emerging technologies. The market assessment and analysis provided valuable feedback about the testing and performance requirements for the technical development program. This market analysis also provided a list of potential candidates for hosting a demonstration unit. Although the narrow window of opportunity generated by the new sulfur regulations and the conservative nature of the refining industry slowed progress of the demonstration unit, negotiations with potential partners are proceeding for commercialization of this process.

  11. A study of electrowetting-assisted boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bralower, Harrison L. (Harrison Louis)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical theory of boiling heat transfer based on bubble dynamics is explained and includes a full derivation of the Rohsenow boiling correlation. An alternative, more accurate correlation for determining boiling heat ...

  12. Subcooled flow boiling of fluorocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Richard Walter

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted of heat transfer and hydrodynamic behavior for subcooled flow boiling of Freon-113, one of a group of fluorocarbons suitable for use in cooling of high-power-density electronic components. Problems ...

  13. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling...

  14. Turbine fuels from tar-sands bitumen and heavy oil. Part 2. Phase II. Laboratory sample production. Interim report, 1 October 1983-31 October 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, A.F.; Elanchenny, V.; Schwedock, J.P.; Swesey, J.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of domestic tar-sands bitumens or heavy crude oils into aviation turbine fuels was studied in small scale equipment to demonstrate the process scheme consisting of hydrovisbreaking the bitumen or crude residuum follwed by catalytic hydrotreating or hydrocracking of the resultant naphtha or distillate fractions. Four different feedstocks were employed; two were bitumens (from Kentucky or Utah) and two were heavy crudes from California. Significant operating parameters were examined for each process step. Prototype naphtha and kerosene-type fuel samples compared well with JP-4 and JP-8 specifications, although fuels prepared from Utah bitumen (Sunnyside deposit) were deficient in freeze point. Initiation of Phase III, pilot-plant-scale evaluation of the process is recommended.

  15. Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleate Boiling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Nucleate Boiling Principal Investigator: Wenhua Yu Coworkers: D. France and R. Smith Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory OVT Merit Review February 28, 2008...

  16. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in Confined Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Pool boiling is an effective method used in many technical applications for a long time. Its highly efficient heat transfer performance results from not only the convection effect but also the phase change process in pool boiling. Pool boiling...

  17. Boiling of the Interface between Two Immiscible Liquids below the Bulk Boiling Temperatures of Both Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiya V. Pimenova; Denis S. Goldobin

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becoming heated above its bulk boiling point. On the contrary, we address the case where both liquids remain below their bulk boiling points. In this paper we construct the theoretical description of the boiling process and discuss the actualisation of the case we consider for real systems.

  18. PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube PACCAR CRADA: Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular...

  19. CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube CRADA with PACCAR Experimental Investigation in Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube...

  20. Acoustically Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. W. Douglas; M. K. Smith; A. Glezer

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic field is used to increase the critical heat flux (CHF) of a flat-boiling-heat-transfer surface. The increase is a result of the acoustic effects on the vapor bubbles. Experiments are performed to explore the effects of an acoustic field on vapor bubbles in the vicinity of a rigid-heated wall. Work includes the construction of a novel heater used to produce a single vapor bubble of a prescribed size and at a prescribed location on a flatboiling surface for better study of an individual vapor bubble's reaction to the acoustic field. Work also includes application of the results from the single-bubble heater to a calibrated-copper heater used for quantifying the improvements in CHF.

  1. Nucleate boiling bubble growth and departure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staniszewski, Bogumil E.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vapor bubble formation on the heating surface during pool boiling has been studied experimentally. Experiments were made at the atmospheric pressure 28 psi and 40 psi, using degassed distilled water and ethanol. The ...

  2. Void volumes in subcooled boiling systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, P.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Knowledge of the pressure drop in a channel and the resulting flow redistribution is essential in predicting the performance of a nuclear reactor. The pressure drop in a channel which is experiencing boiling ...

  3. Pool boiling heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Joong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids are engineered colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in water, and exhibit a very significant enhancement (up to 200%) of the boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) at modest nanoparticle concentrations (50.1% by ...

  4. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three...). .................................................................................................68 Fig. 19. Plots comparing the heat flux through the enhanced test surfaces (qw”) with the heat flux through the bare test surface (qb”) under 10 °C sub-cooling condition for both nulceate and film boiling regimes. Heat flux data...

  5. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PetrusTakaki, N. [Dept. of Applied Science, Tokai Univ., Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  6. Boiling water reactor control rod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.F.; Doshi, P.K.

    1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a control rod for a boiling water type nuclear power reactor, the improvement comprising: (a) an elongated central stem defining a longitudinally extending internal central gas plenum; (b) blades connected to and extending along and radially outward from the stem, each blade including an elongated body portion extending along the stem and terminating in an end tip portion; (c) means defining a series of internal cavities in each of the blades, the cavities being arranged in columns and rows across the length and width of the body and tip portions of the blade; (d) pellets of neutron absorbing material, each disposed within one of the cavities with each of the cavities being oversized in relation to the size of the pellet disposed therein to allow extra space for swelling of the pellet. The cavities and the pellets disposed therein are arranged to define a longer, constant worth section generally coextensive with the body portion of the blade and a shorter, reduced worth section generally coextensive with the end tip portion of the blade; and (e) means defined within each blade communicating each of the cavities with the central gas plenum for allowing any gases generated by irradiation of the pellets to expand from the cavities into the plenum.

  7. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer during flow boiling instabilities in a single microchannel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aussillous, Pascale

    Hydrodynamics and heat transfer during flow boiling instabilities in a single microchannel July 2008 Keywords: Boiling Microchannels Visualisation Flow boiling instabilities Heat transfer a b intensification heat removal. Flow boiling heat transfer in microchannel geometry and the associated flow

  8. Transition boiling heat transfer from a horizontal surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berenson Paul Jerome

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment, utilising a condensing fluid as the heat source, was performed to determine the heat flux vs. temperature difference curve for transition pool boiling from a horisontal surface. The boiling cure was determined ...

  9. Boiling and condensation in a liquid-filled enclosure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Cohen Avram

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of boiling and condensation in a liquid-filled enclosure, with water and Freon- 113 as the working fluids, is described. The operating characteristics of a boiling system, ...

  10. PNNL Enhanced Pool-Boiling Heat Transfer Using Nanostructured Surfaces

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Close-up video of boiling taking place on a nanostructured surface in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  11. Boiling of nuclear liquid in the micro-canonical ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and the critical temperature of 1 #12;Boiling of nuclear liquid in the microBoiling of nuclear liquid in the micro-canonical ensemble K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro@rio.odn.ne.jp Abstract New calculus of the liquid-gas phase transition is developed for the boiling of nuclear liquid

  12. Mechanism of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer to sodium and the criterion for stable boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shai, Isaac

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison between liquid metals and other common fluids, like water, is made as regards to the various stages of nucleate pool boiling. It is suggested that for liquid metals the stage of building the thermal layer plays ...

  13. Transition from film boiling to nucleate boiling in forced convection vertical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iloeje, Onwuamaeze C.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism of collapse of forced cnnvection annular vertical flow film boiling, with liquid core, is investigated using liquid nitrogen at low pressures. The report includes the effect of heat flux from the buss bar. ...

  14. Boiling heat transfer in a vertical microchannel: Local estimation during flow boiling with a non intrusive method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boiling heat transfer in a vertical microchannel: Local estimation during flow boiling with a non the results of experimental and numerical studies concerning boiling heat transfer inside vertical in minichannels for several gravity levels (µg, 1g, 2g). To fully understand the high heat transfer potential

  15. POOL BOILING OF HIGH-FREQUENCY CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, S. E. (Spencer E.); Konecni, S. (Snezana); Ammerman, C. N. (Curtt N.); Sims, J. R. (James R.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents development of a unique, powerful method for cooling high-frequency, AC conductors that can benefit end users of transformer windings, electrical machine windings, and magnet coils. This method of heat removal involves boiling a dielectric, fluorinert refrigerant that is in direct contact with litz wire conductors. A pool boiling test vessel is constructed, which provides for temperature control of the pool of fluorinert liquid. The test vessel is fitted with viewing ports so that the experiments are observed and studied with the aid of high-speed photography. Tests are performed on a variety of litz wire conductors. The boiling heat transfer coefficient is dependent on the conductor surface roughness. The size of the features on the conductor surface depends on the single-strand wire gage from which the conductor is constructed. All tests are performed with the conductors mounted horizontally. These tests are performed using a DC power supply. The results of these experiments will aid in the design of future cooling systems.

  16. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, S.H. [comp.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  17. actual coolant boiling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  18. abwr advanced boiling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  19. advanced boiling curve: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  20. automatic boiling water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  1. advanced boiling water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  2. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  3. OpenEI Community - Naphtha

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy5/0

  4. Two-stage coprocessing of subbituminous coals and bitumen or heavy oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignasiak, B.; Ohuchi, T.; Clark, P.; Aitchison, D.; Lee, T.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pretreatment of subbituminous coal with an appropriately formulated mix of carbon monoxide and water, in presence of bitumen or heavy oil, results in very fast reactions characterized by a high degree of coal solubilization and deoxygenation. The reaction is catalysed by a mixture of alkali metal carbonates and proceeds readily at 380-400/sup 0/C. The first-stage reaction product appears to be susceptible to further catalytic hydrogenation at 420-460/sup 0/C with gaseous hydrogen yielding 65-70% (on daf feed) of hydrogen-rich distillable oil, composed mainly of naphtha and middle oil. The process flowsheet is presented and the comparative economics of two-stage carbon monoxide/steam-hydrogen and hydrogen-hydrogen coprocessing schemes are discussed.

  5. A study of boiling water flow regimes at low pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiori, Mario P.

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "A comprehensive experimental program to examine flow regimes at pressures below 100 psia for boiling of water in tubes was carried out. An electrical probe, which measures the resistance of the fluid between the centerline ...

  6. Film Boiling on Downward Quenching Hemisphere of Varying Sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan S. Kim; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Film boiling heat transfer coefficients for a downward-facing hemispherical surface are measured from the quenching tests in DELTA (Downward-boiling Experimental Laminar Transition Apparatus). Two test sections are made of copper to maintain low Biot numbers. The outer diameters of the hemispheres are 120 mm and 294 mm, respectively. The thickness of all the test sections is 30 mm. The effect of diameter on film boiling heat transfer is quantified utilizing results obtained from the test sections. The measured data are compared with the numerical predictions from laminar film boiling analysis. The measured heat transfer coefficients are found to be greater than those predicted by the conventional laminar flow theory on account of the interfacial wavy motion incurred by the Helmholtz instability. Incorporation of the wavy motion model considerably improves the agreement between the experimental and numerical results in terms of heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the interfacial wavy motion and the quenching process are visualized through a digital camera.

  7. Pressure drop with surface boiling in small-diameter tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr?mer, Thomas

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure drop for water flowing in small-diameter tubes under isothermal, nonboiling, and surface-boiling conditions was investigated. Experimental results for local pressure gradient and heattransfer coefficients are ...

  8. Suppression and Enhancement of Boiling Associated with Multiple Droplet Impingement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yuxuan

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are at play simultaneously. Furthermore, experiments with single streams of droplets have not been able to elucidate the effects of the onset of boiling (ONB) during the droplet impingement process. Therefore, efforts have been undertaken to consider...

  9. Pool boiling studies on nanotextured surfaces under highly subcooled conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcooled pool boiling on nanotextured surfaces is explored in this study. The experiments are performed in an enclosed viewing chamber. Two silicon wafers are coated with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT), 9 microns (Type-A) and 25 microns (Type...

  10. Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

  11. Dryout droplet distribution and dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wayne S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow film boiling is characterized by liquid-phase droplets entrained in a continuous vapor-phase flow. In a previous work at MIT, a model of dispersed flow heat transfer was developed, called the Local Conditions ...

  12. The effects of surface conditions on boiling characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, J. J.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified model relating surface variables to the nucleate pool boiling characteristics was developed. A simple vapor trapping mechanism was postulated and a geometrical model constructed for idealized conical cavities ...

  13. Forced-convection, dispersed-flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynek, Scott Josef

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the latest results of an investigation of the characteristics of dispersed flow film boiling. Heat transfer data are presented for vertical upflow of nitrogen in an electrically heated tube, 0.4 in. ...

  14. Hydrodynamics, heat transfer and flow boiling instabilities in microchannels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, Jacqueline Claire

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boiling in microchannels is a very efficient mode of heat transfer with high heat and mass transfer coefficients achieved. Less pumping power is required for two-phase flows than for single-phase liquid flows to achieve ...

  15. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    Abstract Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). ...

  16. Determination of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux enhancement in nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids are engineered colloids composed of nano-size particles dispersed in common fluids such as water or refrigerants. Using an electrically controlled wire heater, pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Alumina ...

  17. Effects of surface parameters on boiling heat transfer phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids, engineered colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in fluid, have been shown to enhance pool and flow boiling CHF. The CHF enhancement was due to nanoparticle deposited on the heater surface, which was verified ...

  18. Boiling heat transfer on superhydrophilic, superhydrophobic, and superbiphilic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attinger, Daniel

    Boiling heat transfer on superhydrophilic, superhydrophobic, and superbiphilic surfaces Amy Rachel in revised form 30 October 2012 Accepted 31 October 2012 Keywords: Superhydrophobic Superhydrophilic Biphilic- and nanofabrication, superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed. The statics and dynamics

  19. Burnout in forced convection nucleate boiling of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds John Mitchell

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data are presented for burnout in forced coivection nucleate boiling of water at pressures above 500 psia. A dimensionless correlation is devised for. the M.I.T. data which is found to be valid for certain recent data ...

  20. The correlation of nucleate boiling burn-out data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, P.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dimensionless correlation is developed for nucleate boiling buzrnout data including the following ranges of variables. Fluids - Water Bensene n - Heptane n - Pentane Ethanol Pressure - 0.0045 to 0.96 of critical pressure ...

  1. Experimental design for study of nucleate boiling in porous structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Mitchell Joseph

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superheat required to initiate nucleate boiling inside porous wicks is not well understood in practice. This thesis reports the design of an experimental setup for investigating the onset of vapor nucleation in sintered ...

  2. RELAP5/MOD3 subcooled boiling model assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devkin, A.S.; Podosenov, A.S. [Russian Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation). Nuclear Safety Inst.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the assessment of the RELAP5/Mod3 (5m5 version) code subcooled boiling process model which is based on a variety of experiments. The accuracy of the model is confirmed for a wide range of regime parameters for the case of uniform heating along the channel. The condensation rate is rather underpredicted, which may lead to considerable errors in void fraction behavior prediction in subcooled boiling regimes for nonuniformly or unheated channels.

  3. Mild hydrocracking of bitumen-derived coker and hydrocracker heavy gas oils; Kinetics, product yields, and product properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yui, S.M.; Sanford, E.C. (Research Dept., Syncrude Canada Ltd., PO Box 5790, Edmonton, Alberta (CA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors describe bitumen-derived coker and hydrocracker heavy gas oils hydrotreated at 350-400{sup 0}C, 7-11 MPa, 0.7-1.5h/sup -1/ LHSV, and 600 S m/sup 3/ of H/sub 2//m/sup 3/ of feed in a pilot-scale trickle-bed reactor, over presulfided commercial NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts. The conversion of HGO materials (343+ {sup 0}C) in feed to naphtha (195- {sup 0}C) and LGO (195/343 {sup 0}C) was determined by gas chromatographic simulated distillation. The degree of conversion was analyzed with modified first-order kinetics, which incorporate power terms for LHSV and hydrogen partial pressure. The equations were based on three cracking schemes; parallel, consecutive, and combined parallel-consecutive conversion.

  4. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  5. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  6. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, James B. (Denville, NJ); Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA); McLean, Joseph B. (Somerville, NJ)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  7. Design, fabrication, packaging and testing of thin film thermocouples for boiling studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Nipun

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Boiling is the most efficient form of heat transfer. Thermo-fluidic transport mechanisms at different length and time scales govern the nature of boiling. This study was conducted to enhance the understanding of the surface temperature variations...

  8. Mechanism and behavior of nucleate boiling heat transfer to the alkalai liquid metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deane, Charles William

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of boiling heat transfer to the alkali liquid metals is postulated from an examination of the events and phases of the nucleate boiling cycle. The model includes the important effect of microlayer evaporation which ...

  9. Forced-convection surface-boiling heat transfer and burnout in tubes of small diameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles A. E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A basic heat-transfer apparatus was designed and constructed for the study of forced-convection boiling in small channels. The various regions of forced-convection surface boiling were studied experimentally and analytically. ...

  10. Alumina Nanoparticle Pre-coated Tubing Ehancing Subcooled Flow Boiling Cricital Heat Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H.

    Nanofluids are engineered colloidal dispersions of nano-sized particle in common base fluids. Previous pool boiling studies have shown that nanofluids can improve critical heat flux (CHF) up to 200% for pool boiling and ...

  11. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  12. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING Ying He, Masahiro role in nucleate and transition boiling heat transfer at high heat flux. Many experiments have been in the numerical simulation of boiling heat transfer. In this study, based on the macrolayer evaporation model

  13. ECI International Conference on Boiling Heat Transfer Florianpolis-SC-Brazil, 3-7 May 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    . Recently the study of heat transfer in micro pin fin heat sinks has been extended to flow boiling by Koar and Peles (2006c), who studied boiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sinkECI International Conference on Boiling Heat Transfer Florianópolis-SC-Brazil, 3-7 May 2009

  14. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient In Minichannels Correlation and Trends Satish G. Kandlikar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient In Minichannels ­ Correlation and Trends Satish G. Kandlikar York 14623, USA The flow boiling heat transfer in small diameter passages is being applied in many boiling heat transfer coefficient with the correlations developed for conventional channels. It is found

  15. Numerical study of high heat ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Numerical study of high heat ¯ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b , Shigeo simulation model of boiling heat transfer is proposed based on a numerical macrolayer model [S. Maruyama, M. Shoji, S. Shimizu, A numerical simulation of transition boiling heat transfer, in: Proceedings

  16. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in Confined Space 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    on pool boiling. In the study, confinement was achieved by placing a flat plate over heated surface. The flat plate has a hole in the middle, and there is a gap between the flat plate and the heater. The diameters of hole are 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm; the gap...

  17. Jet Flows Around Microbubbles In Subcooled Boiling , Xiaofeng Pengb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    Jet Flows Around Microbubbles In Subcooled Boiling Hao Wanga , Xiaofeng Pengb , David M Strong jet flows were observed emanating from micro bubbles on a 100 µm diameter wire during subcooled analysis. The bubble-top jet flows were characterized by a single jet at the bubble top. Both experiments

  18. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF VAPOR BUBBLE GROWTH AND WALL HEAT TRANSFER DURING FLOW BOILING OF WATER IN A MICROCHANNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    . (2004) developed three- zone flow boiling heat transfer model to describe evaporation of elongated

  19. Thermal stability of a spherical shell heated by convection and cooled by boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qaim-Maqami, Hassan

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such high heat transfer rates by forced convection would require extremely high veloc- ities with subsequent high pressure dropsy With nuclee, boiling, however, such high heat transfe. rates an be obtained at much smaller velocities. Boiling heat...THERMAL STABILITY OF A. SPHERICAL SHELL HEATED BY CONVECTION AND COOLED BY BOILING A Thesis HASSAN @AIM-MAQAMI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  20. Heavy metal biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  1. Turbine fuels from tar sands bitumen and heavy oil. Volume 1. Phase 3. Pilot plant testing, final design, and economics. Final report, 1 June 1985-31 March 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, A.F.; Carson, T.C.; Magill, L.G.; Swesey, J.R.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pilot-plant-scale demonstration of an upgrading/refining scheme to convert bitumen or heavy crude oil into high yields of specification-quality aviation turbine fuel was performed. An atmospheric residue from San Ardo (California) crude was converted under hydrovisbreaking conditions to synthetic crude for further refining. Naphtha cuts from the straight run and synthetic crude were combined, catalytically hydrotreated, then hydrocracked. Products from these operations were combined to produce two prototype specification fuels (JP-4 and JP-8) as well as two heavier, variable-quality fuels. An engineering design (Volume II) was developed for a 50,000 BPSD grass-roots refinery, from the pilot-plant operations. Capital investment and operating costs were estimated, and fuel manufacturing costs projected. Conclusions and recommendations for further work are included.

  2. Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat BasinGreat Boiling

  3. Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleate Boiling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleate Boiling Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleate

  4. Efficient Cooling in Engines with Nucleated Boiling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleate Boiling Efficient Cooling in Engines with

  5. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, Al-SBA-15, containing strong Broensted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt% Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst will be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks to naphtha and middle distillates.

  6. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  7. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Kingston, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  8. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  9. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  10. Comparison of thorium-based fuels with different fissile components in existing boiling water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    Comparison of thorium-based fuels with different fissile components in existing boiling water, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden Keywords: Thorium BWR Neutronics a b s t r a c t With the aim of investigating the technical feasibility of fuelling a conventional BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) with thorium

  11. INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF HEATING METHOD ON POOL BOILING HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF HEATING METHOD ON POOL BOILING HEAT TRANSFER Satish G. Kandlikar Department Rochester Institute of Technology Rochester, NY, USA Phone: (716) 475-6728; Fax: (716) 475-7710 E-mail: SGKEME@RIT.EDU ABSTRACT Pool boiling experiments are generally conducted with electrically heated

  12. Effect of surface conditions on boiling heat transfer of refrigerants in shell-and-tube evaporators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilova, G.N.; Dyundin, V.A.; Borishanskaya, A.V.; Soloviyov, A.G.; Vol'nykh, Y.A.; Kozyrev, A.A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are presented for the boiling heat transfer performance of R 22 and R 717 on surfaces with porous metallized coatings. A calculational-theoretical model is given for predicting the heat transfer of refrigerants boiling on a bundle of finned tubes.

  13. Boiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    transfer in a horizontal tube bundle and reported an increase in local heat transfer coefficient boiling heat transfer of water in small horizontal tube bundles at low velocities. How- ever, the dataBoiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink Ali Kosßar, Yoav Peles

  14. Vapor pressure and boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors: Predictive models with statistical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaman, A.A.; McNally, T.W.; Fricke, A.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibria and boiling point elevation of slash pine kraft black liquors over a wide range of solid concentrations (up to 85% solids) has been studied. The liquors are from a statistically designed pulping experiment for pulping slash pine in a pilot scale digester with four cooking variables of effective alkali, sulfidity, cooking time, and cooking temperature. It was found that boiling point elevation of black liquors is pressure dependent, and this dependency is more significant at higher solids concentrations. The boiling point elevation data at different solids contents (at a fixed pressure) were correlated to the dissolved solids (S/(1 {minus} S)) in black liquor. Due to the solubility limit of some of the salts in black liquor, a change in the slope of the boiling point elevation as a function of the dissolved solids was observed at a concentration of around 65% solids. An empirical method was developed to describe the boiling point elevation of each liquor as a function of pressure and solids mass fraction. The boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors was correlated quantitatively to the pulping variables, using different statistical procedures. These predictive models can be applied to determine the boiling point rise (and boiling point) of slash pine black liquors at processing conditions from the knowledge of pulping variables. The results are presented, and their utility is discussed.

  15. Boiling Crisis as a Non-Equilibrium Drying V. S. Nikolayev, D. A. Beysens, J. Hegseth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    crisis is the formation of a vapor film between the heater and the liquid when the heat supply exceeds in the coordinates heat supply ­ heater temperature is sketched in Fig. 1 for the case of stationary boiling experiment, the so called "pool boiling". When the heat supply to the fluid pool is small, only a fluid

  16. A Review Of Recent Progress On Nano/micro Scale Nucleate Boiling Fundamentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, J. N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research progress in the area of nano/micro scale nucleate boiling is reviewed and an up-to-date summary is provided with a focus on the advances of fundamental boiling physics. This review examines nano/micro scale ...

  17. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Stephen T.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling...

  18. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Stephen T.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling...

  19. Rod bundle film boiling and steam cooling data base and correlation evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, G.L.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Film boiling and steam cooling data from several rod bundle experiments have been compiled from fourteen references. Steam cooling data are presented for five references, while film boiling data are presented for ten references (two of these for tube geometry). The compilation includes experimental parameters necessary for characterization of the local rod heat transfer. These data have been compared to several commonly used film boiling and pure vapor heat transfer coefficients. Results show that the Dougall-Rohsenow correlation tends to overpredict film boiling heat transfer, while Condie-Bengston IV and the Groeneveld 5. series correlations do a reasonable job of predicting film boiling heat fluxes. Of the three vapor correlations examined, the Dittus-Boelter correlation is least conservative, and the Sozer correlation most conservative.

  20. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

  1. Determination of the boiling enhancement mechanism caused by surfactant addition to water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present investigation, boiling heat transfer coefficients are measured for an electrically heated 390-{micro}m, platinum wire immersed in saturated water, and in water mixed with three different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (an anionic surfactant). The addition of a surfactant to water is known to enhance boiling heat transfer. A recently developed photographic/laser Doppler anemometry measurement technique is used to quantify the vapor volumetric flowrate departing from the wire during the boiling process. The volumetric flowrate data are combined with results from additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from three nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms. Comparisons are made to determine which heat transfer mechanisms are affected by the surfactant addition, and thus, which mechanisms promote boiling enhancement.

  2. Exploiting heavy oil reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    North Sea investment potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Beneath the waves in 3D Aberdeen the potential of heavy oil 8/9 Taking the legal lessons learned in the north Sea to a global audience 10 potential Exploiting heavy oil reserves Aberdeen: A community of science AT WORK FOR THE ENERGY SECTOR ISSUE

  3. Nonlinear dynamics and chaos in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are currently 72 commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) in operation or under construction in the western world, 37 of them in the United States. Consequently, a great effort has been devoted to the study of BWR systems under a wide range of plant operating conditions. This paper represents a contribution to this ongoing effort; its objective is to study the basic dynamic processes in BWR systems, with special emphasis on the physical interpretation of BWR dynamics. The main thrust in this work is the development of phenomenological BWR models suited for analytical studies performed in conjunction with numerical calculations. This approach leads to a deeper understanding of BWR dynamics and facilitates the interpretation of numerical results given by currently available sophisticated BWR codes. 6 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Boiling Heat Transfer on Superhydrophilic, Superhydrophobic, and Superbiphilic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, Amy Rachel; Kim, Chang-Jin 'CJ'; Attinger, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With recent advances in micro- and nanofabrication, superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed. The statics and dynamics of fluids on these surfaces have been well characterized. However, few investigations have been made into the potential of these surfaces to control and enhance other transport phenomena. In this article, we characterize pool boiling on surfaces with wettabilities varied from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic, and provide nucleation measurements. The most interesting result of our measurements is that the largest heat transfer coefficients are reached not on surfaces with spatially uniform wettability, but on biphilic surfaces, which juxtapose hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. We develop an analytical model that describes how biphilic surfaces effectively manage the vapor and liquid transport, delaying critical heat flux and maximizing the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, we manufacture and test the first superbiphilic surfaces (juxtaposing superhydrophobic ...

  5. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of tables of temperature measurements.

  6. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of a summary of temperature measurements to include recorded minima, maxima, averages and standard deviations.

  7. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists solely of tables of temperature measurements; minima, maxima, averages and standard deviations being measured.

  8. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  9. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  10. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux.

  11. Identification of pool boiling heat transfer mechanisms in FC-72 using a single-photo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique method to determine the vapor flow rate above a boiling cylinder utilizing a single photograph is developed and discussed. This method is applied to a 75-{micro}m wire immersed in a saturated, highly wetting liquid (FC-72) to determine bubble departure diameter, frequency, and nucleation site density. Using the experimental results, an analysis is performed to evaluate individual heat flux contributions of the four pool boiling mechanisms: latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection. Latent heat is identified as the dominant mechanism throughout most of the nucleate boiling regime.

  12. CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced melt-water, film boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomenological model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe the gas-sparging enhanced film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and an overlying water layer. The model accounts for thermal radiation across the vapor film, bulk liquid subcooling, interfacial area enhancement due to sparging gas, and melt entrainment into the overlying water layer. In this paper, the modeling approach is described, and a comparison with the lead-Freon 11 and lead-water film boiling experiment data of Greene is made. Predictions are then made for the case of film boiling over corium in the presence of sparging concrete decomposition gases. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  13. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, 35, Beijing, 100190 (China); Wang, S. [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, 35, Beijing, 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Science, No. 19 YuQuan Road, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  14. The Role of the Flexicoking Process in Heavy Oil Processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, R. I.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a clean product slate composed of low Btu gas, high Btu gas, LPG, naphtha, distillate and gas oil. The low Btu gas falls within the definition of an "Alternate Fuel" under current legislation (PL 95-620). Originally developed for refinery bottoms...

  15. Experimental Two-Phase Flow Characterization of Subcooled Boiling in a Rectangular Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada Perez, Carlos E.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    On the efforts to provide a reliable source of experimental information on turbulent subcooled boiling ow, time resolved Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) experiments were carried out using HFE-301 refrigerant ow through a vertical rectangular...

  16. Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Alan Edward

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

  17. Bubble behavior in subcooled flow boiling on surfaces of variable wettability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tow, Emily W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow boiling is important in energy conversion and thermal management due to its potential for very high heat fluxes. By improving understanding of the conditions leading to bubble departure, surfaces can be designed that ...

  18. Stability analysis of the boiling water reactor : methods and advanced designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Rui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density Wave Oscillations (DWOs) are known to be possible when a coolant undergoes considerable density reduction while passing through a heated channel. In the development of boiling water reactors (BWRs), there has been ...

  19. Visualization of flow boiling in an annular heat exchanger under reduced gravity conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westheimer, David Thomas

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the effects of gravitational acceleration on the flow boiling process. A test facility focusing on an annular heat exchanger was designed, built out of borosilicate glass, and flown on NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity airplane...

  20. A visualization comparison of convective flow boiling heat transfer augmentation devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundy, Brian Franklin

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The qualitative effects of inset-table heat transfer phics. augmentation devices on vertical in-tube convective flow boiling flow regimes, transition mechanisms, and heat transfer are presented in this study. Three twisted tapes with twist ratios...

  1. Experimental Observation and Measurements of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer using PIV, Shadowgraphy, RICM Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di, Yuan 1988-

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This present study seeks to contribute detailed visualization data on a pool boiling experiments using HFE-7000. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the time resolved whole field liquid velocity. Bubble dynamic parameters...

  2. Experimental & Numerical Investigation of Pool Boiling on Engineered Surfaces with Integrated Thin-flim Temperature Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of subcooling and micro/nano-scale surface texturing using MWCNT coatings on the dynamics of pool boiling is assessed. Dynamic invariants such as correlation dimensions and Lyapunov spectrum are evaluated for the reconstructed attractor. A non-linear noise...

  3. Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

  4. Prediction of departure from nucleate boiling in PWR fast power transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenci, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment is conducted of the differences in predicted results between use of steady state versus transient Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) models, for fast power transients under forced convective heat exchange ...

  5. A study of system-induced instabilities in forced-convection flows with subcooled boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maulbetsch, John S.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined analytical and experimental program was carried out to investigate the problem of hydrodynamic stability of forcedconvection flows with boiling. The study was restricted to the flow of water in small channels ...

  6. Film boiling of saturated liquid flowing upward through a heated tube : high vapor quality range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laverty, W. F.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Film boiling of saturated liquid flowing upward through a uniformly heated tube has been studied for the case in which pure saturated liquid enters the tube and nearly saturated vapor is discharged. Since a previous study ...

  7. Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forslund, Robert Paul

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

  8. Experimental & Numerical Investigation of Pool Boiling on Engineered Surfaces with Integrated Thin-flim Temperature Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to measure and analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling. The surface temperature fluctuations were recorded on silicon surfaces with and without multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Novel Thin...

  9. Nano-engineering the boiling surface for optimal heat transfer rate and critical heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects on pool boiling characteristics such as critical heat flux and the heat transfer coefficient of different surface characteristics such as surface wettability, roughness, morphology, and porosity are not well ...

  10. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Irvine, T.F., Jr. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus_minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured [0 to 8.5 cm/s], the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  11. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Irvine, T.F., Jr. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured (0 to 8.5 cm/s), the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  12. Camera Inspection Arm for Boiling Water Reactors - 13330

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Scott; Rood, Marc [S.A. Technology, 3985 S. Lincoln Ave, Loveland, CO 80537 (United States)] [S.A. Technology, 3985 S. Lincoln Ave, Loveland, CO 80537 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) outage maintenance tasks can be time-consuming and hazardous. Reactor facilities are continuously looking for quicker, safer, and more effective methods of performing routine inspection during these outages. In 2011, S.A. Technology (SAT) was approached by Energy Northwest to provide a remote system capable of increasing efficiencies related to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) internal inspection activities. The specific intent of the system discussed was to inspect recirculation jet pumps in a manner that did not require manual tooling, and could be performed independently of other ongoing inspection activities. In 2012, SAT developed a compact, remote, camera inspection arm to create a safer, more efficient outage environment. This arm incorporates a compact and lightweight design along with the innovative use of bi-stable composite tubes to provide a six-degree of freedom inspection tool capable of reducing dose uptake, reducing crew size, and reducing the overall critical path for jet pump inspections. The prototype camera inspection arm unit is scheduled for final testing in early 2013 in preparation for the Columbia Generating Station refueling outage in the spring of 2013. (authors)

  13. Multi-cycle boiling water reactor fuel cycle optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ottinger, K.; Maldonado, G.I. [University of Tennessee, 311 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work a new computer code, BWROPT (Boiling Water Reactor Optimization), is presented. BWROPT uses the Parallel Simulated Annealing (PSA) algorithm to solve the out-of-core optimization problem coupled with an in-core optimization that determines the optimum fuel loading pattern. However it uses a Haling power profile for the depletion instead of optimizing the operating strategy. The result of this optimization is the optimum new fuel inventory and the core loading pattern for the first cycle considered in the optimization. Several changes were made to the optimization algorithm with respect to other nuclear fuel cycle optimization codes that use PSA. Instead of using constant sampling probabilities for the solution perturbation types throughout the optimization as is usually done in PSA optimizations the sampling probabilities are varied to get a better solution and/or decrease runtime. The new fuel types available for use can be sorted into an array based on any number of parameters so that each parameter can be incremented or decremented, which allows for more precise fuel type selection compared to random sampling. Also, the results are sorted by the new fuel inventory of the first cycle for ease of comparing alternative solutions. (authors)

  14. Generic risk insights for General Electric boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Chung, J. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation)

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of General Electric boiling water rectors and applying the insights gained to plants that have not been subjected to a PRA. The available risk assessments (six plants) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plants. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eight sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human error that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training, maintenance, design review, and inspections. 13 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  16. HEAVY-ION RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY 1,2 Jacob I .RADIOGRAPHY AND HEAVY-ION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY J I Fabrikant,

  17. Relativistic heavy ion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  18. Boiling behavior of sodium-potassium alloy in a bench-scale solar receiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1989-90, a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver was successfully demonstrated at Sandia National Laboratories. Significant features of this receiver include (1) boiling sodium as the heat transfer medium and (2) electric-discharge-machined (EDM) cavities as artificial nucleation sites to stabilize boiling. Since this first demonstration, design of a second-generation pool-boiler receiver that will bring the concept closer to commercialization has begun. For long life, the new receiver uses Haynes Alloy 230. For increased safety factors against film boiling and flooding, it has a refined shape and somewhat larger dimensions. To eliminate the need for trace heating, the receiver will boil the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78 instead of sodium. To reduce manufacturing costs, it will use one of a number of alternatives to EDM cavities for stabilization of boiling. To control incipient-boiling superheats, especially during hot restarts, it will contain a small amount of inert gas. Before the new receiver design could be finalized, bench-scale tests of some of the proposed changes were necessary. A series of bench-scale pool boilers were built from Haynes Alloy 230 and filled with NaK-78. Various boiling-stabilizer candidates were incorporated into them, including laser-drilled cavities and a number of different sintered-powder-metal coatings. These bench-scale pool boilers have been operated at temperatures up to 750{degree}C, heated by quartz lamps with incident radiant fluxes up to 95 W/cm{sup 2}. The effects of various orientations and added gases have been studied. results of these studies are presented. 15 refs.

  19. Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T. G.

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows was studied experimentally and theoretically with an emphasis on establishing the film boiling heat transfer closure law, which is useful in the analysis of nuclear reactor core melt accidents. Systematic experimentation of film boiling on spheres in single-phase water flows was carried out to investigate the effects of liquid subcooling (from 0 to 40 C), liquid velocity (from 0 to 2 m/s), sphere superheat (from 200 to 900 C), sphere diameter (from 6 to 19 mm), and sphere material (stainless steel and brass) on film boiling heat transfer. Based on the experimental data a general film boiling heat transfer correlation is developed. Utilizing a two-phase laminar boundary-layer model for the unseparated front film region and a turbulent eddy model for the separated rear region, a theoretical model was developed to predict the film boiling heat transfer in all single-phase regimes. The film boiling from a sphere in two-phase flows was investigated both in upward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.2 to 0.65, water velocity from 0.6 to 3.2 m/s, and steam velocity from 3.0 to 9.0 m/s) and in downward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.7 to 0.95, water velocity from 1.9 to 6.5 m/s, and steam velocity from 1.1 to 9.0 m/s). The saturated single-phase heat transfer correlation was found to be applicable to the two-phase film boiling data by making use of the actual water velocity (water phase velocity), and an adjustment factor of (1 - {alpha}){sup 1/4} (with a being the void fraction) for downward flow case only. Slight adjustments of the Reynolds number exponents in the correlation provided an even better interpretation of the two-phase data. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to address the influences of multi-sphere structure on the film boiling heat transfer in single- and two-phase flows.

  20. Gas bubbling-enhanced film boiling of Freon-11 on liquid metal pools. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, G.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the analysis of severe core damage accidents in LWRs, a major driving force which must be considered in evaluating containment loading and fission product transport is the ex-vessel interaction between molten core debris and structural concrete. Two computer codes have been developed for this purpose, the CORCON-MOD2 model of ex-vessel, core concrete interactions and the VANESA model for aerosol generation and fission product release as a result of molten core-concrete interactions. Under a wide spectrum of reactor designs and accident sequences, it is possible for water to come into contact with the molten core debris and form a coolant pool overlying the core debris which is attacking the concrete. As the concrete decomposes, noncondensable gases are released, which bubble through the melt and across the boiling interface, affecting the liquid-liquid boiling process. Currently, the CORCON code includes the classical Berenson model for film boiling over a horizontal flat plate for this phenomenon. The objectives of this activity are to investigate the influence of transverse noncondensable gas flux on the magnitude of the stable liquid-liquid film boiling heat flux and develop a gas flux-enhanced, liquid-liquid film boiling model for incorporation into the CORCON-MOD2 computer code to replace or modify the Berenson model.

  1. Hydroconversion of heavy oils. [Residue of tar sand bitumen distillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, D.

    1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for hydroconversion of feedstocks consisting essentially of at least one heavy hydrocarbon oil selected from the group consisting of residue of petroleum oil distillation and the residue of tar sand bitumen distillation to enhance the recovery of 350/sup 0/-650/sup 0/F boiling product fraction. The method comprises treating such feed stock with hydrogen at superatmospheric pressure and in the presence of finely divided active hydrogenation catalyst in consecutive reaction stages. An initial reaction stage is carried out at a temperature in the range of 780/sup 0/-825/sup 0/F, and a subsequent reaction stage is directly carried out after the initial reaction stage at a higher temperature in the range of 800/sup 0/F-860/sup 0/F, the temperature of the subsequent reaction stage being at least 20/sup 0/F higher than that of the initial reaction stage.

  2. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of a mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, AlSBA-15. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst contains strong Br{umlt o}nsted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt % Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at a temperature of 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into a psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst is being evaluated for the conversion of a heavy petroleum feedstock to naphtha and middle distillates. This phase was significantly delayed during the past six months due to a serious malfunction of the fume hoods in the Clark Atlanta University's Research Center for Science and Technology, where the project is being conducted. The fume hood system was repaired and the catalyst evaluation is now underway.

  3. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  4. Influences of electrical field on boiling-condensation heat transfer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Jiaxiang; Ding Lijian; Chi Xiaochun; Liu Ji [Harbin Inst. of Electrical Technology (China). Dept. of Electrical Materials Engineering; Yang He [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China). Dept. of Thermal Energy Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the influences of electrical field on boiling-condensation heat transfer system have been investigated using a cylinder heat transfer model. Freon-11 is selected as working fluid. The condensation heat transfer coefficient, the boiling heat flux and the saturation pressure are measured in this investigation. According to the experimental results, it is found that the electrical field can influence heat transfer system. The boiling heat transfer is enhanced by the applied voltage, and the saturate vapor of working fluid is condensed on the high voltage electrode directly when the applied voltage is higher than 6 kv. The experimental results have been discussed, and it is considered that the high electrical field strength change the thermal properties of working fluid.

  5. BOILING CRISIS:THEORY,SIMULATION,AND EXPERIMENTSBOILING CRISIS: THEORY, SIMULATION, AND EXPERIMENTS Boiling is a very efficient way to transfer heat from a heater to the liquid heat carrier. We discuss the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    that separates the liquid from the heater. Film boiling can be also observed in the kitchen by sprinkling water onto a hot frying pan. In spite of the large temperature of the heater (the pan) the water drops Boiling is a very efficient way to transfer heat from a heater to the liquid heat carrier. We discuss

  6. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  7. Enhancement of pool boiling heat transfer with electrohydrodynamics and its fundamental study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghupathi, Sri Laxmi Priya

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and 10kV. To conduct this study, an existing low pressure pool boiling apparatus was modified and another high pressure apparatus was designed and built. The fluids were tested on the smooth tube at operating temperatures of 4'C and 20'C, and 19 fins... TWl Tvvo Heat flux of EHD enhancement of boiling (W/m ) Total heat flux with EHD at 10kV (W/m ) Total heat flux with no EHD (W/m ) Minimum cavity mouth radius (m) Rayleigh number Fluid temperature ('C) Pool Saturation temperature ('C) Tube...

  8. The use of the probability distribution function to analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Chau Qui

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accepted. 3. Mass-transfer model: As early as 1952, the possi- 1. 1 bi) ity of mass transfer across the bubble was visualized oy Snyder and presented at a conference in 1856 for the ca. , e of subcool ed nucleate boiling in forced convection l qf. He... heat transfer in forced convection, found negligible latent heat transport compared to the total heat transferred from the heated surface. Ruling out the latent heat transport as major factor, they attributed the high heat transfer in boiling...

  9. Investigation of boiling heat transfer at a surface with a system of cylindrical cavities under conditions of free motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilova, G.N.; Reznikov, V.I.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a mathematical model for the intensification of boiling heat transfer and the subsequent increase in thermal efficiency of the cylindrical heat transfer surfaces in an evaporative cooling system. The boiling curves for water, ethanol, and freon 113 are calculated for a surface with artificial nucleation sites. The model incorporates such coolant properties as surface tension, specific heat, and vaporization heat.

  10. Nanoscale modification of key surface parameters to augment pool boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in water and dielectric fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Eric Christopher

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface effects on pool boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux are well documented but poorly understood. This study investigates the pool boiling characteristics of various fluids, and demonstrates that surface ...

  11. Simulation of subcooled boiling at low pressure conditions with RELAP5-3D computer program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reza, S.M. Mohsin

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of subcooled boiling was carried out using RELAP5 thermal hydraulic computer programs. Both one-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses were carried out with one-dimensional RELAP5/MOD3.2 and three-dimensional RELAP5-3D code...

  12. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  13. QSPR models of boiling point, octanolwater partition coefficient and retention time index of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    QSPR models of boiling point, octanol­water partition coefficient and retention time index Structure­Property Relationship (QSPR) analysis and study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (bp), octanol­ water partition coefficient ðlog KowÞ and retention time index (RI) for reversed

  14. Development of a small-channel nucleate-boiling heat transfer correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasza, K.E.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of an improved semimechanistic-based set of correlation parameters for nucleation-dominant flow-boiling heat transfer in small channels is described. Formulation of these parameters is on the basis of a recently published open-literature model for vapor bubble growth at a heated surface. This work is part of a program directed at obtaining an understanding of the physical mechanisms that influence boiling in compact heat exchangers through the use of high-speed video and microscope optics to characterize bubble nucleation, growth, and interaction with the confining walls of small heat transfer passages. The correlation parameters presented here represent the first step in the development of an improved boiling correlation for geometrically confined small-channel flows. In such flows, the nucleating bubbles can become nominally the same size as the channel cross section, thereby invalidating existing correlations that are based on large-channel data. Initial efforts to correlate small-channel-boiling data obtained at Argonne National Laboratory from nontransparent electrically heated metal tube tests appear promising.

  15. 2007-No54-BoilingPoint Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2007-No54-BoilingPoint Theme Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel Energy of fossil-fuel energy systems. These scenarios are analysed for various environmental and health impacts from fossil fuels and other energy sources reported by IEA []. In all of these countries except Kenya

  16. Hydrodynamic cavitation and boiling in refrigerant (R-123) flow inside microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    Hydrodynamic cavitation and boiling in refrigerant (R-123) flow inside microchannels Brandon cavitation has on heat transfer. The fluid medium is refrigerant R-123 flowing through 227 lm hydraulic diameter microchannels. The cavitation is instigated by the inlet orifice. Adiabatic tests were con- ducted

  17. Numerical simulation of boiling during the quenching process N. Kosseifi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by computing the heat flux that arises from the different modes of boiling. They coupled the phase change to heat dissipation of the metal thanks to an interface coupling code. The heat transfer coefficient using a level set method. Surface tension is evaluated using the continuum surface force. The proposed

  18. Method of producing a colloidal fuel from coal and a heavy petroleum fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longanbach, James R. (Columbus, OH)

    1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for combining coal as a colloidal suspension within a heavy petroleum fraction. The coal is broken to a medium particle size and is formed into a slurry with a heavy petroleum fraction such as a decanted oil having a boiling point of about 300.degree.-550.degree. C. The slurry is heated to a temperature of 400.degree.-500.degree. C. for a limited time of only about 1-5 minutes before cooling to a temperature of less than 300.degree. C. During this limited contact time at elevated temperature the slurry can be contacted with hydrogen gas to promote conversion. The liquid phase containing dispersed coal solids is filtered from the residual solids and recovered for use as a fuel or feed stock for other processes. The residual solids containing some carbonaceous material are further processed to provide hydrogen gas and heat for use as required in this process.

  19. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty...

  20. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naphtha Feed Stock Coal Heavy oil NG biomass Electricityheat Ammonia NG Fuel Oil Heavy oil Electric ity heat CoalCoke Electricit y NG Heavy oil Coal Coke Electricity Diesel

  1. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from methane, naphtha, heavy oil, and coal has achievedare suspended in a heavy oil. High-per-pass conversions (95%the catalytic cracking of heavy gas oils can be saturated,

  2. Heavy Quark production at HERA and Heavy Quark contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detlef Bartsch, University of Bonn on behalf of the ZEUS and H1 Collaborations · Introduction · Heavy 1500 0 100 200 300 400 electrons positrons low E HERA-1 HERA-2 Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production Detlef Bartsch Heavy Quark production at HERA, Feb. 23rd 2008 3 #12;pQCD approximations Massive scheme

  3. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  4. Heavy Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sid Diamond; Richard Wares; Jules Routbort

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy Vehicle (HV) systems are a necessary component of achieving OHVT goals. Elements are in place for a far-ranging program: short, intermediate, and long-term. Solicitation will bring industrial input and support. Future funding trend is positive, outlook for HV systems is good.

  5. Heavy Quark Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul B. Mackenzie

    1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice calculations of heavy quark systems provide very good measures of the lattice spacing, a key element in recent determinations of the strong coupling constant using lattice methods. They also provide excellent testing grounds for lattice methods in general. I review recent phenomenological and technical developments in this field.

  6. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L. (Energy Systems)

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  7. Study of bubble growth in water pool boiling through synchronized, infrared thermometry and high-speed video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    High-speed video and infrared thermometry were used to obtain time- and space-resolved information on bubble nucleation and heat transfer in pool boiling of water. The bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and ...

  8. Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zielinski, R. G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a twodimensional, two fluid code developed at M.I.T. for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, ...

  9. Multi-Scale Experiments in Turbulent Subcooled Boiling Flow Through a Square Channel with a Single Heated Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada Perez, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, visualization experimental techniques that provide whole-field and multi-scale measurements of the liquid turbulence parameters, liquid and heater wall temperatures, and gas phase local parameters, were used to study subcooled boiling...

  10. Development of a general purpose subgrid wall boiling model from improved physical understanding for use in computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilman, Lindsey Anne

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced modeling capabilities were developed for application to subcooled flow boiling through this work. The target was to introduce, and demonstrate, all necessary mechanisms required to accurately predict the temperature ...

  11. A four-equation two-phase flow model for sodium boiling simulation of LMFBR fuel assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schor, Andrei L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transients has been developed. The model uses mixture mass and energy equations, while employing a separate momentum equation for each phase. Thermal ...

  12. Film boiling on the inside of vertical tubes with upward flow of the fluid at low qualities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougall, R. S.

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow regimes, local heat transfer coefficients, and temperature distributions along the wall have been studied for film boiling inside a vertical tube with upward flow of a saturated liquid. The area of interest has been ...

  13. Subcooled flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in water-based nanofluids at low pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Joong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanofluid is a colloidal suspension of nano-scale particles in water, or other base fluids. Previous pool boiling studies have shown that nanofluids can improve the critical heat flux (CHF) by as much as 200%. In this ...

  14. Effect of combined nanoparticle and polymeric dispersions on critical heat flux, nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient, and coating adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Bronwyn K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to determine thermal performance and adhesion effects of a combined nanoparticle and polymeric dispersion coating. The critical heat flux (CHF) values and nucleate boiling heat transfer ...

  15. Experimental investigation of subcooled flow boiling using synchronized high speed video, infrared thermography, and particle image velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Bren Andrew

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcooled flow boiling of water was experimentally investigated using high-speed video (HSV), infrared (IR) thermography, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) to generate a unique database of synchronized data. HSV allowed ...

  16. Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions.

  17. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  18. Multi-scale Control and Enhancement of Reactor Boiling Heat Flux by Reagents and Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manglik, R M; Athavale, A; Kalaikadal, D S; Deodhar, A; Verma, U

    2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenological characterization of the use of non-invasive and passive techniques to enhance the boiling heat transfer in water has been carried out in this extended study. It provides fundamental enhanced heat transfer data for nucleate boiling and discusses the associated physics with the aim of addressing future and next-generation reactor thermal-hydraulic management. It essentially addresses the hypothesis that in phase-change processes during boiling, the primary mechanisms can be related to the liquid-vapor interfacial tension and surface wetting at the solidliquid interface. These interfacial characteristics can be significantly altered and decoupled by introducing small quantities of additives in water, such as surface-active polymers, surfactants, and nanoparticles. The changes are fundamentally caused at a molecular-scale by the relative bulk molecular dynamics and adsorption-desorption of the additive at the liquid-vapor interface, and its physisorption and electrokinetics at the liquid-solid interface. At the micro-scale, the transient transport mechanisms at the solid-liquid-vapor interface during nucleation and bubblegrowth can be attributed to thin-film spreading, surface-micro-cavity activation, and micro-layer evaporation. Furthermore at the macro-scale, the heat transport is in turn governed by the bubble growth and distribution, macro-layer heat transfer, bubble dynamics (bubble coalescence, collapse, break-up, and translation), and liquid rheology. Some of these behaviors and processes are measured and characterized in this study, the outcomes of which advance the concomitant fundamental physics, as well as provide insights for developing control strategies for the molecular-scale manipulation of interfacial tension and surface wetting in boiling by means of polymeric reagents, surfactants, and other soluble surface-active additives.

  19. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  20. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  1. Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

    2009-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to determine the throughput capability of the coker so a scaled design could be developed that maximized feed rate for a given size of reactor. These tests were only partially successful because of equipment problems. A redesigned coker, which addressed the problems, has been build but not operated. A preliminary economic analysis conducted by MEG and an their engineering consultant concluded that the WRITE{trademark} process is a technically feasible method for upgrading bitumen and that it produces SCO that meets pipeline specifications for density. When compared to delayed coking, the industry benchmark for thermal upgrading of bitumen, WRITE{trademark} produced more SCO, less coke, less CO{sub 2} per barrel of bitumen fed, and had lower capital and operating costs. On the other hand, WRITE{trademark}'s lower processing severity yielded crude with higher density and a different product distribution for naphtha, light gas oil and vacuum oil that, taken together, might reduce the value of the SCO. These issues plus the completion of more detailed process evaluation and economics need to be resolved before WRITE{trademark} is deployed as a field-scale pilot.

  2. Enhancement of flow boiling of subcooled water on transverse ribbed surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Yasunobu; Deguchi, Hironobu

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work deals with enhancement of flow boiling heat transfer using transverse ribs of rectangular cross section attached on a flat heating surface. High flux cooling is envisioned in the field of the leading edge technology such as high power laser applications, advanced metallurgical processes, fusion reactors, integrated circuit chips and so forth. In such advanced cooling devices subcooled boiling of water at high velocity is expected as one of most efficient and convenient means for heat removal exceeding 10{sup 7}W/m{sup 2}. In the present experiment, a sheet of stainless-steel (10mm wide, 0.2mm thick and 80mm in heated length) was flush mounted on one wall of a vertical rectangular channel (a cross-section 20mm x 30 mm) and used as a heating surface by passing a direct current. Transverse-ribs made of plastic plate (0.5mm thick and 30mm in lateral length) were attached at an equal longitudinal spacing on the heating surface. Longitudinal spacing of ribs was varied from 2.5, 5, 10, 20mm to infinity (a flat surface without ribs), and the rib height was 2.5mm and 5.0mm. Experiments were conducted with water at a pressure of 0.12MPa in the range of mass velocity from 500kg/m{sup 2}s to 2,000kg/m{sup 2}s (water velocity from 0.5m/s to 2m/s) and subcooling from 20K to 50K. It was found that the ribbed structure strongly affects heat transfer both in the non-boiling and partial nucleate boiling regimes. Enhancement rate of heat transfer coefficient varied from 5% to 50% in excess compared with that for the flat heating plate. According to visual observation of boiling bubbles the circulating flow occurred in a space between each consecutive ribs and seemed to enhance heat transfer. For narrow rib spacing a large coalesced bubble filled up each rib space and impeded the exchange of vapor with liquid, leading to heat transfer deterioration. In the present experimental range of the ribs, a 50% increase of heat transfer coefficient was attained on the ribbed surface with 5mm height and a spacing of 10mm.

  3. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Raymond P. (Overland Park, KS); Schmalzer, David K. (Englewood, CO); Wright, Charles H. (Overland Park, KS)

    1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships.

  4. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

  5. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

  6. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. RHIC | Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of LINAC The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a world-class particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory where physicists are exploring the most...

  9. Super Heavy Nuclei

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. .Energy8 Career DaySunShotSuper Heavy

  10. Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlov, Andrey [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Wilfried [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin. - Graphical Abstract: Analysis of spinels in corrosion product deposits on boiling water reactor fuel rod. Combining EPMA and XAFS results: schematic representation of the ferrite spinels in terms of the end members and their extent of inversion. Note that the ferrites are represented as a surface between the normal (upper plane, M[Fe{sub 2}]O{sub 4}) and the inverse (lower plane, Fe[MFe]O{sub 4}). Actual compositions red Black-Small-Square for the specimen at low elevation (810 mm), blue Black-Small-Square for the specimen at mid elevation (1800 mm). The results have an impact on the properties of the CRUD material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion of cations in spinel solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations.

  11. The use of the probability distribution function to analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Chau Qui

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    par t of his t ime and labor to assist in the welding of thermocoupl-. junctions to the copper disk. And to all of those directly connected and to many others who helped by givino words of suggestion, there will always remain a debt o.... DEDICATION. AC (QU OWL EDGI"IENT S. TABLE OF CONTENTS. L1ST OF TABLES. LIST OF F IGUR ES. vi vii 1x CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. CHAPTER II MECHANISMS OF NUCLEATE POOL BOILING. . . . . Bubble agitation model. Vapor-liquid exchange model. 3. M...

  12. Magnetic thaw-down and boil-off due to magneto acceptors in 2DEG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaubet, C.; Raymond, A. [L2C UMR 5221, CNRS-Université Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, 34090 Montpellier cedex 05 (France); Bisotto, I. [LNCMI, UPR 3228, CNRS-INSA-UJF-UPS, BP166, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Harmand, J. C. [LPN, CNRS, route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Kubisa, M. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Zawadzki, W. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quantum Hall Effect (QHE) and Shubnikov-de Haas effect are investigated experimentally using n type modulation-doped GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wells (QWs) additionally doped in the well with beryllium acceptor atoms. It is presently shown that the localized magneto-acceptor (MA) states which possess discrete energies above the corresponding Landau levels (LLs) lead to two observable effects in magneto-transport: magnetic thaw-down and magnetic boil-off of 2D electrons. Both effects are related to the fact that electrons occupying the localized MA states cannot conduct. Thus in the thaw-down effect the electrons fall down from the MA states to the free Landau states. This leads to a shift of the Hall plateau towards higher magnetic fields as a consequence of an increase of the 2D electron density N{sub S}. In the boil-off effect the electrons are pushed from the free Landau states to the empty MA states under high enough Hall electric field. This process has an avalanche character leading to a dramatic increase of magneto-resistance, consequence of a decrease of N{sub S}.

  13. CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced, melt-water, film-boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In evaluation of severe-accident sequences for water-cooled nuclear reactors, molten core materials may be postulated to be released into the containment and accumulate on concrete. The heatup and decomposition of concrete is accompanied by the release of water vapor and carbon dioxide gases. Gases flowing through the melt upper surface can influence the rates of heat transfer to water overlying the melt. In particular, the gas flow through the interface can be envisioned to enhance the heat removal from the melt. A mechanistic model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe film-boiling heat transfer between a molten pool and an overlying coolant layer in the presence of sparging gas. The model favorably predicts the lead-Feron 11 data of Greene and Greene et al. for which the calculations indicate that area enhancement in the conduction heat transfer across the film is the predominant mechanism leading to augmentation in the heat flux as the gas velocity increases. Predictions for oxidic corium indicate a rapid increase in film-boiling heat flux as the gas velocity rises. The predominant mode of heat transfer for this case is radiation, and the increase in heat flux with gas velocity is primarily a result of interfacial area enhancement of the radiation component of the overall heat transfer coefficient. The CORQUENCH model has been incorporated into the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code{sup 6} for the analysis of transient spreading in containments.

  14. Pool boiling of R-114/oil mixtures from single tubes and tube bundles. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus was designed, fabricated, and operated for the testing of horizontal tube bundles for boiling of R-114 with various concentrations of oil. Preliminary data were taken on the top tube in the bundle, with and without the other tubes in operation. Results showed up to a 37% increase in the boiling heat-transfer coefficient as a result of the favorable bundle effect. In a separate single-tube apparatus, three enhanced tubes were tested at a saturation temperature of 2.2 C with oil mass concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 3, 6 and 10%. The tubes were: 1) a finned tube with 1024 fins per meter, 2) a finned tube with 1575 fins per meter and 3) a Turbo-B tube. These tubes resulted in enhancement ratios in pure refrigerant of 2.8, 3.8 and 5.2, respectively, at a practical heat flux of 30 kW/sq. meter. With 3% oil, these ratios were decreased to 2.6, 3.5 and 5, while with 10% oil, these ratios were further reduced to 2.6, 3.2 and 4.7, respectively. Based on these results, the use of Turbo-B tubes is expected to result in significant savings in weight and size of evaporators over the finned tubes presently in use on board some naval vessels.

  15. Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

  16. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern...

  17. A correlation for local coefficients of heat transfer in boiling of R12 and R22 refrigerants on multirow bundles of smooth tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebrov, P.N.; Bukin, V.G.; Danilova, G.N.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results on the boiling of R12 and R22 on bundles of 30 to 50 vertically stacked rows of smooth tubes are presented and correlated. Engineering equations for determining the coefficients of heat transfer in the pool boiling of freons on such multirow bundles are derived.

  18. Heavy Flavour in a Nutshell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Lambert

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Moriond QCD brings together particle physicists of varied interests. This review and introduction to heavy flavour physics is aimed at those not in the heavy-flavour field to describe the motivation and methodology of precision flavour physics, and introduce the most tantalising searches for new physics. The LHC experiments are expected to make great inroads into constraining the new physics parameter space and discover the new physics which I will argue \\emph{must} be present to describe our observed universe.

  19. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. AC-20, NO. 6, DECEMBER 1975 127 Acoustics, Stability, and Compensation in Boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwatny, Harry G.

    of steam pipe acoustics on the control of steam pressore in boiling waterreactors. A madel is developed forthe process which encompassesthe reactor vessel, the main steam piping, the bypasssystempiping in an increased steaming rate. The turbine admission valves would thenopen in responsetotheconsequent increase

  1. Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley Caldera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ). Conditions in Hot Creek can change very quickly. These fish--caught in a burst of high-temperature water" or intermittently spurting very hot, sediment-laden water as high as 6 feet (2 m) above the stream surface. At timesBoiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley

  2. Flow boiling of water in a circular staggered micro-pin fin heat sink Santosh Krishnamurthy, Yoav Peles *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    across a bank of heated tube bundles, have shown that the local two-phase heat transfer coefficient across a tube bundle and determined the void fraction, the frictional pressure drop, and the local heatFlow boiling of water in a circular staggered micro-pin fin heat sink Santosh Krishnamurthy, Yoav

  3. Operational experience with and post-irradiation examinations on boiling water reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eickelpash, N.; Mullauer, J.; Seepolt, R.W.; Spalthoff, W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control rods of the KRB-I 250-MW (electric) boiling water reactor contain Vipac B/sub 4/C powder in Type 304 stainless steel tubes as a neutron-absorbing material. Because of an increase in the reactor coolant /sup 3/H activity, defective control rods were suspected. The hot cell examination of a highly exposed control rod revealed B/sub 4/C losses. The mechanism of failure was shown to be B/sub 4/C swelling and stress corrosion cracking of the absorber tubes, followed by B/sub 4/C washout. The B/sub 4/C volume swelling is given. The tube cracking starts at 30 to 35% and the B/sub 4/C washout at 50 to 55% local /sup 10/B burnup in the tubes.

  4. Boiling water reactor control rod programming using heuristic and mathematical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayase, T.; Motoda, H.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPROD, a computer code for automatic generation of control rod programming that has successfully been applied to an older boiling water reactor (BWR), has experienced some difficulties when applied to a BWR of larger power density and stronger heterogeneity. To improve the performance, a heuristic algorithm that is derived from accumulated experience has been introduced to search for a feasible rod pattern that satisfies all constraints. Application of this algorithm to an initial cycle of an 800-MW(e) BWR of high heterogeneity has been very successful. It has been demonstrated that the proposed algorithm is capable of finding a feasible rod pattern, even starting from an all-rods-out pattern. Some improvement was also made in the method of approximation programming (MAP) algorithm. The temporal constraint relaxation method is shown to be effective in finding an optimal control rod pattern in MAP starting from a guess pattern that is not feasible.

  5. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, P.R.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

  6. Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Paul R. (Tucson, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

  7. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  8. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ce001musculus2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

  9. A phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.A.; Unal, C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling in the post-critical-heat-flux (post-CHF) regime is developed and discussed. The model was implemented in the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 computer code (an advanced best-estimate computer program written for the analysis of pressurized water reactor systems). The model was built around the determination of flow regimes downstream of the quench front. The regimes were determined from the flow-regime map suggested by Ishii and his coworkers. Heat transfer in the transition boiling region was formulated as a position-dependent model. The propagation of the CHF point was strongly dependent on the length of the transition boiling region. Wall-to-fluid film boiling heat transfer was considered to consist of two components: first, a wall-to-vapor convective heat-transfer portion and, second, a wall-to-liquid heat transfer representing near-wall effects. Each contribution was considered separately in each of the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The interfacial heat transfer was also formulated as flow-regime dependent. The interfacial drag coefficient model upstream of the CHF point was considered to be similar to flow through a roughened pipe. A free-stream contribution was calculated using Ishii's bubbly flow model for either fully developed subcooled or saturated nucleate boiling. For the drag in the smooth IAF region, a simple smooth-tube correlation for the interfacial friction factor was used. The drag coefficient for the rough-wavy IAF was formulated in the same way as for the smooth IAF model except that the roughness parameter was assumed to be proportional to liquid droplet diameter entrained from the wavy interface. The drag coefficient in the highly dispersed flow regime considered the combined effects of the liquid droplets within the channel and a liquid film on wet unheated walls. 431 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Measurement of Key Pool BOiling Parameters in nanofluids for Nuclerar Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, In C [ORNL; Buongiorno, Jdacopo [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Wang, Hsin [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofluids, colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in a base fluid such as water, can afford very significant Critical Heat Flux (CHF) enhancement. Such engineered fluids potentially could be employed in reactors as advanced coolants in safety systems with significant safety and economic advantages. However, a satisfactory explanation of the CHF enhancement mechanism in nanofluids is lacking. To close this gap, we have identified the important boiling parameters to be measured. These are the properties (e.g., density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, vaporization enthalpy, surface tension), hydrodynamic parameters (i.e., bubble size, bubble velocity, departure frequency, hot/dry spot dynamics) and surface conditions (i.e., contact angle, nucleation site density). We have also deployed a pool boiling facility in which many such parameters can be measured. The facility is equipped with a thin indium-tin-oxide heater deposited over a sapphire substrate. An infra-red high-speed camera and an optical probe are used to measure the temperature distribution on the heater and the hydrodynamics above the heater, respectively. The first data generated with this facility already provide some clue on the CHF enhancement mechanism in nanofluids. Specifically, the progression to burnout in a pure fluid (ethanol in this case) is characterized by a smoothly-shaped and steadily-expanding hot spot. By contrast, in the ethanol-based nanofluid the hot spot pulsates and the progression to burnout lasts longer, although the nanofluid CHF is higher than the pure fluid CHF. The presence of a nanoparticle deposition layer on the heater surface seems to enhance wettability and aid hot spot dissipation, thus delaying burnout.

  11. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised.

  12. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

  13. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6 AEC001: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  14. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 AEC001: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

  15. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, Dennis

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

  17. Heavy flavour production at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Grelli; Andre Mischke

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will open a new era in high energy physics. The expected large cross section for heavy flavour production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV will allow detailed studies of the production mechanisms and an extensive test of Quantum Chromodynamics. Since charm and beauty has been proposed as a good probe to study hot and dense QCD matter, the understanding of the production mechanisms in elementary proton-proton collisions is of primary importance as a reference for studies in heavy-ion collisions. In the early phase of LHC operation the experiments will focus on the investigation of the heavy flavour production mechanisms.

  18. Method of producing a colloidal fuel from coal and a heavy petroleum fraction. [partial liquefaction of coal in slurry, filtration and gasification of residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longanbach, J.R.

    1981-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for combining coal as a colloidal suspension within a heavy petroleum fraction. The coal is broken to a medium particle size and is formed into a slurry with a heavy petroleum fraction such as a decanted oil having a boiling point of about 300 to 550/sup 0/C. The slurry is heated to a temperature of 400 to 500/sup 0/C for a limited time of only about 1 to 5 minutes before cooling to a temperature of less than 300/sup 0/C. During this limited contact time at elevated temperature the slurry can be contacted with hydrogen gas to promote conversion. The liquid phase containing dispersed coal solids is filtered from the residual solids and recovered for use as a fuel or feed stock for other processes. The residual solids containing some carbonaceous material are further processed to provide hydrogen gas and heat for use as required in this process.

  19. Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R. F.; O'Rear, D. J.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of SRC-II naphtha, middle distillate, and heavy distillate were received and analyzed. These samples are part of a planned study of the potential biological hazards of synthetic crudes. These oils will be hydrotreated when DOE provides blending instructions. Five drums of EDS syncrude made from Big Brown Texas lignite were received and analyzed. The boiling range and other properties of this syncrude are very similar to the properties of the previously studied H-Coal and SRC-II syncrudes. The hydrotreating severities, which were employed to upgrade the H-Coal and SRC-II syncrudes to transportation fuels, are expected to be close to the severities needed for the EDS syncrude.

  20. Pionic Fusion of Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Horn; G. C. Ball; D. R. Bowman; W. G. Davies; D. Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; A. C. Hayes; G. Savard; L. Beaulieu; Y. Larochelle; C. St-Pierre

    1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first experimental observation of the pionic fusion of two heavy ions. The 12C(12C,24Mg)pi0 and 12C(12C,24Na)pi+ cross sections have been measured to be 208 +/- 38 and 182 +/- 84 picobarns, respectively, at E_cm = 137 MeV. This cross section for heavy-ion pion production, at an energy just 6 MeV above the absolute energy-conservation limit, constrains possible production mechanisms to incorporate the kinetic energy of the entire projectile-target system as well as the binding energy gained in fusion.

  1. Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy J. Glauber

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

  2. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  3. Heavy quark physics from LEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dornan, P.J. [Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of some of the latest results on heavy flavor physics from the LEP Collaborations is presented. The emphasis is on B physics, particularly new results and those where discrepancies is given of the many techniques which have been developed to permit these analyses.

  4. DIESEL/HEAVY The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    DIESEL/HEAVY EQUIPMENT The diesel/heavy equipment certificate offers training in maintenance and repair of heavy equipment and trucks. Students will learn to work on electrical and air systems, diesel · Small Engines · Automotive Maintenance · Welding · Training for entry level heavy diesel equipment

  5. Synchronized High-Speed Video, Infrared Thermometry, and Particle Image Velocimetry Data for Validation of Interface-Tracking Simulations of Nucleate Boiling Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Xiaoman

    Nucleation, growth, and detachment of steam bubbles during nucleate boiling of a water pool at atmospheric pressure is experimentally investigated using a combination of synchronized high-speed video, infrared thermography, ...

  6. The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugrue, Rosemary M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

  7. An investigation of the physical and numerical foundations of two-fluid representation of sodium boiling with applications to LMFBR experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No, Hee Cheon

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work involves the development of physical models for the constitutive relations of a two-fuid, three-dimensional sodium boiling code, THERMIT-6S. The code is equipped with a fluid conduction model, a fuel pin model, ...

  8. Investigation of the pool boiling heat transfer enhancement of nano-engineered fluids by means of high-speed infrared thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig Douglas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-speed video and infrared thermography based technique has been used to obtain detailed and fundamental time- and space-resolved information on pool boiling heat transfer. The work is enabled by recent advances in ...

  9. Boiling heat transfer with three fluids in small circular and rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, T.N.; Wambsganss, M.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); France, D.M. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small circular and noncircular channels are representative of flow passages act evaporators and condensers. This report describes results of an ental study on heat transfer to the flow boiling of refrigerants (R-12) and refrigerant-134a (R-134a) in a small horizontal circular-cross-section tube. The tube diameter of 2.46 mm was chosen to approximate the hydraulic diameter of a 4.06 {times} 1.70 mm rectangular channel previously studied with R-12, and a 2.92-mm-diameter circular tube previously studied with R-113. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of channel geometry and fluid properties on the heat transfer coefficient and to obtain additional insights relative to the heat transfer mechanism(s). The current circular flow channel for the R-12 and R-134a tests was made of brass and had an overall length of 0.9 in. The channel wall was electrically heated, and thermocouples were installed on the channel wall and in the bulk fluid stream. Voltage taps were located at the same axial locations as the stream thermocouples to allow testing over an exit quality range to 0.94 and a large range of mass flux (58 to 832 kg/m{sup 2}s) and heat flux (3.6 to 59 kW/m{sup 2}). Saturation pressure was nearly constant, averaging 0.82 MPa for most of the testing, with some tests performed at a lower pressure of 0.4--0.5 MPa. Local heat transfer coefficients were determined experimentally as a function of quality along the length of the test section. Analysis of all data for three tubes and three fluids supported the conclusion that a nucleation mechanism dominates for flow boiling in small channels. Nevertheless, a convection-dominant region was obtained experimentally in this study at very low values of wall superheat (< {approx} 2.75{degrees}C). The circular and rectangular tube data for three fluids were successfully correlated in the nucleation-dominant region.

  10. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are similar to those obtained with the traditional UO2 nuclear fuel.

  11. 3, 37453768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 3, 3745­3768, 2003 Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract/3745/ © European Geosciences Union 2003 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Heavy hydrogen Heavy hydrogen in the stratosphere T. R¨ockmann et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  12. Light-Quark Decays in Heavy Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faller, Sven

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider weak decays of heavy hadrons (bottom and charmed) where the heavy quark acts as a spectator. Theses decays are heavily phase-space suppressed but may become experimentally accessible in the near future. These decays are interesting as a QCD laboratory to study the behaviour of the light quarks in the colour-background field of the heavy spectator.

  13. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

  14. Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  15. Hydrotreating Uinta Basin bitumen-derived heavy oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longstaff, D.C.; Balaji, G.V.; Kim, J.W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy oils derived from Uinta Basin bitumens have been hydrotreated under varying conditions. The process variables investigated included total reactor pressure (11.0-16.9 MPa), reactor temperature (616-711 K), feed rate (0.29-1.38 WHSV), and catalyst composition. The extent of heteroatom removal and residuum conversion were determined by the feed molecular weight and catalyst selection. Catalytic activity for heteroatom conversion removal was primarily influenced by metal loading. The heteroatom removal activity of the catalysts studied were ranked HDN catalysts > HDM catalysts > HDN-support. Catalytic activity for residuum conversion was influenced by both metal loading and catalyst surface area. The residuum conversion activity of HDN catalysts were always higher than the activity of HDM catalysts and HDN supports. The residuum conversion activity of HDN-supports surpassed the activity of HDM catalyst at higher temperatures. The conversions achieved with HDN catalysts relative to the HDM catalysts indicated that the low metals contents of the Uinta Basin bitumens obviate the need for hydrodemetallation as an initial upgrading step with these bitumens. The upgrading of Uinta Basin bitumens for integration into refinery feed slates should emphasize molecular weight and boiling range reduction first, followed by hydrotreating of the total liquid product produced in the pyrolysis process. Kinetics of residuum conversion can be modeled by invoking a consecutive-parallel mechanism in which native residuum in the feed is rapidly converted to volatile products and to product residuum. Deep conversion of residuum is only achieved when the more refractory product residuum is converted to volatile products.

  16. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  17. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

  18. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

  19. Operational experience with and postirradiation examinations on boiling water reactor control rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eickelpasch, N.; Seepolt, R.W.; Muellauer, J.; Spalthoff, W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control rods of the KRBI-I 250-MW(electric) boiling water reactor contain Vipac B/sub 4/C powder in Type 304 stainless steel tubes as a neutron-absorbing material. Because of an increase in the reactor coolant /sup 3/H activity, defective control rods were suspected. The hot cell examination of a highly exposed control rod revealed B/sub 4/C losses. The mechanism of failure was shown to be B/sub 4/C swelling and stress corrosion cracking of the absorber tubes, followed by B/sub 4/C washout. The B/sub 4/C volume swelling is ..delta..V(%) = 0.851x + 0.0449x/sup 2/ (x = /sup 10/B decays in 10/sup 21/(n,..cap alpha..)/cm/sup 3/). The tube cracking starts at 30 to 35% and the B/sub 4/C washout at 50 to 55% local /sup 10/B burnup in the tubes.

  20. Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in pressure tube graphite-moderated boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiklauri, G.; Schmitt, B.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermally induced two-phase instabilities in non-uniformly heated boiling charmers in RBMK-1000 reactor have been analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The RELAP5 model of a RBMK-1000 reactor was developed to investigate low flow in a distribution group header (DGH) supplying 44 fuel pressure tubes. The model was evaluated against experimental data. The results of the calculations indicate that the period of oscillation for the high power tube varied from 3.1s to 2.6s, over the power range of 2.0 MW to 3.0 MW, respectively. The amplitude of the flow oscillation for the high powered tube varied from +100% to {minus}150% of the tube average flow. Reverse flow did not occur in the lower power tubes. The amplitude of oscillation in the subcooled region at the inlet to the fuel region is higher than in the saturated region at the outlet. In the upper fuel region and outlet connectors the flow oscillations are dissipated. The threshold of flow instability for the high powered tubes of a RBMK reactor is compared to Japanese data and appears to be in good agreement.

  2. Wavelet-Based Method for Instability Analysis in Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto; Prieto-Guerrero, Alfonso; Nunez-Carrera, Alejandro; Amador-Garcia, Rodolfo

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a wavelet-based method to analyze instability events in a boiling water reactor (BWR) during transient phenomena. The methodology to analyze BWR signals includes the following: (a) the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) analysis, (b) decomposition using the continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and (c) application of multiresolution analysis (MRA) using discrete wavelet transform (DWT). STFT analysis permits the study, in time, of the spectral content of analyzed signals. The CWT provides information about ruptures, discontinuities, and fractal behavior. To detect these important features in the signal, a mother wavelet has to be chosen and applied at several scales to obtain optimum results. MRA allows fast implementation of the DWT. Features like important frequencies, discontinuities, and transients can be detected with analysis at different levels of detail coefficients. The STFT was used to provide a comparison between a classic method and the wavelet-based method. The damping ratio, which is an important stability parameter, was calculated as a function of time. The transient behavior can be detected by analyzing the maximum contained in detail coefficients at different levels in the signal decomposition. This method allows analysis of both stationary signals and highly nonstationary signals in the timescale plane. This methodology has been tested with the benchmark power instability event of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (NPP) Unit 1, which is a BWR-5 NPP.

  3. Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

  4. The Neutronics Design and Analysis of a 200-MW(electric) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinkler, Daniel R.; Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was designed and analyzed under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. The compact size of a 200-MW(electric) reactor makes it attractive for countries with a less well developed engineering infrastructure, as well as for developed countries seeking to tailor generation capacity more closely to the growth of their electricity demand. The 200-MW(electric) core design reported here is based on the 600-MW(electric) General Electric SBWR core, which was first analyzed in the work performed here in order to qualify the computer codes used in the analysis. Cross sections for the 8 x 8 fuel assembly design were generated with the HELIOS lattice physics code, and core simulation was performed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes RELAP5/PARCS. In order to predict the critical heat flux, the Hench-Gillis correlation was implemented in the RELAP5 code. An equilibrium cycle was designed for the 200-MW(electric) core, which provided a cycle length of more than 2 yr and satisfied the minimum critical power ratio throughout the core life.

  5. Metallurgical failure analysis of a propane tank boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, Alice C.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall; Susan, Donald Francis

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A severe fire and explosion occurred at a propane storage yard in Truth or Consequences, N.M., when a truck ran into the pumping and plumbing system beneath a large propane tank. The storage tank emptied when the liquid-phase excess flow valve tore out of the tank. The ensuing fire engulfed several propane delivery trucks, causing one of them to explode. A series of elevated-temperature stress-rupture tears developed along the top of a 9800 L (2600 gal) truck-mounted tank as it was heated by the fire. Unstable fracture then occurred suddenly along the length of the tank and around both end caps, along the girth welds connecting the end caps to the center portion of the tank. The remaining contents of the tank were suddenly released, aerosolized, and combusted, creating a powerful boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE). Based on metallography of the tank pieces, the approximate tank temperature at the onset of the BLEVE was determined. Metallurgical analysis of the ruptured tank also permitted several hypotheses regarding BLEVE mechanisms to be evaluated. Suggestions are made for additional work that could provide improved predictive capabilities regarding BLEVEs and for methods to decrease the susceptibility of propane tanks to BLEVEs.

  6. FORMOSA-B: A Boiling Water Reactor In-Core Fuel Management Optimization Package II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, Atul A.; Turinsky, Paul J. [North Carolina State University (United States)

    2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the continuing development of the boiling water reactor in-core fuel management optimization code FORMOSA-B, the fidelity of the core simulator has been improved and a control rod pattern (CRP) sampling capability has been added. The robustness of the core simulator is first demonstrated by benchmarking against core load-follow depletion predictions of both SIMULATE-3 and MICROBURN-B2 codes. The CRP sampling capability, based on heuristic rules, is next successfully tested on a fixed fuel loading pattern (LP) to yield a feasible CRP that removes the thermal margin and critical flow constraint violations. Its performance in facilitating a spectral shift flow operation is also demonstrated, and then its significant influence on the cost of thermal margin is presented. Finally, the heuristic CRP sampling capability is coupled with the stochastic LP optimization capability in FORMOSA-B - based on simulated annealing (SA) - to solve the combined CRP-LP optimization problem. Effectiveness of the sampling in improving the efficiency of the SA adaptive algorithm is shown by comparing the results to those obtained with the sampling turned off (i.e., only LP optimization is carried out for the fixed reference CRP). The results presented clearly indicate the successful implementation of the CRP sampling algorithm and demonstrate FORMOSA-B's enhanced optimization features, which facilitate the code's usage for broader optimization studies.

  7. Protective coatings for radiation control in boiling water nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, T.V.; Vook, R.W.; Meyer, W.; Wittwer, C.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless-steel surfaces (316 nuclear grade) develop /sup 60/Co-embedded oxide scales when exposed to a boiling water reactor (BWR) environment. Thin films such as Pd, Ni, Au, and Cr were found to drastically reduce the radioactive buildup. The films were prepared by vacuum evaporation and electroless deposition. The electroless coating consisted of a thin cathodically treated layer, followed by a nickel strike (--1 ..mu..m) and an electroless layer (--600 A). The present paper describes the results obtained from a transmission electron microscope replica study of the radioactive growths that formed on uncoated and thin-film-coated stainless-steel rods. The coated rods, when exposed to a simulated BWR environment, exhibited corrosion film growths ranging from large faceted grains (uncoated) and isolated islands of similar crystallites (Au coated) to extremely small nucleated growths (Pd, Ni coated). Also, it was found that chromium oxide films, which generally form a protective oxide on stainless steel, do not completely stop either the corrosion film growth or the associated radioactive buildup. The morphologies of the corrosion film growth were correlated with the relative /sup 60/Co activity, and the substrate topography. The best coating to date was found to be a Pd thin film, 1000 A thick, which reduced the radioactive buildup by a factor of --13.

  8. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONSII. HEAVY

  9. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  10. Factors influencing the precoat filtration of boiling water reactor water streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermansson, H.P. (Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Persson, G. (Forsmark Nuclear Power Plant, Oesthammar (Sweden)); Reinvall, A. (Industrial Power Co. Ltd., Olkiluoto (Finland))

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of studies on precoat filtration were carried out on condensate and preheater drains in the Swedish and Finnish boiling water reactors (BWRs). The goal was to increase knowledge about the precoat filtration process and to find physical and chemical means to improve the performance of the precoat filters in the condensate polishing plants. To achieve this goal a number of parameters, such as type of resin, bed depth, pH, oxygen and organic contaminant concentrations (measured total organic carbon), and corrosion product particle characteristics, were selected for the study. The work was mainly carried out in the power plants using an experimental facility fed with on-line sampled condensates and drains taken from the plant sampling lines. The main results are that there is a varying influence on precoat filtration from all the aforementioned parameters. The oxygen concentration, the concentration of organic contaminants, and the type of corrosion products are, however, the factors that have the strongest influence within the parameter ranges that are representative for BWR operation. The results are rather similar when the different units are compared. There are, however, some differences that could be mainly attributed to deviations in operation parameters and the subsequent differences in the corrosion product spectra. The mechanism for precoat filtration of corrosion products in BWR condensate is complex. The filtration behavior is to a large extent governed by competition between depth filtration and electrostatic interactions. During the early stages of the filtration cycle, electrostatic interaction is of great importance, whereas depth filtration becomes more important with increasing operating time. Rapid pressure drop buildup rates have been demonstrated to be caused by the presence of amorphous corrosion products. An effect from the presence of organic contaminants has been found, although this should be of little significance.

  11. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

  12. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm lithium metaborate solution respectively at the saturation temperature for 1000 psi (68.9 bar) coolant pressure. Boiling tests also revealed the formation of fine deposits of boron and lithium on the cladding surface which degraded the heat transfer rates. The boron and lithium metaborate precipitates after a 5 day test at 5000 ppm concentration and 1000 psi (68.9 bar) operating pressure reduced the heat transfer rate 21% and 30%, respectively for the two solutions.

  13. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ace01musculus.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

  14. Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out...

  15. Factorization for hadronic heavy quarkonium production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review several models of heavy quarkonium production in hadronic collisions, and discuss the status of QCD factorization for these production models.

  16. Heavy flavor production in the STAR experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Trzeciak; for the STAR Collaboration

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, recent STAR heavy flavor measurements in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions are highlighted. We report studies of open charm mesons, reconstructed directly from hadronic decay products, and studies of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons. We also present J/$\\psi$ measurements via the di-electron decay channel at various collision systems and energies. In Au+Au collisions the energy dependence of J/$\\psi$ production measured at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV is shown. Finally, prospects of heavy flavor measurements with the STAR detector upgrades are discussed.

  17. Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a future in which vehicle automation technologies are ableto support the heavy vehicle automation including PrecisionCommittee on Vehicle-Highway Automation, and the attendees

  18. Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Guo, Feng-Kun; /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.; Hanhart, Christoph; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

  19. Heavy Ions - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNot Logged3 HanfordHarry S.Heat PumpsHeavy

  20. SECTION II. HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F O INTERACTIONSII. HEAVY ION

  1. Heavy Actinides | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat Transfer inoperation in timeHeavy

  2. Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project of accounting for real-world driving performance within heavy truck analyses. The Program is being led by Oak to collect 104 channels of information at 100Hz. Another industry partner, Michelin Tires, was interested

  3. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , describes R&D needs for heavy-ion accelerator, target and chamber R&D. 44 pages. Defines goals and criteria tasks) - ion accelerator technologies - chamber and maintenance technologies - pulsed power technologiesThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan

  4. Heavy-Ion Fusion Mechanism And Predictions Of Super-Heavy Elements Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Heavy-Ion Fusion Mechanism And Predictions Of Super-Heavy Elements Production Yasuhisa Abea University, Omsk, RU-644077, Russia Abstract. Fusion process is shown to firstly form largely deformed mono-ion Fusion; Fusion hindrance; Super-heavy elements; Cross section. PACS: 25.70, Jj, 25.70. Lm, 27.90. +b

  5. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energy’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs program’s VUQ Focus Area.

  6. Heavy quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Bishai

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy quark production cross-sections, correlations and polarizations have been measured at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) using 118 pb{sup -1} of data collected from the 1992 to 1995 Run I of the Fermilab Tevatron. There is still disagreement between theoretical predictions of bottom and charm hadro-production cross-sections and the Run I results. The observed transverse momentum spectrum of the prompt J/{psi} production polarization is still not understood. Run II of the Tevatron began in July of 2001 and the CDF Run II detector [11] has collected 70 pb{sup -1} of physics quality data since January 2002. Large statistics of onia states have been collected. Exclusive B meson decay modes have been reconstructed and the SVT level 2 displaced track trigger has produced large samples of D mesons. The prompt charm and b {yields} cX fractions in both charmonium and D meson samples have been measured. Run II is now poised to greatly enhance the knowledge of heavy quark production dynamics well beyond the reach of the Run I detector.

  7. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Borissov

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the $p \\bar p$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy $b$- and $c$-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays $B^0, B^0_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in $B_s \\to J\\psi \\phi$ decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the $B_s \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  8. Catalytic multi-stage process for hydroconversion and refining hydrocarbon feeds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA); Lee, Lap-Keung (Cranbury, NJ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-stage catalytic hydrogenation and hydroconversion process for heavy hydrocarbon feed materials such as coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and plastic waste materials. In the process, the feedstock is reacted in a first-stage, back-mixed catalytic reactor with a highly dispersed iron-based catalyst having a powder, gel or liquid form. The reactor effluent is pressure-reduced, vapors and light distillate fractions are removed overhead, and the heavier liquid fraction is fed to a second stage back-mixed catalytic reactor. The first and second stage catalytic reactors are operated at 700-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure and 20-80 lb./hr per ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The vapor and light distillates liquid fractions removed from both the first and second stage reactor effluent streams are combined and passed to an in-line, fixed-bed catalytic hydrotreater for heteroatom removal and for producing high quality naphtha and mid-distillate or a full-range distillate product. The remaining separator bottoms liquid fractions are distilled at successive atmospheric and vacuum pressures, low and intermediate-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products are withdrawn, and heavier distillate fractions are recycled and further upgraded to provide additional low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products. This catalytic multistage hydrogenation process provides improved flexibility for hydroprocessing the various carbonaceous feedstocks and adjusting to desired product structures and for improved economy of operations.

  9. Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Wednesday, 27 September 2006 00:00 Heavy-fermion systems are...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion &...

  11. Simulation of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion W. M.et al. , “Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion,”et al. , "Chamber Transport of `Foot' Pulses for Heavy-Ion

  12. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  13. Relativistic heavy ion research. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP).

  14. Heavy ion, recirculating linac, design optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, D.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Godlove, T.F. (FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax Station, VA (United States))

    1991-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost optimization is important to the development of high-current, heavy-ion accelerators for power production based on inertial confinement fusion. Two heavy-ion, recirculating linac configurations are examined that eliminate the necessity to provide reset pulses for the cores used in the linac induction accelerating modules. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  16. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  17. Dispersed-flow film boiling in rod-bundle geometry: steady-state heat-transfer data and correlation comparisons. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, G. L.; Morris, D. G.; Mullins, C. B.; Ott, L. J.; Reed, D. A.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of six film boiling correlations and one single-phase vapor correlation has been made using data from 22 steady state upflow rod bundle tests (series 3.07.9). Bundle fluid conditions were calculated using energy and mass conservation considerations. Results of the steady state film boiling tests support the conclusions reached in the analysis of prior transient tests 3.03.6AR, 3.06.6B, and 3.08.6C. Comparisons between experimentally determined and correlation-predicted heat transfer coefficients, are presented.

  18. Heavy photon search experiment at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanyan, S. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Collaboration: HPS Collaboration

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab will search for new heavy vector boson(s), aka 'heavy photons', in the mass range of 20 MeV/c{sup 2} to 1000 MeV/c{sup 2} using the scattering of high energy, high intensity electron beams off a high Z target. The proposed measurements will cover the region of parameter space favored by the muon g-2 anomaly, and will explore a significant region of parameter space, not only at large couplings (??/? > 10{sup ?7}), but also in the regions of small couplings, down to ??/??10{sup ?10}. The excellent vertexing capability of the Si-tracker uniquely enables HPS to cover the small coupling region. Also, HPS will search for heavy photons in an alternative to the e{sup +}e{sup ?} decay mode, in the heavy photon's decay to ?{sup +}??.

  19. 0-7803-XXXX-X/06/$20.00 2009 IEEE 25th IEEE SEMI-THERM Symposium Sub-Atmospheric Pressure Pool Boiling of Water on a Screen-Laminate Enhanced Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirtz, Richard A.

    structures having wide ranging porosity and pore size. When deployed as a surface enhancement in a boiling pool-boiling experiments at one atmosphere and sub-atmospheric pressure assess the utility of fine factor of lamination [dimensionless] CHF = critical heat flux [W/cm2 ] Dh = pore hydraulic diameter [µm

  20. Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron-State Hybridization in Heavy-Fermion Systems Print Heavy-fermion systems are characterized by electrons with extremely large effective masses. The corresponding...

  1. Long Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralizing plasma column the heavy ion beam can focus to aPlasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  3. NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation This report provides the results of an...

  4. Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Poster presentation at the...

  5. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological...

  6. Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Presentation...

  7. Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ALTERNATIVE. EVERY Advanced Natural Gas Engine Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Dr. Mostafa M Kamel Dr. Mostafa M...

  8. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for...

  9. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission...

  10. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  11. Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles with Control Technologies for Reduced Diesel Exhaust Emissions Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty...

  12. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  13. Heavy quark physics from SLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers preliminary measurements from SLD on heavy quark production at the Z{sup 0}, using 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays accumulated during the 1993-1995 runs. A measurement of R{sub b} with a lifetime double tag is presented. The high electron beam polarization of the SLC is employed in the direct measurement of the parity-violating parameters A{sub b} and A{sub c} by use of the left-right forward-backward asymmetry. The lifetimes of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons have been measured by two analyses. The first identifies semileptonic decays of B mesons with high (p,p{sub t}) leptons; the second analysis isolates a sample of B meson decays with a two-dimensional impact parameter tag and reconstructs the decay length and charge using a topological vertex reconstruction method.

  14. Collisional energy loss of heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Meistrenko; Andre Peshier; Jan Uphoff; Carsten Greiner

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a transport approach for heavy quarks in a quark-gluon plasma, which is based on improved binary collision rates taking into account quantum statistics, the running of the QCD coupling and an effective screening mass adjusted to hard-thermal loop calculations. We quantify the effects of in-medium collisions by calculating the heavy flavor nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow for RHIC energies, which are comparable to radiative effects. We also derive an analytic formula for the mean collisional energy loss of an energetic heavy quark in a streaming quark gluon plasma.

  15. PII S0016-7037(99)00441-X Sub sea floor boiling of Red Sea Brines: New indication from noble gas data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    PII S0016-7037(99)00441-X Sub sea floor boiling of Red Sea Brines: New indication from noble gas in revised form December 8, 1999) Abstract--Hydrothermal brines from the Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea, have been depressions filled by highly saline brines (Hartmann et al., 1998a). The Atlantis II Deep, located

  16. Flow boiling enhancement on a horizontal heater using carbon nanotube coatings N. Singh, V. Sathyamurthy, W. Peterson, J. Arendt, D. Banerjee *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    with embedded cartridge heaters and K-type thermocouples. De-ion- ized (DI) water was used as the test fluidFlow boiling enhancement on a horizontal heater using carbon nanotube coatings N. Singh, V flux on a horizontal heater that is heated from below. The horizontal heater consists of either a bare

  17. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  18. Heat transfer enhancement in single-phase forced convection with blockages and in two-phase pool boiling with nano-structured surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hee Seok

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    boiling on nano-structured surfaces. Experiments were conducted with three horizontal silicon surfaces, two of which were coated with vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with heights of 9 and 25 �¹m, respectively, and diameters...

  19. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai, PIN-400094 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  20. Results and phenomena observed from the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.; Fryer, C.P.; Walker, J.V.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment, one of a series of tests performed as part of the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program, and carried out at Sandia National Laboratories, addressed the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered loss of coolant accident. The DF-4 test is described in some detail herein and results from the experiment are presented. Significant results from prior experiments in the series are also summarized. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B/sub 4/C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. This early melt and relocation phenomena could significantly influence the progression of meltdown in BWRs and should be considered in SFD accident analyses. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  2. Summary and bibliography of safety-related events at boiling-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormack, K.E.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a bibliography that contains 100-word abstracts of event reports submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at boiling-water-reactor nuclear power plants in 1980. The 1547 abstracts included on microfiche in this bibliography describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies that were experienced at the facilities. These abstracts are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Full-size keyword and permuted-title indexes to facilitate location of individual abstracts are provided following the text. Tables that summarize the information contained in the bibliography are also provided. The information in the tables includes a listing of the equipment items involved in the reported events and the associated number of reports for each item. Similar information is given for the various kinds of instrumentation and systems, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction).

  3. New flow boiling heat transfer correlation for CFC-114 and C{sub 4}F{sub 10}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szady, A.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Technology Div.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow boiling tests being conducted at Cudo Technologies, Ltd. in Lexington, Kentucky are a part of The GDP Coolant Replacement Project. The tests are to be done with two alternates, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, as well as CFC-114. So far, tests were conducted with CFC-114 and C{sub 4}F{sub 10}. The CFC-114 data by Cudo shows better heat transfer performance than that predicted by the codes used in the numerical model which were based on a superposition model. The data was applied to an asymptotic model developed by Steiner and Taborek. The new correlation developed seems to fit better with the Cudo data as well as the Paducah cell test data. The model will be further investigated when C{sub 4}F{sub 8} data is available.

  4. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -heavy oil, and oil shale. Tremendous amounts of heavy oil resources are available in the world. Fig. 1.1 shows the total world oil reserves, and indicates that heavy oil, extra heavy oil, and bitumen make up about 70% of the world?s total oil resources...

  5. Magnetic fluctuations and heavy electron superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic fluctuation self-energy based on neutron scattering data is used to calculate mass renormalizations, and superconducting critical temperatures and order parameters, for various heavy electron metals.

  6. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  7. Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a covariant coalescence model, we study hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from both soft partons in the quark-gluon plasma and hard partons in minijets. Including transverse flow of soft partons and independent...

  8. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    progress with more modest near-term budgets. #12;Slide 5 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National requirement: modest growth of HIFS-VNL budget from present 7.7 M$/yr to ~16M$/yr, including suppo

  9. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Oeschler; Hans Georg Ritter; Nu Xu

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review hadron production in heavy ion collisions with emphasis on pion and kaon production at energies below 2 AGeV and on partonic collectivity at RHIC energies.

  10. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Structure and Heavy-Ton Fusion* A series of lecturesthe cross section for fusion in the experiments consideredEffects g in III. Subharrier Fusion Cross Sections for Light

  11. HEAVY-ION IMAGING APPLIED TO MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy particles rat h er than the vax~at1.on 1n t h e x-rayprograms on the a PDPll-34 and VAX- 780 computers. The image

  12. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    line- of-sight damage from target debris, neutron and gamma radiation. · Target injection: Heavy ions-liquid-protected target chambers with 30 yr lifetimes. · Robust final optics: Focusing magnets for ion beams avoid direct

  13. Heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside a 7 mm straight smooth tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Haitao; Ding, Guoliang; Wei, Wenjian; Wang, Zhence [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Kaijian [Fujitsu General Institute of Air-Conditioning Technology Limited, Kawasaki 213-8502 (Japan)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-phase flow patterns and heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside a straight smooth tube with the outside diameter of 7.0 mm were investigated experimentally. The experimental conditions include the evaporation temperature of 5 C, the mass flux from 200 to 400 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, the heat flux from 7.56 to 15.12 kW m{sup -2}, the inlet vapor quality from 0.2 to 0.7, nominal oil concentration from 0% to 5%. The test results show that the heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture increases with mass flux of refrigerant-oil mixture; the presence of oil enhances the heat transfer at the range of low and intermediate vapor qualities; there is a peak of local heat transfer coefficient at about 2-4% nominal oil concentration at higher vapor qualities, and the peak shifts to lower nominal oil concentration with the increasing of vapor qualities; higher nominal oil concentration gives more detrimental effect at high vapor qualities. The flow pattern map of R410A-oil mixture was developed based on refrigerant-oil mixture properties, and the observed flow patterns match well with the flow pattern map. New correlation to predict the local heat transfer of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside the straight smooth tube was developed based on flow patterns and local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture, and it agrees with 90% of the experiment data within the deviation of {+-}25%. (author)

  14. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  15. ? Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Zhou; Nu Xu; Pengfei Zhuang

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the {\\Upsilon} production in heavy ion collisions at LHC energy in the frame of a dynamical transport approach. Both the initial production and in-medium regeneration and both the cold and hot nuclear matter effects are included in the calculations. In comparison with the ground state {\\Upsilon}(1s), the excited state {\\Upsilon}(2s) is much more sensitive to the heavy quark potential at finite temperature.

  16. Probing the Symmetry Energy with Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; Y. Zhang; P. Danielewicz; M. Famiano; Z. Li; A. W. Steiner

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraints on the EoS for symmetric matter (equal neutron and proton numbers) at supra-saturation densities have been extracted from energetic collisions of heavy ions. Collisions of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich heavy ions now provide initial constraints on the EoS of neutron-rich matter at sub-saturation densities. Comparisons are made to other available constraints.

  17. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  18. Definition of heavy oil and natural bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Definition and categorization of heavy oils and natural bitumens are generally based on physical or chemical attributes or on methods of extraction. Ultimately, the hydrocarbon's chemical composition will govern both its physical state and the extraction technique applicable. These oils and bitumens closely resemble the residuum from wholecrude distillation to about 1,000/degree/F; if the residuum constitutes at least 15% of the crude, it is considered to be heavy. In this material is concentrated most of the trace elements, such as sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen, and metals, such as nickel and vanadium. A widely used definition separates heavy oil from natural bitumen by viscosity, crude oil being less, and bitumen more viscous than 10,000 cp. Heavy crude then falls in the range 10/degree/-20/degree/ API inclusive and extra-heavy oil less than 10/degree/ API. Most natural bitumen is natural asphalt (tar sands, oil sands) and has been defined as rock containing hydrocarbons more viscous than 10,000 cp or else hydrocarbons that may be extracted from mined or quarried rock. Other natural bitumens are solids, such as gilsonite, grahamite, and ozokerite, which are distinguished by streak, fusibility, and solubility. The upper limit for heavy oil may also be set at 18/degree/ API, the approximate limit for recovery by waterflood.

  19. Energy loss, hadronization and hadronic interactions of heavy flavors in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Shanshan; Bass, Steffen A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a theoretical framework to describe the evolution of heavy flavors produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The in-medium energy loss of heavy quarks is described using our modified Langevin equation that incorporates both quasi-elastic scatterings and the medium-induced gluon radiation. The space-time profiles of the fireball is described by a (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics simulation. A hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence is utilized for heavy quark hadronization, after which the produced heavy mesons together with the soft hadrons produced from the bulk QGP are fed into the hadron cascade UrQMD model to simulate the subsequent hadronic interactions. We find that the medium-induced gluon radiation contributes significantly to heavy quark energy loss at high $p_\\mathrm{T}$; heavy-light quark coalescence enhances heavy meson production at intermediate $p_\\mathrm{T}$; and scatterings inside the hadron gas further suppress the $D$ meson $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ at large $p_\\mathrm{T}$ and e...

  20. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  1. I. Bloch, DESY/Hamburg University -CIPANP, Puerto Rico 30.5.-03.06.'06 1Heavy Quarks at HERA Heavy Quark ProductionHeavy Quark Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bloch, DESY/Hamburg University - CIPANP, Puerto Rico 30.5.-03.06.'06 1Heavy Quarks at HERA Heavy, Puerto Rico 30.5.-03.06.'06 2Heavy Quarks at HERA HERA: ep collisions within H1 & ZEUS 920 GeV protons920/Hamburg University - CIPANP, Puerto Rico 30.5.-03.06.'06 3Heavy Quarks at HERA H1&ZEUS integrated Luminosity: 96

  2. Heavy flavours in heavy-ion collisions: quenching, flow and correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Beraudo; A. De Pace; M. Monteno; M. Nardi; F. Prino

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the quenching, elliptic flow and azimuthal correlations of heavy flavour particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained through the POWLANG transport setup, developed in the past to study the propagation of heavy quarks in the Quark-Gluon Plasma and here extended to include a modeling of their hadronization in the presence of a medium. Hadronization is described as occurring via the fragmentation of strings with endpoints given by the heavy (anti-)quark Q(Qbar) and a thermal parton qbar(q) from the medium. The flow of the light quarks is shown to affect significantly the R_AA and v_2 of the final D mesons, leading to a better agreement with the experimental data. The approach allows also predictions for the angular correlation between heavy-flavour hadrons (or their decay electrons) and the charged particles produced in the fragmentation of the heavy-quark strings.

  3. Elliptic flow and energy loss of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Greiner, Carsten [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Xu, Zhe [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-time propagation of heavy quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is studied within the partonic transport model Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings (BAMPS). In this model heavy quarks interact with the partonic medium via binary scatterings. The cross sections for these interactions are calculated with leading-order perturbative QCD, but feature a more precise Debye screening derived within the hard thermal loop approximation and obey the running of the coupling. Within this framework the elliptic flow and the nuclear modification factor of heavy quarks are computed for the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies and compared to available experimental data. It is found that binary scatterings alone cannot reproduce the data and therefore radiative corrections have to be taken into account.

  4. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralization on heavy-ion fusion chamber transport,” totechniques for heavy ion fusion chamber transport,” Nucl.liquid heavy-ion fusion target chambers,” Fusion Technol.

  5. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Abstract: Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a...

  6. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milam, David

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

  7. Joint resummation for heavy quark production.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banfi, Andrea; Laenen, Eric

    ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 05 10 14 9v 1 1 2 O ct 2 00 5 February 2, 2008 4:14 WSPC/INSTRUCTION FILE jr International Journal of Modern Physics A c© World Scientific Publishing Company JOINT RESUMMATION FOR HEAVY QUARK PRODUCTION ANDREA BANFI Cavendish... hadroproduction, at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. We exhibit their dependence on the production channel and the color configurations, and compare these distributions to eachother and to NLO. Keywords: Resummation; heavy quark production. 1. Joint threshold...

  8. Recent developments in heavy flavour production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Kramer

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review one-particle inclusive production of heavy-flavoured hadrons in a framework which resums the large collinear logarithms through the evolution of the FFs and PDFs and retains the full dependence on the heavy-quark mass without additional theoretical assumptions. We focus on presenting results for the inclusive cross section for the production of charmed mesons in p anti-p collisions and the comparison with CDF data from the Tevatron as well as on inclusive B-meson production and comparison with recent CDF data. The third topic is the production of D^* mesons in photoproduction and comparison with recent H1 data from HERA.

  9. Full Jet Reconstruction in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevil Salur

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Full jet reconstruction has traditionally been thought to be difficult in heavy ion events due to large multiplicity backgrounds. The search for new physics in high luminosity p+p collisions at the LHC similarly requires the precise measurement of jets over large backgrounds caused by pile up; this has motivated the development of a new generation of jet reconstruction algorithms which are also applicable in the heavy ion environment. We review the latest results on jet-medium interactions as seen in A+A collisions at RHIC, focusing on the new techniques for full jet reconstruction.

  10. New lattice action for heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oktay, Mehmet B.; Kronfeld, Andreas S. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) and School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Theoretical Physics Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the Fermilab method for heavy quarks to include interactions of dimensions 6 and 7 in the action. There are, in general, many new interactions, but we carry out the calculations needed to match the lattice action to continuum QCD at the tree level, finding six nonzero couplings. Using the heavy-quark theory of cutoff effects, we estimate how large the remaining discretization errors are. We find that our tree-level matching, augmented with one-loop matching of the dimension-5 interactions, can bring these errors below 1%, at currently available lattice spacings.

  11. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  12. Standard test method for evaluating stress-corrosion cracking of stainless alloys with different nickel content in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in an acidified boiling sodium chloride solution. This test method is performed in 25% (by mass ) sodium chloride acidified to pH 1.5 with phosphoric acid. This test method is concerned primarily with the test solution and glassware, although a specific style of U-bend test specimen is suggested. 1.2 This test method is designed to provide better correlation with chemical process industry experience for stainless steels than the more severe boiling magnesium chloride test of Practice G36. Some stainless steels which have provided satisfactory service in many environments readily crack in Practice G36, but have not cracked during interlaboratory testing using this sodium chloride test method. 1.3 This boiling sodium chloride test method was used in an interlaboratory test program to evaluate wrought stainless steels, including duplex (ferrite-austenite) stainless and an alloy with up to about 33% nickel. It may also b...

  13. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff`s review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff`s review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design.

  14. Load follow simulation of three-dimensional boiling water reactor core by PACS-32 parallel microprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshino, T.; Shirakawa, T.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional boiling water reactor (BWR) core following the daily load was simulated by the use of the processor array for continuum simulation (PACS-32), a newly developed parallel microprocessor system. The PACS system consists of 32 processing units (PUs) (microprocessors) and has a multiinstruction, multidata type architecture, being optimum to the numerical simulation of the partial differential equations. The BWR core model includes the modified twogroup finite difference, coarse-mesh model for neutronics, steady-state model for thermohydraulics, criticality control by core coolant flow, and the time-dependent solution of iodine-xenon dynamics with constant flux level. The analysis of the parallel processing program revealed that the overhead is independent from the number of PUs and that the efficiency of PUs, i.e., the ratio of effective calculation over total, amounts to 75%, even up to 90% if it is limited to the core part. Simulation was made on the daily load follow for 144 h including the weekend, which took 1.3 central processing unit hours by the PACS system. The PACS system demonstrated a computation speed nearly one-tenth that of the large-scale high-speed general purpose computer, with a 25 times better cost performance ratio and showed that the system could be used as the pratical BWR core simulator with more complicated core models.

  15. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  16. Simulation of in-core neutron noise measurements for axial void profile reconstruction in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykin, V.; Pazsit, I. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Div. of Nuclear Engineering, Dept. of Applied Physics, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A possibility to reconstruct the axial void profile from the simulated in-core neutron noise which is caused by density fluctuations in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) heated channel is considered. For this purpose, a self-contained model of the two-phase flow regime is constructed which has quantitatively and qualitatively similar properties to those observed in real BWRs. The model is subsequently used to simulate the signals of neutron detectors induced by the corresponding perturbations in the flow density. The bubbles are generated randomly in both space and time using Monte-Carlo techniques. The axial distribution of the bubble production is chosen such that the mean axial void fraction and void velocity follow the actual values of BWRs. The induced neutron noise signals are calculated and then processed by the standard signal analysis methods such as Auto-Power Spectral Density (APSD) and Cross-Power Spectral Density (CPSD). Two methods for axial void and velocity profiles reconstruction are discussed: the first one is based on the change of the break frequency of the neutron auto-power spectrum with axial core elevation, while the second refers to the estimation of transit times of propagating steam fluctuations between different axial detector positions. This paper summarizes the principles of the model and presents a numerical testing of the qualitative applicability to estimate the required parameters for the reconstruction of the void fraction profile from the neutron noise measurements. (authors)

  17. Preliminary design study of small long life boiling water reactor (BWR) with tight lattice thorium nitride fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trianti, Nuri, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Su'ud, Zaki, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id; Arif, Idam, E-mail: nuri.trianti@gmail.com, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia) (Indonesia); Riyana, EkaSapta [Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronic performance of small long-life boiling water reactors (BWR) with thorium nitride based fuel has been performed. A recent study conducted on BWR in tight lattice environments (with a lower moderator percentage) produces small power reactor which has some specifications, i.e. 10 years operation time, power density of 19.1 watt/cc and maximum excess reactivity of about 4%. This excess reactivity value is smaller than standard reactivity of conventional BWR. The use of hexagonal geometry on the fuel cell of BWR provides a substantial effect on the criticality of the reactor to obtain a longer operating time. Supported by a tight concept lattice where the volume fraction of the fuel is greater than the moderator and fuel, Thorium Nitride give good results for fuel cell design on small long life BWR. The excess reactivity of the reactor can be reduced with the addition of gadolinium as burnable poisons. Therefore the hexagonal tight lattice fuel cell design of small long life BWR that has a criticality more than 20 years of operating time has been obtained.

  18. Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF In reference...

  19. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion W. M. Sharp,Peterson, "Chamber Transport of 'Foot' Pulses for Heavy-Ionstate of beam ions. Although several chamber- transport

  20. Chamber transport of "foot" pulses for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan-Miller, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization on Heavy-Ion-Fusion Chamber Transport," to beChamber transport of "foot" pulses for heavy-ion fusion W.chamber-transport effectiveness is the fraction of enclosed beam ions

  1. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1830 INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMSAC02-05CH11231. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION467 (1992). [38] R. W. Moir, Fusion Tech. 25, 5 (1994) [39

  2. Identification of geometrical and elastostatic parameters of heavy industrial robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Identification of geometrical and elastostatic parameters of heavy industrial robots A. Klimchik, Y modeling of heavy industrial robots with gravity compensators. The main attention is paid of huge aircraft compo- nents where industrial robots successfully replace conven- tional CNC

  3. additional heavy bosons: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Anomalous Radiative Decay of Heavy Higgs Boson HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: The radiative decay width of a heavy Higgs...

  4. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle Simulation and Analysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  5. atmospheric heavy metal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  6. aquatic heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  7. assess heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  8. airborne heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  9. avoid heavy metals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    381Chemistry 330 Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution...

  10. Flavor Physics Data from the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) was established at the May 2002 Flavor Physics and CP Violation Conference in Philadelphia, and continues the LEP Heavy Flavor Steering Group's tradition of providing regular updates to the world averages of heavy flavor quantities. Data are provided by six subgroups that each focus on a different set of heavy flavor measurements: B lifetimes and oscillation parameters, Semi-leptonic B decays, Rare B decays, Unitarity triangle parameters, B decays to charm final states, and Charm Physics.

  11. Measurements of Heavy Flavour Production at ATLAS and CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gladilin, Leonid; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New and updated (after the previous Moriond QCD) ATLAS and CMS results on heavy flavour production are reviewed.

  12. Systems of two heavy quarks with effective field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nora Brambilla

    2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss results and applications of QCD nonrelativistic effective field theories for systems with two heavy quarks.

  13. The quarkonium saga in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tserruya, Itzhak

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J/psi suppression was proposed more than 25 years ago as an unambiguous signature for the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma in relativistic heavy ion collisions. After intensive efforts, both experimental and theoretical, the quarkonium saga remains exciting, producing surprising results and not fully understood. This talk focuses on recent results on quarkonium production at RHIC and the LHC.

  14. Thermal processes for heavy oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, A.K.; Sarathi, P.S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This status report summarizes the project BE11B (Thermal Processes for Heavy Oil Recovery) research activities conducted in FY93 and completes milestone 7 of this project. A major portion of project research during FY93 was concentrated on modeling and reservoir studies to determine the applicability of steam injection oil recovery techniques in Texas Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoirs. In addition, an in-depth evaluation of a steamflood predictive model developed by Mobil Exploration and Production Co. (Mobil E&P) was performed. Details of these two studies are presented. A topical report (NIPER-675) assessing the NIPER Thermal EOR Research Program over the past 10 years was also written during this fiscal year and delivered to DOE. Results of the Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoir simulation studies indicated that though these reservoirs can be successfully steamflooded and could recover more than 50% of oil-in-place, steamflooding may not be economical at current heavy oil prices. Assessment of Mobil E&P`s steamflood predictive model capabilities indicate that the model in its present form gives reasonably good predictions of California steam projects, but fails to predict adequately the performance of non-California steam projects.

  15. BARC TIFR Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    enterprise using accelerated heavy ion beams is to unravel the complexities of the nuclear world in all repulsion so that the collision process is governed by the nuclear interactions. Using a variety at this centre to pursue research in nuclear, atomic, condensed matter and bio-environmental physics. While

  16. Heavy duty transport research needs assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the desire to decrease the dependence of the US on foreign petroleum as a transportation fuel, this report assesses the research needs to further develop heavy duty engines. The topics covered include diesel engines, alternative fuels, electric vehicle technology, gas turbine engines, and stirling cycle alternative engines. (GHH)

  17. Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

  18. Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

  19. Recent advances in heavy quark theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent developments in heavy quark theory are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing a b quark. The isospin violating hadronic decay D{sub s}* {yields} D{sub s}{sup pi}{sup 0} is also discussed.

  20. Elliptic flow and energy loss of heavy quarks in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Uphoff; Oliver Fochler; Zhe Xu; Carsten Greiner

    2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-time propagation of heavy quarks in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions is studied within the partonic transport model Boltzmann Approach of MultiParton Scatterings (BAMPS). In this model heavy quarks interact with the partonic medium via binary scatterings. The cross sections for these interactions are calculated with leading order perturbative QCD, but feature a more precise Debye screening derived within the hard thermal loop approximation and obey the running of the coupling. Within this framework the elliptic flow and the nuclear modification factor of heavy quarks are computed for RHIC and LHC energies and compared to available experimental data. It is found that binary scatterings alone cannot reproduce the data and, therefore, radiative corrections have to be taken into account.

  1. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond resonance. Keywords: Plasma focus; RF plasma; Beam charge neutralization 1. INTRODUCTION A possible heavyECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization PHILIP C. EFTHIMION,1 ERIK GILSON,1

  2. Flatness of heavy chain systems Nicolas Petit 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .e. trolleys carrying a fixed length heavy chain that may carry a load, is addressed in the partial derivatives the homogeneous chain carrying a load, see equation (13). In [11] the flatness [3, 4] of heavy chain systems, i dimensional case. Under small angle approximations, these heavy chain systems are described by a 1D partial

  3. A Fuzzy Model of Heavy Metal Loadings in Marine Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncheva, Ludmila I.

    A Fuzzy Model of Heavy Metal Loadings in Marine Environment L.I. Kuncheva1 , J. Wrench2 , L.C. Jain model of the loadings of heavy metals for two coastal areas of the Irish Sea (Liverpool Bay, Morecambe Bay, heavy metal concentrations, index of spa- tial distribution, spatial data analysis. 1

  4. Pneumatic brake control for precision stopping of heavy-duty vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bu, Fanping; Tan, Han-Shue

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6], heavy-duty vehicle maintenance automation, as well astrue” automation are applications on heavy-duty vehicles [

  5. Langevin dynamics and decoherence of heavy quarks at high temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akamatsu, Yukinao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Langevin equation of heavy quarks in high-temperature quark-gluon plasma is derived. The dynamics of heavy quark color is coupled with the phase space dynamics and causes a macroscopic superposition state of heavy quark momentum. Decoherence of the superposition state allows us classical description. The time scale of decoherence gives an appropriate discretization time scale $\\Delta t \\sim \\sqrt{M/\\gamma}$ for the classical Langevin equation, where $M$ is heavy quark mass and $\\gamma$ is heavy quark momentum diffusion constant.

  6. A phenomenological model of thermal-hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After completion of the thermal-hydraulic model developed in a companion paper, the authors performed developmental assessment calculation of the model using steady-state and transient post-critical heat flux (CHF) data. This paper discusses the results of those calculations. The overall interfacial drag model predicted reasonable drag coefficients for both the nucleate boiling and the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The predicted pressure drops agreed reasonably well with the measured data of two transient experiments, CCTF Run 14 and a Lehigh reflood test. The thermal-hydraulic model for post-CHF convective heat transfer predicted the rewetting velocities reasonably well for both experiments. The predicted average slope of the wall temperature traces for these tests showed reasonable agreement with the measured data, indicating that the transient-calculated precursory cooling rates agreed with measured data. The hot-patch model, in conjunction with the other thermal-hydraulic models, was capable of modeling the Winfrith post-CHF hot-patch experiments. The hot-patch model kept the wall temperatures at the specified levels in the hot-patch regions and did not allow any quench-front propagation from either the bottom or the top of the test section. The interfacial heat-transfer model tended to slightly underpredict the vapor temperatures. The maximum difference between calculated and measured vapor temperatures was 20%, with a 10% difference for the remainder of the runs considered. The wall-to-fluid heat transfer was predicted reasonably well, and the predicted wall temperatures were in reasonable agreement with measured data with a maximum relative error of less than 13%.

  7. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Malcolm A. (Winterville, GA); Pellerin, Patrice J. M. (Montpellier, FR); Warrenfeltz, Dennis (Athens, GA); Vidal, Stephane (Combaillaux, FR); Darvill, Alan G. (Athens, GA); Albersheim, Peter (Athens, GA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  8. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  9. Heavy quarkonium in a holographic QCD model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngman; Lee, Jong-Phil [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su Houng [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Encouraged by recent developments in AdS/QCD models for the light quark system, we study heavy quarkonium in the framework of the AdS/QCD models. We calculate the masses of cc vector meson states using the AdS/QCD models at zero and at finite temperature. Among the models adopted in this work, we find that the soft-wall model describes the low-lying heavy quark meson states at zero temperature relatively well. At finite temperature, we observe that once the bound state is above T{sub c}, its mass will increase with temperature until it dissociates at a temperature of around 494 MeV. It is shown that the dissociation temperature is fixed by the infrared cutoff of the models. The present model serves as a unified nonperturbative model to investigate the properties of bound quarkonium states above T{sub c}.

  10. Heavy quarks in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens D. Noritzsch

    2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of the heavy quark h=c,b,... contributions to deeply virtual Compton scattering is performed at both the amplitude and the cross section level, and their phenomenological relevance is discussed. For this purpose I calculate the lowest order off-forward photon-gluon scattering amplitude with a massive quark loop and the corresponding hard scattering coefficients. In a first numerical analysis these fixed order perturbation theory results are compared with the conventional intrinsic "massless" parton approach considering generalized parton distributions for the heavy quarks. The differences between these two prescriptions can be quite significant, especially at small skewedness where the massless approach largely overestimates the deeply virtual Compton scattering cross section.

  11. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the Standard Model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the Standard Model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  12. Continuum Study of Heavy Quark Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Neuhaus

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a lattice investigation of heavy quark momentum diffusion within the pure SU(3) plasma above the deconfinement transition with the quarks treated to leading order in the heavy mass expansion. We measure the relevant "colour-electric" Euclidean correlator and based on several lattice spacing's perform the continuum extrapolation. This is necessary not only to remove cut-off effects but also the analytic continuation for the extraction of transport coefficients is well-defined only when a continuous function of the Euclidean time variable is available. We pay specific attention to scale setting in SU(3). In particular we present our determination for the critical temperature $T_c=1/({N_\\tau}a) $ at values of $N_\\tau \\le 22$.

  13. Short distance physics with heavy quark potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zantow, F; Karsch, Frithjof; Petreczky, P

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present lattice studies of heavy quark potentials in the quenched approximation of QCD at finite temperatures. Both, the color singlet and color averaged potentials are calculated. While the potentials are well known at large distances, we give a detailed analysis of their short distance behavior (from 0.015 fm to 1 fm) near the critical temperature. At these distances we expect that the T-dependent potentials go over into the zero temperature potential. Indeed, we find evidences that the temperature influence gets suppressed and the potentials starts to become a unique function of the underlying distance scale. We use this feature to normalize the heavy quark potentials at short distances and extract the free energy of the quark system in a gluonic heat bath.

  14. Reversing a heavy-ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Stephanov; Yi Yin

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a novel approach to study the longitudinal hydrodynamic expansion of the quark-gluon fluid created in heavy-ion collisions. It consists of two steps: First, we apply the maximum entropy method to reconstruct the freeze-out surface from experimentally measured particle distribution. We then take the output of the reconstruction as the "initial" condition to evolve the system back in time by solving the 1+1 ideal hydrodynamic equations analytically, using the method of Khalatnikov and Landau. We find an approximate Bjorken-like plateau in the energy density vs rapidity profile at the early times, which shrinks with time as the boundary shocks propagate inward. In Bjorken frame, the fluid velocity is close to zero within the plateau, as in the Bjorken solution, but increases outside the plateau. The results carry implications for fully numerical hydrodynamic simulations as well as models of heavy-ion collisions based on gauge-gravity duality.

  15. Heavy Flavor Baryons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhr, Thomas

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 have filled many empty spots in the spectrum of heavy baryons over the last few years. The most recent results are described in this article: The first direct observation of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0}, improved measurements of {Sigma}{sub b} properties, a new measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} branching ratio, and a high-statistics study of charm baryons.

  16. Lifecycle-analysis for heavy vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.

    1998-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Various alternative fuels and improved engine and vehicle systems have been proposed in order to reduce emissions and energy use associated with heavy vehicles (predominantly trucks). For example, oil companies have proposed improved methods for converting natural gas to zero-aromatics, zero-sulfur diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process. Major heavy-duty diesel engine companies are working on ways to simultaneously reduce particulate-matter and NOX emissions. The trend in heavy vehicles is toward use of lightweight materials, tires with lower rolling resistance, and treatments to reduce aerodynamic drag. In this paper, we compare the Mecycle energy use and emissions from trucks using selected alternatives, such as Fisher-Tropsch diesel fuel and advanced fuel-efficient engines. We consider heavy-duty, Class 8 tractor-semitrailer combinations for this analysis. The total life cycle includes production and recycling of the vehicle itself, extraction, processing, and transportation of the fuel itself, and vehicle operation and maintenance. Energy use is considered in toto, as well as those portions that are imported, domestic, and renewable. Emissions of interest include greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. Angonne's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is used to generate per-vehicle fuel cycle impacts. Energy use and emissions for materials manufacturing and vehicle disposal are estimated by means of materials information from Argonne studies. We conclude that there are trade-offs among impacts. For example, the lowest fossil energy use does not necessarily result in lowest total energy use, and lower tailpipe emissions may not necessarily result in lower lifecycle emissions of all criteria pollutants.

  17. Running heavy-quark masses in DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Alekhin; S. -O. Moch

    2011-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on determinations of the running mass for charm quarks from deep-inelastic scattering reactions. The method provides complementary information on this fundamental parameter from hadronic processes with space-like kinematics. The obtained values are consistent with but systematically lower than the world average as published by the PDG. We also address the consequences of the running mass scheme for heavy-quark parton distributions in global fits to deep-inelastic scattering data.

  18. Electroweak Precision Data and a Heavy Z'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anirban Kundu

    1996-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the physics of an extra $U(1)$ gauge boson $Z'$, which can mix with $Z$ through intermediate fermion loops. The loop contribution due to the heavy top quark significantly affects the low-energy observables, and for $m_{Z'}>m_Z$, one can always adjust the shifts in these observables to be in the right direction suggested by experiments, when we impose the anomaly cancellation conditions for $Z'$.

  19. The symmetric heavy-light ansatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The symmetric heavy-light ansatz is a method for finding the ground state of any dilute unpolarized system of attractive two-component fermions. Operationally it can be viewed as a generalization of the Kohn-Sham equations in density functional theory applied to N-body density correlations. While the original Hamiltonian has an exact Z_2 symmetry, the heavy-light ansatz breaks this symmetry by skewing the mass ratio of the two components. In the limit where one component is infinitely heavy, the many-body problem can be solved in terms of single-particle orbitals. The original Z_2 symmetry is recovered by enforcing Z_2 symmetry as a constraint on N-body density correlations for the two components. For the 1D, 2D, and 3D attractive Hubbard models the method is in very good agreement with exact Lanczos calculations for few-body systems at arbitrary coupling. For the 3D attractive Hubbard model there is very good agreement with lattice Monte Carlo results for many-body systems in the limit of infinite scattering length.

  20. Cosmic inflation in a landscape of heavy-fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Céspedes, Sebastián; Palma, Gonzalo A., E-mail: scespede@ing.uchile.cl, E-mail: gpalmaquilod@ing.uchile.cl [Physics Department, FCFM, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy isocurvature fields may have a strong influence on the low energy dynamics of curvature perturbations during inflation, as long as the inflationary trajectory becomes non-geodesic in the multi-field target space (the landscape). If fields orthogonal to the inflationary trajectory are sufficiently heavy, one expects a reliable effective field theory describing the low energy dynamics of curvature perturbations, with self-interactions determined by the shape of the inflationary trajectory. Previous work analyzing the role of heavy-fields during inflation have mostly focused in the effects on curvature perturbations due to a single heavy-field. In this article we extend the results of these works by studying models of inflation in which curvature perturbations interact with two heavy-fields. We show that the second heavy-field (orthogonal to both tangent and normal directions of the inflationary trajectory) may significantly affect the evolution of curvature modes. We compute the effective field theory for the low energy curvature perturbations obtained by integrating out the two heavy-fields and show that the presence of the second heavy-field implies the existence of additional self-interactions not accounted for in the single heavy-field case. We conclude that future observations will be able to constrain the number of heavy fields interacting with curvature perturbations.

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

  2. Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Rincon, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to consent to a proposal by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow public access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) reactor building located near Rincon, Puerto Rico for use as a museum. PREPA, the owner of the BONUS facility, has determined that the historical significance of this facility, as one of only two reactors of this design ever constructed in the world, warrants preservation in a museum, and that this museum would provide economic benefits to the local community through increased tourism. Therefore, PREPA is proposing development of the BONUS facility as a museum.

  3. HASSP and HEAVY: Tools for automated heavy atom searches and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, T.T.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this tutorial, a simple example using model data for one derivative with anomalous information will be used to demonstrate the use of HASSP and HEAVY in heavy atom determination and refinement. The data used here will actually be based on model MAD data that has been converted to MIR format using MADMRG, but the treatment is identical to that for any other SIR+anomalous data. The data nd most of the programs discussed here can be obtained by e-mail from ``terwil @prov2.lanl.gov`` along with VAX-specific command files to run the data through.

  4. Heavy Construction Internship Program RegistRation foRm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    in this program, it must relate to the Heavy Construction industry, be a minimum of 35 hours per weekHeavy Construction Internship Program RegistRation foRm eCCs engineeRing Co-oP anD CaReeR se are strongly encouraged to work with Engineering Co-op and Career Services (ECCS) and the Heavy Construction

  5. Experimental investigation of caustic steam injection for heavy oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhavan, Rajiv

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Overview Heavy oil is a part of the unconventional petroleum reserve. Heavy oil does not flow very easily and is classified as heavy because of its high specific gravity. With increasing demand for oil and with depleting... and success of the sodium carbonate and sodium silicate floods respectively. (5) Attainment of very low interfacial tension does not ensure improved oil recovery but a minimum value is necessary for a successful steam alkaline flood. Tiab, Okoye...

  6. Dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Graydon L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow consists of small liquid droplets entrained in a flowing vapor. This flow regime can occur in cryogenic equipment, in steam generators, and during nuclear reactor loss of coolant accidents. A theoretical ...

  7. The Heavy Photon Search Test Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Battaglieri; Sergey Boyarinov; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Andrea Celentano; Gabriel Charles; William Cooper; Chris Cuevas; Natalia Dashyan; Raffaella DeVita; Camille Desnault; Alexandre Deur; Hovanes Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Rouven Essig; Vitaliy Fadeyev; Clive Field; Arne Freyberger; Yuri Gershtein; Nerses Gevorgyan; Francois-Xavier Girod; Norman Graf; Mathew Graham; Keith Griffioen; Alexander Grillo; Michel Guidal; Gunther Haller; Per Hansson Adrian; Ryan Herbst; Maurik Holtrop; John Jaros; Scott Kaneta; Mahbub Khandaker; Alexey Kubarovsky; Valery Kubarovsky; Takashi Maruyama; Jeremy McCormick; Ken Moffeit; Omar Moreno; Homer Neal; Timothy Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Al Odian; Marco Oriunno; Rafayel Paremuzyan; Richard Partridge; Sarah Phillips; Emmanuel Rauly; Benjamin Raydo; Joseph Reichert; Emmanuel Rindel; Philippe Rosier; Carlos Salgado; Philip Schuster; Youri Sharabian; Daria Sokhan; Stepan Stepanyan; Natalia Toro; Sho Uemura; Maurizio Ungaro; Hakop Voskanyan; Dieter Walz; Larry Weinstein; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski

    2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in the e$^+$e$^-$ invariant mass spectrum, above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW0$_{4}$ crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e$^+$e$^-$ pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10~cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.

  8. The Heavy Photon Search test detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Battaglieri, M.; Boyarinov, S.; Bueltmann, S.; Burkert, V.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Cooper, W.; Cuevas, C.; Dashyan, N.; DeVita, R.; Desnault, C.; Deur, A.; Egiyan, H.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Essig, R.; Fadeyev, V.; Field, C.; Freyberger, A.; Gershtein, Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Girod, F.-X.; Graf, N.; Graham, M.; Griffioen, K.; Grillo, A.; Guidal, M.; Haller, G.; Hansson Adrian, P.; Herbst, R.; Holtrop, M.; Jaros, J.; Kaneta, S.; Khandaker, M.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, J.; Moffeit, K.; Moreno, O.; Neal, H.; Nelson, T.; Niccolai, S.; Odian, A.; Oriunno, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Partridge, R.; Phillips, S.K.; Rauly, E.; Raydo, B.; Reichert, J.; Rindel, E.; Rosier, P.; Salgado, C.; Schuster, P.; Sharabian, Y.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Toro, N.; Uemura, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Walz, D.; Weinstein, L.B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in the e+e- invariant mass spectrum, above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW04 crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e+e? pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10~cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.

  9. The Heavy Photon Search test detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Battaglieri, M.; Boyarinov, S.; Bueltmann, S.; Burkert, V.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Cooper, W.; Cuevas, C.; Dashyan, N.; DeVita, R.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in themore »e?e?invariant mass spectrum above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW04 crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e?e? pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10 cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.« less

  10. Heavy-Duty Low Temperature Combustion Development Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Combustion Development Activities at Caterpillar Heavy-Duty Low Temperature Combustion Development Activities at Caterpillar Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

  11. Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions...

  12. argonne heavy water reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas Shea 2014-03-27 2 Antineutrino monitoring for the Iranian heavy water reactor CERN Preprints Summary: In this note we discuss the potential application of antineutrino...

  13. Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Drayage Truck Replacement Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Drayage Truck Replacement Program Principal Investigator: Vicki White South Coast Air Quality Management District May 16, 2012 Project ID ARRAVT045 This...

  14. High Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or otherwise restricted information ACE060 High Fuel Economy Heavy Duty Truck Engine Overview Timeline October 2007 - October 2011 Barriers Barriers addressed: Reduced...

  15. HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY CONDITIONS HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY...

  16. SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards in 2005 SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in 2005 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: PUREM 2003deerfrank.pdf...

  17. Can CP violation be observed in heavy-ion collisions?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B., E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su; Rudenko, A. S., E-mail: a.s.rudenko@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that, at least at present, there is no convincing way to detect CP violation in heavy-ion collisions.

  18. 05663_AlaskaHeavyOil | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goal The goal of this project is to improve recovery of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) heavy oil resources in the Ugnu formation by improving our understanding of the...

  19. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Incorporated...

  20. California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with biomethane generated from anaerobic digestion of organic waste it collects p-10edgar.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy...

  1. Heavy Element Synthesis Reactions W. Loveland Oregon State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Why best? * National user facility for stable beams * Wide range of projectiles and energies and ability to handle heavy element targets. * New facilities (AGFA) * Ability to...

  2. Heavy-Duty Powertrain and Vehicle Development - A Look Toward...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powertrain and Vehicle Development - A Look Toward 2020 Globalization in emissions regulation will be driving freight efficiency improvements and will require heavy-duty engine...

  3. Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of...

  4. Heavy Duty & Medium Duty Drive Cycle Data Collection for Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Duty Cycle and Performance Data Collection and Analysis Program Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Powertrain Controls Optimization for Heavy Duty Line Haul Trucks...

  5. Sequential fissions of heavy nuclear systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Gruyer; J. D. Frankland; E. Bonnet; M. Boisjoli; A. Chbihi; L. Manduci; P. Marini; K. Mazurek; P. N. Nadtochy

    2013-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In Xe+Sn central collisions from 12 to 20 MeV/A measured with the INDRA 4$\\pi$ multidetector, the three-fragment exit channel occurs with a significant cross section. In this contribution, we show that these fragments arise from two successive binary splittings of a heavy composite system. Strong Coulomb proximity effects are observed in the three-fragment final state. By comparison with Coulomb trajectory calculations, we show that the time scale between the consecutive break-ups decreases with increasing bombarding energy, becoming compatible with quasi-simultaneous multifragmentation above 18 MeV/A.

  6. HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment including the dome was removed, a concrete cover was to be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

  7. Lattice String Breaking and Heavy Meson Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I T Drummond; R R Horgan

    1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how string breaking on the lattice, treated as a mixing effect, can be related to decay rates for heavy quark systems. We use this to make a preliminary calculation of the energy split at maximum mixing for static quarks in QCD from the decay rate for $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to B{\\bar B}$. We extend the calculation to achieve rough estimates for the contributions of channels involving $B, B^*, B_s and B_s^*$ mesons to the width of the $\\Upsilon(5S)$.

  8. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosseel, T.M.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. Because the RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a redundant backup system does not exist, it is imperative to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV's fracture resistance that occurs during service. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established.

  9. Neutralino dark matter from heavy axino decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Ki-Young [Departamento de Fisica Teorica C-XI, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Kim, Jihn E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Min [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Seto, Osamu [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider cosmological consequences of a heavy axino, decaying to the neutralino in R-parity conserving models. The importance and influence of the axino decay on the resultant abundance of neutralino dark matter depends on the lifetime and the energy density of axino. For a high reheating temperature after inflation, copiously produced axinos dominate the energy density of the universe, and its decay produces a large amount of entropy. As a bonus, we obtain that the upper bound on the reheating temperature after inflation via gravitino decay can be moderated, because the entropy production by the axino decay more or less dilutes the gravitinos.

  10. Acceleration statistics of heavy particles in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bec; L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; M. Cencini; A. Lanotte; S. Musacchio; F. Toschi

    2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of direct numerical simulations of heavy particle transport in homogeneous, isotropic, fully developed turbulence, up to resolution $512^3$ ($R_\\lambda\\approx 185$). Following the trajectories of up to 120 million particles with Stokes numbers, $St$, in the range from 0.16 to 3.5 we are able to characterize in full detail the statistics of particle acceleration. We show that: ({\\it i}) The root-mean-squared acceleration $a_{\\rm rms}$ sharply falls off from the fluid tracer value already at quite small Stokes numbers; ({\\it ii}) At a given $St$ the normalised acceleration $a_{\\rm rms}/(\\epsilon^3/\

  11. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003Tool ofTopo II:7.1 7.0 8.04.2o w aTowards Heavy

  12. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003Tool ofTopo II:7.1 7.0 8.04.2o wTowards Heavy

  13. Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremie Bec; Luca Biferale; Guido Boffetta; Massimo Cencini; Stefano Musacchio; Federico Toschi

    2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles and tracers advected by homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows are investigated by means of direct numerical simulations. For large values of the Stokes number, the main effect of inertia is to reduce the chaoticity with respect to fluid tracers. Conversely, for small inertia, a counter-intuitive increase of the first Lyapunov exponent is observed. The flow intermittency is found to induce a Reynolds number dependency for the statistics of the finite time Lyapunov exponents of tracers. Such intermittency effects are found to persist at increasing inertia.

  14. Heavy Ion Reactions - Research - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecoveryG -HazmatLoadofthe 25Heavy Ion

  15. Super Heavy Element Discovery | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. .Energy8 Career DaySunShotSuper Heavy Element

  16. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliances » TopTours Sign InTowards Heavy

  17. Heavy Metal Islands | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartment ofHeat Transfer inoperation inElementHeavy

  18. Reaction kinetics of olefin saturation in the hydrodesulfurization of fluid catalytic cracked naphtha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Brian Herbert

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . 30 . . . 3 I . . . 3 I 13. Run 222-92-70--Comparison ofkw/rto Carbon Number forNormalOlefin . . . . 32 14. Run 222-92-70 ? -Comparison of k w/r to Carbon Number for Iso Olefins . . . . . . . . . . . 32 15. Run 222-92-70 ? -Comparison of k w.../r to Carbon Number for Cycfic Olefins . . . . . . 33 16. Run 963-94-24 ? -Comparison of k w/r to Carbon Number for Normal Olefins . . . . 33 17. Run 963-94-24 ? -Comparison of k w/r to Carbon Number for Iso Olefins . . . . . . . . . . . 34 18. Run 963...

  19. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

  20. Heavy to light baryon transition form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, X. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil] [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil; [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Huang, T. [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China)] [CCAST (World Laboratory) P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080, People`s Republic of (China); [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Li, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Stech found form factor relations for heavy to light transitions based on two simple dynamical assumptions for a spectator particle. In this paper we generalize his approach to the case of baryons and find that for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} ({ital Q}={ital b} or {ital c}) only one independent form factor remains in the limit {ital m}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{infinity}. Furthermore, combining with the model of Guo and Kroll we determine both of the two form factors for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} in the heavy quark limit. The results are applied to {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} which is not clarified both theoretically and experimentally. It is found that the branching ratio of {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} is of order 10{sup {minus}5}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Phenomenological Implications of Heavy Axion Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giannotti, M.; Nita, R.; Welch, E. [Physical Sciences, Barry University, FL 33161, Miami Shores (United States)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Several models predict the existence of heavy (mass{approx}MeV or so) pseudoscalar (axion-like) particles. This possibility is permitted only if the relation between the axion mass and the Peccei-Quinn constant is relaxed.Here we consider a possible phenomenological consequence of these models. After being produced in the supernova core, these heavy axions would escape and a fraction of them would decay into photons before reaching the earth. We calculated the expected spectrum of these photons from the supernovae SN1987A and CAS A, in terms of the axion mass and the Peccei-Quinn constant f{sub a}, and compared our results to the data from the FERMI Large Area Telescope. The analysis provides strong constraints on the allowed region in the axion parameter space for 100 keV < or approx. m{sub a} < or approx. 1 GeV. This mass region is completely excluded unless f{sub a}>10{sup 112} GeV. For axion masses {approx}100 MeV, the constraint is stronger f{sub a}> a few 10{sup 14} GeV.

  2. Jet Reconstruction in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevil Salur

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of strong suppression of inclusive hadron distributions and di-hadron correlations at high $p_{T}$, while providing evidence for partonic energy loss, also suffer from geometric biases due to the competition of energy loss and fragmentation. The measurements of fully reconstructed jets is expected to lack these biases as the energy flow is measured independently of the fragmentation details. In this article, we review the recent results from the heavy ion collisions collected by the STAR experiment at RHIC on direct jet reconstruction utilizing the modern sequential recombination and cone jet reconstruction algorithms together with their background subtraction techniques. In order to assess the jet reconstruction biases a comparison with the jet cross section measurement in $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions to account for nuclear geometric effects is performed. Comparison of the inclusive jet cross section obtained in central Au+Au events with that in $p+p$ collisions, published previously by STAR, suggests that unbiased jet reconstruction in the complex heavy ion environment indeed may be possible.

  3. Focus on Venezuelan heavy crude: refining margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Of six crudes refined in the US Gulf Coast, heavy Venezuelan crude Lagunillas (15/sup 0/ API) provides the best margin per barrel. Data for end of December 1983 and the first three weeks of January show that margins on all crudes are on the rise in this market, due to a turnaround in product prices. The lighter crudes are showing the greatest increase in Gross Product Worth. This is having a modest shrinking effect on the margin differential between light and heavy crudes in this market. The domestic crude West Texas Intermediate, at 40/sup 0/ API, provides the highest GPW in this crude slate sample, over US $31 per barrel, compared to GPW of under US $28 per barrel for Lagunillas. Still, as Lagunillas cost about US $8 less than does WTI, refiners with sufficient residue conversion capacity can be earning about US $3.50 more in margin per barrel than they can with WTI. Although few refiners would be using a 15/sup 0/ API crude exclusively for any length of time, heavier oil's inclusion in modern refiners' diets is enhancing their competitive position more than any other single factor. This issue of Energy Detente presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for January 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  4. No User Required: Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries and Digital Humanist Inquiry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Dana

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries and Digital Modernism. In4] Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries. Selected works: Nippon,Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries and Digital Humanist

  5. Posthuman Difference: Traveling to Utopia with Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Warren

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries WARREN LIU In a 2007Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries’ Traveling to Utopia: Withof Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries’ digital text, Traveling

  6. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion Research (8748...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion Research (8748) and Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling (12349) Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion Research (8748) and...

  7. Heavy Quarkonium Production at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Matthew

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    are not fully in agreement with predicted observables from either model. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is well suited to further explore heavy quarkonium production. The Heavy Flavor program...

  8. Contamination of heavy metals in mangroves: A comparison between Cao Martn Pea and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Contamination of heavy metals in mangroves: A comparison between Caño that contamination of heavy metals in mangroves decrease their chlorophyll levels and how heavy metals contamination has affected them. The images utilized

  9. Comprehensive study of a heavy fuel oil spill : modeling and analytical approaches to understanding environmental weathering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemkau, Karin Lydia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driven by increasingly heavy oil reserves and more efficient refining technologies, use of heavy fuel oils for power generation is rising. Unlike other refined products and crude oils, a large portion of these heavy oils ...

  10. Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty Vehicles Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty Vehicles Emissions tests of in-use heavy-duty vehicles...

  11. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    and collaborators. P. K. Roy et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. A 606 22, (2009). The four CAPS produce current through each of the four sources. P. K. Roy #12;The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National P. Gilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National

  12. FLATNESS OF HEAVY CHAIN SYSTEMS NICOLAS PETIT AND PIERRE ROUCHON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­937] of heavy chain systems, i.e., trolleys carrying a fixed length heavy chain that may carry a load, is addressed in the partial derivatives equations framework. We parameterize the system trajectories are described by a one-dimensional (1D) partial differential wave equation. Dealing with this infinite

  13. Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

  14. Bitumen and heavy-oil resources of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crysdale, B.L.; Schenk, C.J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bitumen and heavy-oil deposits represent a significant hydrocarbon resource in the US. Bitumen deposits (10/sup 0/ API) are located in sandstone reservoirs at or near the surface along the margins of sedimentary basins. Heavy oils (10/sup 0/-20/sup 0/ API) are found predominantly in geologically young (Tertiary age and younger) shallow sandstone reservoirs and along the margins of sedimentary basins. Bitumen and heavy oil have high viscosities (10,000 cp for bitumen, 100-10,000 cp for heavy oil) and cannot be recovered by conventional recovery methods. Bitumen deposits have been evaluated in 17 states. The total bitumen resource for the conterminous US is estimated to be 57 billion bbl. Utah contains the largest resource, estimated to be 29 billion bbl, followed by California with 9 billion bbl, Alabama with 6 billion, Texas with 5 billion, and Kentucky with 3 billion. Heavy-oil deposits have been evaluated in 16 states, but most heavy oil is in California, Texas, and Arkansas. Total heavy oil in place for the conterminous US is estimated to be approximately 45 billion bbl; greater than 80% of this amount is in California. The giant Kuparuk deposit on the North Slope of Alaska contains a heavy oil-bitumen resource estimated as high as 40 billion bbl.

  15. TOLERANCE OF HEAVY METALS IN VASCULAR PLANTS: ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATIONBY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    CHAPTER 28 b TOLERANCE OF HEAVY METALS IN VASCULAR PLANTS: ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATIONBY CHINESE the roots take up colossal amounts of a toxic metal from soils and rapidly sequester into their above-ground hyperaccumulation in the light of accumulated knowledge on heavy metal tolerance in higher plants. 1.INTRODUCTION

  16. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Abreu; S. V. Akkelin; J. Alam; J. L. Albacete; A. Andronic; D. Antonov; F. Arleo; N. Armesto; I. C. Arsene; G. G. Barnafoldi; J. Barrette; B. Bauchle; F. Becattini; B. Betz; M. Bleicher; M. Bluhm; D. Boer; F. W. Bopp; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; W. Busza; M. Cacciari; A. Capella; J. Casalderrey-Solana; R. Chatterjee; L. -W. Chen; J. Cleymans; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa Del Valle; L. P. Csernai; L. Cunqueiro; A. Dainese; J. Dias de Deus H. -T. Ding; M. Djordjevic; H. Drescher; I. M. Dremin A. Dumitru; A. El; R. Engel; D. d'Enterria; K. J. Eskola; G. Fai; E. G. Ferreiro; R. J. Fries; E. Frodermann; H. Fujii; C. Gale; F. Gelis; V. P. Goncalves; V. Greco; C. Greiner; M. Gyulassy; H. van Hees; U. Heinz; H. Honkanen; W. A. Horowitz; E. Iancu; G. Ingelman; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Jeon; A. B. Kaidalov; B. Kampfer; Z. -B. Kang; Iu. A. Karpenko; G. Kestin; D. Kharzeev; C. M. Ko; B. Koch; B. Kopeliovich; M. Kozlov; I. Kraus; I. Kuznetsova; S. H. Lee; R. Lednicky; J. Letessier; E. Levin; B. -A. Li; Z. -W. Lin; H. Liu; W. Liu; C. Loizides; I. P. Lokhtin; M. V. T. Machado; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Managadze; M. L. Mangano; M. Mannarelli; C. Manuel; G. Martinez; J. G. Milhano; A. Mocsy; D. Molnar; M. Nardi; J. K. Nayak; H. Niemi; H. Oeschler; J. -Y. Ollitrault; G. Paic; C. Pajares; V. S. Pantuev; G. Papp; D. Peressounko; P. Petreczky; S. V. Petrushanko; F. Piccinini; T. Pierog; H. J. Pirner; S. Porteboeuf; I. Potashnikova; G. Y. Qin; J. -W. Qiu; J. Rafelski; K. Rajagopal; J. Ranft; R. Rapp; S. S. Rasanen; J. Rathsman; P. Rau; K. Redlich; T. Renk; A. H. Rezaeian; D. Rischke; S. Roesler; J. Ruppert; P. V. Ruuskanen; C. A. Salgado; S. Sapeta; I. Sarcevic; S. Sarkar; L. I. Sarycheva; I. Schmidt; A. I. Shoshi; B. Sinha; Yu. M. Sinyukov; A. M. Snigirev; D. K. Srivastava; J. Stachel; A. Stasto; H. Stocker; C. Yu. Teplov; R. L. Thews; G. Torrieri; V. Topor Pop; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos; K. L. Tuchin; S. Turbide; K. Tywoniuk; A. Utermann; R. Venugopalan; I. Vitev; R. Vogt; E. Wang; X. N. Wang; K. Werner; E. Wessels; S. Wheaton; S. Wicks; U. A. Wiedemann; G. Wolschin; B. -W. Xiao; Z. Xu; S. Yasui; E. Zabrodin; K. Zapp; B. Zhang; B. -W. Zhang; H. Zhang; D. Zhou

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This writeup is a compilation of the predictions for the forthcoming Heavy Ion Program at the Large Hadron Collider, as presented at the CERN Theory Institute 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions', held from May 14th to June 10th 2007.

  17. Heavy hybrid mesons in the QCD sum rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng-Zhi Huang; Shi-Lin Zhu

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectra of the hybrid mesons containing one heavy quark ($q\\bar{Q}g$) within the framework of QCD sum rules in the heavy quark limit. The derived sum rules are stable with the variation of the Borel parameter within their corresponding working ranges. The extracted binding energy for the heavy hybrid doublets $H^h(S^h)$ and $M^h(T^h)$ is almost degenerate. We also calculate the pionic couplings between these heavy hybrid and the conventional heavy meson doublets using the light-cone QCD sum rule method. The extracted coupling constants are rather small as a whole. With these couplings we make a rough estimate of the partial widths of these pionic decay channels.

  18. Effect of thermalized charm on heavy quark energy loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souvik Priyam Adhya; Mahatsab Mandal; Sreemoyee Sarkar; Pradip K. Roy; Sukalyan Chattopadhyay

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent experimental results on the flow of $J/\\psi$ at LHC show that ample amount of charm quarks is present in the quark gluon plasma and probably they are thermalized. In the current study we investigate the effect of thermalized charm quarks on the heavy quark energy loss to leading order in the QCD coupling constant. It is seen that the energy loss of charm quark increases considerably due to the inclusion of thermal charm quarks. Running coupling has also been implemented to study heavy quark energy loss and we find substantial increase in the heavy quark energy loss due to heavy-heavy scattering at higher temperature to be realized at LHC energies.

  19. Heavy-light quarks interactions in QCD vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirzayusuf Musakhanov

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD vacuum instantons induce very strong interactions between light quarks, which generate large dynamical light quark mass M for initially almost massless quarks and can bound these quarks to produce almost massless pions in accordance with the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry (S\\chiSB). On the other hand, the QCD vacuum instantons generate heavy-light quark interactions terms, which are responsible for the effects of S\\chiSB in a heavy-light quark system. Summing the re-scattering series that lead to the total light quark propagator and making few further steps, we get the fermionized representation of low-frequencies light quark determinant in the presence of the quark sources, which is relevant for our problems. The next important step in the line of this strategy is to derive the equation and calculate the heavy quark propagator in the instanton media and in the presence of light quarks. This one provide finally the heavy and N_f light quarks interaction term. As an example, we derive heavy quark-light mesons interaction term for the N_f=2 case. If we take the average instanton size \\rho=0.35 fm, and average inter-instanton distance R=0.856 fm from our previous estimates, we obtain at LO on 1/N_c expansion dynamical light quark mass M = 570 MeV and instanton media contribution to heavy quark mass \\Delta M=148 MeV. These factors define the coupling between heavy and light quarks and, certainly, between heavy quarks and light mesons. We will apply this approach to heavy quark and heavy-light quark systems.

  20. Advanced nuclear reactor safety analysis: the simulation of a small break loss of coolant accident in the simplified boiling water reactor using RELAP5/MOD3.1.1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faust, Christophor Randall

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal hydraulic simulation code RELAP5/MOD3.1.1 was utilized to model General Electric's Simplified Boiling Water Reactor plant. The model of the plant was subjected to a small break loss of coolant accident occurring from a guillotine shear...

  1. Production of heavy flavor and photons on high-energy colliders, and rare decays of heavy mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production of heavy flavor and photons on high-energy colliders, and rare decays of heavy mesons (FCNC) decay ¯B0 ¯K0 e+ e- K- + e+ e-. Prompt photon production in pp (p¯p) collisions. Production measurement of photon polarization is difficult, therefore one can instead use virtual-photon production b

  2. Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion Research (8748...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Program Manager: Gurpreet Singh Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion Research (8748) and Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling (12349) FY 2008 DOE Vehicle...

  3. THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    29 The Fission-fusion Hybrid - iii - General DiscussionInteraction in Heavy Ion Fusion BIBLIOGRAPHY HEAVY IONReactor Designs . . . 27 Pure Fusion Power Reactor Tritium

  4. Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

  5. anion heavy-atom salt: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nutrients and heavy metals in experimental salt marsh ecosystems. Environmental Pollution,effects of nutrients and heavy metals in experimental salt marsh ecosystems....

  6. An Investigation on an Ethylene Gylcol/Water Nanofluid for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Investigation on an Ethylene GylcolWater Nanofluid for Heavy Vehicle Cooling Applications An Investigation on an Ethylene GylcolWater Nanofluid for Heavy Vehicle Cooling...

  7. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  8. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  9. Collective Phenomena in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Petrovici; A. Pop

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the main results of detailed flow analysis in highly central and semi-central heavy ion collisions at SIS energies is presented in the first part of this paper. The influence of the mass of the colliding nuclei and centrality on the collective expansion and the information on the equation of state of compressed and hot baryonic matter is discussed. The second part is dedicated to a similar type of analysis, based on the behaviour of the average transverse momentum as a function of mass of different hadrons, at the other extreme of energy range, where free baryonic fireballs are produced. Information on the partonic and hadronic expansion, temperature and degree of thermal equilibrium in p+p and Au+Au central collisions at 200 A.GeV is presented.

  10. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  11. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Paul Blaizot; Yacine Mehtar-Tani

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q $. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the in-cone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  12. Bulk viscosity in heavy ion collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Roy; A. K. Chaudhuri

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of a temperature dependent bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio~($\\zeta/s$) along with a constant shear viscosity to entropy density ratio~($\\eta/s$) on the space time evolution of the fluid produced in high energy heavy ion collisions have been studied in a relativistic viscous hydrodynamics model. The boost invariant Israel-Stewart theory of causal relativistic viscous hydrodynamics is used to simulate the evolution of the fluid in 2 spatial and 1 temporal dimension. The dissipative correction to the freezeout distribution for bulk viscosity is calculated using Grad's fourteen moment method. From our simulation we show that the method is applicable only for $\\zeta/s<0.004$.

  13. Bitumen and heavy oil upgrading in Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrones, J.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the heavy oil upgrading industry in Canada. Up to now it has been based on the processing of bitumen extracted from oil sands mining operations at two sites, to produce a residue-free, low sulfur, synthetic crude. Carbon rejection has been the prime process technology with delayed coking being used by Suncor and FLUID COKING at Syncrude. Alternative processes for recovering greater amounts of synthetic crude are examined. These include a variety of hydrogen addition processes and combinations which produce pipelineable materials requiring further processing in downstream refineries with expanded capabilities. The Newgrade Energy Inc. upgrader, now under construction in Regina, will use fixed-bed, catalytic, atmospheric-residue, hydrogen processing. Two additional products, also based on hydrogenation, will use ebullated bed catalyst systems: the expansion of Syncrude, now underway, is using the LC Fining Process whereas the announced Husky Bi-Provincial upgrader is based on H-Oil.

  14. Bitumen and heavy oil upgrading in Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrones, J. (Chrones Engineering Consultants Inc., 111 Lord Seaton Road, Willowdale, Ontario (CA)); Germain, R.R. (Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority, Edmonton, AB (Canada))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the heavy oil upgrading industry in Canada. Up to now it has been based on the processing of bitumen extracted from oil sands mining operations at two sites, to produce a residue-free, low sulphur, synthetic crude. Carbon rejection has been the prime process technology with delayed coking being used by Suncor and FLUID COKING at Syncrude. Alternative processes for recovering greater amounts of synthetic crude are examined. These include a variety of hydrogen addition processes and combinations which produce pipelineable materials requiring further processing in downstream refineries with expanded capabilities. The Newgrade Energy Inc. upgrader now under construction in Regina, will use fixed-bed, catalytic, atmospheric-residue, hydrogen processing. Two additional projects, also based on hydrogenation, will use ebullated bed catalyst systems; the expansion of Syncrude, now underway, is using the LC Fining Process whereas the announced Husky Bi-Provincial upgrader is based on H-Oil.

  15. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter $\\hat q $. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the in-cone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  16. Heavy Quark Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidel, Sally; /New Mexico U.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from four CDF analyses involving heavy quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy 1.96 TeV. The shapes of b-jets are found to be broader than inclusive predictions and broader than both PYTHIA and HERWIG defaults. A measurement of the production cross section for {psi}(2S) is consistent with Run 1 results and with theoretical predictions associated with parton distribution function energy dependence. The inclusive b-jet production cross section is also consistent with theoretical predictions over six orders of magnitude. The b{bar b} differential production cross section is compared to several theoretical models and found to be best described by MC{at}NLO + JIMMY.

  17. A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chasman, C.; Beavis, D.; Debbe, R.; Lee, J.H.; Levine, M.J.; Videbaek, F.; Xu, Z.; Kleinfelder, S.; Li, S.; Cendejas, R.; Huang, H.; Sakai, S.; Whitten, C.; Joseph, J.; Keane, D.; Margetis, S.; Rykov, V.; Zhang, W.M.; Bystersky, M.; Kapitan, J.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Baudot, J.; Hu-Guo, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Winter, M.; Kelsey, J.; Milner, R.; Plesko, M.; Redwine, R.; Simon, F.; Surrow, B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Anderssen, E.; Dong, X.; Greiner, L.; Matis, H.S.; Morgan, S.; Ritter, H.G.; Rose, A.; Sichtermann, E.; Singh, R.P.; Stezelberger, T.; Sun, X.; Thomas, J.H.; Tram, V.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.H.; Xu, N.; Hirsch, A.; Srivastava, B.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Bichsel, H.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR Collaboration proposes to construct a state-of-the-art microvertex detector,the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT), utilizing active pixel sensors and silicon strip technology. The HFT will significantly extend the physics reach of the STAR experiment for precision measurement of the yields and spectra of particles containing heavy quarks. This will be accomplished through topological identification of D mesons by reconstruction of their displaced decay vertices with a precision of approximately 50 mu m in p+p, d+A, and A+A collisions. The HFT consists of 4 layers of silicon detectors grouped into two sub-systems with different technologies, guaranteeing increasing resolution when tracking from the TPC and the Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) towards the vertex of the collision. The Intermediate Silicon Tracker (IST), consisting of two layers of single-sided strips, is located inside the SSD. Two layers of Silicon Pixel Detector (PIXEL) are inside the IST. The PIXEL detectors have the resolution necessary for a precision measurement of the displaced vertex. The PIXEL detector will use CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS), an innovative technology never used before in a collider experiment. The APSsensors are only 50 mu m thick and at a distance of only 2.5 cm from the interaction point. This opens up a new realm of possibilities for physics measurements. In particular, a thin detector (0.28percent radiation length per layer) in STAR makes it possible to do the direct topological reconstruction of open charm hadrons down to very low pT by the identification of the charged daughters of the hadronic decay.

  18. Jet-Underlying Event Separation Method for Heavy Ion Collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Hanks; A. M. Sickles; B. A. Cole; A. Franz; M. P. McCumber; D. P. Morrison; J. L. Nagle; C. H. Pinkenburg; B. Sahlmueller; P. Steinberg; M. von Steinkirch; M. Stone

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstructed jets in heavy ion collisions are a crucial tool for understanding the quark-gluon plasma. The separation of jets from the underlying event is necessary particularly in central heavy ion reactions in order to quantify medium modifications of the parton shower and the response of the surrounding medium itself. There have been many methods proposed and implemented for studying the underlying event substructure in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we detail a method for understanding underlying event contributions in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV utilizing the HIJING event generator. This method, extended from previous work by the ATLAS collaboration, provides a well-defined association of "truth jets" from the fragmentation of hard partons with "reconstructed jets" using the anti-$k_T$ algorithm. Results presented here are based on an analysis of 750M minimum bias HIJING events. We find that there is a substantial range of jet energies and radius parameters where jets are well separated from the background fluctuations (often termed "fake jets") that make jet measurements at RHIC a compelling physics program.

  19. State of heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    California is unique in the United States because it has the largest heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees}API gravity) resource, estimated to be in excess of 40 billion barrels. Of the current 941,543 barrels/day of oil produced in California (14% of the U.S. total), 70% or 625,312 barrels/day is heavy oil. Heavy oil constituted only 20% of California`s oil production in the early 1940s, but development of thermal oil production technology in the 1960s allowed the heavy industry to grow and prosper to the point where by the mid-1980s, heavy oil constituted 70% of the state`s oil production. Similar to the rest of the United States, light oil production in the Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Region, and San Joaquin Valley peaked and then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Unlike other states, California developed a heavy oil industry that replaced declining light oil production and increased the states total oil production, despite low heavy oil prices, stringent environmental regulations and long and costly delays in developing known oil resources. California`s deep conversion refineries process the nation`s highest sulfur, lowest API gravity crude to make the cleanest transportation fuels available. More efficient vehicles burning cleaner reformulated fuels have significantly reduced the level of ozone precursors (the main contributor to California`s air pollution) and have improved air quality over the last 20 years. In a state where major oil companies dominate, the infrastructure is highly dependent on the 60% of ANS production being refined in California, and California`s own oil production. When this oil is combined with the small volume of imported crude, a local surplus of marketed oil exists that inhibits exploitation of California`s heavy oil resources. As ANS production declines, or if the export restrictions on ANS sales are lifted, a window of opportunity develops for increased heavy oil production.

  20. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Ronningen, Reginald M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Heilbronn, Lawrence [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  1. Jet Analysis in Heavy Ion Collisions in CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Tonjes; for the CMS collaboration

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, jets have been a useful tool to probe the properties of the hot, dense matter created. At the Large Hadron Collider, collisions of Pb+Pb at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.5 TeV will provide a large cross section of jets at high $E_T$ above the minimum bias heavy ion background. Simulations of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's capability to measure jets in heavy ion collisions are presented. In particular, $\\gamma$-jet measurements can estimate the amount of energy lost by a jet interacting strongly with the medium, since the tagged photon passes through unaffected.

  2. Dynamics of heavy flavor quarks in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A general overview on the role of heavy quarks as probes of the medium formed in high energy nuclear collisions is presented. Experimental data compared to model calculations at low and moderate pT are exploited to extract information on the transport coefficients of the medium, on possible modifications of heavy flavor hadronization in a hot environment and to provide quantitative answers to the issue of kinetic (and chemical, at conceivable future experimental facilities) thermalization of charm. Finally, the role of heavy flavor at high pT as a tool to study the mass and color-charge dependence the jet quenching is also analyzed.

  3. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  4. FY 80 heavy oil program. Second quarterly report, April 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayland, J.R.; Fox, R.L.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development efforts in support of the heavy oil program reservoir access and alternate extraction activities that were initiated last quarter have been continued and expanded. The development of a short course on the utilization of specialized drilling technology to heavy oil sands has been investigated. The steam quality sampler is undergoing laboratory testing. A special report on possible application of sand control methods to heavy oil steam injection tests has been prepared. The first stage of the analysis of R.F. and microwave heating has been completed. The results of a series of laboratory experiments on in situ hydrogenation are presented.

  5. Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process localiser la chambre à vapeur. INTRODUCTION [1] Huge quantities of heavy oils (heavy oil, extra heavy oil. Larribau 64018 Pau Cedex, France Oil and Gas Science and Technology 2012, 67 (6), 1029-1039, doi:10

  6. Quantum critical behavior in heavy electron materials Yi-feng Yanga,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Quantum critical behavior in heavy electron materials Yi-feng Yanga,b,1 and David Pinesc,1 Lonzarich and Zachary Fisk) Quantum critical behavior in heavy electron materials is typically brought about about quantum critical behavior in other heavy electron materials. heavy fermion | quantum criticality

  7. SOFT-GLUON DYNAMICS FOR HEAVY QUARK-ANTIQUARK SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shizuya, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gluons Ak, system, the binding energy bE and soft gluons inbe SOFT-GLUON DYNAMICS FOR HEAVY QUAR_K-ANTIQUARK SYSTEMS s·soft external perturbations (via gluons sof·ter than the system

  8. The Role of the Flexicoking Process in Heavy Oil Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, R. I.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently commercialized FLEXICOKING Process has a significant role to play in developing, known heavy oil reserves. The process upgrades virtually any pumpable feed including residual, pitch or total crude. Combined with HYDROFINING, it produces...

  9. QCD Multipole Expansion and Hadronic Transitions in Heavy Quarkonium Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Ping Kuang

    2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the developments of QCD multipole expansion and its applications to hadronic transitions and some radiative decays of heavy quarkonia. Theoretical predictions are compsred with updated experimental results.

  10. Overview of the Heavy Truck Engine and Enabling Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to use less petroleum. --EERE Strategic Plan, October 2002-- Overview of the Heavy Truck Engine and Enabling Technologies R&D Presented at the 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

  11. New Demands on Heavy Duty Engine Management Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Heavy Duty Engine Management Systems Excellence in Automotive R&D Emissions Based Process Control NOx-Reducing by EGR NOx -Reducing by SOI Freez e Activation Signal...

  12. Myosin Heavy Chain Characteristics and Their Relationship to Exercise Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Mike T.

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a large variety of factors that affect performance in physical tasks. One factor is the muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of the muscle involved in the task. Differences in MHC can affect not just ...

  13. Heavy Long-lived Mossbauer State of Niobium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heavy niobium state showing 1/3 residual resistance is discovered below the superconducting transition temperature. This niobium sample contains high-density long-lived Mossbauer excitation.

  14. Heavy Long-lived Mossbauer State of Niobium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Chi-Hao Lee

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A heavy niobium state showing 1/3 residual resistance is discovered below the superconducting transition temperature. This niobium sample contains high-density long-lived Mossbauer excitation.

  15. Exploration for heavy crude oil and natural bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.F. (U.S. Geological Survey (US))

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book discusses heavy oil and tar sand reserves which are enormous. Focus in on regional resources worldwide; characterization, maturation, and degradation; geological environments and migration; exploration methods; exploration histories; and recovery.

  16. Studies of two-region subcritical uranium heavy water lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosnell, James Waterbury

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor physics parameters were measured in eleven two-region subcritical assemblies moderated by heavy water. The regions of the assemblies consisted of nine different lattices of various fuel rod size, U235 enrichment, ...

  17. Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms, SUPRI TR-127

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovscek, Anthony R.; Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.

    2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The program spans a spectrum of topics and is divided into five categories: (i) multiphase flow and rock properties, (ii) hot fluid injection, (iii) primary heavy-oil production, (iv) reservoir definition, and (v) in-situ combustion.

  18. advanced heavy water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How does the use of advanced waterHow does the use of advanced water treatment affect energy Keller, Arturo A. 3 Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine Energy Storage,...

  19. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Gronau; Jonathan L. Rosner

    2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for $D_s$ semileptonic decay is known to be $(17.0 \\pm 5.3)%$ lower than those for $D^0$ or $D^+$, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing $b$ quarks, this method implies that the $B_s$ semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for $B$ semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For $\\Lambda_b$ semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio $\\Gamma(\\Lambda_b)/ \\bar \\Gamma(B) = 1.13 \\pm 0.03$ of total decay rates.

  20. Recent PQCD calculations of heavy quark production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitev, I

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the results of a recent study of heavy quark production and attenuation in cold nuclear matter. In p+p collisions, we investigate the relative contribution of partonic sub-processes to $D$ meson production and $D$ meson-triggered inclusive di-hadrons to lowest order in perturbative QCD. While gluon fusion dominates the creation of large angle $D\\bar{D}$ pairs, charm on light parton scattering determines the yield of single inclusive $D$ mesons. The distinctly different non-perturbative fragmentation of $c$ quarks into $D$ mesons versus the fragmentation of quarks and gluons into light hadrons results in a strong transverse momentum dependence of anticharm content of the away-side charm-triggered jet. In p+A reactions, we calculate and resum the coherent nuclear-enhanced power corrections from the final-state partonic scattering in the medium. We find that single and double inclusive open charm production can be suppressed as much as the yield of neutral pions from dynamical high-twist shadowing. ...

  1. Minimal Seesaw Textures with Two Heavy Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Atsushi Watanabe

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically analyze the Dirac and the Majorana mass matrices in seesaw models with two heavy right-handed neutrinos. We perform thorough classification of the vanishing matrix elements which are compatible with the results from the current neutrino oscillation experiments. We include the possibility of a non-diagonal Majorana mass matrix which leads to new solutions viable with data. In a basis where the Majorana mass matrix is diagonal, these solutions imply a Dirac matrix with specific relationships amongst its elements. We find that at the level of total 4 zeros together in the Dirac and the Majorana sectors, the mass matrices are almost consistent with the data but one mixing angle is predicted to be unsuitable. At the next level, i.e. with total 3 zeros, only seven patterns of mass matrices describe the experimental data well. The seven solutions have testable predictions for the future neutrino experiments. In particular, each solution has definite predictions about the observation of the 1-3 leptonic mixing angle and the effective mass measured in neutrino-less double beta decay. The solutions of the mass matrices contain novel texture forms and provide new insights into the lepton-generation structure. We also discuss possible connections between these textures and the tri-bimaximal mixing to search for symmetry principles behind the mass matrix structure.

  2. Minimal seesaw textures with two heavy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Srubabati [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad -380009 (India); Watanabe, Atsushi [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically analyze the Dirac and the Majorana mass matrices in seesaw models with two heavy right-handed neutrinos. We perform thorough classification of the vanishing matrix elements which are compatible with the results from the current neutrino oscillation experiments. We include the possibility of a nondiagonal Majorana mass matrix which leads to new solutions viable with data. In a basis where the Majorana mass matrix is diagonal, these solutions imply a Dirac matrix with specific relationships amongst its elements. We find that at the level of total four zeros together in m{sub D} and M{sub R} the mass matrices are almost consistent with the data but one mixing angle is predicted to be unsuitable. At the next level, i.e. with total three zeros, only seven patterns of mass matrices describe the experimental data well. The seven solutions have testable predictions for the future neutrino experiments. In particular, each solution has definite predictions about the observation of the 1-3 leptonic mixing angle and the effective mass measured in neutrinoless double beta decay. The solutions of the mass matrices contain novel texture forms and provide new insights into the lepton-generation structure. We also discuss possible connections between these textures and the tri-bimaximal mixing to search for symmetry principles behind the mass matrix structure.

  3. The stimulation of heavy oil reservoirs with electrical resistance heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baylor, Blake Allen

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Equations for r? and P, were written using regression analysis. The calculation procedure is as follows: (1) calculate r?, (2) calculate the skin factor, s??, (3) calculate the heated oil production rate, q, ?, and (4) calculate the downhole power... of various heavy oils at 113 'F Fig. 23 ? Effect of CH, on the viscosity of various heavy oils at 171 'F Fig. 24 - Viscosity/pressure relationship for the recombined field sample Fig. 25 ? Smoothed viscosity/pressure relationship for the recombined...

  4. Heavy metals emission from controlled combustion of PVC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ayyoubi, Mohammed A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Malave (Mem er) G. mble Bennett (Head of Depar tment) August 1989 ABSTRACT Heavy Metals Emission from Combustion of PVC. (August 1989) Mohammed A. El-Ayyoubi, B. S. , Texas ASM University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. John P. Wagner... The primary purpose of this research paper is the identification of heavy metals and other potentially harmful smoke components emitted to the atmosphere as a result of Poly(vinyl chloride) combustion in municipal incinerators . In addition, analysis...

  5. Heavy electron superconductivity: From 1K to 90K to

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pethick, C.J.; Pines, D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the experimental results and physical arguments which led us to conclude that in heavy electron systems the physical mechanism responsible for superconductivity is an attractive interaction between the heavy electrons which results from the virtual exchange of antiferromagnetic f-electron moment fluctuations. In these systems, then, the superconductivity is of purely electronic origin; the phonon-induced interaction between electrons which leads to superconductivity in ordinary metals plays little or no role.

  6. Simple concept predicts viscosity of heavy oil and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, V.R.; Miadonye, A.; Singh, B. (Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For in situ recovery, a correlation has been developed for predicting the viscosity of bitumen and heavy oil. The correlation requires only a single viscosity measurement. The derived viscosities show an overall average absolute deviation of 4.4% from experimental data for 18 sets of Alberta heavy oil and bitumen containing 175 measurements. The paper describes the equations, their accuracy in determining viscosity, and an example from the Alberta deposits.

  7. On possible $?$ vacua states in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have simulated the possible $\\Theta$ vacua states in heavy ion collisions. In a quench like scenario, random phases of the chiral fields were evolved in a zero temperature potential incorporating the breaking of $U_A(1)$ symmetry. Initial random phases very quickly settles into oscillation around the values dictated by the potential. The simulation indicate that $\\Theta$ vacua states that can be populated in heavy ion collisions is a coherent superposition of a number of modes.

  8. Prospects of Heavy Neutrino Searches at Future Lepton Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Shankha; Ibarra, Alejandro; Mandal, Tanumoy; Mitra, Manimala

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the future prospects of heavy neutrino searches at next generation lepton colliders. In particular, we focus on the planned electron-positron colliders, operating in two different beam modes, namely, $e^+e^-$ and $e^-e^-$. In the $e^+e^-$ beam mode, we consider various production and decay modes of the heavy neutrino ($N$), and find that the final state with $e+2j+\\slashed{E}$, arising from the $e^+e^-\\to N\

  9. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Sandeep K. [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goloubinoff, Pierre [Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Christen, Philipp [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: christen@bioc.uzh.ch

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about heavy-duty low...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty Combustion Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about heavy-duty low...

  12. Heavy element nucleosynthesis in jets from collapsars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichirou [Department of Electronic Control, Kumamoto National College of Technology, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan); Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite libre de Bruxelles, CP226 Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Hashimoto, Masa-aki [Department of Physics, School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kotake, Kei [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi [Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate nucleosynthesis in collapsars, based on long-term, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rapidly rotating massive star of 40M{center_dot} during the core collapse. We have calculated detailed composition of magnetically driven jets ejected from the collapsars, in which the magnetic fields before the collapse, are uniform and parallel to the rotational axis of the star and the magnitudes of the fields, B0, are 1010 G or 1012 G. We follow the evolution of chemical composition up to about 4000 nuclides inside the jets from the collapse phase to the ejection phase through the jet generation phase with use of a large nuclear reaction network. We find that the r-process successfully operates in the jets from the collapsar of B0 = 1012 G, so that U and Th are synthesized abundantly. Abundance pattern inside the jets is similar to that of r-elements in the solar system. Furthermore, we find that p-nuclei are produced without seed nuclei: not only light p-nuclei, such as 74Se, 78Kr, 84Sr, and 92Mo, but also heavy p-nuclei, 113In, 115Sn, and 138La, can be abundantly synthesized in the jets. The amounts of p-nuclei in the ejecta are much greater than those in core-collapse supernovae (SNe). In particular, 92Mo, 113In, 115Sn, and 138La deficient in the SNe, are significantly produced in the ejecta. On the other hand, in the jets from the collapsar of B0 = 1010 G, the r-process cannot operate and 56Ni, 28Si, 32S, and 4He are abundantly synthesized in the jets, as in ejecta from inner layers of Type II supernovae. An amount of 56Ni is much smaller than that from SN 1987A.

  13. Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujawa, P.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compile data on reservoirs that contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range, contain at least ten million barrels of oil currently in place, and are non-carbonate in lithology. The reservoirs within these constraints were then analyzed in light of applicable recovery technology, either steam-drive or in situ combustion, and then ranked hierarchically as candidate reservoirs. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I presents the project background and approach, the screening analysis, ranking criteria, and listing of candidate reservoirs. The economic and environmental aspects of heavy oil recovery are included in appendices to this volume. This study provides an extensive basis for heavy oil development, but should be extended to include carbonate reservoirs and tar sands. It is imperative to look at heavy oil reservoirs and projects on an individual basis; it was discovered that operators, and industrial and government analysts will lump heavy oil reservoirs as poor producers, however, it was found that upon detailed analysis, a large number, so categorized, were producing very well. A study also should be conducted on abandoned reservoirs. To utilize heavy oil, refiners will have to add various unit operations to their processes, such as hydrotreaters and hydrodesulfurizers and will require, in most cases, a lighter blending stock. A big problem in producing heavy oil is that of regulation; specifically, it was found that the regulatory constraints are so fluid and changing that one cannot settle on a favorable recovery and production plan with enough confidence in the regulatory requirements to commit capital to the project.

  14. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  15. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state`s total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation`s energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska`s 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  16. Electrochemically Assisted Microbial Production of Hydrogen from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including heavy oils, naphtha, and coal. Only 4% is generated from water using electricity derived from electricity production. In a MFC, microorganisms oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons directly or by endogenously produced mediators, include a wealth of genera including Geobacter, Shewanella, Pseudomonas

  17. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of the vehicle. Furthermore, the evaluation of the impact of small changes in radiator or grille dimensions has revealed that the total drag is not particularly sensitive to those changes. This observation leads to two significant conclusions. First, a small increase in radiator size to accommodate heat rejection needs related to new emissions restrictions may be tolerated without significant increases in drag losses. Second, efforts to reduce drag on the tractor requires that the design of the entire tractor be treated in an integrated fashion. Simply reducing the size of the grille will not provide the desired result, but the additional contouring of the vehicle as a whole which may be enabled by the smaller radiator could have a more significant effect.

  18. Estimate of the single diffractive heavy quark production in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Machado, M. M. [High Energy Physics Phenomenology Group, GFPAE, IF-UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Machado, M. V. T. [Universidade Federal do Pampa. Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Campus de Bage, Rua Carlos Barbosa. CEP 96400-970. Bage, RS (Brazil)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The single diffractive cross section for heavy quarks production is calculated at next-to-leading order (for nucleus-nucleus collisions. Such processes are expected to occur at the LHC, where the nuclei involved are lead at {radical}(s)=5.5 TeV and calcium at {radical}(s)=6.3 TeV. We start using the hard diffractive factorization formalism, taking into account a recent experimental parametrization for the Pomeron structure function (DPDF). Absorptive corrections are accounted for by the multiple Pomeron contributions considering a gap survival probability, where its theoretical uncertainty for nuclear collisions is discussed. We estimate the diffractive ratios for the single diffraction process in nuclear coherent/incoherent collisions at the LHC.

  19. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Grau; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Very soon the LHC will provide beams for heavy ion collisions at 5.52 TeV/nucleon. This center-of-mass energy results in a large cross-section for producing high-$E_T$ ($>$ 50 GeV) jets that are distinct from the soft, underlying event. This brings with it the possibility of performing full jet reconstruction to directly study jet energy loss in the medium produced in heavy ion collisions. In this note, we present the current state of jet reconstruction performance studies in heavy ion events using the ATLAS detector. We also discuss the possibilities of energy loss measurements available with full jet reconstruction: single jet $R_{AA}$ and di-jet and $\\gamma$-jet correlations.

  20. Microscopic analysis of fusion hindrance in heavy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washiyama, Kouhei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Heavy-ion fusion reactions involving heavy nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier exhibit fusion hindrance, where the probability of compound nucleus formation is strongly hindered compared with that in light- and medium-mass systems. The origin of this fusion hindrance has not been well understood from a microscopic point of view. Purpose: Analyze the fusion dynamics in heavy systems by a microscopic reaction model and understand the origin of the fusion hindrance. Method: We employ the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. We extract nucleus--nucleus potential and energy dissipation by the method combining TDHF dynamics of the entrance channel of fusion reactions with one-dimensional Newton equation including a dissipation term. Then, we analyze the origin of the fusion hindrance using the properties of the extracted potential and energy dissipation. Results: Extracted potentials show monotonic increase as the relative distance of two nuclei decreases, which induces the disappearance...